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Daily Archive : Thursday August 14, 2014

News

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    Fumage artist Anne Ressman Zabinski applies flame to a cloth canvas in her home studio in St. Charles. She uses many types of canvas material for her paintings, including tile and clayboard. She has to work quicker with a cloth canvas because it will burn, unlike a tile or a clayboard which allows more time with the flame to the surface.

    St. Charles artist paints with fire and smoke

    Abstract artist Anne Ressman Zabinski of St. Charles uses not only acrylic paints, watercolors and alcohol inks in her work, but also specializes in a technique called fumage, which is painting with a flame and smoke. She uses different sources of flame to create her artwork on canvas and clayboard, and further manipulates the soot residue using carving tools, erasers, water, paints and other...

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    Oakton foundation hopes to raise $50,000

    Cook digest

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    The village's final costs for the $6.5 million settlement will be minimal, says Finance Director Dave Erb.

    Ye Olde Town Inn payout won't raise inusrance rates much, official says

    The roughly $6 million payout to Ye Olde Town Inn from Mount Prospect's insurance carrier won't have a big impact on the village's future insurance premiums, Finance Director Dave Erb said this week. “This payment eats into some of the reserves that the pool had, but we still are funded to cover future claims.”

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    U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk, a Highland Park Republican, speaks to the Republican gathering at the Illinois State Fair Thursday.

    Kirk says Duckworth’s ‘deserter’ comment overblown
    U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk, a Highland Park Republican, criticized Democratic U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth for saying a company that leaves the country to lower its tax burden is a “deserter.”“If we use comments like ‘deserter’ and ‘traitor,’ that normally those crimes have capital punishment consequences, I would say that that rhetoric is probably too...

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    Gabrielle Wesley, 8, left, pushes buttons that make flowers spin at an unveiling celebration of “Bloom” at Alexian Brothers Women and Children’s Hospital in Hoffman Estates.

    ‘Bloom’ bursts on scene at Women’s and Children’s Hospital

    A large kinetic sculpture that literally bursts with energy has blossomed in the front entrance of Alexian Brothers Women and Children’s Hospital in Hoffman Estates. Called “Bloom,” the sculpture has 14 flowerlike blossoms made of acrylic, and a control dock at a child’s level, to let them to move the forms at the touch of a button.

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    After learning of the high obesity rates in his community, Mayor Ruben Pineda has spearheaded a Healthy West Chicago initiative.

    West Chicago’s Ruben Pineda leads initiative to make his community healthier

    Healthy West Chicago is a collaborative effort of many organizations to bring down obesity rates, promote nutrition and physical activity, and create a better environment for West Chicago residets, who currently have among the highest rates of obesity and chronic disease in DuPage County.

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    Naperville liquor commission member Scott Wehrli, center, says he thinks it will take more than enforcing earlier bar closing times to “change the culture of downtown Naperville” to prevent late-night drinking from getting out of hand. The commission on Thursday forwarded several recommendations to the city council including decreasing serving sizes of individual beverages and requiring training for security personnel.

    Panel suggests 6 ways to change Naperville bar scene

    Liquor commission members in Naperville are suggesting six ways the city council could make regulations to prevent the downtown from being overrun with drunks, fights and dangerous drivers. “I think we're fooling ourselves in thinking that we're going to change the culture of downtown Naperville with one hour or two hours a week,” liquor commission member Scott Wehrli said.

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    Two construction workers were treated for injuries Thursday morning after being struck by a vehicle on the westbound Elgin-O’Hare Expressway near Roselle.

    Police looking for driver who fled Elgin-O’Hare Expressway crash

    A police search continues for a driver who caused an accident that injured two construction workers early Thursday morning on the Elgin-O’Hare Expressway, authorities said. The unidentified driver was headed westbound about 4 a.m. when he struck the two men, who were standing outside of a parked construction vehicle on the left shoulder.

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    Chicago police sergeant accused of assaulting girl

    A Chicago police sergeant has been relieved of his powers after being accused of kissing and touching a 9-year-old girl inappropriately and then threatening her mother. The Cook County state’s attorney’s office says 61-year-old Dennis Barnes is charged with attempted predatory criminal sexual assault of a victim under 13 and aggravated criminal sexual abuse.

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    Police searching for Zion man after Amber Alert

    Police are still searching for a Zion man they say abducted his two children early Thursday morning, triggering an Amber Alert. The children were safely turned over to Illinois Department of Children and Family Services Custody, but police on Thursday night said their father, Dejavonte Finley, remains at large and could be armed and dangerous.

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    Kenneth Arndt, left, and Tony Sanders, right, have assumed roles leading Elgin Area School District U-46 in the wake of the departure of Superintendent Jose Torres. Arndt will be interim superintendent, and Sanders will be CEO.

    Elgin U-46 putting Arndt, Sanders at the helm for now

    On Monday, the Elgin Area School District U-46 board is expected to appoint Kenneth Arndt as interim superintendent, while Tony Sanders, chief of staff for outgoing Superintendent José Torres, will take on the role of chief executive officer. “I have informed the District 300 superintendent (Heid) that I plan on resigning effective Sept. 12,” said Arndt, 59, of Algonquin.

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    MARK WELSH/mwelsh@dailyherald.com ¬ Arlington Heights Village Hall.

    No term limits vote in Arlington Hts. this fall

    Residents in Arlington Heights will not vote this November on whether their mayor and trustees should be bound by term limits — after a petition asking for a referendum on the ballot was thrown out on Thursday. All three members of the electoral board — Mayor Tom Hayes, senior Trustee Bert Rosenberg, and Village Clerk Becky Hume — voted to uphold objections filed by a...

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    2 charged in gas station robbery near Harvard

    Two people were arrested on Thursday in connection with an armed robbery at a gas station in unincorporated Harvard, police said.The arrests came within 48 hours of the robbery at a Mobil Station at 24102 Route 173 thanks, in part, to tips from Crime Stoppers, according to a news release from the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office.

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    Andres Quinones

    Elgin man sentenced 12 years for gang stabbing

    An Elgin man was sentenced to 12 years in prison Thursday for stabbing two people during a 2012 fight at a liquor that police say was gang-related. Andres Quinones, 20, of the 0-99 block of Aldine Street, pleaded guilty to attempted murder and two counts of aggravated battery, according to a news release from the Kane County State’s Attorney’s office.

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    Activists confront diocese over pig wrestling

    STEPHENSVILLE, Wis. — Activists weren’t happy about a pig-wrestling fundraiser that a Green Bay-area church held, so they’re offering the bishop cash if he takes the pig’s place in the muddy pit.

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    Rooftop owners sue to block Wrigley Field changes

    The owners of eight rooftop clubs overlooking Wrigley Field have filed a lawsuit to overturn Chicago’s approval of the Cubs’ plan to revamp the century-old ballpark.

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    Police records hint at issues before Bali death

    As Indonesian police question the 19-year-old daughter of a woman whose body was found stuffed in a suitcase in Bali, authorities in Oak Park examined records of 86 incidents in which police were called to the family’s house.

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    Marshalls store may be coming to Buffalo Grove

    A new Marshalls store may be coming to the Woodland Commons shopping center in Buffalo Grove. The owners of the center are expected to meet with village staff later this month to discuss facade renovations that would be done to accommodate a Marshalls store, village officials said.

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    Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner rides his Harley-Davidson motorcycle into the Illinois State Fairgrounds before participating in a Republican Day rally Thursday in Springfield.

    Rauner revs up GOP at state fair

    Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner roared into the state fairgrounds on a Harley Thursday, revving up the party faithful by pledging to help loosen the Democrats’ long hold on power in Illinois government. After removing his helmet, the Winnetka businessman said he would lead an administration that is efficient and transparent.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Two men working together stole razor blades at 7:25 p.m. June 1, 7 p.m. July 5 and 8:40 a.m. Aug. 8 from Walgreens, 1000 N. Roselle Road, Hoffman Estates. One man may have hidden the razor blades in a bag, then left. The second man then entered and quickly fled, carrying a bag over his head to avoid the security sensor at the door. Value of the stolen items for the June and July thefts was...

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A woman moving from the 600 block to the 800 block of McHenry Road told Wheeling police her full-length black mink coat and 3/4-length sheared beaver coat were stolen while in the moving van between 10 a.m. Aug. 5 and noon Aug. 7. Value was estimated at $14,000.

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    Flowers are placed in memory of actor/comedian Robin Williams on his Walk of Fame star in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles on Monday.

    Where to go for help: Robin Williams’ death inspires calls

    "I can be like Robin, and maybe I need to get help right now" is what callers to Alexian Brothers Behavior Health call center have been telling intake workers since actor Robin Williams took his own life Monday. The call line received 17 percent more calls on Tuesday than it normally would, said Carol Hartmann, who oversees the call center.

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    Edwin Paniagua

    Eyewitness testifies in Mount Prospect murder trial

    A Chicago woman who witnessed the 2010 stabbing of a Mount Prospect man testified Thursday as prosecutors presented their case against Edwin Paniagua, 19, charged with killing Jean Louis Wattecamps hours after they met at his apartment complex swimming pool. Prosecutors say robbery motivated Paniagua and co-defendant Marko Guardiola to kill Wattecamps, 52, a man described by prosecutors as...

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    The Allstate Arena will have the same name for at least another 10 years, under a naming rights agreement approved by the village of Rosemont this week. The deal is worth $15 million over 10 years.

    Allstate’s Rosemont naming rights deal means $15 million for 10 years

    The name of the Allstate Arena, Rosemont’s 34-year-old sports and concert venue, is staying put for at least another decade. The village board this week renewed a naming rights agreement with Northbrook-based Allstate Corporation . The deal is worth $15 million over the course of the next 10 years

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    Police investigate sexual assault report at Elgin hospital

    Elgin police are investigating a report of a criminal sexual assault by a staff member against a patient at Presence St. Joseph Hospital. The male victim reported the male assailant went into the patient’s room Saturday and demanded the victim perform a sexual act on him, and then demanded that the victim perform a sexual act on himself.

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    The Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200 board of education is mulling how to expose students and staff to more technology this school year.

    Dist. 200 leaning away from digital devices for all

    The Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200 board of education was presented with two options Thursday for exposing students to more technology this school year. Option one is to move to a 1:1 environment, where every student would have their own device ­— such as a Chromebook or iPad ­— that would travel with them to their classes and home. Option two, which the board was leaning...

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    Hugo Moreno

    Man accused of firing gunshots in Round Lake Park

    A 22-year old Round Lake Beach man was charged Thursday in connection with a report of shots fired Tuesday night toward a home in Round Lake Park in what police say was gang-related activity.

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    Palatine school nurtures community garden for food pantries

    Green thumbs in the making are growing a community garden at Lake Louise Elementary in Palatine. Veggies cultivated by students and parents have gone to a food pantry and Superintendent Scott Thompson, who received some of the fresh produce during a school board meeting this week.

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    Schaumburg officials this week moved to classify electronic cigarettes the same as tobacco products in regard to all existing smoking laws. “Right now, we’d rather err on the side of safety,” said village Public Health Officer Mary Passaglia.

    Schaumburg: Electronic cigarettes still cigarettes

    Schaumburg officials this week classified electronic cigarettes the same as tobacco products for law enforcement purposes, and created a new businesses license for stores that want to let customers sample different flavors on-site for customized devices. The steps are similar to those taken recently in Arlington Heights, and Hoffman Estates is in the process of doing the same

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    Aurora residents and officials lined up Thursday inside the future Richard and Gina Santori Public Library for artist Jerry Savage’s autograph on the “Dream Catcher” design.

    Savage sculpture to grace atrium of new Aurora library

    Aurora Public Library Foundation members and community members gathered Thursday in the steel and concrete shell of the library to announced a $250,000 grant from the Dunham Fund to support the arts and education at the new facility scheduled to open in May 2015.

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    Toni Gipson

    Final suspect nabbed in Villa Park home invasion

    A Chicago woman has been tracked down and now stands charged with being involved in a Villa Park home invasion last year in which three people were tied up and robbed. Toni Gipson, 33, of the 3100 block of South Throop, is charged with home invasion with a firearm. She is being held in DuPage County jail on $500,000 bail.

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    Tentative teachers pact reached in River Trails schools

    The teachers union and the school board in River Trails Elementary District 26 have reached a tentative agreement on a new employment contract, officials announced Thursday. Details about the deal will be revealed after it is formally approved by the union and the board. Contract talks have been taking place in the Mount Prospect-based district since February.

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    Carlos Chavez this week was appointed a trustee on the board of the Gail Borden Public Library.

    Elgin library appoints new trustee

    Carlos Chavez, who’s worked for 22 years as a prevention specialist and community health educator at Renz Addiction Counseling Center in Elgin, was appointed earlier this week to fill a vacancy on the Gail Borden Public Library board.

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    State investigaton shows facility not at fault in St. Charles drowning

    A report by the Illinois Department of Public Health indicates the facility was in good working order and the lifeguards on duty were properly licensed at the time of a 4-year-old’s drowning at a St. Charles country club pool in June.

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    Palatine Township Elementary District 15 has hired a maker of red-light cameras to install a device that captures drivers ignoring a stop sign off school buses.

    Dist. 15, Rolling Meadows police crack down on drivers who ignore bus signs

    A maker of red-light cameras has found new business in suburban school districts. Several are experimenting with cameras that catch drivers blowing stop signs on school buses. In Rolling Meadows, police will review footage to catch violators and issue $150 tickets.

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    Despite traffic congestion from nearby Grand Avenue construction, students were reported to be on time for the first day of classes Thursday at Warren Township High School’s O’Plaine Road freshmen-sophomore campus in Gurnee.

    Warren High students get around Grand Avenue construction near O’Plaine Road campus in Gurnee

    Major road construction near Warren Township High School’s freshmen-sophomore campus in Gurnee didn’t cause travel delays for students on their first day of classes, officials said Thursday. “From our end, things went very smooth,” Warren District 121 transportation director Tina Delabre told the Daily Herald.

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    Scout fundraiser in Lincolnshire:

    The annual Boy Scout Troop 78 Car Wash will be held on Sunday, Aug. 24, from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Community Christian Church, 1970 Riverwoods Road, Lincolnshire.

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    Group donates school supplies:

    A community group called Wauconda Women Of The Moose collected school supplies for needy children and raised $400 for the Wauconda/Island Lake Food Pantry, a representative said.

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    Round Lake Home Town Fest:

    The annual Round Lake Home Town Fest will be held from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, at the Oak Savannah at Goodnow and Avilon avenues southwest of Route 134.

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    Quinn wants apology over ‘cow tipping’ remark

    Gov. Pat Quinn says his Republican challenger’s running mate should apologize for a 2013 comment asking if “cow tipping” was a job requirement in Springfield. The remark came from an email Evelyn Sanguinetti sent to a Department of Human Rights staff attorney asking if there were any job openings.

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    Indiana Geological Survey Assistant Director Todd Thompson talks about of efforts to study Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore’s Mount Baldy on Thursday in Michigan City, Ind.

    Geologists studying Mount Baldy find another hole

    Geologists beginning an in-depth study of why a then-6-year-old Illinois boy became buried in a popular sand dune in northwest Indiana last year have discovered another hole there.

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    Batavia schools post tentative budget, but change is likely

    The Batavia school board has put its tentative 2014-15 budget on display, and plans to have a public hearing a week before it's due to vote on it.

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    Elgin looks at limiting senior rides

    The city of Elgin is looking at cutting back its Ride in Kane program by restricting rides to work, medical appointments, grocery stores and pharmacies starting Oct. 1. “This is an extremely sensitive issue for the community,” Mayor David Kaptain said. “I think we have to be cognizant of that.”

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    EPA to collect household toxic waste in DuPage, 5 other counties

    The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency will collect household hazardous waste collection in six communities this fall. The agency said Wednesday that residents can bring leftover chemicals and other toxic wastes to sites in DuPage, Henry, Logan, Marion, Ogle and Piatt counties during the one-day events in September and October.

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    Group continues fight to put term limits on ballot

    A group that wants to put legislative term limits on the November ballot told an Illinois appeals court Thursday that voters deserve a chance to approve a measure the General Assembly never will pass on its own.

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    Yelp Inc. to expand in Chicago, bring 300 jobs

    San Francisco-based Yelp Inc. plans to open a new office at Chicago’s Merchandise Mart next year. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman announced the planned expansion Thursday.

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    New York State Police crime scene investigators search for clues Thursday at a roadside vegetable stand in Oswegatchie, N.Y.

    Search continues for 2 missing Amish girls

    Officials issued an Amber Alert for the two girls after they were abducted around 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in the rural town of Oswegatchie, on the border 150 miles northwest of Albany.The girls went to wait on a customer at the family’s roadside stand, officials said. A witness saw a passenger in a vehicle put something into the back seat, and when the vehicle drove off the children were gone,...

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    $25.3 million class action lawsuit filed over McHenry court fines

    Four people have filed a lawsuit against McHenry County 22nd Judicial Circuit Clerk Katherine Keefe, arguing her office improperly assessed fines instead of fees after their traffic and misdemeanor cases were adjudicated. The federal lawsuit seeks class action status, a collective refund of $3,525 to the four plaintiffs and a reimbursement of $25.3 million collected from defendants in thousands...

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    St. Charles North High School senior Isabel Miller, 17, helps Maya Mullally, left, and Olivia Vosburgh, both 6, with a joined-hands turn during the dance and drill teams’ 15th annual dance clinic for elementary and middle school students Thursday at Bell-Graham Elementary School in St. Charles.

    St. Charles North High School drill team hosts 15th annual dance clinic

    The St. Charles North High School drill team hosts a four-day dance clinic for elementary and middle school students.

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    Rosemont hires 27 more for part-time security

    Rosemont is hiring another 27 sworn or retired police officers to provide additional security at village venues. The officers, called security specialists by the village, are brought in to work part-time during events at the Allstate Arena, Rosemont Theatre and the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center.

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    Tiffany Thomas

    N. Chicago woman accused in carjacking pleads not guilty

    A North Chicago woman has pleaded not guilty to charges she carjacked a vehicle after causing six hit-and-run accidents near Route 132 in Gurnee in June. Tiffany R. Thomas, 33, of the 2100 block of Dickey Avenue, faces multiple charges included vehicular hijacking.

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    North Central College is asking the Naperville City Council to overturn the historic preservation commission’s denial of a request to demolish six structures on Van Buren Avenue and Loomis Street to make way for a three-story, 125,000-square-foot science center.

    125,000 square feet too big? College appealing Naperville historic commission rejection.

    At 125,000 square feet, Naperville’s historic preservation commission decided a proposed science center for North Central College was too big, but college officials are appealing that decision to the Naperville City Council. “We made the decision that it was right to appeal the decision and ask the members of the city council to give serious consideration,” said Jim Godo,...

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    Frank Geu

    Trial set for Lake Villa Township man accused of shooting neighbor while showing off guns

    A Lake Villa Township man charged with shooting a neighbor while showing off his handguns almost a year ago is set to go to trial Sept. 15, Lake County officials said Thursday.

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    A convoy of white trucks with humanitarian aid is seen at the Ukrainian border in Rostov-on-Don region, Russia, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014.

    Game of chicken with Russian aid convoy

    In a diplomatic game of chicken, a large Russian aid convoy rolled toward the Ukrainian border on Thursday — but it was heading toward a crossing controlled by pro-Russian rebels instead of a government post as Ukraine had demanded. Ukraine’s government threatened to block the convoy if the cargo could not be inspected and announced it was organizing its own aid shipment to the...

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    Meerkat Manor leans against a tree trunk Wednesday in an enclosure at the Pretoria Zoo, South Africa. One of the most captivating sights of African wildlife is that of sharp-eyed meerkats standing side-by-side on their hindlegs, as though posing for a group photograph.

    Study explores sinister side of meerkats

    The recent study by a group of British and South African universities, as well as the Kalahari Meerkat Project in South Africa, builds on observations that dominant meerkats use violence to regulate breeding in their own group and to survive in tough, desert environments.

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    Worst TB outbreak in 5 years hits Alabama prisons

    Health officials say Alabama’s badly overcrowded prison system that is being sued over medical treatment of inmates is dealing with its worst outbreak of tuberculosis in five years.Officials say they’ve diagnosed nine active cases of the infectious respiratory disease in state prisons this year.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Omar P. Zavala, 36, of Elgin, was arrested at about 5 p.m. Wednesday in the 1400 block of Dundee Avenue and charged with resisting/obstructing an officer causing injury and possession of cannabis, according to a police report.

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    Andrew Harrelson poses Sunday with a 12-foot fossilized tusk that he found in a bend of the Fish River near the village of White Mountain, about 63 miles east of Nome, Alaska.

    Mom, son find wooly mammoth tusks 22 years apart
    On Sunday, Andrew Harrelson, who now lives in Nome, was fishing with his fiancee and two children in the river. He had caught just one coho salmon in two hours so he decided to look for tusks.They arrived at the bend where his mother had found the tusk. Almost immediately, Harrelson saw the base of another tusk, covered by a stump.

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    An Iraqi woman and her daughter from the Yazidi community settle under a bridge in Dahuk, 260 miles (430 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014.

    Iraq’s al-Maliki gives up post to rival

    Nouri al-Maliki, Iraq’s prime minister for the past eight years, says he is relinquishing the post to fellow Dawa Party member Haider al-Abadi.

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    Mario Mendoza

    Hanover Park man charged with sexually assaulting juvenile

    A 26-year-old Hanover Park man has been charged with sexually assaulting a juvenile Aug. 7, Hanover Park police said Thursday afternoon. Mario Mendoza has been charged with a felony count of predatory criminal sexual assault, according to a police news release.

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    Hanover Township offering perks for blood drive

    Hanover Township and Heartland Blood Centers will host a blood drive in Bartlett Sept. 2. "Summer is the time of greatest need for blood donations," Trustee Steve Caramelli said. "A few minutes out of your day to donate a pint of blood could help to save a life."

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    Schaumburg asking residents about future needs

    Schaumburg will be seeking input from its residents next month as the village prepares revisions of its capital-improvement and comprehensive land-use plans. That input will come from a survey soon being mailed to 1,200 randomly selected households.

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    Little Brothers — Friends of the Elderly has opened a respite house near Batavia.

    Batavia-area home gives seniors 70 and over a respite

    A four-day stay in semi-rural Kane County is a welcome respite for the elderly clients of the Little Brothers - Friends of the Elderly, an organization long dedicated to helping enrich the lives of isolated older people. "I wait all year for my invite to me to come," Maria Lucio of Chicago said while staying at the new Audrey's House in Batavia.

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    Vicki Bethke, president of the Support Staff of Elgin Community College Association, thanks trustees for their decision to keep the college’s existing custodial workers at a June meeting.

    ECC board approves support staff contract

    The Elgin Community College Board this week approved a three-year contract for support services granting employees a more than 3 percent salary increase each year. Under the terms of the agreement, support staff members will receive a 3.65 percent increase in 2014, a 3.75 percent increase in 2015, and a 4 percent increase in 2016. Members in the lowest salary grades will receive an additional...

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    A protester takes shelter from smoke billowing around him Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014, in Freguson, Mo.

    Governor vows change in Ferguson police response

    President Obama, speaking from the Massachusetts island where he’s on a two-week vacation, said there was no excuse for excessive force by police in the aftermath of Saturday’s shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown. He said he had asked the Justice Department and FBI to investigate the incident.

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    Reduced-price lunches jumping to $2 in District 214

    The daily cost of reduced-price breakfast and lunch will be five times higher for students at Northwest Suburban High School District 214 this year than in the past. Students who qualified for reduced prices last year paid 30 cents for breakfast and 40 cents for lunch each day. Those prices are now rising to $1 and $2, respectively.

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    Keith K. Crawford

    Missing Bartlett man last seen at a party near West Dundee

    Police are searching for a missing 36-year-old Bartlett man last seen at a party near West Dundee. Keith K. Crawford left his home on the 100 block of Mary Court about 9 p.m. Saturday, police said.

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    Missing Mt. Prospect man returns home

    A 63-year-old Mount Prospect man with dementia who went missing last week has returned home safely, police said Thursday. Joseph E. Pierre arrived home Tuesday evening after last being seen Friday at the CTA station in Rosemont. He was last at his home in the 1500 block of Redwood Drive on Thursday night.

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    Can Wauconda go a day without complaining? Community group hopes so

    Can Wauconda residents go a day without griping? That's the challenge of the upcoming "Complaint Free Day," a promotion launched by a local community group.

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    Don’t let go of your childlike wonder

    Our Ken Potts can't help but laugh when he looks back at photos of his daughter from a time when she resembled Curley from "The Three Stooges." Some of the humor, though, comes from recalling the eagerness and excitement she brought to exploring life every day.

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    From left, Joe Pawlica, 80, of Warren, helps his son City councilman Greg Pawlica, 46, of Ferndale, go through his soaked album collection with neighbor Wanda Korgol, 41 of Ferndale, after water rose over a foot in his basement.

    Communities across U.S. recover after floods

    Communities across the U.S. are drying out after unusually heavy rains swamped highways, flooded basements and were blamed for at least four deaths.

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    Senate Minority Leader Bob Huff, R-Diamond Bar, center, accompanied by GOP Sens. Anthony Canella, of Ceres, left, and Andy Vidak, of Hanford, tells reporters that his caucus would provide enough votes to pass a compromise water bond measure in Sacramento, Calif. on Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014. The $7.5 billion compromise bond proposal emerged after hours of negotiations between Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders from both parties.

    Californians to vote on $7.5 billion water plan

    Driven to action by the state’s historic drought, California lawmakers on Wednesday voted to place a $7.5 billion water plan before voters in November. The measure marks the largest investment in decades in the state’s water infrastructure and is designed to build reservoirs, clean up contaminated groundwater and promote water-saving technologies.

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    Military base shelters for young immigrants close

    Officials have closed the three shelters for unaccompanied immigrant children that were set up temporarily on military bases to cope with a surge of Central Americans illegally crossing the border.

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    Gay marriages could begin in Va., barring delay

    A federal appeals court appears to have cleared the way for same-sex marriages to begin in Virginia as early as next week, but that could be put on hold indefinitely if the nation’s highest court intervenes. The state also would need to start recognizing gay marriages from out of state next Wednesday after the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals’ decision not to delay its ruling that...

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    An armed robber held up the Aldi at 215 S. Randall Road in Elgin Wednesday night.

    Elgin police seek leads on retail robbery suspect

    The Elgin Police Department is looking for leads on a male suspect in an armed robbery at the Aldi store along Randall Road. The man was described as being roughly 6 feet 2 inches tall with a muscular build. He was caught on camera by the store’s video surveillance, police said. He is suspected to have committed two previous robberies at a different retail store, police said.

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    Washington Post reporter Wes Lowery gives an account of his arrest by the Ferguson, Mo., police. “My hands are behind my back,” I said. “I’m not resisting. I’m not resisting.” At which point one officer said: “You’re resisting.”

    Washington Post reporter details arrest by Ferguson police

    Washington Post reporter Wes Lowery gives an account of his arrest by the Ferguson, Mo., police. “My hands are behind my back,” I said. “I’m not resisting. I’m not resisting.” At which point one officer said: “You’re resisting.”

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    Pearl Berlin, right, listens as her spouse, Lennie Gerber, talks about a federal lawsuit, at their home in High Point, N.C. Their suit is one of four challenging the state’s constitutional ban on gay marriage.

    Together 48 years, couple fights NC marriage ban

    On the summer night Ellen Gerber and Pearl Berlin committed to spending their lives together, the No. 1 song was “When A Man Loves A Woman.” Lyndon B. Johnson was president. “We’re still in love, after 48 years,” Gerber, better known as Lennie, said recently. But under North Carolina law, they might as well be strangers. That’s why Gerber and Berlin are...

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    Civil War Days — this weekend at Blackberry Farm — will feature dozens of re-enactments, including live battle scenes and a chance to “Meet the Lincolns.”

    Civil War Days revived at Aurora's Blackberry Farm

    Reading history is one thing. Seeing it acted out and relived brings even greater impact. It will all come to life this weekend at historical Blackberry Farm, where a new event — Civil War Days — stages a full-scale re-enactment of this central event in American history.

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    Liberia President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, wearing brown at left, consoles a relative of a nurse who died from Ebola.

    Nigeria confirms 1 more Ebola case

    ABUJA, Nigeria — Nigeria’s health minister, Onyebuchi Chukwu, has announced there is another Ebola case in Africa’s most populous country, bringing the total confirmed cases there to 11.

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    Palestinians walks next the rubble of homes destroyed by Israeli strikes in the town of Beit Hanoun, in the northern Gaza Strip, Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014.

    Gaza truce extension fans hope of Cairo talks deal

    A five-day extension of a Gaza truce appeared to be holding despite a rocky start on Thursday, fanning cautious optimism of progress in the indirect negotiations underway in Cairo between Israel and major Palestinian factions, including Hamas. It’s the longest cease-fire yet since the war broke out last month in the Gaza Strip.

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    Pope Francis, center, shakes hands with a representatives of family members of victims onboard the sunken ferry Sewol upon his arrival at Seoul Air Base in Seongnam, South Korea, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014.

    Pope to Koreas: Avoid ‘fruitless’ shows of force

    Pope Francis called Thursday for renewed efforts to forge peace on the war-divided Korean Peninsula and for both sides to avoid “fruitless” criticisms and shows of force, opening a five-day visit to South Korea with a message of reconciliation as Seoul’s rival, North Korea, fired five projectiles into the sea.

  •  
    Pope Francis’ choice of wheels during his five-day South Korean visit has surprised many in this painfully self-conscious country, where big-shots rarely hit the streets in anything but expensive luxury cars.

    Pope’s small car fascinates South Koreans

    Pope Francis’ choice of wheels during his five-day South Korean visit has surprised many in this painfully self-conscious country, where big-shots rarely hit the streets in anything but expensive luxury cars. After his arrival Thursday, the pope left the airport in a compact black Kia that many South Koreans would consider too humble a conveyance for a globally powerful figure.

  •  
    Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel addresses the Marines assembled in a hangar at Camp Pendleton on Tuesday Aug. 12, 2014.

    Obama weighs strategy against Islamic State

    The Obama administration is grappling with how to bridge the gap between its increasingly dire assessment of the threat posed by the Islamic State group and the limited, defensive air campaign it has so far undertaken, which military officials acknowledge will not blunt the group’s momentum.

  •  
    Tyler Perry

    Perry headlines Willow Creek Leadership Summit

    Willow Creek Community Church’s 20th annual Global Leadership Summit begins in South Barrington Thursday — an event which has evolved and expanded immensely since its relatively humble start in 1995. Among the summit’s “faculty” this year will be filmmaker, actor and philanthropist Tyler Perry; General Electric CEO Jeffrey Immelt; and former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly...

  •  
    Associated Press An Indonesian police officer escorts Tommy Schaefer, left, as he is brought to the police station for questioning in relation to the death of his girlfriend’s mother, in Bali, Indonesia, Wednesday.

    Chicago woman dead in Bali was widow of composer

    The Chicago woman whose body was found stuffed inside a suitcase on the Indonesian resort island of Bali was a member of a venerable Chicago book club and the widow of a highly regarded composer, producer and arranger.

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    Ex-CEO of red-light firm faces corruption charges

    A former executive of a Phoenix-based company was indicted on public corruption charges Wednesday in an ongoing federal investigation in Chicago of one of the nation’s largest red-light camera programs.

  •  
    The oil painting, “Sunrise, St. Charles,” by Nick Freeman, will be the centerpiece of an art auction on Friday, Aug. 15, at the Norris Cultural Arts Center in St. Charles.

    Help support arts at Norris Center auction Aug. 15 in St. Charles

    Culminating its summer-long exhibit, "The Wine of Life," by St. Charles artist Nick Freeman, the Norris Cultural Arts Center holds a benefit auction Friday, Aug. 15.

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    $3.3M grant to benefit 3 Illinois youth groups

    Sen. Dick Durbin has announced that Illinois organizations supporting at-risk youth will benefit from a $3.3 million U.S. Department of Labor grant. The department’s YouthBuild program will provide money to several groups that help the state’s at-risk youth strengthen academic and occupational skills through training programs.

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    FBI sending agents to Chicago to combat gun crimes

    A published report has the FBI dispatching 65 agents to high-crime areas in Chicago in an effort to combat street gang activity.The Chicago Sun-Times reports the agents, working with the Chicago Police Department, will be assigned to gang suppression.

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    Company settles lawsuit by family of crash victim

    A company that transports the disabled has settled a lawsuit with the family of a woman passenger killed in a Chicago crash. The family of Ella Mae Williams will receive $2.7 million from SCR Medical Transportation Paratransit Services.

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    Human trafficking conference to be held in Chicago

    Loyola University’s downtown Chicago campus is set to hold a two-day human trafficking conference starting Thursday. Local and national experts will discuss topics relevant to human trafficking, including how the investigation and prosecution of such cases can be improved.

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    Troopers join Chicago police in fugitive hunt

    Illinois State Police troopers are expected to hit Chicago’s streets in an effort to get wanted fugitives off the street and maybe stem gun violence. Beginning Thursday, 40 state troopers will join up with Chicago police officers in up to 25 teams to serve arrest warrants in high-crime neighborhoods.

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    Kids get free meals at Chicago library branches

    Chicago children are now getting fed at the public library.T he Chicago Public Library announced it is partnering with the Greater Chicago Food Depository in a pilot program that distributes free lunches to children and teens at branch libraries. The program started this week and will run every weekday through Aug. 29 at the library’s Humboldt Park branch and the Chicago Lawn branch.

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    No charges filed in deaths of Clydesdale horses

    Northeastern Indiana prosecutors have decided not to file charges in a case where dead and malnourished Clydesdales were discovered on a horse arm. Huntington County Prosecutor Amy Richison says she could not file charges because necropsies weren’t done on the horses found dead in March to determine how they died.

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    Vera Bradley to cut manufacturing at Indiana plant

    Vera Bradley plans to phase out a shift that about 150 people work at its New Haven plant in an effort to reduce manufacturing capacity and save on domestic costs.

  •  
    The first of three town hall meetings to answer questions about the Illinois medical marijuana application process is about to get underway in southern Illinois.

    Illinois officials hold medical cannabis town hall

    The first of three town hall meetings to answer questions about the Illinois medical marijuana application process is about to get underway in southern Illinois.

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    U.S. EPA denies permit to store PCBs in landfill

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has decided against giving a chemical waste permit to a central Illinois landfill that would allow it to store PCB. In a statement released Wednesday, the EPA said it based its decision on the Illinois EPA’s decision last month to bar PCBs from being dumped in the Clinton Landfill near Clinton.

  •  
    Women who take pole-dancing classes at Tiger Lily Vertical Fitness & Dance in Geneva are part of a sisterhood that welcomes and supports women of all ages and shapes, the owners say.

    Pole dancers strip away stereotypes in championship

    This isn't your pervy uncle's pole dancing. The pole-dancing championship this weekend in St. Charles features gymnastics, athleticism and performances from suburban performers as well as last year's champion--a 26-year-old man. “That's the challenge, to break that stigma people have,” says Sarah Ritzman, who with Caroline Patel, owns Tiger Lily Vertical Fitness and Dance in Geneva.

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    Dawn Patrol: Support for gay ex-church staffer; AWOL firms blasted

    Ex-music director of Inverness church finds big support at meeting; Rep. Duckworth blasts firms that leave U.S.; $100,000 fire in Schaumburg;c community alert for Round Lake Park; $16 million upgrade for Addison golf course?

  •  
    Kuechmann Park is on Old Rand Road in Lake Zurich. A plan has emerged to preserve the park that village officials identified for possible sale.

    Plan emerges to save Lake Zurich park

    A plan has emerged to preserve a Lake Zurich park on Old Rand Road identified by village officials for a possible sale. The proposal for Kuechmann Park calls for the land to be improved with upgraded trails, a fitness area and enhancements for existing wildlife and migratory birds. “We sat down over the course of a month to put some meat in the plan,” Lake Zurich Recreation Manager...

Sports

  •  

    Rozner: For Bears’ Conte, there’s safety at home

    After the Packers debacle, off-season shoulder surgery and the acquisition of seemingly a dozen safeties, hardly anyone outside the organization thought Chris Conte would be where he was Thursday night: At Soldier Field with the Bears.

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    About his return from two knee surgeries, Derrick Rose said, “I know that I’m going to be fine. I know I busted my butt for an entire two summers — you could say, two seasons — to get back to where I am right now.”

    Derrick Rose: I have no fear, I have faith

    Derrick Rose was back on the floor with Team USA on Thursday in Chicago. This was the first time the team has been together since Paul George suffered a gruesome broken leg on Aug. 1. Rose has refused to watch video of the accident, but isn't worried about his own health.

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    Bears head coach Marc Trestman was excited after Brandon Marshall scored a second-quarter touchdown on a pass from Jay Cutler.

    Bears find some positives in win over Jaguars

    The Bears offense wasn't as impressive Thursday night as it was last week in the preseason opener, but there were a few positives they can take into next week's test against the Super Bowl-champion Seahawks in Seattle.

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    Fuller felled early by ankle injury

    The many sun-drenched fans who arrived late for the start of the Bears’ preseason game against Jacksonville on Thursday night missed their chance to see the home team’s first-round draft pick. Rookie cornerback Kyle Fuller turned his ankle on the game’s opening kickoff and never returned. It was a contrast from recent years, when the Bear wearing No. 23 often provided a special-teams highlight.

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    Jennings out to prove he’s worth a nickel

    Cornerback Tim Jennings didn't get a chance to work on his other job, as the Bears' No. 1 nickel corner in passing situations, because rookie cornerback Kyle Fuller, who takes Jennings' spot on the outside, when the veteran moves into the slot, suffered an ankle injury on the opening kickoff.

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    Martin helps Cougars sweep Bandits

    Coverage of Kane County Cougars baseball:The Kane County Cougars rallied with 4 runs in the eighth inning to complete a sweep of the River Bandits 4-1 at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva on Thursday night.

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    Boomers drop finale of homestand

    Coverage of the Schaumburg Boomers:The Schaumburg Boomers’ longest homestand of the season ended with a 6-1 loss to the Evansville Otters on Thursday night.

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    Abbott, Bandits edge Racers

    Coverage of Chicago Bandits fastpitch softball:The Chicago Bandits capitalized a couple of miscues by the Akron Racers to earn a 2-1 win Thursday night in Rosemont.

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    Chicago Bears’ Brandon Marshall greets youngsters before the game.

    Images: Bears vs. Jaguars preseason
    Images of the Chicago Bears' 20-19 win over the Jacksonville Jaguars in preseason football at Soldier Field in Chicago Thursday night.

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    Bears running back Senorise Perry (35) tries to leap over Jacksonville Jaguars defensive end Allen Bradford (58) during the second half of the preseason football game in Chicago Thursday.

    Bears rally to beat Jaguars 20-19

    Chad Henne passed for 130 yards and a touchdown, and Blake Bortles threw for 160 in relief before backup quarterback Jordan Palmer rallied the Bears to a 20-19 preseason victory over the Jacksonville Jaguars Thursday night.

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    Cubs starter Edwin Jackson delivers a pitch during Thursday’s first inning at Wrigley Field.

    Jackson breaks Cubs’ quality-start streak

    After getting 7 straight quality starts from their pitchers, the Cubs were slapped back to cold reality Thursday at cool Wrigley Field. Edwin Jackson, a disappointment for most of his almost two years with the Cubs, allowed 7 hits and 5 runs in 4.2 innings.

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    Florent Geroux will ride trainer Wayne Catalano’s I’m Already Sexy, above, in Saturday’s Beverly D. at Arlington International Racecourse. Geroux will ride in three of the four stakes races on Saturday.

    Jockey Geroux has rare opportunity at Arlington

    Florent Geroux, who has ridden at more than 50 race tracks in France, gives credit for his success as a jockey in the United States to the “American dream”. While many jockeys can only dream of riding three of the four races in the Festival of Racing at Arlington International Racecourse, that’s the opportunity the French-born Geroux will have Saturday.

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    Cubs tweak starting rotation

    The Cubs are tweaking their starting rotation to give their pitchers a break during a busy stretch of games. They'll call up Dan Straily from Class AAA Iowa to start Saturday. Travis Wood starts Friday, as scheduled, and everyone after Straily gets pushed back one day for extra rest.

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    Carlos Rodon, seen here pitching for the United States in a 2013 exhibition game against Cuba, is likely to be in the White Sox’ bullpen when rosters expand in September.

    Sox have hope down on the farm

    As the White Sox play out the string this season, they can look forward to developing talents Carlos Rodon, Tyler Danish and Trey Michalczewski making big contributions in 2015 and beyond.

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    Retiring Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig, right, introduces his successor, Rob Manfred, on Thursday.

    Manfred elected to lead MLB

    Rob Manfred was elected baseball’s 10th commissioner Thursday, winning a three-man competition to succeed Bud Selig and given a mandate by the tradition-bound sport to recapture young fans and speed play in an era that has seen competition increase and attention spans shrink.

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    Green Bay Packers quarterback Scott Tolzien (16) scrambles away from Tennessee Titans defenders Akeem Ayers (56) and Karl Klug (97) in last Saturday’s preseason game. In his three series of work, Tolzien went 8 of 12 for 124 yards with a passer rating of 100.7.

    Fremd grad Tolzien has shot at Packers backup QB spot

    While Matt Flynn knows better than to worry about a numbers game at this juncture of training camp, Fremd graduate Scott Tolzien is putting up some solid numbers in their battle for the backup quarterback spot in Green Bay.

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    Corey Conner of Canada advanced to the quarterfinals after winning his third-round match play at the U.S. Amateur golf tournament at Atlanta Athletic Club in Johns Creek, Ga., Thursday. Doug Ghim of Arlington Heights and Dan Stringfellow of Roselle lost in the Round of 64 on Wednesday.

    8 golfers advance in U.S. Amateur match play

    JOHNS CREEK, Ga. — South Korea’s Gunn Yang advanced Thursday to the U.S. Amateur quarterfinals , birdieing the final three holes to beat top-ranked Ollie Schniederjans 1 up at Atlanta Athletic Club. In the Wednesday’s Round of 64, University of Texas freshman Doug Ghim of Arlington Heights and Auburn senior Dan Stringfellow of Roselle both failed to advance.

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    Major League Baseball Commissioner Allan H. “Bud” Selig, right, and Major League Baseball Chief Operating Officer Rob Manfred speak to reporters after team owners elected Manfred as the next commissioner of Major League Baseball during an owners quarterly meeting in Baltimore Thursday.

    Manfred elected next MLB commissioner

    Rob Manfred has been elected baseball’s 10th commissioner and will succeed Bud Selig in January.A labor lawyer who has worked for Major League Baseball since 1998, Manfred beat out Boston Red Sox Chairman Tom Werner on Thursday in the first contested vote for a new commissioner in 46 years.The 55-year-old, who grew up in Rome, New York, must address issues that include decreased youth interest and the longer games. He has served as MLB’s chief operating officer for the past year.Selig turned 80 last month and has ruled baseball since September 1992, when he was among the owners who forced Commissioner Fay Vincent’s resignation. He said he intends to retire in January.

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    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for Aug. 15

    Joe Kristufek's selections for Aug. 15 racing at Arlington International.

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    Milwaukee Brewers starter Mike Fiers delivers a pitch during the first inning of a baseball game against the Cubs in Chicago Thursday.

    Fiers fans 14 in Brewers 6-2 win over Cubs

    Mike Fiers struck out a career-high 14 through six innings of three-hit ball, Khris Davis and Mark Reynolds homered, and the Milwaukee Brewers beat the Cubs 6-2 on Thursday to widen their first-place lead in the NL Central.Scooter Gennett drove in two runs with a double, and Elian Herrera and Carlos Gomez each had RBIs to help the Brewers move 2 ½ games ahead of Pittsburgh and St. Louis. The Cardinals host San Diego on Thursday night.Fiers (2-1) dominated and walked only one in his second start this season since being recalled from Triple-A Nashville to face the Dodgers last Saturday. In that one, he pitched eight strong innings and outdueled Zack Greinke for his first win this season.

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    Northwestern running back Venric Mark (5), who was suspended recently, has decided to transfer and play closer to his home in Houston. The Wildcats will have to turn to a young group of running backs to fill the void.

    How will Northwestern replace Mark?

    With Northwestern running back Venric Mark deciding to transfer, and wide receiver Christian Jones expected to miss the season with a knee injury, how will the Wildcats recover from those two losses?

  •  
    White Sox manager Robin Ventura kicks dirt over the plate Wednesday after being ejected for arguing a call on San Francisco Giants’ Gregor Blanco, who was originally ruled out at home but then ruled safe after review, during the seventh inning in San Francisco.

    5 great coaching meltdowns

    White Sox manager Robin Ventura has been ejected from a few games for arguing calls, but he took it to another level Wednesday in San Francisco. Ventura kicked dirt and got in the face of umpires after a call at home plate was overturned following a review. Here are five great coaching rants.

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    Mike North video: Ventura goes off at Sox game
    Mike North says baseball needs to get rid of the home plate rule, and he agrees with White Sox manager Robin Ventura and Hawk Harrelson, who both went off during yesterday’s game against the San Francisco Giants.

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    The casket of race car driver Kevin Ward Jr., is taken from a hearse before being carried into South Lewis Central School before a funeral on Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014, in Turin, N.Y. Ward died after being struck by NASCAR driver Tony Stewart’s car during a race last weekend at a dirt track in western New York.

    Mourners gather for driver hit by Stewart’s car

    Mourners are streaming into the upstate New York high school where funeral services are being held for Kevin Ward Jr., the dirt-track racer killed by NASCAR champion Tony Stewart during a race last weekend. Ward’s casket, decorated with orange and white flowers, was carried into South Lewis Senior High School about an hour before services were to begin. Ward, a 2012 graduate, lived in nearby Port Leyden.

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    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for Aug.14

    Joe Kristufek's selections for Aug. 14 racing at Arlington International.

Business

  •  
    Joe Russell

    Arlington Heights dog lover honors pets with online artwork

    Joe Russell grew up having a dog around the house and even had a dog while serving in the Air Force during the Vietnam War. .Now, the Arlington Heights man owns and operates Laughing Dog Artworks, an online e-commerce business that creates, produces and sells dog-themed, framed art and T-shirts. The business was inspired by C.M. Coolidge’s “Dogs Playing Poker” painting, he said.

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    Berkshire Hathaway Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett gestures during an interview with Liz Claman on the Fox Business Network in Omaha, Neb.

    Stocks creep higher following earnings news

    In Thursday trading, the Class A shares of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway conglomerate crossed the $200,000 mark, making the highest-priced U.S. stock even more expensive. Buffett has never split Berkshire’s A shares to make them cheaper, although Berkshire created more affordable Class B shares, which closed Thursday at $135.30 Berkshire’s Class A shares rose $3,241, or 2 percent, to end at $202,850.

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    A sign at Dickey’s Barbecue Pit Thursday in South Jordan, Utah. Police say a woman was in extremely critical condition after drinking sweet tea laced with an industrial cleaning chemical at the restaurant.

    Woman critical after drinking chemical-laced tea

    Jan Harding, 67, is in critical condition at a Salt Lake City hospital’s burn unit, unable to talk and fighting for her life, lawyer Paxton Guymon said.The restaurant manager and investigators have told the woman’s family that the worker accidentally put large quantities of a product containing lye into the iced-tea dispenser at Dickey’s Barbecue Pit in South Jordan, he said.

  •  
    Writer George Orwell

    Orwell rep accuses Amazon of doublespeak

    Amazon cited a 1936 Orwell essay in which he wrote of paperbacks that if “publishers had any sense, they would combine against them and suppress them.” But in fact, Orwell had been praising some new releases from Penguin, which had recently launched its now-famous line of paperbacks.“The Penguin Books are splendid value for sixpence, so splendid that if the other publishers had any sense they would combine against them and suppress them,” Orwell actually wrote.

  •  
    Plant manager Peter Allen flushes out a bin from which he had fed Asian carp onto a conveyer belt at the American Heartland Fish Products carp-processing plant near Grafton, Ill., north of St. Louis.

    Illinois company latest to test market for carp

    American Heartland originally targeted exports to China but turned to the domestic market when a contract fizzled. Now some experts say a recent fall-off in the world’s anchovy supplies could open a new market for carp as a replacement in animal feed.Still, the industry has grown to a point where some fish experts have begun to worry about what happens to carp businesses if they actually succeed in helping to wipe the species out.

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    Electrolux in discussions to acquire GE home-appliances division

    Electrolux AB, the Swedish maker of AEG stoves and Frigidaire refrigerators, said it’s in talks to buy General Electric Co.’s home-appliances business. No agreement on a purchase of the century-old unit has been reached, Stockholm-based Electrolux said in a statement.

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    Motorola Solutions Inc. sold $1.4 billion of bonds in its biggest issue in almost seven years to help fund pension contributions and refinance debt.

    Motorola solutions sells $1.4 billion of bonds to fund pensions

    Motorola Solutions Inc. sold $1.4 billion of bonds in its biggest issue in almost seven years to help fund pension contributions and refinance debt. The maker of two-way radios and other communications equipment sold equal, $400 million portions of 3.5 percent notes due 2021 and 5.5 percent bonds due 2044, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

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    AT&T throws in iPads with iPhones to boost tablet subscriptions

    AT&T Inc. is dangling $200 discounts on iPads as part of an iPhone sales promotion, a promotion aimed at clearing inventory ahead of the next iPhone and at boosting the number of data-device subscribers.

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    Pilot’s false arm came off during windy landing

    A pilot lost control of a plane carrying more than 50 passengers and crew after his prosthetic arm became detached during a landing in stormy conditions, according to a U.K. accident report released today.

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    Vladimir Putin’s dream of a new pipeline to deliver Russian natural gas to the European Union without passing through Ukraine is fading amid escalating tit- for-tat economic sanctions.

    Putin’s pipeline bypassing Ukraine at risk amid conflict

    Vladimir Putin’s dream of a new pipeline to deliver Russian natural gas to the European Union without passing through Ukraine is fading amid escalating tit- for-tat economic sanctions. The $46 billion South Stream project, spearheaded by OAO Gazprom, is on hold and will probably remain in limbo for years as Russia continues to foment armed conflict in eastern Ukraine and the EU retaliates with bans.

  •  

    Alibaba hidden billionaires unveiled as Alipay estimate raised

    Simon Xie, an Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. co-founder and second-biggest shareholder of its finance affiliate that owns Alipay, may become a billionaire as the estimate for the value of the electronic-payment company rose.

  •  
    A child with other stranded people as they stand at a roadblock waiting to cross into Sierra Leone on the border that separates Guinea and Sierra Leone, at a makeshift border control checkpoint at Gbalamuya-Pamelap, Guinea. A vaccine that could help protect medical workers as they fight Ebola in West Africa, even just after contamination, may take at least a month to be available as global officials weigh its safety.

    First use of Ebola vaccine appears at least a month away

    A vaccine that could help protect medical workers as they fight Ebola in West Africa, even just after contamination, may take at least a month to be available as global officials weigh its safety. The sudden donation of as many as 1,000 doses of a vaccine that hasn’t been tested in humans is creating a conundrum because they could go to healthy people, rather than those already infected

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    Cheese-loving Russians turn to Emmental as Swiss dodge ban

    At Intercheese AG’s headquarters in Switzerland, the phone barely stops ringing these days. A Russian voice is usually at the other end. Since Aug. 7, when Vladimir Putin’s government banned many food imports from nations supporting sanctions due to the country’s role in the Ukraine crisis, at least 14 Russian importers have contacted Intercheese.

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    Madoff son asks judge to block trustee’s bid to revamp lawsuit

    Bernard Madoff’s surviving son and the estate of another who committed suicide asked a court to block the trustee unwinding the con-man’s firm from adding new claims to a lawsuit accusing them of aiding his fraud.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    NBC News says Chuck Todd will replace David Gregory as moderator of “Meet the Press.” He begins Sept. 7.

    Chuck Todd taking over NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’

    Embattled “Meet the Press” moderator David Gregory is leaving NBC News and Chuck Todd will replace him on the venerable Sunday morning public affairs program, NBC said Thursday. Todd begins his new role on Sept. 7. He remains as NBC News’ political director, but will relinquish his duties as Chief White House correspondent and anchor of MSNBC’s “The Daily Rundown.” He has been a frequent guest on “Meet the Press” as a political analyst.

  •  
    Brenton Thwaites and Odeya Rush, stars of the new futuristic drama “The Giver,” sat down for a recent chat with Dann Gire.

    Gire: 5 minutes with 'The Giver' stars

    Dann interviews Brenton Thwaites and Odeya Rush, the young stars of the new fututistic sci-fi drama "The Giver."

  •  
    This Nov. 9, 2009, file photo shows actor Robin Williams, right, and his wife, Susan Schneider, at the premiere of “Old Dogs” in Los Angeles.

    Robin Williams’ wife: He had Parkinson’s disease

    Robin Williams was in the early stages of Parkinson’s disease and was sober at the time of his suicide, his wife said Thursday. In a statement, Susan Schneider said that Williams, 63, was struggling with depression, anxiety and the Parkinson’s diagnosis when he was found dead Monday in his Northern California home. Schneider did not offer details on when the actor comedian had been diagnosed or his symptoms.

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    This image released by Starpix shows The Rockettes dressed as toy soldiers and rag dolls at Radio City Music Hall in New York, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014, kicking off the 2014 “The Radio City Christmas Spectacular,” which starts Nov. 7. (AP Photo/Starpix, Dave Allocca)

    Santa Claus and Rockettes stop traffic in New York

    The calendar says August, but that didn’t stop Santa Claus from visiting midtown Manhattan and snarling a section of Sixth Avenue, much to the bafflement of tourists and the frustration of drivers forced to idle their vehicles.Father Christmas, along with 15 Rockettes costumed as rag dolls, stood on a Radio City Music Hall porch on Thursday as 12 Rockettes dressed as toy soldiers marched on the street below to perform the “Parade of the Wooden Soldiers.”

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    Team leader Barney (Sylvester Stallone), left, isn’t sure if he wants out-of-work assassin Galgo (Antonio Banderas) working for him “Expendables 3.”

    New tricks can’t rescue ‘Expendables 3’

    Despite some ruthless new tactics, there’s no saving “The Expendables 3,” the overpopulated third outing of Sylvester Stallone’s all-star action ensemble. Perhaps recognizing its own mortality, the film goes for a kitchen-sink approach. There’s the injection of AARP-eligible action stars like Wesley Snipes, Mel Gibson and Harrison Ford, as well the addition of some junior Expendables. But those extra bodies don’t add any oomph to the stiff dialogue or predictable plot.

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    Ryan (Jake Johnson, left) and Justin (Damon Wayans Jr.) take their LAPD Halloween costumes too far in “Let’s Be Cops.”

    ‘Let’s Be Cops’ a crime against comedy

    Like a down-market “Sharknado” of buddy-policemen movies, “Let’s Be Cops” seeks to capitalize on the success of the “21 Jump Street” franchise with lackadaisically exploitative relish: Jake Johnson and Damon Wayans Jr. play a couple of 30-year-old washed-ups living in Los Angeles. When a couple of cop costumes earn them all kinds of respect, they decide to take their impersonation as far as they can. The result is a tired, lazy film that should earn all involved a stint in movie jail.

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    Actress-model Lauren Bacall on the cover of the March 1943 issue of “Harper’s Bazaar.”

    The fashion world looks back on Lauren Bacall

    Lauren Bacall had one condition when the Fashion Institute of Technology wrote recently to ask if it could turn hundreds of personal garments she donated into an exhibition about her style. “She said, ‘Yes, it’s fine, as long as it’s high-quality — Diana Vreeland style,’” recalled Valerie Steele, director of The Museum at FIT. And next spring, Steele’s museum — with the help of FIT graduate students learning how to curate — will fulfill its promise in a show focused on five designers who helped define Bacall’s subtle seductiveness.

  •  
    Savannah Guthrie gave birth to daughter Vale Guthrie Feldman on Wednesday in New York. Guthrie is married to communications strategist Michael Feldman.

    It’s a girl for ‘Today’ host Savannah Guthrie

    “Today” host Savannah Guthrie has a new daughter. Vale Guthrie Feldman was born Wednesday morning, weighing in at 8 pounds, 5 ounces. The “Today” anchor gave birth at a New York hospital with husband Mike Feldman by her side.

  •  
    A wise old man (Jeff Bridges) takes on a youthful protégé (Brenton Thwaites) in the futuristic society of “The Giver,” based on the best-seller.

    'Giver' takes all: Ambitious sci-fi drama a dispassionate tale of dispassion

    In Phillip Noyce's futuristic drama “The Giver,” a totalitarian government becomes so adept at suppressing human emotions — excitement, fear, passion and joy — that it not only anesthetizes its population, it numbs the movie. Parts of this film, based on Lois Lowry's influential 1993 best-seller, should be utterly terrifying or heroically thrilling, but it's mostly a nice-looking tepid tale.

  •  
    Brenthaven Collins Backpack

    Five gadgets aimed for back-to-school time

    You can't consider carpooling, homework or even lunch these days without talking about increasing efficiency with all sorts of gadgets manufacturers are pushing to help students balance school and home life. Here are five items from five emerging trends likely to help your family and budding scholars this school year.

  •  
    David Letterman is a finalist for this year’s Thurber Prize for American Humor.

    Letterman nominated for humor prize

    David Letterman, maybe your next career should be as an author. The CBS “Late Show” host, scheduled to step down in 2015, is a finalist for this year’s Thurber Prize for American Humor. Letterman and illustrator Bruce McCall have been nominated for the satirical picture book “This Land Was Made for You and Me (But Mostly Me).”

  •  

    ‘Vape’, ‘binge-watch’ added to Oxford Dictionaries

    Don’t know what “vaping” is? How about “listicle”? Perhaps it’s time to get to know them. Britain’s Oxford University Press said Thursday it is adding the words — along with other new entries, from “time-poor” to “Paleo diet” — to its online Oxford Dictionaries to reflect new language trends.

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    R&B singer Chris Brown appears at a probation progress hearing Wednesday in Los Angeles Superior Court after he pleaded guilty to assaulting his then-girlfriend, Rihanna.

    Judge: Chris Brown doing well since jail release

    A judge says Chris Brown has been doing well and following his probation rules since his release from jail in June. The Grammy-winning R&B singer appeared in a Los Angeles court Wednesday for a progress report.

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    While kayaking on the Mississippi River near Alma, Wis., try paddling under the railroad bridge to experience seeing a train from underneath.

    Wisconsin's Great River Road winds its way into great road trip

    Straight out of a time when the kids piled into the station wagon for a Sunday drive, the Wisconsin Great River Road — yes, that “great river,” the Mississippi — wholesomely winds its way through 33 river towns over 250 miles of terrain. This stretch of pavement is what road trip dreams are made of. There are no billboard-filled lengths of straightaway. Rather, the road curves gently along the river and each new town offers foods to try, shops to browse through and scenic vistas to photograph.

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    Linwood Barclay creates a family thriller in “No Safe House.”

    A family is tested in ‘No Safe House’

    A family’s past continues to haunt Terry Archer and his family as they find it impossible to move on with their lives in Linwood Barclay’s latest suburban thriller, “No Safe House.” Cynthia Archer still remembers a tragedy in her upbringing, and she promised herself that her husband, Terry, and her daughter, Grace, would be trauma-free. That hope was shattered seven years ago when her past came back with a vengeance. Now the three of them are trying to go on with their lives.

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    Tips for taking kids out of school to travel

    Those of us who travel with kids know that travel is educational. We also know that family travel gets much more affordable after Labor Day, once kids are back in the classroom. That’s why we so often take our kids out of school for family travel.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Glenbard right to enforce athletic code

    Glenbard West's athletics code has a no-tolerance policy for student-athletes who drink or are present where underage drinking is occurring, and that's a good thing, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    The secret story we can’t stop talking about

    Columnist Jim Slusher: My original theme for this column was going to be “The story we won’t tell about Robin Williams’ death.” But as I reflect, I realize the more accurate theme may be, “The story people won’t talk about despite Robin Williams’ death.”

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    Runner wants help at dangerous corner
    Letter to the editor: Larry Schneider, of Buffalo Grove, says his daily runs take him through the Buffalo Grove and Half Day roads intersection - where he says he takes his life in his hands pretty much every day.

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    Township: Repeal prevailing wage law
    Letter to the editor: Sharon Langlotz-Johnson and the rest of the Palatine Township board want to make it clear they passed the Prevailing Wage law only because they had to, not because they wanted to.

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    Why were beautiful old trees cut down?
    Letter to the editor: Stanley Reynolds and his Rolling Meadows neighbors are heartsick over some beautiful old trees that were cut down recently.

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    (No heading)
    Letter to the editor: Raj B. Verma of Palatine thinks the library is wildly overspending on its bathroom renovations.

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    They’re happy in the village of good neighbors
    Letter to the editor: Bonnie Boyle Cote are delighted with their move from the East Coast to Arlington Heights."Best of all is the friendliness of the people we encounter throughout the day," she writes.

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    Dispute over tax bill has him steaming
    Letter to the editor: Michael Bares ofStreamwood is upset with the Cook County Treasurer's office for claiming his tax payment wasn't processed by the bank and charging him a $25 fee.

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    Hultgren afraid of town meetings?
    A Geneva letter to the editor: Why is U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren afraid to hold public town hall meetings in District 14 during this August recess? I contacted both his Geneva and Washington offices to find out a schedule.

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