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Daily Archive : Monday August 11, 2014

News

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    Actor Christopher Reeve was paralyzed after a horsebackriding accident in 1995, and he credited Robin Williams with helping him when he contemplated surgery by making him laugh. “My old friend had helped me know that somehow I was going to be OK,” Reeve said.

    How Robin Williams may have saved Christopher Reeve’s life

    In 1995, “Superman” star Christopher Reeve was about to undergo an operation after a devastating equestrian accident. “At an especially bleak moment,” Reeve reported, “the door flew open and in hurried a squat fellow with a blue scrub hat and a yellow surgical gown” speaking in a hilarious Russian accent.” He, of course, was Chicago-born Robin...

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    Roberto Cintora, a Marine Corps veteran who grew up in Elgin, proudly holds up his new keys outside his home Sunday. The Elgin native and his twin sons moved into the home Sunday after working with Habitat for Humanity of Northern Fox Valley to rehab it.

    Marine vet's hard work pays off with new home in Elgin

    Roberto Cintora and his twin 10-year-old sons on Sunday became the latest family move into a new home Sunday after teaming with Habitat for Humanity of Northern Fox Valley. Cintora, a Marine Corps veteran and Elgin native, said the process of helping to build the home in the community where he was raised was “an unforgettable and wonderful experience.”

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    Hoffman Estates Citizen Fire Academy taking applications

    The Hoffman Estates Fire Department is accepting applications for its 15th Citizen Fire Academy, which takes place in weekly three-hour sessions on Wednesdays between Sept. 3 and Nov. 5. The program will give citizens an opportunity to participate in firefighter activities like scaling a 100-foot ladder and using the “Jaws of Life” to cut through a car, as well offer education on...

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    Borghild (Bobbie) Aanstad sits on the shoulders of an unknown male friend, circa 1917. She was 14 when she accompanied her mother, sister and uncle on board the Eastland on the morning of July 24, 1915. They survived and it was her stories that inspired her granddaughters to start the Eastland Disaster Historical Society.

    Arlington Hts. family preserves story of Chicago’s Eastland disaster

    On the morning of July 24, 1915, thousands of people gathered along the Chicago River for Western Electric’s fifth annual employee picnic. Tragedy struck when the Eastland rollled over and 844 people lost their lives. The Arlington Heights family of one of the survivors has formed a historical society to preserve the personal stories of the people who were present that day.

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    Doug Petit — whose son Jonathan drowned in 2005 at age 16 in a case of underage drinking — was one of the people who packed a Glenbard High School District 87 board meeting Monday night to comment on the suspensions of athletes over a party where alcohol was served.

    Parents pack Glenbard meeting over athlete suspensions

    Teens and adults filled the room at Monday's District 87 board meeting, forcing some to stand and others to linger outside the doorway. And they didn't all agree that Glenbard West High School's suspensions of athletes after one or more parties where alcohol was served was a bad move. More than 100 people attended the meeting.

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    Robin Williams was found dead this morning at his California home, the Marin County sheriff’s office says.

    Robin Williams, boisterous comedy star, dead at 63

    He was the funniest guy in the room, something that made it all the harder for friends and fans to accept that beneath that reservoir of frenetic energy and seemingly endless good humor resided demons so dark they could push Robin Williams, 63, to suicide. It was no secret that the Oscar-winning actor had suffered for years from periodic bouts of substance abuse and depression. But word that he...

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    State suspends Chicago psychiatrist's medical license

    Illinois regulators have suspended the license of a Chicago psychiatrist who is alleged to have prescribed a risky drug to thousands of Medicare and Medicaid patients for illegal drug company payments.

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    The smoke from a gun being fired at a bank teller in Bolingbrook Monday afternoon can be seen in this surveillance photo released by the FBI.

    Police searching for man who shot bank telller

    Authorities are looking for a suspect after a bank robbery and shooting at the First Midwest Bank in Bolingbrook, ABC 7 is reporting. One woman was shot in the arm during the robbery, according to reports. The victim is in good condition at Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Stephanie A. Michaelson, 21, of Elgin, was charged Sunday with disorderly conduct/making a false 911 call, court records show. Michaelson called 911 with her cellphone to report that she saw someone running with a gun in the area of Prairie and Gifford streets, police said. Michaelson later told police she made the false report because she didn’t want her boyfriend, Teaurus Lesure, who had...

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    Robin Williams, the Academy Award winner and comic supernova whose explosions of pop culture riffs and impressions dazzled audiences for decades and made him a gleamy-eyed laureate for the Information Age, died Monday in an apparent suicide.

    Images: Robin Williams 1951-2014
    Robin Williams, the Academy Award winner and comic supernova whose explosions of pop culture riffs and impressions dazzled audiences for decades and made him a gleamy-eyed laureate for the Information Age, died Monday in an apparent suicide. He was 63.

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    Robin Williams played disc-jockey Adrian Cronauer in director Barry Levinson's comedy-drama, “Good Morning Vietnam.” Williams, whose free-form comedy and adept impressions dazzled audiences for decades, has died in an apparent suicide. He was 63.

    Robin Williams: Filmography, video clips, pictures

    Robin Williams, who died Monday at age 63, appeared in a staggering number of films, not to mention two network TV series (“The Crazy Ones” and “Mork & Mindy”), countless TV specials and appearances, stand-up comedy tours, and pretty much anything else you can think of that can make you laugh and cry. Here's a visual tour of his filmography.

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    Actor Robin Williams arrives at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Los Angeles Britannia Awards on Nov. 30, 2011, in Beverly Hills, Calif. .

    Famous fans, colleagues tweet Robin Williams farewell messages

    News of the death of Robin Williams prompted many of his colleagues, friends, fellow entertainers and famous fans to send heartfelt messages of remembrance Monday via Twitter. Here are a sampling.

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    Intuit closing Arlington Heights support center

    Intuit Inc. is closing its support center in Arlington Heights and laying off 104 employees, according to documents recently filed with the state. “It’s never anything we like to see. We always work hard to attract new businesses and retain the ones we have,” said Charles Witherington-Perkins, the director of planning and community development in Arlington Heights.

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    COURTESY OF JELLY BELLY Jelly Belly production at the North Chicago plant will move to Fairfield, California.

    Jelly Belly production leaving North Chicago

    Jelly Belly jelly beans will no longer be made in the company’s North Chicago factory, according to a recent workforce reduction announcement made by the company. Nearly 70 employees will be laid off in North Chicago in the coming months as California-based Jelly Belly moves the production of its Jelly Belly brands to Fairfield, California.

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    Pedestrian killed in Waukegan

    A pedestrian was struck and killed Thursday evening in Waukegan, police said Monday.

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    Alexander J. Story, 24, is facing 50 years in prison for selling “Molly” in Antioch.

    Trial delayed for Antioch couple accused in drug case

    The trial for an Antioch couple charged with selling the drug "Molly" was postponed to Nov. 3. Alexander and McKenzie Story, both 24, face prison sentences of 50 years if found guilty on all three counts of posession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver. Defense attorney Steven McCullom requested the delay while he awaits forensic test results, he said in court.

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    Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, left, is running for re-election against Republican Bruce Rauner. ¬

    Quinn calls on Rauner to confirm debates

    With less than three months until the November election, Gov. Pat Quinn on Monday called on Republican challenger Bruce Rauner to firm up the candidates’ debate schedule. Quinn’s campaign said the Chicago Democrat has committed to eight debates and forums statewide ahead of Nov. 4, along with a ninth potential event. Rauner’s campaign said the businessman plans to appear at...

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    Grace Deetjen of Naperville embraces her mom, Kim, after Grace and a team from the University of Illinois bicycled roughly 4,000 miles across the U.S. to raise money for cancer research.

    4,000-mile bike journey ‘incredible’ for Naperville student

    Grace Deetjen of Naperville and 19 other members of the Illini 4000 cross-country biking team recently completed their 71-day coast-to-coast journey, raising $92,000 to fight cancer. "That was the moment it hit me," Deetjen said of reaching the Golden Gate bridge in San Francisco. "I rode here from Central Park in New York City."

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    Cary Lion scholarship chairman Mitch Cohen congratulates winners Samuel Rita, Sarah Kendeigh and Griffin Dempsey.

    Cary Lions award scholarships

    The Cary Lions Club was pleased to award three $1,000 scholarships to high school seniors residing within the 60013 ZIP code and attending Cary Grove, Prairie Ridge or Marian Central high schools.

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    A notice of the suspension of Blues Bar’s village liquor license was posted on the door of the Mount Prospect business Monday.

    Mt. Prospect Blues Bar’s liquor license suspended

    Mount Prospect officials suspended the liquor license of Blues Bar in the village’s downtown after the business’ state license expired last week. The state license cannot be renewed, officials said, until the business’ owners pay overdue taxes.

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    Illinois concealed carry process getting easier

    The initial flood of applications for permits to carry concealed weapons in Illinois has slowed down considerably and observers say the process for those still applying is getting a bit easier to navigate.

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    Health worker wearing protective clothing and equipment, await patients to screen against the deadly Ebola virus at the Kenema Government Hospital situated in the Eastern Province in Kenema, 186 miles from the capital city of Freetown, Sierra Leone.

    Remainder of Ebola drug headed to Africa

    Liberian government said Monday it will receive all the remaining doses of an experimental Ebola drug to treat doctors in the West African country. The U.S. government confirmed it had put Liberian officials in touch with the maker of ZMapp, though the drug’s supply was limted and Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc. confirmed there would be no more made for the time being.

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    U-46 launches campaign to improve attendance

    Elgin Area School District U-46 has launched a campaign to improve student attendance rates. Student attendance for the 2013-14 school year was at 94.3 percent. On average, 1,949 students are missing from district classrooms each day. The “I’m Here! ¡Aquí estoy!” messaging campaign aims to raise awareness about the importance of staying in school. The goal is to...

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    Abraham Lincoln in 1864

    New papers added to Lincoln collection

    A documentary project about Abraham Lincoln has scanned two previously unknown papers from the former president for its collection. The Papers of Abraham Lincoln is a project dedicated to identifying and publishing all documents written by or to the 16th president during his lifetime.

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    Adult, juvenile charged in beating death

    An adult and a 15-year-old have been charged with beating to death a Romeoville man with baseball bats. Police say the 55-year-old Richard Pollack was beaten to death Sunday after confronting a group of teens he thought stole his son’s skateboard several days earlier.

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    Though the Black Ram Restaurant in Des Plaines received permission to install a new outdoor dining patio, the owners say they’re upset the necessary approvals from city officials didn’t come sooner.

    Des Plaines noise rules could change following dispute

    A neighborhood dispute over noise from the Black Ram restaurant in Des Plaines appears to have simmered down — at least for now — after the restaurant’s installation of a patio didn’t prove to be as much of a disturbance as nearby residents feared. But the episode has led Des Plaines officials to re-examine their noise ordinance in hopes of averting future disputes.

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    University of Illinois proposes off-campus cameras

    City council members in Champaign are considering a proposal from the University of Illinois to expand its network of surveillance cameras off campus and onto city streets. If approved, the effort would be the first time the university has installed security cameras on property it doesn’t own.

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    Quinn signs Pace shoulder-riding program into law

    Legislation that allows a suburban Chicago bus agency’s vehicles to ride on the shoulders of a major roadway is now law. Gov. Pat Quinn signed a plan on Monday that makes Pace’s “Bus on Shoulders” pilot program permanent.

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    Associated Press/July 22, 2008 Charles T. Payne was the brother of President Barack Obama’s maternal grandmother, Madelyn Payne Dunham. Payne died in Chicago of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

    Great-uncle of Obama dies at age 89

    Charles T. Payne, a World War II veteran and great-uncle of President Barack Obama who was briefly in the public eye during his nephew’s first presidential bid, has died. He was 89.

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    Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton rebuked President Barack Obama for his cautious approach to global crises and sayid foreign policy has to go beyond “don’t do stupid stuff.”

    Clinton distinguishes herself from Obama policies

    Laying out a foreign policy vision ahead of a possible run for president, Hillary Rodham Clinton made her most aggressive effort yet to distinguish herself from her former boss, President Barack Obama, rebuking his cautious approach to global crises and saying the U.S. doctrine has to go beyond “don’t do stupid stuff.”

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    Marcelle Stewart, left, confronts police officers during a march and rally in downtown Ferguson, Mo., Monday. The group marched along the closed street, rallying in front of the town’s police headquarters to protest the shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown by Ferguson police officers.

    Witnesses: Teen had hands raised when he was shot

    A black teenager who was fatally shot by a police officer had his hands raised when the officer approached with his weapon drawn and fired repeatedly, according to two men who said they witnessed the shooting that sparked a night of unrest in suburban St. Louis. The FBI opened an investigation Monday into the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, who police said was shot multiple times Saturday...

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    Hoffman Estates’ Germanfest, 5K is Sept. 12-13

    The village of Hoffman Estates hosts its annual Platzkonzert Germanfest on Saturday, Sept. 13, an open air celebration with authentic German food, beer, entertainment and activities.

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    Wauconda parks proposal:

    The Wauconda Park District board will meet Tuesday to discuss a plan to expand the district’s community center at Cook Park. The meeting is at 7 p.m. at the community center, 600 N. Main St.

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    Mundelein High athletics meeting:

    Mundelein High School will host a special meeting for athletes from all three sports seasons, their parents and coaches on Tuesday, Aug. 19, beginning at 7 p.m. at the high school, 1350 W. Hawley St., Mundelein.

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    Lead investigator talks about John Wayne Gacy case
    Hear about the search and arrest of one of America’s most notorious serial killers — John Wayne Gacy — from the lead investigator on the case, Joseph Kozenczak. His talk begins at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 14, in the Prairie Lakes Multipurpose Room, 515 E. Thacker St., Des Plaines.

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    Lake Zurich police safety check:

    Lake Zurich police plan to launch a roadside safety check campaign Saturday, Aug. 16.

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    Iraqis chant pro-government slogans and wave national flags in a show of support for embattled Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki during a demonstration in Baghdad, Iraq, Monday.

    Iraq crisis deepens; US directly arms Kurds

    Iraq’s president snubbed incumbent Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and picked another politician Monday to form the next government, setting up a fierce political power struggle even as the country battles extremists in the north and west. The showdown came as the United States increased its role in fighting back Sunni extremists of the Islamic State group that is threatening the autonomous...

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    Young skiers ride the conveyor belt on Little Grizz at Alta Ski Resort in Little Cottonwood Canyon near Salt Lake City. A group of snowboarders suing to get access to Alta ski area are headed to court.

    Judge weighs rare ban on snowboarding in ski area

    Snowboarders suing one of the last ski resorts in the country to prohibit snowboarding will argue Monday in a Utah courtroom that the ban is discriminatory and based on outdated stereotypes. They say the Alta ski area can’t legally bar boarders from the federally owned land that makes up most of the resort in the mountains east of Salt Lake City. But the business says a snowboarder-free...

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    Veterans from World War II and the Korean War, along with their families, were guests of honor Sunday at the “Remembering ’45,” event in Gilberts. The event was organized by the True Patriots Care Foundation.

    ‘Remember what we did’: Veterans honored in Gilberts

    Local veterans who served during World War II and the Korean War were celebrated in Gilberts on Sunday with an event that featured pride, humor and solemnity. "We have to keep remembering," said Jerry Christopherson.

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    Giovanni Tlatempa-Carreto

    Elgin man charged with insurance fraud after burglary report

    The owner of an Elgin cellphone store faces felony charges that he falsified invoices after reporting three burglaries in an attempt to bilk insurance companies out of $43,000. Giovanni Tlatempa-Carreto, 35, of Elgin, was arrested Friday and faces anywhere from probation to five years in prison.

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    President Barack Obama speaks about developments in Iraq on Monday from his vacation residence in Chilmark, Mass. He gave his approval to the appointment of a prime minister to replace Nouri al-Maliki and urged the formation of a new government in Iraq as soon as possible.

    Obama calls for new Iraqi government

    President Obama is giving his approval to the appointment of a prime minister to replace Nouri al-Maliki and urging the formation of a new government in Iraq as soon as possible. In brief remarks delivered at his vacation spot in Martha’s Vineyard, Obama said he and Vice President Joe Biden had spoken with Haider al-Ibadi, who was designated prime minister by the new president.

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    Hinsdale country club seeks DuPage’s OK for skeet shooting

    Ruth Lake Country Club, a private golf club near Hinsdale, is asking for permission to offer skeet shooting for its members during the wintertime. Some expect residents to complain. “I would imagine the biggest issues that will come up — apart from shooting guns on the golf course — are going to be what the hours are going to be, what the decibel levels are going to be and...

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    Caputo’s expected to open in Carol Stream this fall

    Angelo Caputo’s Fresh Markets plans to open a new store in Carol Stream this fall. It will offer a cappuccino bar, a pizza station, a wine and beer bar, a grill and a juice bar. “We opened up as a produce store in 1958, and that’s going to be the first thing you see when you walk in the store.” said Chief Executive Officer Robertino Presta.

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    Thomas Poynton

    Home rule might land on ballot in Lake Zurich

    Lake Zurich Mayor Thomas Poynton alluded to felonious former Illinois governors Rod Blagojevich and George Ryan when he addressed the possibility of his village gaining more control over taxes and other matters through home rule power. “Take a look at the state of Illinois,” Poynton said at a recent village board meeting when officials examined the pros and cons of home rule.

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    Cold patch marks the site of a water main repair Monday morning in the southbound lanes of Arlington Heights Road just south of Golf Road in Arlington Heights. A permanent road repair is scheduled for the week of Aug. 25.

    Repair of water main break slow in Arlington Hts.

    A busy location and a midnight rainstorm stretched the repair time for a water main break at the intersection of Arlington Heights and Golf roads in Arlington Heights from late Sunday afternoon until Monday morning. The blowout occurred in the bottom of a 12-inch pipe about 5 p.m. Sunday near the left lane of southbound Arlington Heights Road.

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    A drive-through recently opened at Panera Bread in Algonquin. The Geneva Panera will soon have one as well.

    Drive-through coming to Geneva Panera

    A new drive-through lane at the Panera in Algonquin opened recently along the Randall Road corridor. It's a preview of what's to come further south on Randall. By next summer, the Geneva Panera will move to a larger location and open a drive-through, officials said.

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    Intruder wakes up Buffalo Grove woman at 4 a.m., flees after struggle

    A Buffalo Grove woman woke up early Saturday morning to find an unknown man straddling her in her bed, according to police who now are seeking the public’s help identifying and locating the suspect. Police say the woman struggled with the man, causing him to run out of her bedroom and flee her condominium through a patio door.

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    Aurora Escamilla

    Beach Park woman pleads guilty to child endangerment in son’s death

    A Beach Park woman whose infant son was killed by the baby’s father was sentenced to pay $1,326 in court fines Monday after she pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of child endangerment in Lake County court.

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    The supermoon rises through the clouds behind the “Motherland” statue, part of the World War II memorial complex, in Kiev, Ukraine, Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014. The phenomenon, which scientists call a “perigee moon,” occurs when the moon is near the horizon and appears larger and brighter than other full moons.

    Images: Supermoon around the world

    This weekend, the world got to see the superest of all supermoons. The phenomenon will happen three times this year, with Sunday night's sky show the second. The first one occurred on July 12 and the third will take place on Sept. 9. A supermoon is when the moon is its absolute closest to the Earth while also being full.

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    Associated Press A 2008 photo shows Nicholas T. Sheley being escorted out of the Granite City Police Department in Granite City

    Man in kill spree case gets four more life sentences

    A man serving two life sentences for a pair of Illinois killings has been sentenced to four more. Nicholas Sheley was convicted in May of murder for fatally beating three people and a 2-year-old with a hammer in a northwest Illinois apartment.

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    Ten-year-old Delilah Herrera, a fourth-grade student at Harriet Gifford Elementary School in Elgin enjoys breakfast as part of the Breakfast in Classroom program that is available at 10 U46 schools this year. Elgin Area School District U-46 teachers are trying to revive a special program that fed students a free breakfast in their classrooms.

    U-46 teachers urge district to reconsider breakfast program

    Elgin Area School District U-46 teachers are trying to revive a program that provides students with a free breakfast in their classrooms at the start of the school day. District leaders discontinued the Breakfast in the Classroom pilot program in June, saying it cut into instruction time.

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    In this combination image taken from video a child in a buggy is blown on to subway tracks at Goodge Street undeground station, London, and a woman leaping to the rescue moments before a train arrived.

    London police show images of child blown onto tracks

    British Transport Police have released harrowing images of a child in a stroller being blown by tunnel wind onto London subway tracks and a woman leaping to the rescue moments before a train arrived.

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    In this Tuesday, 2009 photo, former chess world champion Garry Kasparov, right, and Anatoly Karpov, left, play an exhibition rematch in Valencia, Spain.

    Kasparov bid fails as chess body’s boss re-elected

    Former world champion Garry Kasparov failed in his bid to oust the eccentric longtime head of the World Chess Federation on Monday in a bitter contest steeped in Russian power plays.

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    Missionaries return to US and Ebola quarantine

    Three missionaries who worked with patients infected with the Ebola virus in Liberia have returned to the United States. The group they were working for, Charlotte-based SIM USA, said in a news release Monday that all three were healthy and showed no signs of infection.

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    Police: 6 killed in Houston-area police chase

    Authorities say six people have been killed, including a family of four, when an SUV speeding from police struck another vehicle southeast of Houston.

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    Police Chief William Benson, left, stands while Officer Ian Frey holds his proclamation during a ceremony at a Wheeling Village Board meeting.

    Wheeling honors life-saving police officers

    Wheeling Police Officer Ian Frey recently received two awards for saving lives in the village, and other members of the department were also honored.

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    2 years later, trial for man in housemate deaths

    Jury selection is getting underway in the trial of a suburban Detroit man who is charged with killing a couple and dumping their body parts in the Detroit River.

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    Illinois man injured watching demolition derby

    Authorities in northwestern Illinois say a man was injured while watching the Carroll County Fair demolition derby.The (Sterling) Daily Gazette reports that 32-year-old Christopher M. Heisler of Milledgeville was watching the event Saturday night when he was hurt.

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    Arrest in theft of Illinois hospital laughing gas

    A 33-year-old central Illinois man has been charged in connection with the theft of laughing gas from the hospital where he worked. The (Peoria) Journal-Star reports that Eric J. Rebholz of Chillicothe was charged with theft and delivery of nitrous oxide Sunday. Online records show he’s in custody Monday at the Peoria County Jail.

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    The Zipper amusement ride and others go into motion during South Elgin Riverfest Express at Panton Mill Park.

    South Elgin Riverfest Express switches it up

    Visitors returning to the annual South Elgin Riverfest Express may be a little turned around this year. In previous years, the stage for live entertainment has been near the State Street bridge. But this year, it will be next to the dam on the opposite side of the festival grounds. This alters the whole layout of the festival, said Joyce Ware, event co-chairwoman.

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    Navy SEAL trying out for Northwestern football

    A 32-year-old father of three who is an active Navy SEAL is trying to earn a spot on Northwestern University’s football team. Tom Hruby is a junior and wants to walk on as a defensive end. Hruby tells the Chicago Sun-Times that he’s not doing anything “outstanding or amazing.” Instead he sees it as “just more of a challenging route.”

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    Ramp momentarily closed on I-90 due to water

    An eastbound ramp on I-90 at Route 31 near Elgin was closed momentarily Monday morning due to water on the pavement, authorities said.

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    President Barack Obama is directing $10 million in emergency Pentagon spending to help fight terrorists in northern Africa.

    Obama directs funds to fight terrorists in Africa

    President Barack Obama is directing $10 million in emergency Pentagon spending to help fight terrorists in northern Africa. Obama made the order Monday from his vacation on Martha’s Vineyard off the Massachusetts coast.

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    Police officers patrol the area Sunday in Ferguson, Mo.

    Vandalism, looting after vigil for Missouri man

    A candlelight vigil for an unarmed black man who was fatally shot by a suburban St. Louis police officer was followed by unrest as crowds looted and burned stores, vandalized vehicles and taunted officers who tried to block access to parts of the city.

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    Haidar al-Abadi

    Iraq’s al-Abadi asked to form new government to replace Malikic

    Iraq’s President Fouad Masoum asked Haidar al-Abadi to try to form a new cabinet, in a bid to end the political deadlock that has hobbled the country’s efforts to roll back an Islamist insurgency. The Shiite National Alliance tapped Abadi to replace the embattled Nouri al-Maliki, al-Iraqiya television said, citing a statement from the bloc’s chief, Ibrahim al-Jaafari.

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    Dan Bridges Inside District 203

    Naperville Dist. 203 celebrating improvements for new school year

    As Naperville Unit District 203 students prepare to head back to school, educators are adopting the theme "Celebrate 203." Superintendent Dan Bridges says the district has much to celebrate, including an updated logo, the advent of all-day kindergarten, a new English/language arts curriculumn and a partnership with neighboring districts.

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    Fair races to go on after horse quarantine lifted
    Illinois State Fair harness races will go on Monday after nearly three dozen horses were quarantined briefly over the weekend because of concerns they may have been exposed to a virus. The (Springfield) State Journal-Register reports that officials lifted the quarantine Saturday, after the animals were cleared of having the equine herpes virus.

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    Warrenville man named County Fair person of year

    A man from northeastern Illinois’ Warrensville has been named the 2014 Outstanding County Fair Person of the Year. Jim McGuire has served for more than a decade on the DuPage County Fair board. He was honored Friday at the Illinois State Fair in Springfield during County Fair and Horse Racing Day festivities.

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    Chicago team in Little League Series Thursday

    An all-black team from Chicago is headed to the Little League World Series for the first time in three decades. The Chicago Sun Times reports that Cameron Bufford’s fifth-inning grand slam helped the Jackie Robinson West team to a 12-7 victory Saturday in the Great Lakes Regional championship game in Indianapolis.

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    Police: Wisconsin man found lying in road dies

    Police in western Wisconsin say a 20-year-old man has died after being thrown from a car driven by someone suspected to be intoxicated. KARE-TV reports Ellsworth Police say Nicholas Rhiel died from injuries Sunday after being found unconscious on a residential road early Saturday.

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    Chicago judge sets $450,000 bond for Texas man

    A Cook County judge has set bond at $450,000 for a Texas man who police say tried to run over an officer during an arrest attempt. The Chicago Sun-Times reports Ricardo Castro-Beltran was charged Sunday with felony aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and leaving the scene of an accident.

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    Peoria officials relocate woman after retaliation

    The Peoria County State’s Attorney’s Office is finding new housing for a 22-year-old woman who says six women attacked her for helping the office with a case.

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    3-year-old pulled from backyard pool in Racine

    A 3-year-old boy is hospitalized in critical condition after he was found in a swimming pool in Racine. Authorities say the boy was not breathing when he was pulled from the pool at a home Sunday afternoon. Police are investigating how the child got into the pool area.

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    Dawn Patrol: Crash victim identified; Bears’ Bennett returns

    Crystal Lake man killed in Lake in the Hills crash; Naperville triathlon draws first-timers and veteran competitors; McHenry prosecutor up for anti-DUI honor; musical parade a highlight of Gurnee Days; Bears lift suspension; latest auto racing tragedy impossible to comprehend; Gillaspie making some noise for Sox; Cubs’ front office steps on the accelerator

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    Dennis Caravello of Mount Prospect is named the winner of the Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent competition during Saturday’s finale in Arlington Heights.

    10 stories you may have missed this weekend
    What you may have missed over the weekend: Parents of Glenbard West High students unhappy with suspensions of athletes; people camped outside overnight in Elgin to get some of the 3,000 backpacks stuffed with free school supplies; a puppy was stolen from a Naperville pet store; Naperville girl killed in motorcycle crash; Geneva High to change way students pay for lunch; Lake County officials to...

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    Stained glass windows adorn the new chapel at Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital near Barrington. The new chapel, built as part of a $247 million hospital modernization project, will be dedicated today.

    New chapel a fitting first for Good Shepherd renovations

    Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital on Monday will dedicate a new chapel in what hospital officials are calling a fitting first project completed in their $247 million campus modernization effort. The chapel is named after a pair of longtime hospital volunteers and supporters.

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    Collisions between trains and cars or pedestrians — a fact of life in the suburbs — also plague the international community. Prevention was the subject of a global symposium last week in Illinois.

    Railroad accidents underscore safety conference's mission

    How do we make rail crossings safer? A group of international experts gathered at the University of Illinios this week to share ideas and learn from some local experts. “Highway-rail grade crossing and trespassing accidents were up in 2013, and we're seeing a continued uptick in this fiscal year,” Federal Railroad Administrator Joseph Szabo said.

Sports

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    Naperville Central High School’s football team works Monday out on the first official day of practice. Defensive End Nick Litman, foreground, and other linemen push the sled.

    Countdown to prep football kickoff begins

    It didn’t take long for Naperville Central to begin focusing on defending its Class 8A title. “The Monday after the state title game we had 42 kids in the weight room at six in the morning,” said Redhawks coach Mike Stine. “It’s a new team, but they’re ready to work.” Look no further than the DuPage Valley Conference to again find the area’s top Class 8A teams.

  •  
    Micheal Spurlock managed just 2 yards on two punt returns in the Bears’ preseason opener against the Eagles.

    So far, Bears’ special teams not very special

    Bears special teams were not especially impressive in the preseason opener. In fact, according to special teams coordinator Joe DeCamillis, there is much room for improvement across the board heading into Thursday night's second game.

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    Conte looks to bounce back from sluggish 2013

    Bears safety Chris Conte took a positive step on the comeback trail from his off-season shoulder surgery with a red zone interception at Monday's practice.

  •  

    Hernandez brilliant as Seattle jolts Toronto 11-1

    Felix Hernandez allowed one run in seven strong innings and Robinson Cano helped provide him with a jolt of run support as the Seattle Mariners romped to an 11-1 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays on Monday night.

  •  

    Stanton powers Marlins past Cardinals in 6-5 win

    Giancarlo Stanton hit two home runs and made a spectacular diving catch in right field to help the Miami Marlins beat the St. Louis Cardinals 6-5 on Monday night.

  •  

    Correia wins Dodgers debut, beats Braves

    Kevin Correia won in his debut, outpitching All-Star Julio Teheran and leading the Los Angeles Dodgers over the slumping Atlanta Braves 6-2 on Monday night.

  •  

    Davis HR sparks Orioles in 11-3 win over Yankees

    The satisfaction the Baltimore Orioles derived from beating the New York Yankees 11-3 Monday was dampened by the possibility that third baseman Manny Machado could be headed toward the disabled list with a sprained right knee.

  •  

    Snider hits 2 homers, Pirates top Tigers 11-6

    Travis Snider hit two home runs, and Starling Marte drove in three runs as the Pittsburgh Pirates coasted to a 11-6 win against the Detroit Tigers on Monday night.

  •  

    Smyly gets 1st win for Rays, 7-0 over Rangers

    Drew Smyly allowed three hits and struck out the final batter he faced in his only shaky inning, Matt Joyce had a two-run single and the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Texas Rangers 7-0 on Monday night.

  •  

    Mauer leads Twins to 4-2 win over Astros

    Joe Mauer had two hits in his return from the disabled list, including a go-ahead RBI single in the ninth inning, to help the Minnesota Twins to a 4-2 win over the Houston Astros on Monday night.

  •  

    Royals win 8th in row, top A’s, take Central lead

    The Kansas City Royals won their eighth straight game and took over the AL Central lead Monday night when Yordano Ventura outdueled Sonny Gray during a 3-2 win over Oakland Athletics.

  •  
    Cubs starting pitcher Jake Arrieta allowed only 2 runs on 5 hits in 7⅓ innings Monday night but took the loss against the Brewers.

    Cubs strike out against Brewers 3-1

    With an upcoming schedule chock full of contenders, the Cubs find themselves in the role of potential spoilers again. They failed to spoil the Milwaukee Brewers Monday night, falling 3-1 at Wrigley Field as Brewers starter Yovani Gallardo outdueled Cubs ace Jake Arrieta.

  •  

    White Sox scouting report
    Scouting report: White Sox vs. San Francisco Giants

  •  
    Could it be the White Sox are targeting Pirates power-hitting third baseman Pedro Alvarez to replace Adam Dunn in the lineup next season?

    Pirates’ Alvarez could be mystery man for White Sox

    The day after the July 31 nonwaiver trade deadline, White Sox general manager Rick Hahn said he was close to making a three-team deal. Beat writer Scot Gregor suspects Pittsburgh slugger Pedro Alvarez was Hahn's target.

  •  
    Defender Timmy Kitrys stops running back Daniel Blair during the first day of football practice at Hersey High School on Monday.

    Images: Football First Day, Lake County and Northwest
    Images of the first day of high school football practice in Lake County and the Northwest suburbs.

  •  
    Malik Dunner charges through obstacles during Dundee-Crown High School football practice Monday.

    Images: Football First Day, Fox Valley and DuPage
    Images of the first day of high school football practice in DuPage County and the Fox Valley.

  •  
    Chicago Cubs center fielder Arismendy Alcantara is unable to catch a fly ball by Milwaukee Brewers’ Scooter Gennett, during the seventh inning of a baseball game Monday in Chicago. Alcantara recovered relaying to Starlin Castro who threw out Ryan Braun at home.

    Gallardo pitches Brewers past Cubs 3-1

    Yovani Gallardo pitched seven sparkling innings and Khris Davis had a tiebreaking RBI double, leading the Milwaukee Brewers to a 3-1 victory over the Chicago Cubs on Monday night.

  •  
    New head football coach Mike Steinhaus during Dundee-Crown High School football practice Monday.

    Fox Valley players excited to be back on field

    The boys of fall were greeted by muggy August air as high school football practices began throughout the Fox Valley and across the state on Monday. And the players loved every sweat-dripping second of it. “It’s extremely exciting to be out here,” St. Edward quarterback Joseph Mullen said during an afternoon practice at Elgin’s Abbott Park. “It’s great being with this group of guys. We’re all competitive and ready to work. It’s going to be a good time.”

  •  

    Boomers fall short 4-3

    The Schaumburg Boomers dropped a 4-3 decision to the visiting Rockford Aviators on Monday night.

  •  
    Warren wide receiver Caleb Reams, left, has committed to the University of Illinois.

    Changing landscape coming to Lake County soon

    A new conference structure for the 2016-17 school year is just one of the changes ahead in Lake County high school sports.

  •  
    This July 5, 2014 photo provided by Empire Super Sprints, Inc., shows sprint car driver Kevin Ward Jr., in the vicotry lane with his car at the Fulton Speedway in Fulton, N.Y. Ward was killed Saturday at the Canandaigua Motorsports Park in Central Square, N.Y., when the car being driven by Tony Stewart struck the 20-year-old who had climbed from his crashed car and was on the darkened dirt track trying to confront Stewart following a bump with Stewart one lap earlier.

    Ward crafted reputation as wheelman

    Kevin Ward Jr. was crafting a reputation as a wheelman, the kind of driver who could race vehicles on any track without fear. He'd sit up on his seat, floor it, and zip his way through a maze of cars straight toward the front of the pack. Ward was killed Saturday night about 140 miles away at a clay track in Canandaigua when he was struck by NASCAR champion Tony Stewart.

  •  
    Coach Dennis Piron during Batavia High School football practice Monday.

    Batavia not letting success go to its head

    Titled, not entitled. Batavia football comes off a banner year, the 2013 Class 6A title win over Richards the Bulldogs’ first state football championship and the school’s first team championship since the boys basketball team won it all in 1912.

  •  
    Quarterback Kevin Malisheski, right, hands off to running back Tyler Theel during football practice Monday at Wauconda.

    For real, Wauconda likes artificial turf future

    Wauconda opened up the 2014 football season with an afternoon practice on Monday on a grass field just south of its brand new artificial turf field, which will be ready in time for its home opener on Sept. 5.

  •  
    Chicago Cubs’ Travis Wood, left, celebrates with manager Rick Renteria after scoring on a single hit by Javier Baez during the fifth inning of an interleague baseball game Sunday against the Tampa Bay Rays in Chicago.

    Renteria says give credit to Rays pitching

    Despite his team's batters striking out 44 times in the three-game weekend series against the Rays, Cubs manager Rick Renteria said the approaches at the plate were good. The Cubs also drew only 2 walks over the three games.

  •  
    Even Richard Duchossois has to wonder what will happen to Arlington International Racecourse after he is gone.

    Again, Million week comes with fear, appreciation

    Arlington Million week arrives with the customary mixed emotions: Appreciation for the International Festival of Racing and fears for Arlington Park beyond the Richard Duchossois era.

  •  
    Running back Chase Bandolik carries the ball during the first day of football practice at Hersey on Monday.

    New outlook as football season begins

    The first day of fall football practice marked an earlier start to the sport in past seasons, and the changes only begin there as various precautions are being taken to limit the risk of concussion and other injuries.

  •  
    Tiger Woods winces after tee shot on the sixth hole during the second round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at Valhalla Golf Club on Friday, Aug. 8, 2014, in Louisville, Ky.

    Watson still considering Woods for Ryder Cup

    U.S. captain Tom Watson said he would be foolish not to consider Tiger Woods as one of his three wild-card selections for the Ryder Cup, a decision that ultimately would be based on Woods’ words instead of his actions. Watson has said all year he wanted Woods on his team if he were healthy and playing well. Even though Woods is injured and not playing for the next month, Watson wouldn’t rule him out Monday.

  •  

    Phillies’ rally falls short, lose to Mets 5-3

    David Buchanan was nine outs away from taking over as the team leader in wins before things fell apart. Slumping Anthony Recker hit a tiebreaking, three-run homer, Jonathon Niese pitched seven sharp innings and the New York Mets beat the Philadelphia Phillies 5-3 Monday.

  •  
    Northern Illinois University football games will be carried this fall on WIND 560-AM, school officials announced Monday.

    WIND to carry NIU football, basketball

    Northern Illinois University has found a new home for its college sports broadcasts with WIND 560-AM, school officials announced Monday.

  •  

    Bulls release NBA preseason schedule

    The Chicago Bulls will open their preseason schedule against the Washington Wizards, the team that knocked them out of the NBA playoffs last season.

  •  

    Mike North video: Rory roars at PGA Championship
    As Rory Mcllroy wins his 3rd straight tournament- two of them Majors, Mike North thinks we are entering a new golden age of golf with young players like Rory and Rickie Fowler.As Rory Mcllroy wins his 3rd straight tournament- two of them Majors, Mike North thinks we are entering a new golden age of golf with young players like Rory and Rickie Fowler.

  •  
    Rory McIlroy, of Northern Ireland, celebrates after winning the PGA Championship golf tournament at Valhalla Golf Club on Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014, in Louisville, Ky.

    McIlroy shines through the darkness at PGA

    There was some confusion on the last hole, but that didn’t detract from another Rory McIlroy victory in the PGA Championship. As darkness fell in the tournament, McIlroy's game shined on.

Business

  •  
    SKF Group, a Swedish-based manufacturing company, has been announced as the name of the company that is seeking to build a 130,000-square-foot research and development center at 1203 E. Warrenville Road in Naperville. The business — without disclosing its name — received preliminary approval last month of its proposal from the city's planning and zoning commission.

    Swedish manufacturer breaks secrecy about Naperville plans

    The name of a business that wants to build a research and development facility in Naperville is a mystery no more. SKF Group, a Swedish-based manufacturer, is behind plans to build a 130,000-square-foot research and development center at 1203 E. Warrenville Road, city and state officials said Monday. “The project is spectacular,” said Christine Jeffries, president and CEO of the Naperville Development Partnership.

  •  
    Humza Khan

    Hanover Park man ditches convenience for franchise

    Humza Khan of Hanover Park loves buildings. He loves what you may not notice, like the ceiling, the floor plans, the color and the design. So it’s no surprise that the 28-year-old left behind a secure job with his family’s 7-Eleven businesses to pursue his dream. He has taken his test to obtain a license as an inspector and aims to launch his own franchise of Pillar to Post, a building inspection firm, by early September.“Growing up in Chicago, one of the most beautiful cities in the world that contains incredible architecture in the hundreds of buildings, I was always interested in buildings and design,” Khan said. “I would notice crown moldings, cabinetry, floor plans of houses and just overall color schemes and think about the design style of each structure. It was a passion that slowly grew as I got older.”He said he once considered a career in interior design but was more interested in the overall area of real estate, architecture and remodeling.“I initially began researching different business opportunities within the architecture and real estate areas and after several months of research, I found Pillar to Post,” he said.The franchise appealed to him because it combined the two things he has always loved and has been good at, architecture and people skills, he said.“The business plan and methodology guided a new business owner to succeed and their code of business ethics allowed for a newcomer to provide honest, necessary, informed information regarding a building so a potential buyer can have peace of mind in their purchase,” he said.Khan was born in downtown Chicago. At 3, his parents moved to Hanover Park. When he was 18, he began working at 7-Eleven in Glendale Heights, owned by his older sister’s husband.For the next 10 years, he worked with his brother-in-law and they expanded the business and opened two additional locations, one in Park Ridge and another in Glendale Heights. Khan began as a sales associate and worked his way up to general manager of the two Glendale Heights stores. The experience has taught him about customer service and customer satisfaction to build loyalty.He said after much thought and deliberation, he decided it was time to combine his passion with his business skills and create something for himself. “Starting this company has been wonderful and terrifying at the same time,” Khan said. “It takes a lot of courage and confidence to leave an existing profitable family business to go out and try to follow my dreams.”He also wants to help people build their own dreams as well.“My goal is to continue to build and grow and help the residential community of my hometown to buy and sell property with confidence,” he said. Rosemont legacy continues Jacqueline Stephens Breisch is a new associate in the Lake Forest office of Schiller DuCanto & Fleck LLP. She has extensive experience in family law cases involving custody, maintenance, child support, property division, and finding creative solutions to deal with complex financial matters associated with divorce. The Rosemont native recently moved back to her hometown where her grandfather, Donald E. Stephens, was the founding mayor of Rosemont and served for nearly 50 years. Her uncle, Brad Stephens, took over as mayor in 2007. Specialist now at Lutheran General Anastasios Raptis of Libertyville is the new stem cell transplant medical director at Advocate Lutheran General in Park Ridge. Raptis is a hematology/oncology specialist, with nearly 30 years experience in performing all types of stem cell/bone marrow transplants and was recruited from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

  •  
    ASSOCIATED PRESS Facebook’s recent effort to force people to adopt its standalone mobile messaging app has privacy-concerned users up in arms. In truth, Facebook Messenger isn’t any more invasive than Facebook’s main app — or other similar applications.

    Busted: 5 Myths about Facebook’s messenger app

    Facebook’s recent effort to force people to adopt its standalone mobile messaging app has privacy-concerned users up in arms. Many of them believe the app is especially invasive. In truth, Facebook Messenger isn’t any more invasive than Facebook’s main app —or other similar applications.

  •  
    Stocks closed slightly higher Monday as investors turned their focus to corporate news and as tensions eased in Ukraine.

    U.S. stocks edge higher on corporate news, earnings

    U.S. stocks gained on Monday as investors focused on corporate news instead of geopolitical worries. News: Kinder Morgan surged after announcing that it would combine a group of businesses that it controls to create the fourth-biggest U.S. energy company by market value. Banana seller Chiquita Brands International soared after the company received a $611 million buyout offer.

  •  
    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Acting Administrator David J. Friedman testifies before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation subcommittee on Capitol Hill on April 2. Auto safety regulators are often slow to grant or deny petitions from people seeking investigations into what could be serious safety problems, an Associated Press review shows.

    U.S. agency moves slowly on investigation requests

    People are waiting longer than they should for an answer when they petition the government to open an investigation into what could be serious safety problems. The Associated Press reviewed all 15 petitions filed by drivers with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration since 2010 and found the agency missed the legal deadline to grant or deny the requests 12 times. One petition from 2012 has yet to be resolved.

  •  

    U.S. agency warns consumers about Bitcoin risks

    Federal regulators are warning consumers about the risks of using virtual currencies such as Bitcoin. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau says it will begin fielding complaints from people who rely on products such as Bitcoin and online exchanges for such currencies.

  •  

    FDA rules may jeopardize Black & Mild cigar name

    Plans to regulate cigars and other tobacco products the same as cigarettes may threaten one of the nation’s top-selling cigar brands — Black & Mild. Under a proposal by the Food and Drug Administration, cigar makers would have to remove descriptions such as “light,” “mild,” “medium” or “low” from their products.

  •  

    Islamic state uses crucifixion in syrian push

    Militants from the Islamic State, an al-Qaeda breakaway group, are taking advantage of the world’s focus on Iraq to push deeper into eastern Syria and are using be-headings and crucifixion to intimidate opponents, according to an opposition human rights group.

  •  

    Priceline bookings top forecast as travel website expands reach

    Priceline Group Inc., the largest U.S. online travel-reservation service, reported better-than- forecast second-quarter bookings as more consumers used its websites to plan summer trips. Bookings in the recent period rose 34 percent to $13.5 billion, the Norwalk, Connecticut-based company said today in a statement.

  •  
    Russian President Vladimir Putin.

    Putin denies companies cash they can’t get abroad

    Russia is limiting corporate access to domestic financing even as the escalating Ukraine crisis increasingly isolates companies from overseas sources of cash. The government’s about-face on its pledge to end a freeze on pension money being used by private money managers risks raising corporate borrowing costs as it deepens the country’s economic slowdown.

  •  
    A prisoner displays fragments of a shell after shelling in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, Monday.

    Ukraine urges mass evacuation as troops surround eastern cities

    Ukraine told residents of separatist strongholds in its easternmost regions to flee as government troops close in after dismissing a cease-fire offered by the militants.Inhabitants of Donetsk and Luhansk, cities that were home to 1.5 million people before the pro-Russian insurgency began in March, can leave via humanitarian corridors.

  •  
    Penn State offensive line coach Herb Hand motions to players during a team practice in State College, Pa. Hand, who took to Twitter recently to vent his frustration with a recruit gone bad online. “Dropped another prospect this AM due to his social media presence ... Actually glad I got to see the ‘real’ person before we offered him,” Hand tweeted.

    Bad behavior on social media can cost recruits

    At St. Paul’s Episcopal School in Mobile, Alabama, the high school that produced Crimson Tide quarterbacks AJ McCarron and Jake Coker, there’s a new preseason ritual for football players: the social media talk. It’s about more than minding their manners. Coach Steve Mask warns players not to post about injuries, which can scare away recruiters.

  •  

    Irish bookie follows stolen client cache to Ontario basement

    Jason Ferguson said the job was straightforward: buy a gambling company’s client data and flip it to a rival who could use the information to win new ustomers. Instead, the story ended last month with a fleet of cars arriving outside his home in a cul-de-sac in a suburb of Brockville, a town three-and-a-half hours drive northeast of Toronto.

  •  

    China has more than 150 economic fugitives in U.S.

    More than 150 people suspected of economic crimes from China remain at large in the U.S., China Daily reported today, as officials pledge to step up efforts to hunt down those who take their ill-gotten gains abroad.Most of those who fled to the U.S. are officials facing corruption charges at home.

  •  
    Shanghai has ordered Oak Brook-baased McDonald’s Corp. and other foreign restaurant chains to disclose their product sources as the city seeks to regain consumer trust after a food scare sparked safety concerns in the country.

    Mcdonald’s, Yum ordered to reveal suppliers amid Shanghai probe

    Shanghai has ordered Oak Brook-baased McDonald’s Corp. and other foreign restaurant chains to disclose their product sources as the city seeks to regain consumer trust after a food scare sparked safety concerns in the country.

  •  
    Itasca-based Gogo Inc. a leading global aero communications service provider, today announced its financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2014.

    Gogo announces second quarter 2014 results

    Ithaca-based Gogo Inc. a leading global aero communications service provider, today announced its financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2014.

  •  

    How to get a bank loan: Know the language

    You’ll have a better chance of getting a loan from your bank if you understand the banker’s sometimes arcane language.Rosetta Stone can’t help, but a good accountant can.Small business owners, especially startups, often “don’t have the right understanding of what a bank can do,” says Greg Dowell, managing partner at Bass, Solomon & Dowell LLP, a Palatine CPA firm. “The bank is your lender, not an equity investor.”That’s a huge difference. “Bankers want to lend on one of two things — receivables or inventory. Sometimes equipment. The banker is interested in being paid back.”Bankers always have wanted to get their money back, but a regulatory tightening of lending rules following the near financial collapse in 2008 has banks still on a short tether. Consequently, it’s worth paying attention to comments from Larry Jones, vice president at First State Bank, St. Charles, one of 21 locations of Mendota-based First State Bank.Business owners “don’t know how to ask for money,” Jones says. “They must understand the nature of the loan business’ requirements and be aware of how the different loans work and cost.”Among the different loans Jones lists are real estate loans, including the SBA’s 504 loan program; accounts receivable; construction loans; and work-in-progress loans. If you don’t understand the differences, which for a non-banker isn’t especially surprising, “Go to your accountant for some help,” Jones suggests.Typically, “The business owner has something he enjoys and thinks he can make money with — but he doesn’t know how to manage the business,” Jones says. “A loan officer will be able to figure out whether the business owner knows his business.”When hopeful business borrowers “come in, meet with a commercial lender, lay out their plans for the business and say, ‘I need $100,000,’ it’s the loan officer’s job to ask, ‘Why?’”Jones seeks a stronger answer than, “So I can grow.”Although a sensible presentation about the business is a logical part of a request for funds, numbers count. For example, “Your P&L (profit and loss statement) must indicate an upward projection,” says John Lafferty, president, CFO-Pro, Naperville.Among Lafferty’s thoughts on what to take to the bank:* A short business plan that describes what you’re trying to achieve. If growth is the intent, the plan should explain how you will reach that goal.* An explanation of staffing costs that will be necessary to support growth.* Anticipated revenue streams, with assumptions fully explained and market data that support projections.* Competitive factors.* Details on margins and overhead.Lafferty has more, but that’s a decent sample of the information he says bankers want to see. Dowell “will counsel (firm) clients before they go to the bank,” as will Lafferty. Illinois Small Business Development Centers are another good source of support. So is SCORE, SBA-affiliated retired business executives committed to counseling.• Follow Jim Kendall on LinkedIn, Twitter, and at Kendall Communications on Facebook. Jim@kendallcom.com. 2014 Kendall Communications Inc.

  •  
    Candice Milstein

    Wyatt Austin Jewelers owner talks about love and business
    An interview with Candice Milstein, owner of Wyatt Austin Jewelers in Schaumburg. She talks about young love and business.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Morris Chestnut, left, Sean Bean and Ali Larter star in “Legends,” a new TNT drama from a producer of “Homeland” and “24.”

    Bean's cliched 'Legends' has promising premise

    “Legends,” based on the novel by Robert Littell, is the latest terrorism thriller from producer Howard Gordon, whose credits include “Homeland” and “24.” The title refers to the FBI code for assumed identities, of which Sean Bean's Martin Odum is a master. When we first meet him in Wednesday's premiere episode, Odum's undercover as a budding bomber named Lincoln Dittmann, and looks and acts not unlike the unsure, inexperienced Walter White of “Breaking Bad's” first few episodes.

  •  
    Bob Weir performs in 2002 at the Alpine Valley Music Center in East Troy, Wisconsin.

    Grateful Dead founder cancels tour dates, including Ravinia stop

    Grateful Dead founder Bob Weir is canceling all of the tour dates he had planned through January, including an Aug. 31 concert at Ravinia Festival in Highland Park with Dwight Yoakam. The guitarist says his tour with the band RatDog won’t kick off this week as planned. He posted a message Sunday on RatDog’s website saying “circumstances have necessitated that all scheduled tour dates for Bob Weir & RatDog are being cancelled.”

  •  
    Children who spend time with youngsters who share similar interests may be more likely to develop lasting friendships.

    How to help children make new friends

    Students learn lessons each day. While many of these lessons pertain to their coursework, kids pick up much more than book smarts from school, where kids first learn to cultivate friendships and build lasting relationships.

  •  
    Pretzel-crusted trout is one of the hard-to-resist dinners served at Devon Seafood and Steak in Oakbrook Terrace.

    Stylish menu, setting reel in diners at Devon Seafood and Steak

    At Devon Seafood and Steak in Oakbrook Terrace modern wood walls, abstract, nature-driven art, low lighting and sleek seating are favored over the tired maritime theme you see at many seafood spots. A spacious patio with equally stylish furnishings furthers the contemporary, civilized vibe at this redo of Braxton Seafood Grill.

  •  

    NAMI offers a lifeline for families struggling with mental illness

    Mental illness remains one of the most complex range of disabilities to diagnosis and most convoluted to understand.

  •  
    This fall will mark the beginning of a new chapter for incoming freshmen. While some may fear what awaits them in the halls of high school, students may have more control over their experience than they think.

    How to navigate the hallways of high school

    Let’s face it: Navigating new social situations is daunting for all of us — young, old, and in-between. For you, the prospect of diving into the unknown pool that is high school ... well, it can be terrifying. Don’t fret, Dear Freshman. You and only you are in charge of your high school experience.

  •  

    The vagaries of the late-summer garden
    Q. I had planted two heirloom varieties of tomato obtained from a farmers market vendor; they seemed to really start to struggle in a heat wave and now most of the nine are mostly dead. Am I crazy to think I could attempt again next year with better varieties.

  •  

    (No heading)
    Chandler’s $5 burger night; The Still Bar and Grill is open in Bartlett; Famous Dave’s fantasy football and BBQ bites.

  •  
    Bryan Cranston will be a presenter for the Emmy Awards on Aug. 25.

    Film, TV and music stars among Emmy presenters

    Film stars Julia Roberts, Matthew McConaughey and Halle Berry are among the first presenters announced for this month’s Emmy Awards ceremony. In a statement Monday, executive producer Don Mischer said 13 celebrities have been confirmed so far as trophy presenters for the Aug. 25 awards.

  •  
    Humans are typically infected when a tick has been attached for more than 48 hours, so prompt removal of ticks is critical.

    Watch out for insect bites, stings this summer

    Now that the “dog days” of summer have arrived, families must be watchful for infections carried by mosquitoes and ticks, such as Lyme disease, West Nile virus, and insect bites.

  •  
    Tracy Morgan is struggling more than two months after he was injured in a motor vehicle crash that left a fellow comedian dead, his lawyer said Monday, Aug. 11.

    Lawyer: Tracy Morgan struggling after crash

    Tracy Morgan is struggling more than two months after he was injured in a motor vehicle crash that left a fellow comedian dead. His attorney, Benedict Morelli, told NBC’s “Today” show Monday the former “Saturday Night Live” cast member is fighting hard. Morgan suffered a broken leg and broken ribs when the limousine van he was riding in was hit from behind June 7 by a Wal-Mart truck on the New Jersey Turnpike.

  •  

    Are vegan diets appropriate for children?

    The vegan diet, which does not use animal products, can be a healthy one if done right. In its 2009 position statement, the American Dietetic Association declared that “appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate and … are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the lifecycle.”

  •  

    Relieve PMS symptoms with diet, lifestyle changes

    Q: Every month I have awful PMS. Can you suggest drug-free ways to relieve my symptoms?

  •  
    Ned Wulin, left, discusses an AFF (accelerated free fall) course with Brian Barbaree.

    Sky diving: The thrills and the dangers

    Wheelchair-bound sky diving instructor Ned Wulin was not injured parachuting out of an airplane. It was a plane accident on the runway that left Wulin paralyzed from the waist down. Still, Wulin knows better than most the joys and perils that lurk beyond the aircraft door in the adrenaline-inducing activity of sky diving.

  •  
    1970 Cadillac ambulance

    Rebuilt 1970 Cadillac ambulance revives memories

    Wailing sirens, flashing lights and cool vintage iron could be seen and heard in North Aurora at the annual Chicagoland Emergency Vehicle Show. One vehicle on display was a 1970 cadillac ambulance once owned by the Romeoville Fire Department.

  •  
    Hedgehog pencil sharpeners

    Fun and fashion lead the way in school supplies

    It’s school supply time and there’s no shortage of nifty backpacks, pencil cases, erasers and more for kids young and older. “Most people are looking for something unique,” said Larina Lin, founder of the site Coolpencilcase.com, which sells supplies imported from Japan.

  •  
    Multiple studies show vitamins may not be the health boosters we hoped.

    Your health: Are multivitamins good for you?
    Over the past five years multiple studies and health experts have come forward to reveal that vitamins are not the health boosters we hoped them to be.

  •  
    Eric Hartsburg, 30, hoped his Romney-Ryan election logo tattoo would make politics more fun.

    How tattoos went from corporate to cool

    How far are consumers ready to go to show their love to brands? As the BBC recently noted, tattoos representing brands are getting more and more common. But why? And what does it tells us about the psychology of consumers and brand identities?

  •  
    Afghan native Fahim Fazli, left, and retired Marine Michael Moffett are co-authors of a book about Fazli’s life as an Afghan native who fled his country, became a U.S. Citizen, a Hollywood actor who played roles as a Middle eastern terrorist, and returned to Afghanistan to be a translator for U.S. Marines. The two hiked Mount Washington in hopes the Presidential Range would be a stand in for a movie for Asia’s Hindu Kush mountains.

    Afghan actor links cultures as U.S. war translator

    Fahim Fazli’s screen career was beginning to take off, with roles in blockbusters like “Iron Man,” when the Afghanistan-born actor decided it was time to give back to the country that had taken him in after he fled Russian occupation a quarter century earlier. Staring at his U.S. passport, he wondered: “Do I earn this?” Fazli went to work as a translator for the U.S. Marines in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. It was a U.S. Marine who had helped Fazli track down his mother, who escaped Afghanistan in 1980, and put his family back together.

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    Is traveling with little kids to family gatherings worth it?

    I once considered “family time” important enough that family travel became an item in our monthly budget so money would never be a reason for not visiting family. Now, with three small kids in tow, I am dreading our yearly trips. I would happily cancel this year’s to save the hassle of days in the car with kids, sleeping in unfamiliar places, and the weeks of poor sleep the youngest experiences when we return. In all honesty, I’d skip two years of trips.

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    Iggy Azalea, who performed last weekend at Chicago's Lollapalooza, is widely thought to have the unofficial Song Of The Summer with “Fancy.”

    Is 'Fancy' the song of summer? Here are some less-obvious alternatives

    These days there are two types of people in the world: Those who accept the conventional wisdom that Iggy Azalea's breakout hit “Fancy” is the Song Of The Summer, and those desperate to find something, anything, to replace it.

Discuss

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    Reform tax code to benefit middle class
    An Elgin letter to the editor: The stampede of corporations threatening to set up headquarters in another country and using “tax inversions” to do this is just another scam on the American taxpayer! Walgreen is the latest to consider this. Not only are they “playing” the politicians, but they already get all kinds of tax loopholes, tax incentives and they keep workers' salaries low so they can hoard their profits offshore.

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    Vow not to shop at these companies
    A Lindenhurst letter to the editor: We read about Walgreen and other companies leaving America because of the taxes they would have to pay. I want to point out that it is against the tax laws of our country to use a method strictly to avoid taxes or solely as a reduction for a tax benefit.

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    U.S. tax law suppresses job creation
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: Edd Jarina’s letter of July 29 concerning U.S. companies relocating their headquarters outside the U.S. misses the point. This isn’t surprising since the new media have done an awful job of explaining the issue.

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