Daily Archive : Saturday August 2, 2014

News

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    Karen Wessel, left, with her sister Janice Potocki, both of Arlington Heights. The Rev. Edward Fialkowski, pastor of Our Lady of the Wayside Catholic Church in Arlingtom Heights, touched on the sisters' closeness Saturday during his homily for Wessel's funeral Mass.

    Arlington Heights mom who saved boy remembered

    An Arlington Heights woman who died after saving a 9-year-old boy from drowning in a Wisconsin lake was remembered Saturday for a willingness to take care of others and being nonjudgmental. “Throughout her life, she lived her life showing great love to those around her,” Our Lady of the Wayside's pastor, the Rev. Edward Fialkowski, said in his homily.

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    An ambulance is shown en route Saturday to Emory University Hospital after departing from Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Marietta., Ga.

    U.S. doctor with Ebola in Atlanta for treatment

    The first person infected with Ebola to be brought to the United States from Africa was safely escorted into a specialized isolation unit Saturday at one of the nation's best hospitals, where doctors said they are confident the deadly virus won't escape. Fear that the outbreak killing more than 700 people in Africa could spread in the U.S. has generated considerable anxiety among some Americans.

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    Aurora police step up patrols after shootings leave two men dead

    Aurora police have assigned extra patrol officers to the city's east side in response to two fatal shootings in less than 24 hours, Chief Greg Thomas said Saturday. A 20-year-old Aurora man died this morning after being shot just hours after a 24-year-old Chicago man was killed in another Aurora shooting Friday. Police said they don’t know if the two shootings are related.

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    Two hurt in boating accident on Diamond Lake in Mundelein

    Two people suffered minor injuries after the pontoon boat they were riding in on Diamond Lake in Mundelein was struck by another boat Saturday night, fire officials said. The impact of the collision apparently caused the pontoon's canopy to topple down, authorities said.

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    Israeli Army 2nd. Lt. Hadar Goldin, 23, from Kfar Saba, central Israel.

    Israel: Soldier thought captured is dead

    Israel’s military has declared dead a soldier who was previously believed captured by Hamas gunmen in Gaza violence that shattered a temporary ceasefire. The military announced early Sunday morning that 23-year-old Hadar Goldin of the Givati infantry brigade had been killed in battle on Friday.

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    Crystal Fitzgerald, right, serves up fresh ears Saturday at the 58th annual Cornfest in Rolling Meadows.

    Rolling Meadows Cornfest serves thousands

    All-you-can-eat sweet corn was on the menu Saturday at Cornfest in Rolling Meadows. More than 2,000 people turned out for the summer staple, picked hours before the event on a Lincolnshire farm.

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    Sebastian Chag of Streamwood cleans his 2007 Suzuki at the Summer Daze car show Saturday. He was one of more than 50 people vying for best of show.

    Muscle cars make Warrenville’s Summer Daze shiny

    The smell of rubber and the gleam of American muscle cars added to the traditional muggy August weather, making the Warrenville annual Summer Daze Celebration one hot event.

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    Front to back, Chauncey Broussard, 13, Semin Muminovic, 14, and Joshua Lopez, 12, all of Hoffman Estates participate in a tug-of-war Saturday during the Party in the Park at Highpoint Park in Hoffman Estates.

    Hoffman Estates Park District turns 50

    The Hoffman Estates Park District threw a Party in the Park Saturday evening to celebrate the successes in the district’s first half century.

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    Nancy Writebol, with children in Liberia. Writebol is one of two Americans working for a missionary group in Liberia diagnosed with Ebola. Plans are underway to bring her back for treatment.

    5 things to know about Ebola outbreak

    The virus was first discovered nearly four decades ago in Congo in a village near the Ebola River. Since then there have been sporadic outbreaks.Five things to know about Ebola and how it is spread:

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    Round Lake Park police said a driver is in critical condition after he drove around crossing gates and in front of a Metra commuter train early Saturday.

    Police: Gurnee man hit by train drove around crossing gates

    Round Lake Park police said a driver is in critical condition after he drove around crossing gates and in front of a Metra commuter train early Saturday. Police Chief George Filenko said tje 46-year-old Gurnee man drove may have been under the influence of alcohol. Area fire departments had to extricate the man from the four-door Oldsmobile Alero.

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    Theodore Van Kirk visits a veteran’s group at the Golden Corral in Macon, Ga. The navigator for the Enola Gay spoke about his experience guiding the aircraft that dropped the first atomic bomb. He was the last surviving member of a crew that dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima.

    Notable deaths last week

    Manny Roth, a colorful club owner in Greenwich Village who owned Cafe Wha?; Dick Wagner, the skilled guitarist who worked with Alice Cooper, Lou Reed, Kiss and Aerosmith; and Dick Smith, the Oscar-winning “Godfather of Makeup” are among the notable deaths this past week.

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    An abandoned railroad line (tracks have been removed) where DeBruyne Street dead ends is near where Moline Malleable once stood in St. Charles. The area is now a commercial sector, with an indoor soccer venue and other businesses.

    Dean Street a microcosm of St. Charles

    Dave Heun says if you wanted to get a feel for St. Charles back in the day, Dean Street was the place to be. It still serves as a microcosm of the city.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn greets people as he arrives Saturday for the official opening of the Riverside Drive promenade in Elgin. Work was finished in June after two years of construction using two state grants totaling $9 million.

    Riverside Drive ‘open for business’ in Elgin

    Elgin officials shared a positive outlook for commerce with about 250 people gathered Saturday for the official opening of the $10.5 million Riverside Drive project. “Here today we know that we’re at a crossroads and on the threshold of a dream," state Sen. Mike Noland said. "And Elgin is finally open for business. It has been open for business for some time now but this is the...

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    Geri Graham of Grayslake views items displayed during the David Adler Music and Arts Center 34th annual Festival of the Arts at Cook Park in Libertyville Saturday.

    34th annual Festival of the Arts in Libertyville’s Cook Park

    A variety of art forms were represented in Saturday’s opening of the David Adler Music and Arts Center’s 34th annual Festival of the Arts at Cook Memorial Park in downtown Libertyville.

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    Connor Kozanecki, 10, of Lindenhurst goes down the water slide near the finish of Saturday’s Mud Run at Caboose Park in Lake Villa.

    Mud Run in Lake Villa Township

    The Lindenhurst-Lake Villa Chamber of Commerce held its second annual 5K Mud Run on Saturday at Caboose Park in Lake Villa Township.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Burglars pried open the rear kitchen door between 8:20 and 9:45 p.m. July 25 at a home on the 2000 block of South Lee Street in Des Plaines and stole a purse, wallet, checks, cash, men’s vintage designer watch, two women’s watches, several pieces of jewelry and a camera lens. Loss was estimated at $25,291.

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    Vandals to $6,600 in damage to Des Plaines school

    Vandals did an estimated $6,600 in damage to Orchard Place Elementary School, 2727 S. Maple St., Des Plaines, according to police reports.

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    Kids play in the snow Friday night before the showing of the movie “Frozen” in Rolling Meadows.

    'Frozen' accompanied by blizzard in Rolling Meadows

    Meadows Christian Fellowship Church used 8 tons of ice to make “blizzards” every 15 minutes between 5:30 and 8:30 p.m. Friday before showing the movie “Frozen.” Showing an outdoor movie is an annual community event for the church, but this year it added a twist, bringing in Snow Making by Sturm from Lake Geneva, Wis.

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    Gunmen drive away Saturday with about a dozen men, two in camouflage police uniforms, in Arsal, a Sunni Muslim town near the Syrian border in eastern Lebanon.

    Syria rebels raid Lebanese town, capture troops

    Prime Minister Tammam Salam described the attack as a “flagrant aggression against the state of Lebanon” and vowed that his government “will deal with the developments with extreme firmness and strength.”Saturday’s attacks came hours after the army said troops detained Syrian citizen Imad Ahmad Jomaa, who identified himself as a member of Syria’s...

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    Deborah M. Stevens

    Two arrested on felony drug charges in Elgin

    An Elgin woman and a River Grove man face felony drug charges after Elgin police served a warrant on a residence in the 1-100 block of South Crystal Street about 7:30 p.m. Friday.

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    Members of the Army’s 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment, The Old Guard, wait Saturday for the Republic of Guinea Prime Minister Mohamed Said Fofana to arrive at Andrews Air Force Base, Md.President Barack Obama is gathering nearly 50 African heads of state, including Fofana, in Washington for the unprecedented US - Africa Leaders Summit.

    Obama hosts 50 African heads of state

    White House officials say the American interests in Africa are immense. The continent is home to some of the world’s fastest growing economies and a rapidly expanding middle class. The U.S. is also competing for those consumers with China, which surpassed the United States in 2009 as Africa’s largest trading partner.

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    President Barack Obama smiles near the conclusion of a news conference Friday in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House. He’s starting his birthday weekend with a round of golf before escaping to the Maryland mountains. Obama turns 53 on Monday.

    Obama kicks off birthday weekend golfing with pals

    President Barack Obama is starting his birthday weekend with a round of golf before escaping to the Maryland mountains.Obama turns 53 on Monday.

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    Man, 18, shot at party in Elgin, dropped off at hospital

    An 18-year-old man who apparently was shot at a party in Elgin was dropped off early today at Sherman Hospital in Elgin with injuries that weren’t believed to be life threatening, police said. Police said the victim was driven to the hospital by an unknown subject and dropped off about 4:50 a.m.

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    Celvyn Mejia Romero prepares to respond to a question last Sunday during an interview as his mother Susana Romero looks on at the Greater Boston Legal Services in Boston. Twelve years after arriving to the U.S. from Honduras, Mejia Romero is still fighting to stay in America.

    After 12 years, Honduran man still waits for asylum

    Some critics say it has become too easy to win asylum and the standards for demonstrating persecution are too lenient. A person has to demonstrate a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership of a social group. Kids seeking asylum based on fear of gangs often have trouble convincing immigration judges that’s the kind of...

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    Suspect dead after LA County hostage standoff

    Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies have shot and killed a parolee who held a woman hostage during an eight-hour standoff. But a bystander also has died.

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    Riders have to walk off coaster after power issue

    Riders on a New Jersey roller coaster got an unexpected thrill when the attraction lost power and they had to walk down along the tracks.

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    The Oregon Gulch fire, burns in the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument east of Ashland, Ore., on Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. Buildings have burned, but there are no reports of injuries from a wildfire that was touched off by lightning along the Oregon-California border and led to the evacuation of ranch families east of Ashland, a fire spokesman says.

    Fires force evacuations in West Coast states

    Wildfires burning through dry terrain in West Coast states have forced scores of evacuations as fire teams worked to corral the blazes.

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    Emergency personnel arrive at the scene of a collision between a big rig truck and a MUNI light rail vehicle at the intersection of Innes and 3rd streets on Friday, Aug. 1, 2014, in San Francisco, Calif. A San Francisco Municipal Railway bus and a dump truck collided at 1:29 p.m. in the Japantown neighborhood, leaving the bus with a smashed windshield. Twenty people were examined at the scene and a dozen of them went to hospitals, including one with serious injuries, fire spokeswoman Jennifer Balestrieri said.

    Crashes minutes apart injure 40 in San Francisco

    Forty people were injured and more than half of them hospitalized in two separate San Francisco transit collisions just minutes apart — a bus and a dump truck crashed then a light-rail train and a tractor-trailer collided across town.

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    Palestinians walk through the rubble of a house that was destroyed in an overnight Israeli strike at Shati refugee camp, in the northern Gaza Strip, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014.

    Gaza fighting surges after truce frays, soldier disappears

    Fighting intensified in the Gaza Strip after a truce was left in tatters and Israel said one of its soldiers may have been taken captive.

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    American Muslim Omar Akersim, 26, poses for a photo on his prayer rug at his home in Los Angeles Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. Nearly 40 percent of the estimated 2.75 million Muslims in the U.S. are American-born and the number is growing, with the Muslim population skewing younger than the U.S. population at large, according to a 2011 survey by the Pew Research Center.

    Muslim movement accepts once-taboo causes

    A small but growing number of American Muslims are challenging the long-standing interpretations of Islam that defined their parents’ world.

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    Aundrea Simmons stands next to her minivan with cases of bottled water she bought after Toledo warned residents not to use its water, Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014 in Toledo, Ohio. About 400,000 people in and around Ohio’s fourth-largest city were warned not to drink or use its water after tests revealed the presence of a toxin possibly from algae on Lake Erie.

    Toledo to residents: Don’t use or drink the water

    About 400,000 people in and around Ohio’s fourth-largest city are being warned not to drink or use its water after tests revealed the presence of a toxin possibly related to algae on Lake Erie.

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    Chicago-area man gets life term for slaying son, 3

    A suburban Chicago man has been ordered to spend life in prison without the possibility of parole for stabbing his 3-year-old son to death and sexually assaulting the child’s mother in a 2011 attack at her home.

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    Illinois economic index shows growth

    A University of Illinois index shows the state’s economy continues to grow as it bounces back from the harsh winter.

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    A rendering of the planned new facade of the Antioch Theatre

    Online campaign hits goal; Antioch Theatre renovation proceeds

    A campaign to raise funds for digital equipment at the old Antioch Theater has been successful so the show will go on. Owner Tim Downey said a $750,000 makeover of the theater, which opened in 1919 as a live performance venue, is ongoing. "We're going to work as hard as we can to be open by the end of the year," he said.

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    Tony Zamiar

    Teachers doubling as administrators for more personalized service at Grayslake charter school

    In what officials say is an effort to provide more personalized service, a Grayslake charter school will break from tradition and have two teachers double as top building administrators for the 2014-15 academic season. Teacher Tony Zamiar will be dean in the morning at Prairie Crossing Charter School’s Carson building. Instructor Kelly Smith will be the dean, or administrator on duty, in...

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    From left, Raleigh Showers of McHenry with his dog Spike, Richard Skinner of Westmont with his dog Apache, and Bob Royce of Schaumburg and his dog Blitz. The Vietnam veterans are training to be dog handlers as part of Lutheran Church Charities Kare-9 Ministry.

    Comfort Dog Ministry launches program to help vets

    Lutheran Church Charities, which started the Addison-based Comfort Dog Ministry, Friday launched its newest outreach: Kare-9 Ministry, designed to serve active military, veterans and their families. “Part of the healing process from moral injury and post-traumatic stress disorder is to feel loved and valued,” said retired Maj. Gen. James Mukoyama. “The Comfort Dogs give off a...

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    Trevor Weeks, a cadet Explorer with Aurora Post 221 and Post 99, supervises as Kimberly Menchaca, 9, makes her way down the fire pole during the Youth Firefighter Challenge summer camp at the Aurora Regional Fire Museum.

    Youth Firefighters Challenge in Aurora makes fire safety lessons fun

    A Youth Fireflighters Challenge being held in Aurora's Regional Fire Museum is providing a great time for youngsters all the while teaching valuable fire safety tips that someday may save lives.

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    Batavia District 101 is considering borrowing money to do building and grounds work at its schools, including installing artificial turf at the high school stadium.

    Batavia schools might seek voters’ OK to borrow for sports field

    Plans to install artifical turf in the stadium at Batavia High School are firming up. The school board is preparing to hire an engineer to design the project. It is also working on a contract with the Batavia Bulldogs Boosters club for the club to pay for the turf.

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    Arlington Hts. Dist. 25 sees jump in foreign language class interest

    Arlington Heights Elementary District 25 is sticking with its plan to offer world languages to elementary students — outside of regular hours and for an additional fee — but a huge jump in interest in the classes has officials wondering if learning a new language should be a part of the regular curriculum again in the future.

Sports

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    Cubs pitcher Tsuyoshi Wada started Saturday’s game against the Dodgers in Los Angeles. The Cubs lost after a three-run homer in the 12th inning, 5-2.

    Dodgers beat Cubs 5-2 on Ramirez’s 3-run HR

    Hanley Ramirez hit a three-run homer in the 12th inning to lift the Los Angeles Dodgers to a 5-2 victory over the Chicago Cubs on Saturday night.Dee Gordon hit a two-out single against Blake Parker (1-1), stole his major league-leading 51st base and came home when Ramirez drove a 1-0 pitch into the Dodgers’ bullpen in left field for his 12th homer after a full-count walk to Justin Turner.

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    Chicago White Sox left fielder Alejandro De Aza can’t make the play on a double hit by Minnesota Twins’ Oswaldo Arcia during the eighth inning of a game Saturday in Chicago.

    Mistakes lead to White Sox’ loss to Twins

    The White Sox' bats have been carrying the load since the all-star break, but poor relief pitching, outfield defense and baserunning were too much to overcome in Saturday night's 8-6 loss to the Twins.

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    Bandits blank Pride 4-0

    Following Friday’s shutout loss, it was the Bandits’ turn to shut out the Pride as they took game three of the series 4-0.

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    Red Stars fall 2-1

    The Chicago Red Stars struck early with a 4th minute goal from Lori Chalupny, but Washington pulled out their own tricks, scoring early in the second half with a 48th minute Christine Nairn goal and followed by a last-second winner from Yael Averbuch in the 94th minute of the game, during stoppage time for a 2-1 victory.

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    White Sox first baseman Jose Abreu, who saw his hitting streak end at 21 games in Saturday’s loss to the Twins, is putting up more than impressive numbers, especially for a rookie.

    Abreu quite a big hit with White Sox

    White Sox rookie first baseman Jose Abreu was expected to be an impact bat, but he has quickly emerged as one of major-league baseball's most dangerous hitters. Abreu is making a Triple Crown run in his first season with the Sox.

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    Former Buffalo Bills quarterback Jim Kelly, back, hugs inductee Andre Reed during the Pro Football Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony Saturday in Canton, Ohio.

    Reed caps HOF induction with catch from Jim Kelly

    After delivering an emotionally charged speech that brought both laughter and tears, receiver Andre Reed had one more thing to do to make his Pro Football Hall of Fame induction complete. Turning his back to the crowd at the podium, Reed caught a pass from former Buffalo Bills teammate and fellow Hall of Famer Jim Kelly on the stage at Fawcett Stadium on Saturday night.

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    Chicago White Sox’s Adam Eaton, left, scores on a double hit by Gordon Beckham as Minnesota Twins catcher Kurt Suzuki applies a late tag during Saturday’s game at U.S. Cellular Field. The Sox lost 8-6.

    White Sox collapse late in 8-6 loss to Twins

    Adam Eaton admitted he made a bad mistake trying to stretch a single into a double in the eighth inning of a one-run game. Alejandro De Aza said he should have caught a liner that fell for a two-run double. The Chicago White Sox made mistakes in the field and on the base paths, and their bullpen struggled again in an 8-6 loss to the Minnesota Twins on Saturday night.

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    Defensive back Kyle Fuller chases down running back Matt Forte at Chicago Bears minicamp Wednesday at the Walter Payton Center in Lake Forest.

    Giving Forte a breather easier said than done

    The Bears want to preserve running back Matt Forte by limiting his wear and tear, but that's easier said than done because he excels in so many facets of the game that it's hard to give the ball to anyone else.

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    Federico Higuain helps Crew tie Fire 1-1

    Federico Higuain scored 10 seconds into the second half for Columbus in the Crew’s 1-1 tie with the Chicago Fire on Saturday night. Ethan Finlay redirected a one-hopper from midfield and Fire defender Patrick Ianni overplayed the clearance attempt. Higuain gathered the loose ball, evaded Lovel Palmer and struck the ball into the left corner for his eighth goal of the season.

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    Powell helps power Barrington to state Legion title

    Brad Powell almost did not play American Legion baseball this summer. “I came out at the last minute,” said Powell, who had planned to golf (scratch handicap) this summer. “But I really wanted to be with the guys. I knew this team was something and I could not leave it.” Barrington Post 158 is also glad Powell decided to stay with baseball. Especially on Saturday, when he came in to pitch four scoreless innings and belt a pair of hits to help lead Barrington to Illinois’ American Legion state championship with a 10-7 victory over Galesburg Post 285.

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    Rookie cornerback Kyle Fuller, here chasing down running back Matt Forte during minicamp in June, has been getting valuable time with the first team as starter Tim Jennings recovers from a quad injury.

    Several Bears’ backup battles coming into focus

    Some of the Bears' key battles for backup positions are starting to work themselves out at the midway point of training camp, including competitions for the third wide receiver spot, the fourth defensive end position and the No. 3 cornerback.

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    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for Aug. 3

    Joe Kristufek's selections for Aug. 3 racing at Arlington International.

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    In this photo provided by the Las Vegas News Bureau, Indiana Pacers’ Paul George is carted off the court after breaking his right leg during the USA Basketball Showcase intrasquad game in Las Vegas on Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. (AP Photo/Las Vegas News Bureau, Glenn Pinkerton)

    Doctors say George faces long rehab process
    Doctors say Paul George’s biggest battle is yet to come, and it may take a year or more before he returns to the Pacers lineup.One day after the two-time All-Star suffered a gruesome open tibia-fibula fracture on his right leg during a USA Basketball intrasquad scrimmage in Las Vegas, the questions began in earnest about George’s recovery -- and whether he’d ever regain the form a that made him one of NBA’s most complete players

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    Oakland Athletics pitcher Jon Lester was acquired from Boston in a deal that ignited more activity before the Major League Baseball trade deadline passed.

    MLB trade deadline touches all bases

    The Major League Baseball trade deadline offered something for everyone, and delivered like few others have, as Matt Spiegel explains in his weekly baseball column.

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    Western Am: 2 Illini in semis; Ghim ousted

    The University of Illinois hasn’t had this many players in a final four since 2005, when the basketball team navigated its way through the NCAA Tournament. Incoming freshman Nick Hardy and senior Brian Campbell survived two 18-hole matches against tough opponents Friday to advance to this morning’s semifinal round at The Beverly Country Club. The future Illini teammates could meet in the afternoon finals should both win their morning matches. Meanwhile, Texas-bound Doug Ghim of Arlington Heights was eliminated in match play.

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    After missing 17 games this season to receive treatment for Lyme disease, Chicago Sky forward Elena Delle Donne has returned to WNBA action. She played 10 minutes Thursday night.

    Delle Donne returns, but her battle continues

    Chicago Sky forward Elena Delle Donne has endured hours of treatments over the last two months to combat what she calls a flare-up of her Lyme disease. She returned to action for the first time since June 25 on Thursday night and was happy to be back on the court. In this interview, she details detailed what her life was like before she returned.

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    While the Fire may lose its bid to land World Cup player Jermaine Jones, at left with USA teammate Michael Bradley, the team is close to signing an Argentine forward, sources tell the Daily Herald.

    Fire may sign Argentine forward, but could lose Jones

    Frank Yallop and Brian Bliss have spent much of the nine months since taking over the Chicago Fire front office remaking the team roster. While one report says Jermaine Jones has rejected a $6 million offer from the Fire, sources tell the Daily Herald the team is close to signing an Argentine forward.

Business

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    Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen removes her glasses as she testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    Yellen ‘dashboard’ signals: Job market not at full health

    Despite a step-up in job gains this year, most Americans have received little or no meaningful pay raise. Average hourly earnings ticked up a penny in July, the government said Friday, and are just 2 percent higher than a year ago — less than the rate of inflation. Hourly pay typically rises 3 percent to 4 percent in a healthy economy, Yellen noted in March.

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    Athena Korines of Elk Grove Village and Rob Devine of Des Plaines won $1 million with an Illinois Lottery scratch-off ticket in February 2014.

    Lotteries nationwide try to bring in young adults

    Tying lotteries to charity is a new, appealing frontier if Illinois Lottery Director Michael Jones has it pegged. “Young adults really care about causes, they really want to help things they believe in and causes they believe in,” he said. Illinois has games that direct money to the Special Olympics, Breast Cancer and Multiple Sclerosis research and has seen more sales among younger people with those games, Jones said.

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    Beach-goers walking on the sand near the San Onofre nuclear power plant in San Clemente, Calif.

    Dismantling California nuke plant to cost $4.4 billion

    On Friday, the utility laid out a draft plan for dismantling the twin reactors and restoring the property north of San Diego over two decades, beginning in 2016.As early as 2019, the spent nuclear fuel would be transferred from cooling pools to dry storage in reinforced steel canisters, where it would remain until the federal government comes up with a permanent storage plan.

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    The damaged workshop Saturday following an explosion at an eastern Chinese automotive parts factory in Kunshan, Jiangsu Province.

    Blast at China car parts plant kills 68, injures 187

    A dust explosion is caused by the fast combustion of particles suspended in air in an enclosed space. The particles could include dust or powdered metals such as aluminum. They would have to come into contact with a spark, such as fire, an overheated surface or electrical discharge from machinery.

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    A worker looks over solar panels at the NRG Solar and Eurus Energy America Corp.’s 45-megawatt solar farm in Avenal, Calif. Energy companies are wrapping renewable energy projects and other power-related assets that generate steady cash into new companies they hope attract investors hunting for dividends.

    How to fit a wind farm into your portfolio

    You can now fit a wind or solar farm into your portfolio, even if your portfolio isn’t exactly vast. Energy companies are wrapping renewable energy projects and other power-related assets that generate steady cash into new companies they hope attract investors hunting for dividends.

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    Jeff Bezos, chairman and CEO of Amazon.com.

    Why Amazon wants cheaper books from Hachette

    Amazon.com has finally laid out the reasons behind its months-long e-book dispute with Hachette Book Group, arguing that it is advocating for a new pricing and revenue sharing plan that will ultimately boost sales, lower prices and benefit the entire publishing industry.

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    Mobile technology is revolutionizing life for many of the more than 1 billion people in Africa for whom services like banking, the Internet and affordable energy were previously considered luxuries, rather than everyday staples. Lights from cellphones are even helping protect citizens from wildlife at night.

    Warding off lions with cell phones shows African technology boom

    Mobile technology is revolutionizing life for many of the more than 1 billion people in Africa for whom services like banking, the Internet and affordable energy were previously considered luxuries, rather than everyday staples. And with wireless operators pioneering their own inexpensive smartphones, the continent with the world’s youngest population will soon have access to 4G networks and apps that will feed a consumer boom that’s driving African economic growth.

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    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg may be changing his mind about what privacy means in a modern age — or at least how Facebook can advertise its privacy standards to put users’ minds at ease.

    Facebook tries to ease your privacy concerns

    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg once famously said that privacy was no longer a “social norm” in a society that seemed compelled to share everything. But recent moves from Facebook signal that Zuckerberg may be changing his mind about what privacy means in a modern age -- or at least how Facebook can advertise its privacy standards to put users’ minds at ease.

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    Facebook Inc. is ending a service that lets friends send digital gift cards to each other, as the social-networking service revamps how users can buy goods and services.

    Facebook trades gift feature for buy button

    Facebook Inc. is ending a service that lets friends send digital gift cards to each other, as the social-networking service revamps how users can buy goods and services.

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    Twitter said than half of the requests for user data came from the United States, as has been the case since Twitter began issuing its “transparency report” in 2012. Typically, the requests are part of criminal investigations. To obtain non-public information about users — such as email addresses — law enforcement agencies have to get a

    Twitter: Govt. requests for user data increased

    Twitter said government requests for user data grew sharply in the past six months as more countries asked for a greater amount of information about users. More than half of the requests came from the United States.

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    Facebook’s Internet.org app will give subscribers of Zambia’s Airtel phone company access to a set of basic Internet services for free.

    Facebook’s Internet.org expands in Zambia

    Facebook’s Internet.org project is taking another step toward its goal of bringing the Internet to people who are not yet online, launching an app this week in Zambia. The Internet.org app will give subscribers of Zambia’s Airtel phone company access to a set of basic Internet services for free.

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    The Food Network’s recipe finder taps into the knowledge of the channel’s resident chefs such as Alton Brown or Giada De Laurentiis, and lets you look at, save and make shopping lists from their recipes.

    App review: Food Network in the Kitchen, Ninja Up

    App review: The Food Network’s recipe finder taps into the knowledge of the channel’s resident chefs and Ninja Up lets you test your reflexes and channel your inner acrobat.

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    A 3Doodler pen and a packet of plastic sticks are arranged for a photo, Tuesday, July 29, 2014 in New York. A plastic stick goes in one end of the glue gunlike device and comes out, melted, at the tip. As you move your hand, it leaves a thin trail of cooling, solidifying plastic. Move it around with a plan, laying down string upon string, and things start taking shape.

    Review: 3Doodler is fun but quirky ‘3-D pen’

    3-D printing is all the rage. You can hit a button on your computer, which sends a file to a printer, which produces a small 3-D object out of plastic. It’s a cool technology, but it’s not exactly a hands-on way to make things. Enter the 3Doodler: the pen that turns you into the 3-D printer.

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    Tax-free trading of bitcoin faces a legal test at the Eean Union’s top court after Swedish authorities sought to extend existing levies to virtual currencies.

    Bitcoin tax-free transactions face court test

    Tax-free trading of bitcoin faces a legal test at the European Union’s top court after Swedish authorities sought to extend existing levies to virtual currencies.

Life & Entertainment

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    Parents get final say, no matter what

    Q. My mother-in-law wants my 5-year-old to sleep over at her house. The problem is that even though she has been living with the same man for several years and my husband and I think he is very nice, we still don’t feel comfortable with our daughter sleeping over at her grandmother’s house with him there.

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    Michael Johns, who appeared in season 7 of the “American Idol: and was voted off in an eighth-round stunner, has died. He was 35. The network and his family released statements Saturday, confirming the Australian-born singer’s death. The Hollywood Reporter says Johns died Friday. A cause of death wasn’t immediately available.

    ‘American Idol’ contestant Michael Johns dies

    “American Idol” contestant Michael Johns, who appeared in season 7 of the hit Fox singing competition and was voted off in an eighth-round stunner, has died. He was 35.

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    Actress Cheryl Hines walks across a lawn to the tent where her wedding to Robert F. Kennedy Jr., will take place Saturday in Hyannis Port, Mass.

    RFK Jr., actress Hines wed at Kennedy compound

    Robert Kennedy Jr. and “Curb Your Enthusiasm” actress Cheryl Hines are now husband and wife. The couple married Saturday before family and friends gathered at the Kennedy compound in Hyannis Port on Cape Cod.

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    Book notes: ‘Chicagoland Vampires’ author speaks in Oak Brook
    Chloe Neill, author of the "Chicagoland Vampires" series, discusses the newest title in the series, "Blood Games," at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 8, at Barnes and Noble in Oak Brook.

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    Thompson Chicago’s Beach Butler service, offered throughout beach season, makes it easy for hotel guests to soak up the sun on the lakefront without having to carry beach chairs and towels.

    On the road: Beach Butlers make hotel stay even better

    Thompson Chicago beckons you to experience a favorite Chicago summertime pastime with a private and luxurious twist ... Beach Butlers! Also. grab some krofne and dance to Serbain music at Serb Fest, at Holy Resurrection Cathedral in Chicago. Retro on Roscoe is a flashback weekend of pure fun, featuring six full blocks of great global cuisine, continuous entertainment, antique vendors and an antique and classic car & motorcycle show.

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    Shailene Woodley, left, and Theo James star in “Divergent,” based on the book by Barrington’s Veronica Roth.

    DVD previews: ‘Divergent,’ ‘Need for Speed’

    The film "Divergent" -- the first in a trilogy by Barrington author Veronica Roth -- comes to DVD Aug. 5. Also out that day: "Oculus," "Need for Speed" and "God's Not Dead."

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    Singer Dionne Warwick performs at the 25th Anniversary Rainforest Fund benefit concert at Carnegie Hall in New York. This week Warwick is heading back to San Jose to be dubbed the city’s “global ambassador of goodwill.”

    Dionne Warwick knows her way to San Jose

    In 1968, Dionne Warwick had never been to San Jose and didn’t think much of the song. But after the iconic singer recorded “Do You Know The Way To San Jose?” and the song became a huge hit, the 73-year old singer says with a laugh that she “cried all the way to the bank.” This week, Warwick is heading back to San Jose to be dubbed the city’s “global ambassador of goodwill.” She’ll sing that song, as part of a Sister Cities International conference, on Friday.

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    Butterflies and bees enjoy Magnus coneflowers as much as gardeners do.

    Award-winning perennials make garden design easy

    With a new sunny border to plant and great anticipation, you head off to your favorite garden center to choose perennials. You grab a cart and begin your journey — down one row and up another. With the plethora of pretty plants from which to choose, the selection may seem overwhelming.

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    Plant crops for fall harvesting, such as these radishes, during the first week of August.

    Prepare your garden for autumn

    The hot days of summer are the perfect time to prepare your vegetable garden for the cool days of autumn.

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    Idea to shorten TSA lines could be worth $15,000

    Did you hear the TSA needs your help? Apparently, they can’t figure out how to improve airport security lines, so they want you to do it. And if they choose your solution, you could collect as much as $15,000. But there’s a catch. Getting your idea registered is a lot like waiting in one of those security lines at the airport.

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    Director Woody Allen, center, works with actors Emma Stone, left, and Colin Firth on the set of “Magic in the Moonlight.”

    Colin Firth, Emma Stone riff on working with Woody

    Colin Firth had been hoping for decades to get a call from Woody Allen. Emma Stone, at only 25, hadn’t been waiting nearly as long — but she notes her family dog IS named Alvy, after a classic Allen character, and she can keep up with Firth in a spontaneous recounting of the bank robbery scene in “Take the Money and Run.” The two stars of “Magic in the Moonlight” were both working for the first time with Allen, and they sat down recently to recount what it was like.

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    Olympic champion Kyla Ross is expected to compete at the Secret U.S. Classic Gymnastics Championship at the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates on Saturday, Aug. 2.

    Weekend picks: See Olympic-sized gymnastics at Sears Centre

    Cheer on competitors such as Olympic champion Kyla Ross and up-and-comer Makenzie Sedlacek of West Chicago at the Secret U.S. Classic Gymnastics Championships on Saturday at the Sears Centre Arena. Tots get a chance to sit in the driver's seat of some heavy machinery at the Big Trucks Event in Barrington Saturday. And Downtown Libertyville's MainSweet Dessert Walk coincides with the David Adler Festival of the Arts Saturday. All this and more in Chicago and the suburbs. Comedian Finesse Mitchell, a veteran of the 2013 Shaq All-Star Comedy Jam tour, continues his run of standup shows this weekend at the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg.

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    Selling a home furnished is risky proposition

    Q. I am 70 years old and am getting ready to sell my house up north. I already own a condo unit in Florida. Can we sell it "as is," furnished, so this is not much of a hassle?

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    LG’s ‘HomeChat’ makes it possible to communicate with appliances via text message.

    Six feats making today’s appliances magical

    From helping with the grocery list to keeping track of chores, smart appliances are transforming kitchens and lifestyles.

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    Tamar Shovali

    Experts on aging share care advice

    These days, many aging family members are being cared for by baby boomer children who live far away. Balancing careers and kids of their own, these grown children may find it difficult to move closer to parents who have begun to need daily help.

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    Marilyn Genther of Arlington Heights helps keep tabs on her 97-year-old mother, Clara Genther, who has lived in the same Cincinnati house since 1945.

    Baby boomers becoming long-distance caregivers

    Living far away from an aging or ailing parent is a burden that only those who have experienced it can understand. Your first instinct is to hop in a car (or onto a plane) to rush to their side when they become ill.

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    Serosun Farms is building its first cluster of homes on the property, which includes a working farm and equestrian center.

    Serosun Farms now ready to grow

    The owners of Serosun Farms in Kane County laid low during the recession. San Diego-based developer John DeWald and his sister, Jane Strickland, had spent years laying the groundwork for their innovative Serosun Farms project, located between Huntley, Hampshire and Burlington.

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    Balcony cannot be extended without owners’ permission

    Q. Our townhouse style condominium unit includes a rear balcony that is a limited common element of the unit. I want to extend my balcony about a foot. Is this permitted?

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    Yields are incredible when you invest in a larger down payment

    Anyone looking to purchase a home within the near future faces many decisions, including how large a down payment to make. Many people put down as little as possible despite having the capacity to put down more because they view the down payment as lost money. But that is a mistake.

Discuss

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    The Soapbox

    Daily Herald editors write about the recovering economy in the 'burbs, a touching funeral for a baby, and a state study that seems to lack purpose, among other things.

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    U.S. has a duty to help end conflict
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: I hope my members of Congress will support and work for a lasting cease fire that includes lifting the Israeli blockade of Gaza. The U.S. has a particular responsibility to help end the killing since U.S. weapons are fueling this conflict.

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    O’Hare noise here for a long time
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: Bensenville voters kicked out Village President John Geils for fighting Chicago over O’Hare expansion that could only bring more noise and pollution to the area.

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    Yes, respect beliefs on all sides
    A Lake Villa letter to the editor: Just finished your article in today’s Herald’s Opinion section. Spot on gentlemen! Absolutely spot on!

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    Quinn hasn’t kept his promises
    A Naperville letter to the editor: I noticed that Governor Quinn and Senator Durbin were in the picket lines for a higher minimum wage. This is the same governor who said he would not raise taxes and raised them immediately after getting elected.

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    Why fashion agenda to placate liberals?
    A Warrenville letter to the editor: In Froma Harrop’s fevered imagination, the Democratic Party is a “sleeping bear” which Tea Party conservatives risk waking with their “blabbering mouths” and efforts at “self-aggrandizement.”

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    Environment radicals put nation at risk
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: I recently had an opportunity to read the editorial of Richard Cohen dated July 2. With all due respect to Mr. Cohen and as a lawyer with many years of trial experience, I must make the following comments:

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    Recycling event was valuable
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: I’d like to highlight the shredding and recycling event Sam Yingling, our state representative, held recently at Grayslake North High School.

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    One of VA’s problems is union holdup
    A Lindenhurst letter to the editor: I must respond to the Bill Spence letter posted on July 28. It’s the usual blame the GOP for everything wrong with this country that we usually here from liberals.

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