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Daily Archive : Wednesday July 16, 2014

News

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    Bill Novack, Naperville’s director of transportation, engineering and development, explains proposed entrances for a assisted living center to be built near Nike Park on the north side of the city. The city council unanimously approved a 96-unit facility called HarborChase of Naperville to be built at Mill and Commons streets.

    Naperville approves assisted living near Nike Park

    An assisted living center with space for 96 units is on its way to north Naperville near Nike Park. The city council on Tuesday night annexed a nearly 6-acre property at the northwest corner of Mill and Commons streets and gave the necessary zoning approvals for the HarborChase of Naperville facility to be built. “It’s a need in our community and hopefully it will work out...

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    Elgin police officers respond to a call of a sighting of missing prisoner Jesse Vega at beauty salon on Route 25 in Elgin early Wednesday afternoon. Vega escaped from the custody of Elgin Mental Health Center authorities in Elgin Wednesday morning and was captured later in the afternoon.

    Escapee from Elgin Mental Health Center captured

    Elgin police late Wednesday afternoon captured Jesse Vega, a prisoner who escaped from the custody of Elgin Mental Health Center security personnel. Shortly before 4 p.m., a woman on the 400 block of Prospect noticed a man leaving her backyard and get into a cab, Elgin Cmdr. Glenn Theriault said. The woman immediately called police. At the same time, the cabdriver became suspicious and pulled...

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    A Tumblr convention at the Schaumburg Convention Center last weekend has drawn a lot of criticism from attendees who are mocking an apology from organizers DashCon that included a reference to spending time in the "ball pit."

    Tumblr convention in Schaumburg implodes

    A social media convention at the Schaumburg Convention Center last weekend — aimed at Tumblr bloggers and their followers — went horribly wrong when organizers were forced to raise $17,000 on the spot to prevent the event's immediate cancellation. The debacle has since sparked a life of its own on Tumblr and elsewhere — particularly through ridicule of the organizers' apology...

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    Emily Lesko, 10, of Glendale Heights trims the hair on the forehead of her pig named Teenie to prepare for showing him at the Kane County Fair Thursday in St. Charles. This is her third year showing with the Whirlybirds 4-H Club.

    Kane County Fair gets off to a comfortable start

    For Tony Jones, who has two food and beverage booths at the Kane County Fair, business is extremely dependent on weather conditions. He has worked at Illinois fairs every summer since he was a child, and he sees statewide fair attendance decline every year from extreme temperatures. But fair officials said weather was ideal for opening day Wednesday, and they hope for a higher attendance than in...

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    Mount Prospect OKs shopping center expansion

    Mount Prospect trustees this week gave the new owners of village’s second largest shopping center approval to get even bigger, but some of the center’s neighbors are not thrilled at the prospect of an expansion. The decision will allow Farmington Hills, Michigan-based Ramco-Gershenson Properties to build two new outlots at Mount Prospect Plaza, adding almost 12,000 square feet of...

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    In this June 12 photo, Illinois Gov. Patrick Quinn listens to a question at a news conference in Chicago. Quinn, who fighting to hold onto his seat and his reputation as a reformer who’s cleaned up state government, is facing questions about a now-defunct anti-violence program he started in the run-up to his 2010 election after a state audit found funds were misused.

    Illinois Gov. Quinn facing ongoing investigation

    Democratic Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn, locked into a competitive re-election bid, is fighting to maintain an image as a reformer who’s cleaned up state government as questions about a now-defunct anti-violence program he started in the run-up to his 2010 election threaten to hang over his campaign for months. On Wednesday, a bipartisan commission of lawmakers agreed to grant federal...

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    In this March 2012 photo, former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich waves as he departs his Chicago home for Littleton, Colo., to begin his 14-year prison sentence on corruption charges. Blagojevich’s lawyers submitted an additional argument on why an appeals court in Chicago should overturn the imprisoned former governor’s convictions Wednesday in Chicago. The two-page filing with the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals refers to an April Supreme Court decision striking down laws that restrict aggregate limits on campaign contributions.

    Blagojevich files new argument in appeal

    Lawyers for imprisoned former Gov. Rod Blagojevich submitted an additional argument Wednesday to the federal court that’s considering his appeal, saying a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision bolsters their contention that the Illinois Democrat never crossed the line from legal political horse trading into corruption.

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    A girl cries as Palestinians flee their homes in the Shajaiyeh neighborhood of Gaza City, after Israel had airdropped leaflets warning people to leave the area, Wednesday.

    Israel, Hamas agree to Gaza ‘humanitarian’ pause

    Israel and Hamas agreed to a five-hour U.N. brokered “humanitarian” pause to their 9-day-long battle, offering the most encouraging sign yet that the fierce fighting could come to an end. Israel’s bombardment of Gaza has killed more than 200 Palestinians, including four boys struck on a beach Wednesday by shells fired from a navy ship.

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    A four-term senator — Washington state Democrat Patty Murray — and a vulnerable freshman — Sen. Mark Udall, a Colorado Democrat, seen here — pushed legislation that would counter last month’s court ruling and reinstate free contraception for women who are on health insurance plans of objecting companies. But Senate Republicans defeated the bill in a vote Wednesday.

    Dems seek gains with women in birth control loss

    Senate Democrats suffered what looked like a difficult setback on birth control Wednesday, but they hope it pays big political dividends in November. Republicans blocked a bill that was designed to override a Supreme Court ruling and ensure access to contraception for women who get their health insurance from companies with religious objections. The vote was 56-43 to move ahead on the legislation...

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    The casino boat Escapade, with 123 people aboard, is grounded off the coast of Tybee Island, Ga., Wednesday.

    After 16 hours, an exit from stalled casino boat

    After 16 hours stuck at sea, passengers stranded on a casino boat that ran aground off Georgia’s coast were ferried to shore Wednesday aboard two Coast Guard cutters. Even more embarrassing for the Escapade’s captain and crew was that this was their maiden voyage.

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    Police: 2 men now in custody after being on lam

    Two men who have been on the run since charges came down in late June for several members of an Aurora street gang are now in custody.

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    Aurora man gets 7th burglary conviction

    An Aurora man was convicted of burglary for the seventh time this week in a Kane County court. Earnest E. Cooley, 47, of the 200 block of East New York Street, was convicted of residential burglary on Tuesday and faces a minimum of six years in prison, according to a prosecutors.

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    House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee Chairman Rep. Tim Murphy holds a bag to illustrate how poorly some strains of dangerous diseases are stored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    CDC director admits safety problems at germ labs

    The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledged Wednesday that systemic safety problems have for years plagued federal public health laboratories that handle dangerous germs such as anthrax and bird flu. Testifying at a congressional hearing in Washington, CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said the agency had long thought of the lapses as unrelated accidents. But two...

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    The first day of football practice for suburban high school teams is Aug. 11. But many young athletes play in summer leagues and camps, participate in strengthening and conditioning programs and dedicate themselves to one sport year round. Experts say that leads to injuries and burnout.

    Specialization not really key to kids’ sports success

    The days when kids played sports instead of organized sports is long gone. Now it seems that organized sports is becoming the singular organized sport for most young athletes.

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    Two-story Menards store moves to final approval in Vernon Hills

    A proposed two-story Menards home improvement store in Vernon Hills is moving to final approval after about nine months of review. The village board this week directed staff to prepare an ordinance approving the architecture, landscaping, lighting and sign plans.

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    New details from two studies reveal more side effects from niacin, a drug that hundreds of thousands of Americans take for cholesterol problems and general heart health.

    Studies see new risks for cholesterol drug niacin

    New details from two studies reveal more side effects from niacin, a drug that hundreds of thousands of Americans take for cholesterol problems and general heart health. Some prominent doctors say the drug now seems too risky for routine use.

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    Partial air conditioning coming to Dist. 204 elementaries

    Officials in Indian Prairie Unit District 204 have found a partial solution to sweaty conditions in schools that lack air conditioning thanks to $3.7 million in unexpected funding from the state. “This is a way that we could partially air-condition our classrooms in an effort to really limit the amount of heat days that we could have to call,” school board President Lori Price said.

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    Tom Hartwell

    Kane Co. circuit court clerk puts son on payroll

    There are now two Hartwells on Kane County's payroll as the elected circuit court clerk, Tom, recently hired his son, Dave. Tom Hartwell said he hired his son, who is a math teacher in Arkansas, for a part-time summer job because he was having a hard time finding anyone who would work on a temporary basis.

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    Court overturns Carpentersville woman’s 4th DUI

    An appellate court panel has overturned a 35-year-old Carpentersville woman's aggravated DUI conviction, ruling a prosecution witnesses estimation of her blood alcohol concentration was "inherently unreliable." Chrystal Floyd was sentenced to six years in prison for the 2011 offense.

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    Max McKeough has blossomed from a little boy who pulled his eye lashes in frustration and couldn’t handle loud noises into an accomplished teenager with a promising future. After graduating high school this May — at just 16 years old — he plans to study neuroscience beginning next month at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

    Conquering Asperger’s just the start for Antioch teen

    When Maxwell “Max” McKeough was diagnosed with Asperger syndrome at age 5, his parents were told he’d never be able to hold a job or truly function independently. But thanks to his and his family’ determination, Max has blossomed from a little boy who pulled his eye lashes in frustration and couldn’t handle loud noises into an accomplished teen with a promising...

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    The Palatine village council voted to let the owners of the Inverness Cleaners Plaza (right) pave the empty lot (left) to provide additional parking at the shopping center in the 700 block of West Palatine Road. The empty lot had served as a buffer between the strip mall and nearby homes.

    Palatine OKs controversial parking lot expansion

    The Palatine village council this week gave the owners of a strip mall on Palatine Road permission to turn land intended to serve as a buffer between the stores and the adjacent neighborhood into a parking lot, despite the protests of some residents. Representatives from Inverness Cleaners Plaza strip mall, which includes Inverness Cleaners and Tailors and four other stores in the 700 block of...

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    Waukegan Park District to host soccer tournament

    The Waukegan Park District hosts the inaugural Mayor’s Cup Men’s Soccer Tournament on Sunday, July 20, at the Waukegan SportsPark, 3391 West Beach Road.

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    Wauconda honors Deborah Gompertz for service

    Deborah L. Gompertz was honored Tuesday with a mayoral proclamation for her 40 years of service to the Wauconda Police Department and the Village of Wauconda.

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    Northwest Suburban parishes help refugees

    Responding to an urgent call last month from Catholic Charities for help with a large group of refugees, four Northwest Suburban Catholic parishes came through with donations totaling $2,500. The parishes are Our Lady of the Wayside, Arlington Heights; St. Emily, Mt. Prospect; St. Thomas Beckett, Mt. Prospect; and St. Zachary in Des Plaines. The money was used for rent, furnishings and food.

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    N. Chicago walk to benefit Honor Flight

    The North Chicago Community Days 2nd Annual 5K Family Fun Run & Fitness Walk at 8 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 2, will benefit Lake County Honor Flight.

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    Run/walk will benefit Children’s Advocacy Center

    Lake County Children's Advocacy Center will host a fun run and walk Aug. 16.

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    TIF revenue drops in suburbs, clerk says

    The collective revenue of suburban Cook County tax increment financing districts dropped about 2 percent in 2013, Cook County Clerk David Orr said Wednesday, as he released his 2013 TIF report along with a new interactive tool called TIF Viewer.

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    Courtesy of Pace Pace is expanding its express bus system along with adding park-and-ride sites in cooperation with the Illinois Tollway.

    Pace, Tollway deal would ramp up service along I-90

    The Illinois tollway and Pace are partnering to build three parking lots along the I-90 corridor that will feed into an expanded express bus service.

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    state Rep. Jack Franks, a Marengo Democrat, won approval for a new law, which Gov. Quinn signed Wednesday, aiming to prevent double-dipping on transit boards.

    Quinn signs law barring double dipping on transit boards

    Gov. Pat Quinn Wednesday signed a law barring CTA board members from holding other government work and further clarifying that other transit board members can’t, either.

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    Earth movers were in full force Wednesday as Chicago Premium Outlets in Aurora broke ground for a 50-store, $110 million expansion of the popular mall.

    Aurora outlet mall begins ‘complete transformation’

    Bulldozers are out in force flattening 45 acres east of Chicago Premium Outlets in Aurora to make way for what officials are calling a historic expansion of the popular outlet mall. Fifty new stores anchored by Saks Fifth Avenue Off 5th are coming to the shopping area at I-88 and Farnsworth Road. “This is a big deal, and this is going to help move our city forward positively in the...

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    Mosquitoes in Deerfield tests positive for West Nile

    A batch of mosquitoes in Deerfield sampled July 8 was the first confirmed indicator of the presence of West Nile virus in Lake County. A West Nile hotline to report stagnant water or to get information is (847) 377-8300.

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    Save Buffalo Grove forms PAC

    Save Buffalo Grove, a citizen group that formed to oppose a proposal to build a 65-acre “downtown” project in the village, has formed the Save Buffalo Grove Political Action Committee, allowing the group to raise funds and engage in political activities. “We can do more to educate the entire community regarding the implications of the downtown development and how sad it will...

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Someone punctured the left rear tire on a Hummer H3 on the 6N500 block of Route 25 near St. Charles between 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 8:30 a.m. Sunday, according to a sheriff’s report. Also, two Garmin GPS devices were stolen from a van and garbage hauler also parked there, causing an estimated total loss of $900, the report said.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Someone punctured the left rear tire on a Hummer H3 on the 6N500 block of Route 25 near St. Charles between 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 8:30 a.m. Sunday, according to a sheriff’s report. Also, two Garmin GPS devices were stolen from a van and garbage hauler also parked there, causing an estimated total loss of $900, the report said.

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    Naperville has agreed to allow billboards on Ogden Avenue at Rickert Drive to remain in place until Dec. 31, 2015.

    Ogden billboards staying until end of 2015 in Naperville

    The billboards on Ogden Avenue at Rickert Drive in Naperville have a new lease on life. The agreement allowing the signs to stay on the property of Simply Hair Salon and Renewal Spa owner Frances “Dolly” Long expired June 7, but the city council Tuesday night granted an extension until the end of 2015.“I think leniency and flexibility should apply here,” council member...

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    Giesel Sanchez of Elgin sings onstage as Hamilton Wings’ SCORE students rehearse their original opera “The Key” at the Blizzard Theater at Elgin Community College. Sanchez attends Abbott Middle School in Elgin.

    Elgin area students create and perform opera

    A group of Elgin area teens and preteens will see months of hard work come alive onstage this weekend, when they perform "The Key," an opera they wrote themselves, at Elgin Community College. The students are part of Hamilton Wings' SCORE program, which gives at-risk kids a chance to experience the performing arts.

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    Shadwick R. King is brought into the court by Kane County Sheriff’s Deputy Bob Schwer before appearing in front of Judge James C. Hallock Wednesday in St. Charles. King, 47, is accused of killing his wife, Kathleen King, 32, by asphyxiating her July 6 at their Geneva home and dumping her body along railroad tracks near their home, authorities said.

    Prosecutors seek cellphone records in Geneva murder case

    Prosecutors are seeking the cellphone records of Shadwick R. King, a Geneva man who is accused of killing his wife, Kathleen, on July 6. King, 47, who was being held on $1.5 million bond, appeared briefly in court Wednesday and faces up to 60 years in prison if convicted.

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    Dan McQuaid of Naperville, left, and Stefanie Nano of Chicago will play Nick Bottom and Titania, Fairy Queen, in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” Saturday, July 19, at Island Park in Geneva. Admission is free.

    Outdoor Shakespeare show geared toward all ages

    What happens when fairies get involved in a complicated love triangle? Comedy and confusion result in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” on Saturday, July 19, at Geneva’s Shakespeare in the Park. Performed by the Midsummer Shakespeare Troupe, the free, family-friendly event takes place in a Ravinia-like setting on Island Park.

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    The fountain in Grafelman Park in West Dundee is slated for repair and should be in working order soon, according to village officials.

    Repairs planned for West Dundee fountain

    The fountain in West Dundee’s Grafelman Park will flow again. Village officials do not know when, but they hope it will be before Heritage Fest in September.

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    Naperville teen sued for driver education class crash

    A Naperville teen who hit two pedestrians while behind the wheel in a driver education class last summer is now a defendant in two DuPage County lawsuits. The 16-year-old Waubonsie Valley High School student is accused in the lawsuits of striking two women, from Plano and Downers Grove, near Jackson Avenue and Webster Street in Naperville the morning of July 12, 2013.

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    A plan by Rep. Dave Camp, a Michigan Republican, would raise almost $19 billion over the next six years by extending for another five years a pension smoothing plan enacted to help pay for the 2012 highway bill. But over the final four years of the budget window, roughly two-thirds of that revenue gain is taken back as companies take higher tax deductions from larger pension contributions in the longer term. So the 10-year revenue gain is $6.4 billion, though it’ll continue to cost revenues after 2024.

    Washington pays for roads with bogus cash

    If there’s anything that can unite Democrats and Republicans in the partisan swamp of Capitol Hill, it’s free money. The latest example of free money in Washington is a retread proposal called “pension smoothing” that raises money but doesn’t increase anyone’s taxes. To some people’s way of thinking, that’s a win-win situation. But others...

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    Associated Press Gov. Pat Quinn, fighting to hold onto his seat and his reputation as a reformer who’s cleaned up state government, is facing questions about a now-defunct anti-violence program he started in the run-up to his 2010 election after a state audit found funds were misused.

    Witnesses refuse to appear before group looking into Quinn program

    Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn, fighting to hold onto his seat and his reputation as a reformer who’s cleaned up state government, is facing questions about a now-defunct anti-violence program he started in the run-up to his 2010 election after a state audit found funds were misused. Six witnesses told the commission through their attorneys Wednesday morning that they wouldn’t appear, in...

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    $150,000 damage in fire that started in Lombard garage

    No injuries were reported Wednesday when a fire that started in a detached garage caused more than $150,000 damage on the 600 block of North Grace Street in Lombard, authorities said. Lombard firefighters said the blaze also damaged the house, a neighbor’s house, two vehicles, two motorcycles and a boat.

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    Carly Rousso

    Sentencing in Highland Park huffing crash delayed again

    A Lake County prosecutor requested, then withdrew a motion to revoke the bond a Highland Park woman convicted of running over and killing a 5-year-old girl while “huffing” computer dust cleaner. Carly Rousso's sentencing date is set for Sept. 17.

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    Henry Smogolski relaxes in the garden he has helped nurture.

    Courtyard garden at Inverness parish is a labor of love

    Henry Smogolski owes his inspiration for the garden at Holy Family Parish to the memory of his wife, Isabel, but the entire church community finds peace and reflection come more easily there.

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    Prospect Heights plans cruise night Aug. 28

    Prospect Heights is planning a cruise night with classic cars, food and music. The event is scheduled to take place from 5-10 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 28, outdoors near the H.O.M.E. Bar, 1227 N. Rand Road.

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    Prospect Heights encourages residents to clean stream banks

    Prospect Heights is asking residents to help keep local streams clean by preventing yard waste, lawn ornaments, children’s toys and general debris from floating downstream. “It’s the responsibility of people whose property abuts the stream,” said Steve Cutaia, the city’s director of public works. “Keeping them clear benefits everybody.”

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    Food, music and fun are part of 24th annual Taste of Antioch

    Antioch Taste of Summer is back in 2014 for its 24th summer festival. Guests can expect a variety of new activities and attractions as well as traditions that make the event special to Antioch.

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    Kisses can have a variety of motives

    Have you ever thought about the motives for your kisses? asks columnist Annettee Budzban.

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    This Rolling Meadows fire station was built in 1958 and was named for the long-time fire chief, from 1958 and 1977.

    Rolling Meadows council supports third fire station

    A third fire station in Rolling Meadows took another step forward Tuesday when the city council voted 4-3 to work toward that goal. “We are voting to give direction to the staff to switch off moving both stations and switch to three stations including something that makes Station 15 (downtown) something we can all be proud of,” Mayor Tom Rooney said.

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    Angela Cichosz of Carol Stream won our June photo contest with this moody photo of a tree that seems to be reaching out for something.

    Carol Stream photographer turns tree into something almost Gothic

    Angela Cichosz, a graduate student at Aurora University, captured the surreal image with a bit of serendipity. “I’ve developed a habit of trying to bring my camera along everywhere,” she said. “And the conditions that day were perfect.” An unusually wet June made for lush environs on the Aurora campus, and the fog rolling in made for an eerie and spooky scene.

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    Amusement rides, music, food and entertainment are on tap Thursday through Sunday at the Vernon Hills Summer Celebration in Century Park.

    Sister Hazel headlines Summer Celebration in Vernon Hils

    The annual Summer Celebration festival in Vernon Hills will be held Thursday, July 17, through Sunday, July 20. Rock band Sister Hazel is the headliner on Saturday.

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    Wisconsin police locate suspect in puppy case

    Oshkosh police say they have located a Missouri man who they suspect left a puppy behind a truck stop trash bin.Oshkosh Northwestern Media reports that police say they spoke to the man and he admitted he left the puppy. The investigation continues and no charges have been filed.

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    Prosecutor: Man slapped, spit on Illinois judge

    Illinois prosecutors are charging a Chicago man with a hate crime after they say he spat at and slapped a black female judge. An assistant state’s attorney tells the Chicago Sun-Times that David Nicosia told Judge Arnette Hubbard he wanted her to stop smoking outside a Chicago courthouse. The attorney says Nicosia called the 79-year-old judge “Rosa Parks” and spat in her...

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    Group asks for more time to review Wisconsin governor investigation

    The Wisconsin Club for Growth is asking for three more weeks to work on agreement over making public documents related to an investigation into whether Gov. Scott Walker’s recall campaign and conservative groups broke campaign finance laws.The Wisconsin Club for Growth on Wednesday asked U.S. District Judge Rudolph Randa for the additional time. The conservative group is working with...

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    Some West Chicago residents haven't been billed for water for nearly a year due to a software compatibility issue that has caused city officials to input usage and billing data manually, officials there said.

    Software problem leaves residents in dark on water bills

    Many West Chicago residents haven't seen a water bill in nearly a year because of a software compatability issue. Residents and some city officials complain poor communication from the city has left many residents owing large sums. “It's scary, and it makes me angry a little bit because I don't know what I'm facing when the bills start coming again,” one resident said.

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    Cook County sheriff boosts Chicago warrant arrests

    The Cook County Sheriff’s Department will increase efforts to apprehend people wanted for violent crimes in an effort to reduce gun violence in Chicago. Cook County Jail executive director Cara Smith says sheriff’s deputies are being shifted from suburban Robbins, where they were working to reduce violence, to Chicago. Smith told the Chicago Sun-Times the deputies won’t be...

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    Motorists get extra day to buy Chicago stickers
    The city of Chicago is giving residents an extra 24 hours to purchase vehicle stickers after problems were reported with the city’s computer system. Tuesday was to be the last chance for motorists to buy annual vehicle stickers before fines are imposed. However, currency exchanges and other locations that weren’t part of the city clerk’s office were reporting problems with...

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    Ellen Stice, left, and Melinda Deeds, talk to one of the venders about his produce at the Farmers Market behind The Quincy Mall in Quincy,

    Illinois law helps standardize farmers markets

    Roger Sharrow has started posting hand-written signs in front of his vegetables in his booth that say the produce is from Sharrow Farms in Golden. Signs like that will become a normal sight at farmers markets across Illinois, as new legislation signed into law last month by Gov. Pat Quinn will require the signs that state the origin of unprocessed produce. Sharrow and his wife, Virginia Sharrow,...

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    1.1 million attend Taste of Chicago, down from last year
    tormy weather meant 400,000 fewer people attended the Taste of Chicago this year.Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office says about 1.1 million people attended the annual food and music festival this year in Grant Park.

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    Illinois prisons overtime costs top $60M again

    The Illinois Department of Corrections has paid over $60 million in overtime costs for the second year in a row. The Springfield bureau of Lee Enterprises reports that officials predicted last spring that overtime costs would drop in the budget year that ended June 30. Authorities are blaming unanticipated retirements by correctional guards and a rise in payroll costs tied to a contract...

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    Microsoft Corp. says it has agreed to buy electricity from a new wind farm in Illinois for the next 20 years in an effort to reduce its carbon footprint.

    Microsoft to buy Illinois wind power for 20 years

    Microsoft Corp. says it has agreed to buy electricity from a new wind farm in Illinois for the next 20 years in an effort to reduce its carbon footprint. The company’s chief environmental strategist, Rob Bernard, made the announcement Tuesday. The 175-megawatt Pilot Hill Wind Project is being built on the Kankakee and Iroquois county line, about 60 miles from Chicago.

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    Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Jacqueline Berrien speaks at a Middle Class Task Force event in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building across from the White House. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has updated 30-year-old guidelines to make clear that any form of workplace discrimination or harassment against pregnant workers by employers is a form of sex discrimination and illegal.

    New guidelines could help many pregnant workers

    New federal guidelines on job discrimination against pregnant workers could have a big impact on the workplace and in the courtroom. The expanded rules adopted by the bipartisan Equal Employment Opportunity Commission make clear that any form of workplace discrimination or harassment against pregnant workers by employers is a form of sex discrimination — and illegal.

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    A Christian organization is seeking a special use permit to have Bible study classes and services at 1550 Higgins Road in Elk Grove Village.

    Christian group wants church in Elk Grove Village office park

    A Christian organization is seeking approval to operate a church within an existing office building in Elk Grove Village. Centi Illinois officials say they chose to lease space within the Elk Grove office complex, at the northern end of the village's sprawling business park, instead of a residential area to avoid problems with disturbing neighbors. “It's more so a Bible study than a church...

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    Dawn Patrol: Woman screams to scare coyote pack away; torture guilty plea

    'Hero' neighbor rescues dog from pack of coyotes. Woman pleads guilty to torture, murder of Waukegan man. Republicans have some catching up to do in suburban races, monetarily speaking. Kane County animal control poised to pay off $1.5 million debt. Antioch restaurateur involved in fatal crash sentenced to jail time. Germanfest returns to Lombard church for 47th year. So just how do revamped...

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    Bartlett considers 30 single-family homes on Kane side

    Bartlett trustees on Tuesday gave an informal nod to a proposal for 30 single-family homes on vacant land once intended for town homes. The project would also bring new residents to the village's Kane County side for the first time in years, officials say.

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    The Batavia Overseas Post 1197, Veterans of Foreign Wars, is asking Batavia to rescind its ban on video gambling. Past commander Dale Richard said it is losing customers to other social clubs outside the city limits that do have video gambling.

    Batavia gets a step closer to repealing video gambling ban

    The Batavia City Council seems likely to repeal its ban on video gambling, judging by a vote Tuesday at a committee meeting. Only two of 10 aldermen voted against the idea. “We should be looking at ‘Is it good for Batavia or bad for Batavia as a whole,’” Kyle Hohmann said.

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    Board President Brain Battle, left, and Superintendent Brian Harris, center, listen as Mike Galvan, seated, right, expresses his concerns over the board’s decision relating to class sizes and the budget during the public comment section of the Barrington Area Unit School District 220 board meeting Tuesday night at Barrington High School. Later in the meeting, the board approved a plan to hire four more teachers, which satisfied the concerns of many of the parents at the meeting.

    Barrington 220 to hire 4 more teachers, easing class size concerns

    The Barrington Area School District Unit 220 approved a decision by new Superintendent Brian Harris to add four new teachers for additional class sections at the elementary level in the district. The board’s decision prompted grateful applause from the parents who once again filled nearly every available seat. “Thank you, thank you,” said Keely Hegner, a parent of three students.

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    Barrington to break ground on White House renovation next week

    Organizers will break ground on the $5 million renovation project at the Barrington White House during a ceremony at noon on Tuesday, July 22, at the 116-year-old building, located at 145 W. Main St. According to a release from the village, work to convert the historic building into a cultural and community center will begin soon after the ceremony.

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    Elgin man identified as pedestrian killed in crash near Hoffman Estates

    Authorities Tuesday identified Gabriel Gutierrez-Gomez of Elgin as the pedestrian struck and killed by a vehicle early Monday morning near Hoffman Estates. Gutierrez-Gomez, 27, of 100 block of Hilton Place, was walking along Golf Road between Rohrssen Road and Route 59 at 5 a.m. when he was struck by a westbound Nissan Versa.

Sports

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    Blackhawks teammates Jonathan Toews, left, and Patrick Kane smile during a news conference at the United Center on Wednesday.

    Blackhawks' Toews, Kane more than teammates

    Wednesday afternoon at the United Center, where the two were part of a press conference formally announcing their identical 8-year, $84 million contract extensions, something seemed a little different when Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane spoke of one another. “I’m humbled to be up here alongside one of the greatest players in the league today, and, I think, the greatest leader in the NHL,” Kane said of Toews.

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    Lugnuts hand Cougars rare consecutive loss

    For the first time in the second half of the season, the first-place Kane County Cougars dropped their second game in a row, falling 8-4 to the Lansing Lugnuts in Midwest League action at Cooley Law School Stadium on Wednesday.

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    Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews, left, and Patrick Kane shake hands after talking at their news conference Wednesday at the United Center. The iconic pair recently agreed to identical eight-year contract extensions.

    Must be great to be young faces of the Blackhawks

    Judging by the Jonathan Toews/Patrick Kane news conference, it's great to be young and a Blackhawk these days. They're healthy wealthy and should contend for Stanley Cups the next decade or so.

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    Slutzky showing the young guys how it’s done

    Chadd Slutzky could be the first non-college player to win the State Amateur if he can survive Wednesday’s 36-hole finale.

  •  
    White Sox manager Robin Ventura, left, takes the ball from starting pitcher Hector Noesi (48) in the fifth inning last Friday. Noesi had just given up a 2-run home run to Indians’ Nick Swisher.

    Bullpen hardly Sox’ biggest concern

    The bullpen has been an issue, but it’s not the biggest problem facing the White Sox, says Sox Insider Chris Rongey.

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    FILE - In this July 6, 2014, file photo, Oakland Athletics players including Jed Lowrie (8), Sonny Gray (54) and Alberto Callaspo (7) celebrate their four game sweep of the Toronto Blue Jays after a baseball game in Oakland, Calif. The small-budget Athletics are baseball's best team at the break in a division featuring some of the highest-paid stars. The Giants are right in the chase for the NL West crown despite some recent stumbles. It's only mid-July and there is already talk of a special October and, perhaps, a Bay Bridge Series with far more significance come fall. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)

    A’s, Giants give Bay Area high hopes for playoffs

    The small-budget Oakland Athletics are baseball’s best team at the break in a division featuring some of the sport’s highest-paid stars. The San Francisco Giants are right in the chase for the NL West title despite recent stumbles.Bay Area baseball has delivered a stellar first half. It’s only mid-July and there is already talk of a special October and, perhaps, the first Bay Bridge Series since 1989.

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    Pacquiao returns to ring Nov. 22 in Macau

    Manny Pacquiao will return to China for his next fight, taking on Chris Algieri in the gambling enclave of Macau.

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    New Orleans Saints cheerleader Kriste Lewis, right, her sons Jake, 14, and Rob, 11, center, and her Mother Vassie Owens, left, poses for a photograph at the NFL football team's training facility in Metairie, La., Wednesday, July 16, 2014. Lewis is one of only two NFL cheerleaders in her 40s. The other dancer is 45-year-old Laura Vikmanis, who has been with the Cincinnati Bengals dance team, the Ben-Gals, since making the squad at age 40. (AP Photo/Bill Haber)

    Mother of 2 makes NFL cheerleading squad at 40

    She hadn’t done splits and high kicks since her cheerleading days in high school, but 40-year-old dance instructor Kriste Lewis set a lofty goal — to try out for the New Orleans Saints cheerleading squad, known as the Saintsations.Faced with competition from women most of whom were half her age, Lewis never thought she’d make the team — and then, she did.

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    Wading’s evolution has been worth the wait

    Most of us anglers got our start in the budget bracket of the wader market, but it's impressive to see just how far this product has come.

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    White Sox claim pitcher off waivers from Rockies

    The Chicago White Sox filled out their 40-man roster Wednesday by claiming right-handed pitcher Raul Fernandez off waivers from the Colorado Rockies. Team officials then assigned the 24-year-old reliever to Class A Winston-Salem.

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    In his role as a player/coach for the Iowa Cubs, Manny Ramirez is struggling a bit at the plate (.222 BA in 27 at-bats), but Cubs prospects say his advice is hitting its mark.

    Manny Ramirez enjoying his new life with Iowa Cubs

    All Manny Ramirez wants now is to help future Cubs and be around the game he loves, even if it’s under a hot sun at a minor-league park in the middle of Iowa. “I knew how to have fun when I was in the big leagues, and I know how to have fun now that I’m here,” Ramirez said. “I’m loving it. I’m doing something that I like. I’m changing lives. I’m helping people. So I’m just happy to be here.” Joe Aguilar has more reaction from I-Cubs prospects and their new player/coach.

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    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for July 17

    Joe Kristufek's selections for July 17 racing at Arlington International.

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    Mike North video: Hinrich a good signing for Bulls
    Mike North sees the Kirk Hinrich signing with the Bulls as an excellent move, and if Derrick Rose can return at even 80 percent, expect good things from this team this year.

Business

  •  
    U.S. stocks finished higher on Wednesday, pushing the Dow Jones industrial average to its second record high close this month. Strong earnings results and deal news from big U.S. companies helped lift the market.

    U.S. stocks close higher; Time Warner soars

    Major stock indexes rebounded Wednesday, finishing higher for the third time in four days and lifting the Dow Jones industrial average to its second record close this month. Investors had lots of market-moving news to consider, including encouraging corporate earnings from Intel, a higher profit forecast from hospital operator HCA Holdings and a pickup in U.S. homebuilders’ confidence.

  •  
    Time Warner Inc. on Wednesday said it has rejected a takeover bid from Twenty-First Century Fox and says it has no interest in further discussions with Rupert Murdoch’s media entertainment giant.

    Rejected Fox bid for Time Warner shows growth mood

    In a move that aims to counter consolidation among TV distributors, Rupert Murdoch’s Fox has made an unsolicited takeover offer for rival media giant Time Warner for about $76 billion in cash and stock. Time Warner rejected the bid, which amounted to about $86.30 per share, but an analyst called it just a first attempt in a courtship that would make the combined company as large as Disney in market value.

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    File photo Don’t blame the millennial generation for lackluster home sales. They are increasingly ethnically diverse, more educated and less likely to be married — all factors that make them less likely to own a home, says a new report

    Study: U.S millennials buying homes later

    Don’t blame the millennial generation for lackluster home sales. They are increasingly ethnically diverse, more educated and less likely to be married — all factors that make them less likely to own a home, said a new report released Wednesday by Trulia, the online real estate firm. After adjusting for these population changes, younger Americans are actually buying homes at the same rate as they did during the late-1990s. “For at least the past 20 years, there have been significant demographic headwinds for homeownership for young people,” said Jed Kolko, chief economist at Trulia.

  •  
    Ben Boschetto of Wayland, Mass., left, and Wes Bell of Fort Ann, N.Y., try to force each other into the water while log birling on Lower St. Regis Lake at the Adirondack Woodsmen’s School at Paul Smith’s College in Paul Smiths, N.Y.

    Ax throw, log climb at Adirondack lumberjack class

    Ax throwing is encouraged in lumberjack class. It’s also OK to dump your classmate in the lake — as long as you’re both frantically trying to stay upright on a floating log.The annual Adirondack Woodsmen’s School is being held this summer amid the tall pines and placid waters of Paul Smith’s College. Despite the course’s name, there are no bushy beards here, no flannel shirts, no suspenders, no oxen.

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    A worker loads vegetables onto food washing machine at Marolda Farm in Vineland, N.J.

    Once a niche, local foods becoming big business

    Once a niche business, locally grown foods aren’t just for farmers markets anymore. A growing network of companies and organizations is delivering food directly from local farms to major institutions like Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in downtown Philadelphia, eliminating scores of middlemen from farm to fork. Along the way, they’re increasing profits and recognition for smaller farms and bringing consumers healthier, fresher foods.

  •  

    Bank of America takes $4 billion litigation hit

    Bank of America said Wednesday that its second quarter earnings were hit by higher litigation expenses.The Charlotte, N.C.-based bank earned $2 billion in the second quarter after payments to preferred shareholders, compared with $3.6 billion in the same period a year earlier. Per share, that worked out to 19 cents, compared with 32 cents a year ago. The bank’s litigation costs of $4 billion crimped earnings by 22 cents a share.The bank also said that it had reached a settlement Tuesday with American International Group Inc. to resolve all outstanding residential mortgage-backed securities litigation between the two companies. Revenue fell 4 percent to $21.9 billion from $22.9 billion. Bank of America’s stock was little changed at $15.91 pre-market trading.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    There’s still time to plant zucchini

    Q: Every year I plant zucchini, and every year I have the same problem arise with them. After a month or so of growing, I notice that the stems seem to start rotting right where they come out of the ground. After a few weeks of this, the plant dies. What could cause this, and how do I fix it?

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    Mason (Tilda Swinton), center, is taken prisoner by rebel leader Curtis (Chris Evans), left, and Tanya (Octavia Spencer), right, in “Snowpiercer.”

    'Snowpiercer' leads train of on-demand gems

    "Snowpiercer” — the buzzworthy science-fiction flick starring “Captain America” himself, Chris Evans — opened in a small number of Chicago-area theaters on July 4, but you can already watch it from the comfort of your own home. Many brand-new films are now premiering on VOD services while still playing in theaters.

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    Dining events: Four new ways to Zoup up your day

    Zoup! dishes up a set of summer gazpacho soups; El Tapeo set to open in Oak Brook; P.M. Prime in Highwood is now open for business.

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    Fragrant apricots that have no green patches are prefect candidates for preserving in a sweet syrup.

    Capture the golden glow of apricots by canning

    Most trees in commercial apricot orchards will be completely stripped during harvest, with most of the apricots at peak ripeness, some underripe and some overripe. For canning, look for slightly underripe fruit that gives only slightly when gently squeezed. The fruit should be not at all green and should have a sweet scent.

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    Mary Sarah’s new album “Bridges” features duets with country greats such as Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton, Merle Haggard and the late Ray Price.

    Country newcomer Mary Sarah pairs with legends on new album

    What does it take to get country legends like Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton and Merle Haggard on the same album? A 19-year-old newcomer named Mary Sarah. Sarah’s debut album, “Bridges,” features duets with their original performers including Parton and Nelson on their well-known country songs. “This project isn’t just about me," Sarah said. "It’s about the legends and bringing this to a newer generation.”

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    Night life: Dinner for two with wine
    Treat yourself to Eddie Merlot’s summer grill menu; H.O.M.E. Bar offers industry Sundays in Arlington Heights; sip and shop at Old Orchard event.

  •  
    Thanks to some help from a dentist, singer Michael Buble was able to go onstage in New Hampshire as scheduled. Less than 24 hours before he was to perform last week during his “Crazy Love” tour, Buble dislodged a crown while trying to open a ketchup packet with his teeth.

    Michael Buble gets emergency dental help before show
    Thanks to some help from a dentist, singer Michael Buble was able to go on stage in New Hampshire as scheduled.

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    Daughter’s rep: Casey Kasem’s body still unburied

    A spokesman for Casey Kasem’s daughter says the famous radio host’s unburied body remains at a funeral home in Tacoma, Washington, a month after his death.

  •  

    Hunter Hayes to headline US Open Kids’ Day

    Hunter Hayes is set to join MTKO, the Vamps and other acts at the U.S. Open’s annual Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day.

  •  
    Hillary Rodham Clinton gave Jon Stewart no hints about whether she will run for president, but acknowledged during Tuesday’s taping of “The Daily Show” that the speculation surrounding her possible candidacy has become “a cottage industry.”

    No hints from Hillary Clinton on ‘The Daily Show’

    Hillary Rodham Clinton gave Jon Stewart no hints about whether she will run for president, but acknowledged during Tuesday’s taping of “The Daily Show” that the speculation surrounding her possible candidacy has become “a cottage industry.” Stewart introduced Clinton by saying, “She’s here solely for one reason: to publicly and definitively declare her candidacy for president of the United States ... I think.” That proved not to be true.

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    Justin Bieber’s lawyers and Florida prosecutors said Wednesday they need more time to work out a possible plea deal on charges that the pop star drove under the influence and resisted arrest.

    Another delay in Justin Bieber’s Fla. DUI case

    Justin Bieber’s lawyers and Florida prosecutors said Wednesday they need more time to work out a possible plea deal on charges that the pop star drove under the influence and resisted arrest.

  •  
    Marja Mills

    Harper Lee says she didn't OK new book about her

    The reclusive author of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” one of the most acclaimed novels of the 20th century, says she never gave her approval to a new memoir that portrays itself as a rare, intimate look into the lives of the writer and her older sister in small-town Alabama. “Rest assured, as long as I am alive any book purporting to be with my cooperation is a falsehood,” Harper Lee said in a letter released Monday, just as the new book, “The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee” was about to released.

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    Serve fresh raspberries with zabaglione, the boozy Italian custard sauce.

    Raspberries best when served fresh

    Raspberries are one of the few fruits that never improve when cooked. This seeming miracle of nature poses a problem for home cooks: If you can’t improve raspberries by putting them in a tart or cobbler or upside-down cake, how are you supposed to serve them at a dinner party? L.V. Anderson humbly proposes serving your berries with zabaglione.

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    Serve fresh raspberries with zabaglione, the boozy Italian custard sauce.

    Raspberry with Prosecco Zabiglione
    Rasberry Zabigone showcases summer fruit the way it's meant to be served: fresh.

  •  

    To solve the problem of breaking bottles, Coravin has a trick up its sleeve

    With the help of Coravin, a revolutionary way of preserving leftover wine, restaurants could offer premium, expensive wines by the glass without fear of wasting most of the bottle. Until bottles began breaking.

  •  
    Radicchio, Corned Beef and Nectarine Salad can be on the dinner table in 25 minutes

    Corned beef and nectaring salad? Are you serious?
    Puerto Rican celebrity chef Wilo Benet at Mio restaurant in downtown Washington added shredded corned beef to this summery nectarine and radicchio salad. It doesn’t take much of the salty protein to have a positive impact on the sweetness caused by lightly charring the radicchio and by the fruit.

  •  
    Andrew Pittz of the Sawmill Hollow aronia berry farm discusses farming of aronia berry plants in Missouri Valley, Iowa. The berry has set its sights on becoming the next “superfood” and is in hundreds of products worldwide.

    Aronia berry gaining market foothold in US

    Aaronia berryies are showing up in everything from juices and powdered supplements to baby food. Midwesterners probably know it as chokeberry, the name European settlers centuries ago gave the berry they found tart, astringent and more pretty than palatable.

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    Rocking Chair Lemonade, left, is a good starting point for making flavored lemonade and lemonade cocktails.

    Simple syrup the secret to great lemonade

    Homemade lemonade is an essential taste of summer. But concentrates and powders simply won’t suffice. Luckily, great homemade lemonade is as easy as remembering a few numbers — 3-1-1-1. Three cups of cold water, 1 cup of lemon juice, 1 cup of sugar and 1 more cup of water to make the sugar syrup.

  •  
    Kevin and Chrissie Wilson of Hawthorn Woods enjoy drinks and dinner at the Chatterbox of Long Grove.

    Chatterbox of Long Grove spotlights beer, small plates

    With its homey, rustic decor and trendy small-plates menu, Chatterbox of Long Grove seems a perfect fit for the village. Open just five months, the new bar’s menu and beer list should appeal to those who want a casual spot to unwind over appetizers and a cold drink.

  •  
    Manolo, left, voiced by Diego Luna, serenades Maria, voiced by Zoe Saldana, in a scene from the animated comedy, “Book of Life.”

    New film ‘Book of Life’ animates Day of the Dead

    Guillermo del Toro is helping to open the “Book of Life.” The Oscar winner is producing the animated feature by first-time director Jorge Gutierrez. “Book of Life” is rich with imagery from Mexican folklore, with a special emphasis on the Day of the Dead, the food- and music-filled celebration of the annual return of the spirits of deceased loved ones.

  •  
    Elvis tribute artist Jim Westover, left, of Arizona City, Ariz., gives a scarf to fan Juanita Curtice, of Woodbridge, Va., during the Las Vegas Elvis Festival. Some three dozen Elvis tribute artists took their gyrating hips and curled lips to the stage over the weekend to see who could do the most convincing portrayal.

    At Elvis Fest, impersonations are reverent tribute

    The white-suited, chest hair-baring, blue contact-wearing men posing with fans outside the showroom of the former Las Vegas Hilton don’t want to be called Elvis impersonators. The correct term is Elvis tribute artist — or ETA for short. “It’s not a gag,” explained Jason Sherry, producer of Elvis Festival in Las Vegas, one of several sanctioned by Presley’s estate that lead up to Elvis Week in Memphis in August.

  •  
    “The Bone Orchard,” by Paul Doiron.

    ‘The Bone Orchard’ is satisfying mystery

    “The Bone Orchard” (Minotaur Books), by Paul DoironMike Bowditch’s recklessness and insubordination, along with his struggle with a series of personal tragedies, seemed to make him a bad match for his job as a Maine game warden. So, as the fifth novel in this fine series opens, it comes as no great surprise that Mike has quit law enforcement and taken refuge as a fishing guide in the state’s great North Woods.But Sgt. Kathy Frost, Mike’s former mentor in the warden service, is in trouble. A suicidal Afghanistan war vet she was assigned to help has been shot dead. The ex-soldier’s politically connected parents and former army buddies blame her. And she is under investigation for her role in the affair.Thinking he might be able to help, or at least offer a sympathetic ear, Mike drives to her cabin and comes under sniper fire in her driveway. He finds his old friend critically wounded.A civilian now, Mike has no business getting involved. As reckless and impetuous as always, he dives in anyway. The authorities suspect the dead soldier’s old army buddies for the attack on Kathy. Mike casts his net wider as he pursues the case from the urban landscape of Portland to the desolate farming villages of Aroostook County. As always, Doiron describes his state so vividly that it becomes not just the setting but also a character in its own right.As Mike’s list of suspects grows, he digs deeply into Kathy’s past. Along the way, he also keeps running into people from his own past, including old friends, old enemies and an ex-wife. The encounters lead to much soul-searching — so much that for a good portion of the book, the biggest mystery Mike confronts isn’t who shot Kathy, it’s what kind of man Mike has become. This makes “The Bone Orchard” both a rich exploration of character and a satisfying mystery story.

  •  

    New bride Edelstein takes on ‘Guide to Divorce’

    Lisa Edelstein, the star of Bravo’s new “Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce,” is in a far happier place in her personal life. The former “House” star said she was married the day before she moved to Vancouver, British Columbia, to begin working on the scripted series about a marriage dissolving.

  •  
    Bryana Martinez

    Vote for your Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent favorite

    Voting kicks off Wednesday online at dailyherald.com for your Fan Favorite from the top 15 finalists of Suburban Chicago's Got Talent. The top vote getter from this round will automatically advance to the Top 10, and be in the running to win the ultimate Fan Favorite prize of a Funjet Vacation for two.

Discuss

  •  
    A section of the United Airlines DC-10 stands among emergency vehicles after crashing while trying to make an emergency landing in Sioux City, Iowa, July 19, 1989. The FAA acknowledges its rules fall short of what's safest for young fliers in such a catastrophe.

    Editorial: Re-examine safety for young fliers after Flight 232

    The FAA and airlines need to take a close look at the safety of infants on commercial flights and put consistent rules in place, a Daily Herald editorial says. In the crash of Chicago-bound Flight 232 in Sioux City, Iowa, which killed 112 of 296 people on board, at least three of four lap-held infants were pulled from parents' hands, and one died even though his mother was uninjured

  •  

    When it comes to gossip, some conservatives will buy anything

    Columnist Richard Cohen: They had a term for her, but I’ve forgotten it. It was a name applied to a person who could not say no to a door-to-door salesman. The one I remember from my brief career selling magazines was totally upfront about her intentions. “I’ll buy whatever you’re selling,” she said. I sold her Esquire and two other subscriptions. Salesmen back then had a name for such people. Today, I would call them conservatives. They, too, will buy anything.

  •  

    Cold and calculating on immigration

    Columnist Ruben Navarrette: Whenever President Obama acts unilaterally on immigration reform — and it’s not often enough — the reactions on both the right and the left are so predictable.

  •  

    Empathy for victims of sexual assault
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: I was robbed by three large young men. They approached me after I was leaving a wake. They demanded that I give them my wallet. They did not hurt me, but they threatened to hurt me, and considering their size I was not going to call their bluff. They took my cash, left the credit cards and fled.

  •  

    Voters got themselves into this mess
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: Jim Peterson admonished his “liberal folks” to vote liberal in order to get their agenda on track in his July 3 letter, However, he overlooked a few salient points. Not all of us want an incompetent federal government making decisions on winners and losers in that industry.

  •  

    Get ready for new shot at political map
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: Does anyone really expect that there will not be a tax levied or present tax extended to make up for the tax that is supposed to default this year?

  •  

    Does Herald favor recalling all cars?
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: The Daily Herald “Other Views — Only in America” pictorial was a very misleading message for its gun control agenda.

  •  

    Why was motto missing on July 4th?
    A Bloomingdale letter to the editor: I find it surprising that on the day we celebrate our independence as a nation, your motto was missing at the top of the page — “Our aim: To fear God, tell the truth and make money.” — H. C. Paddock 1852-1935.

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