Daily Archive : Tuesday July 15, 2014

News

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    ECC gears up for Project Backpack, donations sought

    Project Backpack, a community-based initiative led by Elgin Community College to benefit students in need, is accepting donations of school supplies now through Friday, Aug. 1, at several locations.

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    Lifeguard Sarah Pilgrim keeps an eye on the few kids braving the cold waters at Centennial Beach in Naperville on Tuesday. The water did not open to swimmers until 11:40 a.m., when the temperature reached 65 degrees.

    Too cold to even spray for mosquitoes?

    How cool is it tonight? It’s so cold that one village is postponing it’s mosquito spraying. The village of Woodridge sent a notice to residents saying it is putting off its skeeter spraying until Thursday. Mosquitoes were "less active, resulting in a less effective treatment."

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    Rich Parent and his dog, Roxie, visited Dolores “Dolly” Jefferson Tuesday, just days after Jefferson's screams saved Roxie from a coyote attack.

    'Hero' neighbor rescues dog from pack of coyotes

    The quick thinking and loud screams of an 84-year-old Bensenville-area woman has neighbors calling her a hero after she scared off a pack of coyotes attacking a neighbor's dog. “My son has always told me to scream and yell real loud if I see a coyote and that's what I did," Dolores “Dolly” Jefferson said. "I ran outside screaming as loud as I could and shooed the coyotes...

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    Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, immigration rights activist and self-declared undocumented immigrant Jose Antonio Vargas was released after being detained Tuesday by U.S. Border Patrol agents at a South Texas airport.

    Journalist, activist released by U.S. Border Patrol

    Prominent immigration activist and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, who has lived and worked in the U.S. illegally for years, was released by U.S. Border Patrol agents on Tuesday after being detained at a South Texas airport. In a statement late Tuesday, the Border Patrol said Vargas was arrested at the airport in McAllen after telling an agent he was in the country...

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    Kane County animal control poised to pay off $1.5 million debt

    A preview of the 2015 budget for Kane County's animal control agency shows the department is on track to zero out the so-called mortgage debt it owes county taxpayers for the construction of its facility by 2017. When that happens, it will provide more than $150,000 of financial wiggle room for the department, which has had financial difficulties in the recent past.

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    Afghanistan’s security forces and civilians walk at the site of a suicide attack in the Urgun area of Paktika province, Afghanistan, Tuesday. The attack near a busy market and a mosque killed at least 89 people in the deadliest insurgent attack on civilians since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion.

    89 killed in worst Afghanistan bombing since 2001

    A suicide bomber blew up a car packed with explosives near a busy market and a mosque in eastern Afghanistan on Tuesday, killing at least 89 people in the deadliest insurgent attack on civilians since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion. The explosion destroyed dozens of mud-brick shops, flipped cars over and stripped trees of their branches, brutally underscoring the country’s instability as U.S.

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    Israeli policemen and army officers carry the remains of a rocket fired from Gaza at the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon Tuesday. An Egyptian truce proposal for the conflict in Gaza unraveled Tuesday after the Islamic militant Hamas rejected the plan. Gaza militants launched scores of rockets at Israel, which after halting fire for hours finally responded with what Hamas security said were more than two dozen air strikes.

    Israel: Hamas to pay price for its ‘no’ to truce

    Israel resumed its heavy bombardment of Gaza on Tuesday and warned that Hamas “would pay the price” after the Islamic militant group rejected an Egyptian truce plan and instead unleashed more rocket barrages at the Jewish state. Late Tuesday, the military urged tens of thousands of residents of northern and eastern Gaza to leave their homes by Wednesday morning, presumable a prelude...

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    Jennifer Haselberger, the whistleblower who took on the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis about allegations of clergy sexual misconduct, said in an affidavit released Tuesday that archbishops and staff ignored the 2002 pledge by Roman Catholic bishops to keep abusive clergy out of parishes.

    Church lawyer details cover-up claims on sex abuse

    A canon lawyer alleging a widespread cover-up of clergy sex misconduct in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis has made her most detailed claims yet, accusing archbishops and their top staff of lying to the public and of ignoring the U.S. bishops’ pledge to have no tolerance of priests who abuse.

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    Speaker of the House John Boehner on Tuesday ushered through passage of a multibillion-dollar appropriation for federal highway and transit programs but ducked the issue of how to put them on a sound financial footing for the long term.

    House passes highway bill as deadline looms

    With an August deadline looming, the House voted Tuesday to temporarily patch over a multibillion-dollar pothole in federal highway and transit programs while ducking the issue of how to put them on a sound financial footing for the long term.

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    Rasmussen Lake in the Ethel’s Woods Forest Preserve near Antioch was created in the mid-1950s by damming Mill Creek.

    Man-made lake to be drained to allow restoration of North Mill Creek

    After years of planning, work is set to begin to drain a hidden, man-made lake and restore the meandering North Mill Creek at the Ethel's Woods Forest Preserve near Antioch. The Lake County Forest Preserve District board on Tuesday approved measures to start the $1.2 million project to slowly drain Rasmussen Lake.

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    Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeau addresses immigration protesters Tuesday in Oracle, Ariz. Dozens of protesters on both sides of the immigration debate showed up in Oracle, a small town near Tucson, after the sheriff said the federal government plans to transport about 40 immigrant children to an academy for troubled youths. Anger has been spreading throughout the U.S. Southwest since a massive surge in unaccompanied Central American children crossing the border illegally began more than a month ago.

    House GOP prepares response to border crisis

    House Republicans announced Tuesday they will recommend dispatching the National Guard to South Texas and speeding Central American youths back home as their response to the immigration crisis that’s engulfing the border and testing Washington’s ability to respond.

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    Pingree Grove & Countryside Fire Protection District trustees pose for formal photos at the groundbreaking of a new $3.3 million fire station on Tuesday evening. The station is being built near the Cambridge Lakes North, or Carillon, subdivision.

    Groundbreaking for Pingree Grove fire station

    The groundbreaking of Pingree Grove’s new fire station — seven years in the making — took place during a fitting window of sunshine during an otherwise rainy Tuesday afternoon. The $3.3 million station is being built on about 3 acres west of Reinking Road just north of Route 72, at the entrance of the Cambridge Lakes North, or Carillon, subdivision.

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    All Huntley residents will be able to use McHenry County’s MCRide dial-a-ride service if the village board approves joining the program.

    Huntley may offer permanent bus service for all residents

    Huntley may soon be offering a permanent bus service for all residents, not just seniors. The village board’s committee of the whole Thursday will review a memorandum of understanding and resolution to join McHenry County Division of Transportation’s MCRide Dial-a-Ride Transit Service program. It would cost Huntley $48,582 yearly to participate and would allow residents to commute...

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    Protester Deborah Pfaff stands near the entrance to juvenile facility in an effort to stop a bus load of Central American immigrant children from being delivered to the facility Tuesday in Oracle, Ariz. Federal officials delayed the bus with no details on whether the children will arrive or not.

    Arizona protesters hope to stop immigrant transfer

    Protesters carrying “Return to Sender” and “Go home non-Yankees” signs faced off with immigrant rights activists Tuesday in a small Arizona town after a sheriff said a bus filled with Central American children was on its way. The rallies demonstrated the deep divide of the immigration debate as groups on both sides — and in similar numbers — showed up in...

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    Eighi Hiastake, of the San Francisco Dept. of Public Works, washes a city sidewalk with a mixture of water and disinfectant. In one of the most drastic responses yet to California’s drought, state regulators on Tuesday will consider fines of up to $500 a day for people who waste water on landscaping, fountains, washing vehicles and other outdoor uses.

    California water use rises amid crippling drought

    Californians increased water consumption this year during the state’s severe drought, despite pleas from the governor to conserve, fallowed farm fields and reservoirs that are quickly draining, according to a report released Tuesday.

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    Swan uppers hold swans and cygnets after lifting them into their Thames skiff rowing boats to be counted and checked during the annual “Swan Upping” census, on a stretch of the river between Staines and Windsor in southern England Monday.

    Science meets ceremony in UK’s royal swan count
    The white, long-necked swan gliding along the River Thames looks serene, but his life is full of danger. If the sharp-toothed mink don’t get him or his brood, then floods, fish hooks or hooligans with air rifles might. Fortunately, he has a powerful ally — Queen Elizabeth II.

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    Sacred Heart Church’s 47th annual Germanfest begins Thursday and runs through Sunday. The festival features bands, carnival rides, a beer and wine tent and German food.

    Germanfest returns to Lombard church for 47th year

    The 47th annual Germanfest returns this weekend to Sacred Heart Church in Lombard. “It’s a great time to meet new people, to visit with old friends and just really enjoy some good entertainment, German food and beer,” said John Brill, co-general chairman for Germanfest.

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    Waukegan celebrates Christmas in July

    The Waukegan Park District, the Puerto Rican Arts Alliance of Chicago, and the Puerto Rican Society of Waukegan will celebrate Christmas in July on Saturday, July 19, 1 to 8 p.m. at Bowen Park.

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    Nadia Palacios

    Woman pleads guilty to torture, murder of Waukegan man

    A Waukegan woman accused of helping torture and kill a man in a Waukegan body shop in 2011 pleaded guilty Tuesday to murder. Nadia Palacios will be sentenced to 20 to 60 years in prison for assisting in the murder of David Campbell of Waukegan.

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    Christine Tancredi of Naperville practically has Centennial Beach to herself Tuesday. Colder temperatures kept many people away. “I like cold weather,” Tancredi said.

    Summer chill changes scene at area pools

    An unusually chilly July day caused some area swimming pools to close Tuesday and left others with much smaller crowds than you'd expect in the heart of summer.

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    Roof fire extinguished at North Barrington home

    Lake Zurich firefighters Tuesday afternoon safely extinguished a blaze on the roof of garage on Hidden Oaks Lane West in North Barrington, officials said. The residents were home at the time and engaged in a controlled burn that somehow ignited the outside surface of the garage roof, Lake Zurich Fire Capt. Jeff Radtke said.

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    Daniel Mora

    Two accused of beating at Carpentersville party

    Two Carpentersville men face felony charges that they jumped a man outside of a party in Carpentersville over the weekend, kicking him repeatedly while he was on the ground and breaking his nose. Daniel Mora, 23, and Jose A. Mora-Aguilar, 26, face charges of aggravated battery and mob action.

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    23 apply for associated judge opening

    Lake County circuit court officials say 23 applicants have been received for an associate judge opening.

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    Last gap in Des Plaines River Trail closed

    The purchase of 4.4 acres approved Tuesday by the Lake County Forest Preserve District board officially will close the last gap in the Des Plaines River Trail.

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    Katelyn Dorn, 6, of Campton Hills helps prepare a dairy calf Tuesday at the Kane County Fairgrounds in St. Charles. The county fair opens Wednesday and continues through Sunday.

    Kane County Fair opens Wednesday

    The 146th annual Kane County Fair begins its five-day run at 8 a.m. Wednesday with sheep and poultry judging at the fairgrounds on Randall Road in St. Charles. Preparations pretty much wrapped up Tuesday under threatening skies, a bit of rain and unseasonably cool temperatures. It was in the 50s early Tuesday.

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    Body discovered in Bolingbrook retention pond

    A man’s body was found floating Tuesday morning in a Bolingbrook retention pond, officials said. Bolingbrook police and fire officials were dispatched about 10:52 a.m. to the pond on the 300 block of Woodcreek Drive, according to an email from Bolingbrook Police Department Lieutenant Mike Rompa.

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    Tickets for Davis Cup tennis at Sears Centre go on sale Thursday

    Tickets go on sale Thursday for the United States vs. Slovakia matches in the 2014 Davis Cup, an international men’s team tennis event. The best-of-five match series begins Friday, Sept. 12, with two singles matches featuring each country’s No. 1 player against the other country’s No. 2 player.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Robert Wehrle, 40, of Hampshire, was charged with felony attempted strangulation and domestic battery at 7 p.m. Friday after authorities were called to the 45W800 block of Plank, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Peter J. Vicicondi IV, 20, of the 900 block of South 11th Avenue, and Andrew A. Fecteau, 19, of the 1200 block of Ronzheimer Avenue, both of St. Charles, were charged with underage consumption of alcohol after authorities were called at 1:19 a.m. Saturday to the 4N200 block of Citation Lane near Elburn for a report of a broken vehicle window, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    St. Charles dance marathon to raise funds for teen arts

    Teenagers and adults in the Batavia, Elgin and St. Charles areas are urged to put on their dancing shoes for a good cause Friday. The Teen Writers and Artists Project will host the “T-WAAP Sock Hop” dance marathon, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. at Marquee Youth Stage in the lower level of The Quad/Charlestowne Mall, 3800 E. Main St., St. Charles. “This is our first one,” said...

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    Dist. 200 proposed budget available for viewing

    Creating the 2014-15 budget for Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200 proved to be an “arduous process” this year, district officials say. The nearly $183.7 million proposed budget is now available for viewing at the district’s school service center, local libraries and online. Total revenues amount to $174.5 million, leaving a nearly $9.2 million anticipated deficit, but...

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    Jason J. Mueller

    Coroner’s office: Alcohol played role in cop’s death in Gurnee crash

    A Waukegan police officer exceeded the legal blood-alcohol limit when he died in an off-duty, single-vehicle crash in Gurnee last weekend, according to the Lake County coroner’s office. Jason J. Mueller, 27, of Grayslake, died after the wreck early Saturday, July 12. He was a U.S. Army veteran who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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    Democrat Bill Foster, left, and Republican Darlene Senger, right, are candidates for the 11th Congressional District.

    Republicans have some catching up to do in suburban races, monetarily speaking

    Incumbent Democrats in the suburbs’ three biggest races for Congress are heading toward November with sometimes sizable cash advantages Republicans challengers will have to try to overcome, reports filed Tuesday show.

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    Ricky J. Moreno

    Elgin teens get 20 years for 2012 murder

    Elgin teenagers Ricky Moreno, 17, and Mario Williams, 18, pleaded guilty Tuesday to the June 2012 shooting death of 16-year-old Nestor Alvarado. In exchange for their guilty pleas to an amended charge of second degree murder, Moreno and Williams were sentenced to 20 years in prison.

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    Jorge Chavez

    Chicago man, Elgin woman face multiple charges after car chase

    A Chicago man and an Elgin woman face several charges following a car chase Sunday night, prior to which an Elgin detective was injured trying to arrest the man. Authorities said the two were charged with multiple counts of burglary, aggravated battery of a peace officer, resisting or obstructing a peace officer, and aggravated fleeing and eluding.

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    For the first time in 30 years, the federal government is issuing new guidelines designed to protect pregnant workers from on-the-job discrimination.

    Agency toughens protections for pregnant workers

    Pregnant women have new protections against on-the-job discrimination. News: The government has updated 30-year-old guidelines, citing “the persistence of overt pregnancy discrimination, as well as the emergence of more subtle discriminatory practices.” The new guidelines from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission make clear that any form of workplace discrimination or...

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    Round Area Lake Unit District 116 will launch full-day kindergarten for the next academic season. It’ll be at Joseph J. Pleviak School in Lake Villa.

    Full-day kindergarten for Round Lake Area Unit District 116

    Round Area Lake Unit District 116 will launch full-day kindergarten for the next academic season. It'll be at Joseph J. Pleviak School in Lake Villa, which District 116 will lease. “This is a wonderful opportunity for all of our kindergartners and for our staff to have extended time for the core instruction and core curriculum,” Melanie Arthur, coordinator of teaching and learning...

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    David P. Maish

    Antioch restaurateur involved in fatal crash sentenced to jail time

    An Antioch restaurateur will spend the next 12 months in periodic imprisonment for drinking alcohol in violation of a 2011 probation sentence he received after driving into and killing pedestrian in 2011.

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    Elite in-line skaters and suburban weekend warriors will take to the streets of Hoffman Estates this weekend for the sixth annual Alexian Brothers Fitness for America Sports Festival.

    Hoffman fitness fest draws top runners, skaters and first-timers

    Some of the nation's top in-line skaters, along with hundreds of other athletes, will be in Hoffman Estates this weekend for the sixth annual Alexian Brothers Fitness For America Sports Festival.

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    Eric Leys

    Leys stepping down from Dist. 207 board

    A longtime Maine Township High School District 207 board member, who had been one of the youngest elected leaders in the suburbs, will be stepping down from his position later this month. Eric Leys, a 13-year board member, wrote in an email to district officials that he will be moving to Orange County, California to take a job with Penske Automotive Group, working in a leadership capacity.

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    A Cubs fan who grew up in the suburbs, author Dennis Hetzel puts his favorite team in the World Series in his new novel, “Killing the Curse.” His book also boasts a U.S. president from Palatine and an over-the-top Cubs fanatic from Streamwood.

    U.S. president from Palatine, Cubs in the World Series?

    At the All-Star break, the last-place Cubs are a long way from the World Series. But in his new book, "Killing the Curse," author Dennis Hetzel, who grew up in the suburbs, tells of the Cubs playing for it all during a tense drama revolving around a U.S. president from Palatine and a Cubs fanatic from Streamwood.

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    Arlington Heights village trustees voted this week to grant a new liquor license classification for Arlington Lanes, despite some concerns over measures the bowling alley’s new owner says he might take to prevent underage patrons from obtaining alcohol.

    New Arlington Lanes owners get liquor license

    Arlington Lanes, which is now under new ownership got a recommendation for a new liquor license in Arlington Heights on Monday night after concerns from one trustee.

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    Christiano Figueredo stays on “Wild and Western” for the full eight seconds during last year’s Championship Bull Riding at the Kane County Fair in St. Charles.

    Bull riding shows featured at Kane County Fair

    Bob Sauber has experienced thrill. He has gone bungee jumping and cliff diving. He has gone snowboarding and skiing down some of the hardest black diamond courses. But for him, there’s nothing quite like the thrill of bull riding.

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    Appeals court upholds tossing of Asian carp suit

    The U.S. Court of Appeals in Chicago has upheld a lower court ruling dismissing a lawsuit filed by five states seeking the placement of barriers to keep Asian carp from invading the Great Lakes. Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Ohio and Pennsylvania claim the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Chicago's Metropolitan Water Reclamation District are causing a public nuisance by failing to physically...

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    Maine police: Illinois man made up abduction story

    Police say an Illinois man who took a bus to Maine to meet a woman he met playing an online game concocted a story about being abducted to gain the woman’s sympathy.Police say 30-year-old Randolph Patriakeas, of Pana, Illinois, was discovered lying face down on a Waterville street at about 3:30 a.m. Monday. He was blindfolded and had scratches on his upper body.

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    Strangled Illinois woman’s ex-husband found dead

    Peoria officials say the ex-husband of a strangled woman whose murder investigation is ongoing has died of apparent suicide. The Peoria County coroner tells the Journal Star 51-year-old Daniel Wilson was pronounced dead Monday after his body was found in a vehicle. The coroner says a hose was running from the vehicle’s exhaust pipe into the trunk. A note was found inside.

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    Mary Kowalski, of DeKalb, points out a large section of the milkweed leaf that a monarch caterpillar has eaten on her front porch. Kowalski found five monarch caterpillars on the milkweed in her rain garden and brought them in for protection from birds. One of them is currently a chrysalis, the last stage in the transformation to a monarch butterfly.

    Dearth of monarch butterflies worries local experts

    The huge decline in monarch butterflies has local conservationists and residents throughout Illinois trying to bolster supplies of milkweed, the plant crucial to monarch survival that also has been disappearing. “I think the monarch is an easy poster child,” said Peggy Doty, an environmental and energy stewardship educator with University of Illinois Extension. “But this is...

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    Hi Infidelity will perform at 8 p.m. Friday at the Kane County Fair.

    Rock out to local favorites at fair soundstage

    One of the most popular spots at the Kane County Fair, now on its 146th year, is the Miller Lite Soundstage, which showcases local bands and performers each day. Fair board president Larry Breon says organizers aim to offer a variety of acts to suit all musical tastes.

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    A group of legislators is looking for new ways to address crime in Illinois communities and overcrowding in the state's prisons and jails.

    Illinois lawmakers look to ease prison crowding

    A group of legislators is looking for new ways to address crime in Illinois communities and overcrowding in the state's prisons and jails.The newly formed Joint Criminal Justice Reform Committee is set to meet Tuesday in Chicago. The bipartisan committee also will look at how to reduce racial disparities in sentencing and the number of people released from prison who commit new crimes.

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    New rules issued for concealed carry denials

    A flurry of lawsuits from Illinois residents whose applications for a permit to carry a concealed weapon were rejected without explanation has prompted the state police to require a state review board to reveal its reasoning. Under what the Illinois State Police called in a Tuesday news release “emergency rules,” the Concealed Carry Licensing Review Board will notify applicants of...

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    Middle school teacher honored for promoting healthy lifestyles

    Abbott Middle School mathematics teacher Kim Elders was named the 2013-2014 Illinois inductee into the Fuel Up to Play 60 Hall of Fame.

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    Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle announced Tuesday that she will not run for mayor of Chicago, multiple media outlets reported.

    Reports: Preckwinkle rules out running for Chicago mayor

    Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle has ruled out running for mayor of Chicago, the Chicago Tribune is reporting.

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    Rescue teams work inside the tunnel where several cars of a wrecked train look almost coiled, occupying the entire space of the tunnel of a Moscow subway on Tuesday.

    Rush-hour Moscow subway derails: 21 dead, 136 hurt

    A subway train derailed Tuesday deep below Moscow’s streets, twisting and mangling crowded rail cars at the height of the morning rush hour. At least 21 people were killed, Russian officials said, and 136 were hospitalized, many with serious injuries. The Russian capital’s airports and transit systems have been a prime target for terrorists over the past two decades, but multiple...

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    Not a single marijuana seed has been planted in Illinois’ pilot medical cannabis program. But medical marijuana is inching closer to reality and a meeting set for Tuesday will shape the program’s future.

    Medical marijuana rules approved by Illinois committee

    An Illinois legislative committee approved rules Tuesday for the state’s medical cannabis program, which means would-be growers and retailers can soon apply for permits. The state law enacted last year authorized a four-year pilot project that will expire in 2017, but so far, not a single marijuana seed has been planted.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn is crowing that Illinois' pile of overdue bills has dropped to $3.9 billion.

    Quinn: Illinois past-due bills lowest since 2010

    Gov. Pat Quinn is crowing that Illinois' pile of overdue bills has dropped to $3.9 billion. The Democrat said Monday it's the lowest since he took office in 2009. It topped out in 2010 at $9.9 billion. But the governor's office does not count health care bills until they're past due. Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka, a Republican, includes Medicaid invoices as soon as the state is billed. That...

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    Alpine Fest returns Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 18-20, to Lion Fred Blau Park in Lake Zurich.

    Alpine Fest in Lake Zurich features firefighter water fights

    Lake Zurich’s annual Alpine Fest, sponsored by the village’s Lions Club, returns for another run starting Friday. Alpine Fest will be in downtown Lake Zurich at Lion Fred Blau Park, 81 E. Main St

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    A lone seagull waddles past the village-owned property at 1775 N. Rand Road in Palatine. The building used to be a Menards store until they sold the building to the village for $8 million in 2009. While the village looks for a permanent buyer, the store is used by Wolff's Flea Market on the weekends.

    Palatine council votes to move forward with old Menards sale

    The Palatine village council voted Monday to task a developer with selling the old Menards store at 1775 N. Rand Road, a property which has been owned by the village since 2009. First Rockford Group Inc. would have one year to find a buyer interested in the large property. If they were successful in locating a buyer, First Rockford would purchase the property from the village.

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    The Sanfilippo Mansion in Barrington Hills will host a fundraiser Aug. 2 for the Interfaith Committee for Detained Immigrants. The organization provides advocacy and services to people in the immigration detention services through programs at the McHenry County jail and elsewhere in the Chicago area.

    Sanfilippo Mansion to host fundraiser for immigration advocates

    The Interfaith Committee for Detained Immigrants is hosting a fundraiser from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 2, at the Sanfilippo Mansion in Barrington Hills. The organization advocates for just and humane treatment in the immigration detention system, including those detained at the McHenry County jail.

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    Leaders sought for Vernon library Friends group before it fades away

    The Friends of the Vernon Area Library in Lincolnshire has cited an urgent need for leaders to continue its work or risk disbanding. "We're at a transition point," said Angela Goodrich, president of the Friends board.

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    Wisconsin site to host War of 1812 re-enactment

    A southwestern Wisconsin historical site is set to host a re-enactment of a War of 1812 battle. The Villa Louis mansion will commemorate the 200th anniversary of a battle on Saturday and Sunday. The battle, which pitted U.S. troops against British-Canadian soldiers, took place on what is now the mansion’s west lawn from July 17 through July 20, 1814. It was the only battle in the war that...

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    Wisconsin boys, 9 and 4, take another car ride — alone
    Sheriff’s officials say a 9-year-old boy and his 4-year-old cousin have taken a car on a drive through Washington County for the second time in a month. Authorities say the West Bend cousins took a car from the older boy’s stepfather Sunday and drove through Farmington. Investigators say the boys wanted to go to a park. They ended up in the ditch about six miles away. Neither child...

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    5 injured in Chicago horse-drawn carriage accident

    Police in Chicago say an SUV and horse-drawn carriage accident has injured five people, including four children. Chicago police tell the Chicago Sun-Times that the SUV rear-ended the carriage late Monday. There were no passengers in the carriage. The driver was injured. Fire department officials say the children were passengers in the SUV.

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    Dawn Patrol: ‘Polar’ air moves in; Glen Ellyn mom on ceiling collapse

    ‘Polar’ air expected overnight. Glen Ellyn mom happy kids safe after ceiling collapse. Schaumburg native swaps Broadway dreams for production success. Massive wooden soldier moved to Pingree Grove. Des Plaines oasis demo underway. A Grayslake man charged in drive-by shooting. Cubs 40-54 at all-star break.

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    Ronald Stochl

    Fox Lake officials may repeal grant for facade work

    An advisory committee is recommending Fox Lake officials repeal a June vote that gave a business owner and village trustee a pair of $4,000 grants in violation of the village’s revised facade improvement ordinance. Mayor Donny Schmit said the facade improvement committee recommended Trustee Ron Stochl is entitled to one, but not both grants. It will go before the village board for a vote...

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    A developer has a plan for the shuttered Cetron building on Richards Street in Geneva.

    Geneva council hears pitch for apartments at Cetron site

    The crumbing Cetron factory in downtown Geneva could be replaced by 200 apartments, plus shops and restaurants, under a proposal presented to the Geneva City Council. Marquette Cos. of Naperville wants to tear down the factory to build a five-story building at Seventh and State streets. “Really the main point is creating that pedestrian environment and engaging the street (State),”...

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    This is an artist’s rendering of a proposed veterans memorial in Huntley, which might be located near the village hall. A group of local volunteers are raising funds for the project.

    Huntley group wants to erect veterans memorial

    A group of volunteers is raising funds to create a veterans memorial park in Huntley. The newly formed Huntley Area Veterans Foundation is reaching out to area businesses and residents for donations. The group also is working to get its nonprofit status and location secured. “The first phase is going to cost about $275,000,” said foundation president Dawn Ellison, 58, of Huntley, a...

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    From left, Karlee Smith, 13, Alissa Chu, 12, and Haley Beilfuss, 13, all of Batavia, wait to go onstage Monday at the Kane County Talent Show at Kane County Fairgrounds in St. Charles. The girls danced jazz and hip-hop to the song “Invade.”

    Two girls win Kane County Fair Talent Contest

    The annual Kane County Talent Show featured 25 contestants in two divisions Monday night at the fairgrounds in St. Charles -- and two winners emerged after all the girls anxiously awaited their chance to sing, dance or play instruments (VIDEO).

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    Craig Gigstad plays the stand up bass while singing with The Neverly Brothers during their performance in Wheaton as part of the Wheaton Park District’s free Monday concert series. The Neverly Brothers perform classic hits dating back to the beginning days of rock ’n’ roll including songs from The Big Bopper, Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, Chuck Berry and Elvis just to name a few.

    Neverly Brothers band performs as part of Wheaton concert series

    The Neverly Brothers took fans on what the band calls a “musical tour through the history of rock 'n’ roll” from Elvis to the Beatles during a performance Monday night in Wheaton’s Memorial Park.

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    Professor: New police-file policy will shine light

    An agreement to make public all completed investigations of Chicago police misconduct will shine a light like never before on a department that has long been dogged by a reputation for brutality and a code of silence, according to a law school professor involved in the litigation that led to the city’s decision.

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    Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai, who survived being shot by the Taliban because she advocated education for girls, visits Abuja, Nigeria, Monday. Malala Yousafzai traveled to Abuja in Nigeria to meet the relatives of schoolgirls who were kidnapped by Boko Haram three months ago.

    Pakistani teen seeks release of Nigerian girls

    The Pakistani teen who survived a Taliban assassination attempt in 2012 marked her 17th birthday Monday with a visit to Nigeria and urged Islamic extremists to free the 219 schoolgirls who were kidnapped there, calling them her “sisters.” Malala Yousafzai, who has become an international symbol for women’s rights in the face of hard-line Islam, said Nigeria’s president...

Sports

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    Ryan Hartman shoots on Antti Raanta during the Blackhawks' camp last September. t's been a whirlwind year for the West Dundee native and top Hawks prospect.

    Top Hawks prospect Hartman learning by experience

    Ryan Hartman has been a man on the move lately. For the native of West Dundee, whose family recently relocated to Naperville while he himself has set up shop in Lincoln Park, it's been a whirlwind year or so. “It's nice to see the guys and the coaching staff and be around the organization and wearing the Blackhawks sweater,” the 20-year-old forward said. “It's good to be here and around all of the guys.”

  •  
    It's just a matter of days now before quarterback Jay Cutler and the Bears regroup for the opening of training camp.

    Bears camp can't start soon enough

    The NFL is almost here and it can't come soon enough in Chicago, where -- until further notice -- baseball ends annually at the trade deadline.It doesn't hurt that expectations for The Beloved are soaring after an off-season designed to rebuild a 2013 defense that was predictably bad and, by the finish, even worse.

  •  
    Shortstop Derek Jeter, of the New York Yankees, doubles during the first inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 15, 2014, in Minneapolis.

    Jeter, Trout lead AL to All-Star win

    MINNEAPOLIS — Derek Jeter soaked in the adulation from fans and players during one more night on baseball’s national stage, set the tone for the American League with a pregame speech and delivered two final All-Star hits.Mike Trout, perhaps the top candidate to succeed the 40-year-old Yankees captain as the face of the game, seemed ready to assume the role with a tiebreaking triple and later a go-ahead double that earned him MVP honors. On a summer evening filled with reminders of generational change, the AL kept up nearly two decades of dominance by beating the National League 5-3 in the All-Star game Tuesday for its 13th win in 17 years.Miguel Cabrera homered to help give the AL champion home-field advantage for the World Series.No matter what else happened, it seemed destined to be another special event for Jeter.He received a 63-second standing ovation when he walked to the plate leading off the bottom of the first, another rousing cheer when he led off the third and about two minutes of applause after AL manager John Farrell sent Alexei Ramirez of the White Sox to shortstop to replace him at the start of the fourth.As Frank Sinatra’s recording of “New York, New York” boomed over the Target Field speakers and his parents watched from the stands, Jeter repeatedly waved to the crowd, exchanged handshakes and hugs in the AL dugout and then came back onto the field for a curtain call.While not as flashy as Mariano Rivera’s All-Star farewell at Citi Field last year, when all the other players left the great reliever alone on the field for an eighth-inning solo bow, Jeter also tried not to make a fuss.A 14-time All-Star who was MVP of the 2000 game in Atlanta, he announced in February this will be his final season. His hits left him with a .481 All-Star average (13 for 27), just behind Charlie Gehringer’s .500 record (10 for 20) for players with 20 or more at-bats.While the Yankees are .500 at the break and in danger of missing the postseason in consecutive years for the first time in two decades, Jeter and the Angels’ Trout gave a boost to whichever AL team reaches the World Series.The AL improved to 9-3 since the All-Star game started deciding which league gets Series home-field advantage; 23 of the last 28 titles were won by teams scheduled to host four of a possible seven games.Detroit’s Max Scherzer, in line to be the most-prized free agent pitcher after the season, pitched a scoreless fifth for the victory, and Glen Perkins got the save in his home ballpark.Pat Neshek, a hometown favorite whose brother works on the Target Field grounds crew, took the loss.It was not a notable night for the game’s Chicago representatives — aside from White Sox ace Chris Sale’s blown save in the 4th inning. Ramirez went 1 for 2 with a run scored, and Sox slugger Jose Abreu flied out in the bottom of the 8th.For the NL, Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo and shortstop Starlin Castro both struck out.The AL won for the first time in three tries in Minnesota; it lost 6-5 at Metropolitan Stadium in 1965 and 6-1 at the normally homer-friendly Metrodome, where not one longball was hit under its Teflon roof in 1985.Target Field, a $545 million, limestone-encased jewel that opened in 2010, produced an All-Star cycle just eight batters in, with hitters showing off flashy neon-bright spikes and fielders wearing All-Star caps with special designs for the first time.With the late sunset the sky didn’t darken until the fifth inning, well after 9 o’clock there was bright sunshine when Jeter was cheered before his first at-bat. He was introduced by a recording of late Yankees public address announcer Bob Sheppard’s deep monotone: “Now batting for the American League, from the New York Yankees, the shortstop, number two, Derek Jeter. Number two.

  •  
    Now that Carlos Boozer’s time with the Bulls has come to an end and the roster is close to being set, how do the Bulls figure to fare in the East?

    So just how do revamped Bulls stack up in East?

    The Bulls officially used the amnesty clause on Carlos Boozer, creating cap space to sign Pau Gasol and Nikola Mirotic. How will the Bulls revamped roster stack up in the East next season?

  •  
    Playing in his final All-Star Game, Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter waves as he is taken out in the fourth inning Tuesday night at Target Field in Minneapolis.

    Yankees’ Jeter true star of stars

    Very few athletes have had the combination of attributes that it takes to earn the respect and reverence that Derek Jeter received in his final All-Star Game before he retires this fall.

  •  
    In newspaper reports, Oscar Pistorius has been accused of an aggressive altercation at a Johannesburg nightclub he visited last weekend. A spokeswoman for the Pistorius family said an argument ensued and the athlete, who is free on bail, soon left the club.

    Pistorius gets into nightclub argument

    Oscar Pistorius was in an altercation at an upmarket nightclub over the weekend, his family said Tuesday. Pistorius went with a cousin to a trendy Johannesburg nightclub on Saturday, where he was accosted by a man who aggressively questioned him about his murder trial, a family spokeswoman said.

  •  

    Dwyane Wade re-signs with Miami Heat

    Dwyane Wade is staying with the Miami Heat, and his latest deal is designed to give both the player and the only franchise he’s ever known some flexibility in the coming years.Wade signed a new contract with the Heat on Tuesday. It’s a two-year deal, the second of those seasons a player option, said a person familiar with the situation. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because neither side announced terms.“I am proud to have spent every single day of my career as a member of the Miami Heat and to have brought three championship titles to this great city,” Wade said in a statement. “I’ve been here through the good times and the hard times. I have confidence in the Miami Heat organization and the team they are building.”Earlier Tuesday, Wade tweeted “Home Is Where The Heart Is... My Home,My City,My House” and attached a photo of himself standing below the three NBA championship banners that hang at Miami’s home arena.Financial terms were not announced, though it’s expected Wade’s salary for next season will not reach the $20.2 million he would have made under his previous contract.Heat President Pat Riley confirmed that Wade again bought into the Heat mantra of sacrifice. The contract he signed four years ago left millions on the bargaining-room table, in part to make the deals with LeBron James, Chris Bosh and Udonis Haslem happen.“Dwyane has been the franchise cornerstone for this team since the day he arrived 11 years ago,” Riley said. “He has shown his commitment to the Heat many times over the course of his career and has always been willing to sacrifice in order to help build this team into a champion. This time is no different.”Wade’s return was expected, yet still represents a huge win for Miami during free agency — especially since it comes less than a week after James left the Heat after four seasons and returned to the Cleveland Cavaliers.So now, what was the “Big 3” is a “Big 2.” Bosh is in the process of finishing a $118 million, five-year contract with Miami.Also Tuesday, the Heat signed Luol Deng to a two-year, $20 million deal, which was agreed to over the weekend.“Luol Deng is one of the most important free agent signings that we have ever had in the history of the franchise,” Riley said. “He is a proven All-Star and quintessential team player, both as a scorer, as well as an All-NBA defender. He brings the attitude of a warrior and competes every single night against the very, very best.”Miami also announced the signing of small forward James Ennis, who has been one of the team’s summer-league standouts this year. Ennis was the 50th pick in the 2013 draft and spent last season playing in Australia.Wade is entering his 12th Heat season and is the franchise’s all-time leader in games, points, assists and steals. He and Haslem, who is also expected to complete a new two-year contract with Miami in the coming days, are the only players to appear on all three of the Heat teams that won NBA championships in 2006, 2012 and 2013.He was limited to 54 games last season, in large part because of a maintenance program designed to limit wear and tear on his knees. But when he was on the floor, he was effective — shooting a career best 54.5 percent and averaging 19.0 points.With James gone, Wade likely won’t have the luxury of resting as much this season.He’s averaged 24.3 points for his career, 16th-best in NBA history and fifth-best among active players with at least seven seasons. And only seven other players in league history have as many points (17,481), rebounds (3,605), assists (4,301), steals (1,262) and blocked shots (696) as Wade has posted so far in his career.

  •  
    Zach Johnson, shown here after missing a birdie putt during the final round of the John Deere Classic, believes the short game is the key to winning the British Open.

    British Open challenge just what Johnson craves

    Twenty-five players who competed in the John Deere Classic were on the tournament’s jet to the British Open on Sunday night, and golf columnist Len Ziehm says Zach Johnson figures to have the best chance of that group when the third major championship of the season tees off on Thursday at Royal Liverpool.

  •  
    Tiger Woods looks down the 5th fairway prior to teeing off Tuesday during a practice round ahead of the British Open at the Royal Liverpool golf club in Hoylake, England. The British Open starts on Thursday.

    British Open: a new golf course, a new Tiger Woods

    Tiger Woods was an hour into his practice round Tuesday at the British Open when he stood on the fifth tee with a foreign object in his hand. In golf vernacular, it’s called a driver. “This is a different golf course when what we played in ‘06,” Woods said. “It was hot, ball was flying. It was very dusty. Now we’re making ball marks on the greens, which we weren’t doing then.”

  •  
    Associated Press In this July 16, 2013 photo, National League’s Clayton Kershaw, of the Los Angeles Dodgers, pitches during the second inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game in New York. The spike in strikeouts, the dip in home runs and worries that the game is becoming boring for fans reminds some people of 1968, when Bob Gibson, Denny McLain and their fellow aces dominated.

    With hitting down, should MLB lower the mound?

    Baseball has a problem: Clayton Kershaw, Aroldis Chapman, Felix Hernandez and all the other kings of the hill are just too good. Ruling with an assortment of big-bending curveballs, sharp sliders and 100 mph heat, a new generation of pitchers has thrown major league hitters into a huge slump. The spike in strikeouts, the dip in home runs and worries that the game is becoming boring for fans reminds some people of 1968, when Bob Gibson, Denny McLain and their fellow aces dominated.

  •  
    Derek Jeter, of the New York Yankees, waits to hit during batting practice for the MLB All-Star baseball game, Monday, July 14, 2014, in Minneapolis.

    The $1 million solution to All-Star Game woes

    Baseball is having a difficult time squeezing into the public consciousness these days. About all there is to say about baseball is that the All-Star Game – the latest edition scheduled for tonight in Minneapolis — is broken. The solution: Offer $1 million to the manager that manages to manage a victory.

  •  
    Pau Gasol (16), who signed with the Chicago Bulls, averaged 17.4 points and 9.4 rebounds per game last season for the Los Angeles Lakers.

    Except for Cleveland, Bulls put together best off-season

    While the Cleveland Cavaliers got their guy back and the world is right again in Ohio, the Chicago Bulls got Pau Gasol, and outside of LeBron James’ return to Cleveland, Mike North believes that’s the best addition any NBA team made in the off-season.

Business

  •  
    Dr. Bradley Shapior checks Sue Erb of Hanover Park before he performs a procedure on her at St. Alexius Medical Center in Hoffman Estates as nurse Deborah Thompson checks and records vital signs. St. Alexius is U.S. News and World Report's 5th-best hospital in the Chicago area.

    U.S. News list: Suburban hospitals among the 'best'

    Several suburban hospitals, including those in the Advocate and Alexian Brothers health care systems, were ranked among the best locally and nationally, according to the U.S. News and World Report's 2014-2015 Best Hospitals released today. Five hospitals within the Downers Grove-based Advocate Health Care system are listed among the top 25 hospitals in the Chicago area.

  •  
    Stock ended mostly lower Tuesday as investors considered a new set of corporate earnings and the Federal Reserve’s latest assessment of the U.S. economy.

    U.S. stocks mostly down as investors digest earnings

    The Federal Reserve’s latest take on the U.S. economy put many investors into sell mode Tuesday, sending stocks mostly lower after a brief upward turn early in the day. Fed Chair Janet Yellen, speaking before Congress, said the U.S. economy has yet to recover fully, but raised the possibility the central bank could raise its key short-term interest rate sooner than currently projected.

  •  
    Reynolds American Inc., producer of Camel and Pall Mall cigarettes, agreed to buy rival Lorillard Inc. for $27.4 billion including debt in a deal that reduces the 400-year-old U.S. tobacco industry to two major competitors.

    Tobacco firm Reynolds American to buy Lorillard

    Joe Camel is bulking up to take on the Marlboro Man. Camel cigarette maker Reynolds American Inc.’s $25 billion deal to buy Newport maker Lorillard Inc. creates a formidable No. 2 tobacco company in the U.S. behind Marlboro maker Altria. It also creates a powerhouse in menthol cigarettes, which are becoming a bigger part of the business and gives the combined company some breathing room even as people smoke fewer cigarettes every year.

  •  
    ASSOCIATED PRESS The Tribune Co. has set Aug. 4 as the date for the expected spinoff of its newspaper publishing business.

    Tribune sets Aug. 4 date for publishing spinoff

    The Tribune Co. has set Aug. 4 as the date for the expected spinoff of its newspaper publishing business. It first announced plans to separate its television and print businesses a year ago.

  •  

    World's wealthiest are even richer than you think

    With apologies to both F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, it seems the rich are not only different than you and me; they also have even more money than we previously thought. Philip Vermeulen, a senior economist at the European Central Bank, has produced a paper suggesting the top 1 percent in the U.S. and Europe own a much bigger share of national wealth than current surveys would suggest.

  •  
    Janet Yellen

    What Yellen can’t tell congress about rates

    Some major questions stand out as Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen heads to Capitol Hill this week for her semi-annual testimony to Congress: particularly, when should the Fed start raising interest rates, and are its unconventional stimulus efforts contributing to a financial bubble? Unfortunately, neither Yellen nor anyone else is in a position to provide decisive answers at this stage.

  •  
    Employees work inside an Airbus A350 XWB aircraft during manufacture at the Airbus Group NV factory in Toulouse, France. Airbus Group NV dominated the opening of the Farnborough Air Show with a $21 billion sales blitz and extended its run on the second day to grab an early lead over Chicago-based Boeing Co. at the aviation industry’s biggest expo.

    Airbus jet-sales blitz tops Boeing at Farnborough air show

    Airbus Group NV dominated the opening of the Farnborough Air Show with a $21 billion sales blitz and extended its run on the second day to grab an early lead over Chicago-based Boeing Co. at the aviation industry’s biggest expo.Boeing’s pulled in about $7.7 billion on the first day.

  •  
    Stock traders work at the Goldman Sachs post at the New York Stock Exchange in New York. Goldman Sachs Group Inc., which set a Wall Street record for trading revenue in 2009, reported earnings that topped estimates on a smaller drop in fixed-income revenue than many analysts projected.

    Goldman sachs beats analysts’ estimates on fixed-income trading

    Goldman Sachs Group Inc., which set a Wall Street record for trading revenue in 2009, reported earnings that topped estimates on a smaller drop in fixed-income revenue than many analysts projected. Second-quarter net income rose 5 percent to $2.04 billion, or $4.10 a share, from $1.93 billion, or $3.70, a year earlier, the New York-based company said today in a statement. That beat the $3.09 average estimate of 25 analysts in a Bloomberg survey.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Country superstar Garth Brooks opens his world tour on Thursday Sept. 4, with a performance at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont.

    Garth Brooks to launch world tour in Rosemont

    Garth Brooks will open his World Tour on Thursday, Sept. 4, at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont. Tickets go on sale to the public at 10 a.m. Friday, July 25. Tickets are $65.50 and go on sale to the public beginning at 10 a.m. Friday, July 25. There is a six-ticket limit per order.

  •  
    Elio’s Pizza on Fire’s Capricciosa pizza features plum tomatoes, artichokes, ham, mushrooms and olives.

    Elio’s gets pizza lovers fired up in Addison

    Tucked into the far end of a small yet busy strip mall off Lake Street in Addison, Elio’s Pizza on Fire's small size belies its vast and belly-filling menu. With only nine tables (seven inside; two outside) and seven bar chairs looking into the kitchen, Elio’s easily fills up on busy weekend nights. The wait is more than worth it.

  •  
    “Scandal” star Tony Goldwyn has taken on behind-the-camera roles as producer, director and writer for the new drama “The Divide.” The first of eight episodes premieres at 8 p.m., July 16, on WeTV.

    ‘Scandal’ star Tony Goldwyn creates a new drama

    Tony Goldwyn has displayed a lack of ethics in the White House. As President Fitzgerald Grant on ABC’s hit melodrama “Scandal,” he has cheated on his wife right under her nose and even smothered a pesky Supreme Court justice on her sickbed. But in his behind-the-camera roles as producer, director and writer, Goldwyn is exposing the ethical minefields of the justice system in a fine new drama “The Divide,” which premieres July 16.

  •  

    Son puts mom in tough situation because of sibling’s girlfriend

    Her oldest son won't attend family functions because he dislikes his brother's girlfriend. Mom now feels she has to choose who to invited and when. Carolyn Hax says both siblings are equal and she needs to say so.

  •  
    “Midnight Rider” director Randall Miller and two others have been charged with manslaughter and criminal trespassing in connection with a Feb. 20 crash in which a freight train plowed into their film crew on a railroad bridge in southeast Georgia. A camera assistant was killed and six workers were injured.

    Filmmakers in Ga. train crash go briefly to jail

    Two filmmakers charged with manslaughter several months after a train crash killed a member of their movie crew flew to Georgia over the weekend to turn themselves in at a rural jail, where they posted $25,000 bond apiece before returning home to California, their defense attorney said Tuesday.

  •  
    The Broadway musical “Holler If Ya Hear Me,” which uses songs from Tupac Shakur, will close Sunday at the Palace Theatre after playing just 17 previews and 38 regular performances.

    Tupac Shakur musical to close Sunday on Broadway

    Tupac Shakur fans, keep ya head up: The Broadway musical “Holler If Ya Hear Me” that uses songs from one of hip-hop’s greatest artists is closing after less than two months.

  •  
    The organization that puts on the Golden Globe Awards and the company that produces the telecast have resolved their long-standing court battle over rights to the show.

    Golden Globe producers, organizers settle lawsuit

    The organization that puts on the Golden Globe Awards and the company that produces the telecast have resolved their long-standing court battle over rights to the show. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association and dick clark productions announced Monday that the 2010 lawsuit has been settled. The terms were not revealed.

  •  
    Three Connecticut residents have pleaded not guilty to causing a disturbance at a Rhode Island house owned by Taylor Swift.

    3 plead not guilty to disturbance at Taylor Swift’s house

    Three Connecticut residents have pleaded not guilty to causing a disturbance at a Rhode Island house owned by Taylor Swift.

  •  
    Jennette McCurdy, left, and Ariana Grande, star in the Nickelodeon series “Sam & Cat.” The children’s network said Monday, July 14, 2014 that Thursday’s episode of the series will be its last. At points this year, the series that debuted last summer with Grande and Jennette McCurdy was Nickelodeon’s most popular series.

    Nick’s ‘Sam & Cat’ gone after less than season

    With Ariana Grande hitting it big in the music world this summer, her time as a star on children’s television is about to become history. Nickelodeon announced Monday that “Sam & Cat,” which at times was the network’s most popular series after debuting just last summer, will air its last original episode Thursday.

  •  
    Meredith Vieira’s new daytime talk show, “The Meredith Vieira Show” premieres in syndication Sept. 8.

    Vieira looks to connect with viewers on new show

    Meredith Vieira is looking to connect. “Authenticity,” she said, “is the key word” for what she hopes to bring to her new daytime talk show, “The Meredith Vieira Show,” which premieres in syndication Sept. 8.

  •  
    Proceeds from sales of “The Green City Market Cookbook” (2014 Midway) benefit the local, sustainable farmers market that has operated in Chicago since 1998.

    From the food editor: Celebrating farmed food and famed chefs

    “The Green City Market Cookbook” celebrates the farmers, the food, the chefs and shoppers who have flocked to Green City Market for organic, sustainable and locally sourced produce since 1998.

  •  

    Music Notes: Black Flag, White Zombie perform in suburbs

    Suburban fans of loud, powerful music have much to cheer for, as hardcore-punk pioneers Black Flag and industrial metal artist Rob Zombie will perform this weekend in Lombard and Grayslake, respectively.

  •  
    This Okapi handbag is made of cork fabric. Embraced by some progressive furniture makers decades ago and a staple in housewares, cork has found a larger place among shoes, handbags, jewelry and other fashion accessories.

    Cork. It’s not just for wine and bulletin boards

    Cork. It’s not just for wine stoppers and bulletin boards anymore. Embraced by some progressive furniture makers decades ago and a staple in housewares, cork has found a larger place among shoes, handbags, jewelry and other fashion accessories. Some upsides are that cork is renewable, feather light and water-resistant.

  •  
    Neil (Matt Passmore) and Grace Truman (Stephanie Szostak) confront their lives and unhappy marriage in USA’s “Satisfaction.”

    Troubled marriage fuels identity crisis in USA’s ‘Satisfaction’

    Can, and should, this marriage be saved? The question normally isn’t the central subject of a fictional television series, but it fuels USA Network’s serio-comic “Satisfaction.” Premiering Thursday, July 17, the show from “Suits” executive producer Sean Jablonski casts Matt Passmore as investment banker Neil Truman, whose displeasure with his life is stoked when he accidentally discovers his similarly unhappy wife, Grace (Stephanie Szostak), getting intimate with a male escort.

  •  
    Mini cherry cheesecakes she calls Jen’s Jems are just one of J’Ann Tharnstrom specialties.

    Cook of the Week: Volunteering, baking merge to benefit Lake Zurich Lions

    When the Lake Zurich Lions’ Alpine Fest opens July 18, it’s not likely that you will see J’Ann Tharnstrom, anywhere near the front lines. More likely, she will be working in the background, probably in the hot concession stand, aka ‘the Eat Stand,” and that’s just the way she likes it. “I like to work quietly, behind the scenes,” the Hawthorn Woods woman says.

  •  
    Julianna Margulies was nominated for an Emmy Award for best actress in a drama series for “The Good Wife,” but the show was not nominated for best drama series.

    TV academy: A few snubs won’t prompt Emmy changes

    When the Emmy Award nominations were unveiled, there was a glaring shortage of love for popular dramas “The Good Wife,” “Scandal” and “The Blacklist.” Although some of those broadcast network shows received acting bids, all were snubbed in the best drama series category. Is it time for a rules change or two?

  •  
    Living room furniture can be placed either on or off an area rug.

    Make your room pop with the right area rug

    There is hardly a room that doesn’t need an area rug. It is that item that puts a finishing touch on any room. Rugs can turn a room that seems not quite finished into a space that has that WOW factor.

  •  
    Wind and driving snow are seen on the top of the highest peak in the Northeast, Mount Washington, in New Hampshire.

    Going to extremes at a mountaintop weather museum

    How do you rebuild a weather museum atop a mountain known for some of the world’s worst weather? Very carefully. Extreme Mount Washington sits on the top of the Northeast’s highest peak, in New Hampshire. The museum recently underwent a $1 million transformation from a modest collection of artifacts behind glass to a modern facility packed with hands-on exhibits.

  •  
    Morrissey, “World Peace Is None Of Your Business”

    Morrissey gets political on new album

    Rue the day when Morrissey runs out of gripes. Throughout his 37-year career, he’s transformed torment and disdain into a memorable body of work with both the Smiths and as a solo artist. The 55-year old crooner has always approached romance and anything else that gets in his craw with stark reality. This time, on his 10th album “World Peace is None of Your Business,” he’s decided to exorcise more of his political demons.

  •  
    Jason Mraz, “Yes!”

    Mraz’s ‘YES!’ a bright, acoustic romp

    On his fifth studio album, singer-songwriter Jason Mraz returns to familiar lyrical territory, exploring the highs and lows of love in his bright, folk-pop style. “YES!” tells a love story, from the initial intoxication to the inevitable goodbye.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: Time for new thinking on prison reform

    A Daily Herald editorial says a special legislative panel meeting in Chicago must take a fresh, non-political approach to prison reform.

  •  

    Highway Trust Fund needs a solution for the long haul

    Columnist Donna Brazile: Once again, Congress needs to act — this time to renew the Federal Highway Trust Fund, created in 1956 to help construct and fund our nation’s roadways, bridges, tunnels and sidewalks. The trust fund has been a complete success, but it’s about to run out of money soon if Congress fails to act.

  •  

    Needed: A conservative temperament

    Columnist Michael Gerson: Precisely because President Obama’s progressivism is exhausted and increasingly discredited, Americans will give the GOP another look. They will be either impressed or frightened by what they see.

  •  

    Board of review cooperates for success
    A Cook County letter to the editor: Cook County homeowners have received their second installment property tax bill for 2013. While most folks don’t enjoy receiving their bill, there is good news this time. After more than 30 years of late billing, for the third year in a row, the bills have gone out on time.

  •  

    Don’t waste money extending Rt. 53
    A Lake Barrington letter to the editor: Yes, the Route 53 extension rears its ugly head again, in reference to the July 1 report, “Committee to study potential Route 53 savings,” wouldn’t it be a better idea to spend the billions of dollars in a more productive way?

  •  

    Hobby Lobby’s ties to China shameful
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: Imagine this: that a supposed Christian organization depending on an atheistic country that not only persecutes its own Christian citizens, promotes abortions and limits family size has literally sworn to destroy theist democracies around the world subsidizing such a regime.

  •  

    New rules needed to manage traffic
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: This letter started when I heard the morning traffic reporter state that it was a 62 minute ride from Thorndale on in at 6:22 a.m., and stayed at 62 minutes for over two hours.

  •  

    Wal-Mart still bad idea for C’ville
    A Carpentersville letter to the editor: Wal-Mart Super Centers, as purposed for Carpentersville, do sell most everything, including specialty items like ethnic foods and drugs, automotive supplies and alcohol. They tend to sell what fits their specific market location. A Wal-Mart on the East side of Carpentersville will hurt or kill existing businesses.

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