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Daily Archive : Sunday July 6, 2014

News

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    IndyCar driver Charlie Kimball, who has Type 1 diabetes, talks with kids who have the same disease at Camp Discovery, in the HealthTrack Sports Wellness facility in Glen Ellyn.

    Indy driver Charlie Kimball tells kids with diabetes to follow their dreams

    Recently, 51 kids ages 4 to 9 learned how to manage their Type 1 diabetes while having fun at a day camp at HealthTrack Sports Wellness in Glen Ellyn. Charlie Kimball, the first race car driver with diabetes to win an IndyCar Series race, was there to help them build model race cars and encourage them with his own story. “Being able to share my enthusiasm and passion for racing with these...

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    Investigators look over the scene of a fire Sunday morning that caused extensive damage to a restaurant at 6 W. Jefferson Ave. in downtown Naperville. The fire left the business uninhabitable, authorities said.

    Fire leaves downtown Naperville restaurant uninhabitable

    Investigators are working to determine what sparked an early morning fire Sunday that left a downtown Naperville restaurant uninhabitable and caused an estimated $200,000 in damage to its building. No one was injured in the fire, which was reported at 6:13 a.m. by a passer-by that noticed a large amount of smoke coming from the two-story structure at 6 W. Jefferson Ave.

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    Former U.S. Sen. Alan Dixon, seen here in 1995, died Sunday at his home in Fairview Heights, Ill. He was 86.

    Former U.S. Sen. Alan Dixon of Illinois dies

    Former U.S. Sen. Alan Dixon, an Illinois Democrat whose career in national and state politics spanned more than 40 consecutive years in public office, died Sunday, his son said. He was 86. Dixon, who served in the U.S. Senate from 1981 to 1993, died at his home in Fairview Heights the day before his 87th birthday.

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    Algonquin crash leaves car on its side; no injuries reported

    Apart from minor cuts and bruises, no injuries were reported in a two-car wreck near the intersection of Algonquin and Pyott roads in Algonquin Sunday night that left one car on its side.

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    Elgin school among sites for free summer meals

    Classes may be out of session, but a state program providing free breakfasts and lunches for students will continue this summer at schools, including one in Elgin, worship centers, parks and community centers statewide. Last year, more than 106,500 low-income children daily ate free meals through summer food programs.

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    A new front entrance is part of an ongoing, $247 million modernization project at Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital near Lake Barrington. The main entrance will be closed 18 months while construction takes place.

    Work begins on new entrance at Good Shepherd

    Work has begun on a new main entrance at Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital, adding more traffic cones, construction cranes and workers in hard hats to the campus near Lake Barrington, but also signaling further progress in the facility’s $247 million modernization project expected to finish in 2017. Officials say the new entrance will provide a much-needed facelift to the 35-year-old...

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    Oppido Mamertina mayor Domenico Giannetta, center, wearing a sash with Italian flag’s colors, flanked at left by Italian Carabinieri officer Andrea Marino, walk during a religious procession in Oppido Mamertina, Calabria region, Southern Italy.

    Church parade past Mafia home a challenge to pope

    In apparent defiance of Pope Francis, a church procession detoured from its route through a southern Italian town to honor a convicted mobster under house arrest. Interior Minister Angelino Alfano on Sunday denounced the tribute in Oppido Mamertina, a Calabrian town and ‘ndrangheta crime syndicate stronghold, as ‘’deplorable and disgusting.” He praised three...

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    Two men carry Steven Robles, second from right, after he was bitten by a great white shark, as lifeguards close in at left in the ocean off Southern California’s Manhattan Beach Saturday.

    California shark bite victim feared for his life

    Steven Robles was an hour into his regular weekend swim off some of Southern California’s most popular beaches when he came face-to-face with a great white shark. The 7-foot-long juvenile had been trying to free itself from a fisherman’s hook for about half an hour.

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    Soldiers patrol a terminal at Paris Charles de Gaulle airport in Roissy, France. Friday, when the French civil aviation authority announced stepped-up security measures “for the summer period.”

    TSA: Some on U.S.-bound flights must turn on phones

    Passengers at some overseas airports that offer U.S.-bound flights will be required to power on their electronic devices in order to board their flights, the Transportation Security Administration said Sunday. The TSA said it is requiring some overseas airports to have passengers turn on devices such as cellphones before boarding. It says devices that won’t power up won’t be allowed...

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    Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, appearing Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” said all persons regardless of age face “a deportation proceeding” if they enter the country illegally. The Obama administration, he said, is “looking at ways to create additional options for dealing with the children in particular, consistent with our laws and our values.”

    Legal, political hurdles in child migrant crisis

    The legal, humanitarian and political constraints facing the Obama administration as it copes with thousands of Central American children entering the country illegally came into sharp focus in a series of interviews Sunday.

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    German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere has summoned the U.S. ambassador to help clarify an apparent case of American spying on Germany.

    Spy case threatens to sour German-U.S. ties anew

    German-U.S. relations are facing a new test over a German intelligence employee who reportedly spied for the U.S., with Germany’s president saying if the allegations are true, that kind of spying on allies must stop. Prosecutors say a 31-year-old German was arrested last week on suspicion of spying for foreign intelligence services, and that he allegedly handed over 218 documents between...

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    Geneva woman found dead on railroad tracks

    Police are investigating the death of a woman found lying on the Union Pacific railroad tracks in Geneva by a Metra conductor early Sunday morning. The woman was identified as Kathleen M. King, 32, of Geneva, according to police.

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    Jaime Guzman and Joel Arriaga eat some ribs during the final day of the 27th annual Ribfest in Naperville. “We are going to try them all,” Guzman said of the dozen rib vendors at the festival.

    Ribfest comes to a satisfying end for barbecue lovers

    Rib lovers had a lip-smacking, finger-licking good time on the last day of the 2014 Naperville Ribfest. Among them was Jaime Guzman and his nephew, Joel Arriaga, who said they couldn’t choose just one or two rib vendors to try. “We are going to try them all,” Guzman said.

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    2014 Miss Mundelein Mollie Shutter, center, waves to the crowd Sunday during the Mundelein Community Days Parade as it traveled along Hawley Street. Crowds lined the street to watch the parade that featured the Navy Band Great Lakes and lots of candy for kids.

    Thousands turn out for Mundelein parade

    Mundelein proved Sunday that a July 6 parade can be just as festive as one held on the fourth. You didn’t even have to live in Mundelein to enjoy Sunday’s Mundelein Community Days parade.

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    Yorkshire terrier Hairy Pawter, owned by Adrian and Denise Brigham of Streamwood, dressed as a firefighter Sunday for the pet parade at Arlington Heights’ Frontier Days. Pets and their owners competed for best costume, best trick, cutest pet, most unusual and looks most like its owner awards during the event.

    Dog Day at Frontier Days

    The dogs had their day during the Frontier Days pet parade Sunday at Arlington Heights’ Recreation Park. More than 50 pets, mostly dogs but also a cat and a guinea pig, participated in the event and competed in categories including best costume looks most like its owner.

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    A Ukrainian soldier gives out sausages in Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, Sunday, a day after Ukrainian troops forced the rebels out of the city that had been the center of the fighting. The success there suggests that the government may finally be making gains in the months-long battle against the insurgency.

    Pro-Russia separatists vow to keep up the fight

    Discouraged but defiant, pro-Russia separatists vowed to keep fighting the government in Kiev from the largest city in eastern Ukraine, where they regrouped Sunday after being driven out of a key stronghold. At a rally in a central Donetsk square, the rebels were cheered on by thousands of supporters waving flags from Russia and the self-proclaimed independent Donetsk People’s Republic.

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    This image made from video posted on a militant website Saturday purports to show the leader of the Islamic State group, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, delivering a sermon at a mosque in Iraq.

    Iraq analyzing tape purported to show top militant

    Iraq security agencies are working to verify the authenticity of a video that purportedly shows the elusive leader of the Sunni extremist group that has declared an Islamic state in a large chunk of territory it controls leading prayers this week in northern Iraq, authorities said. The video said to show Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the head of the Islamic State group, was reportedly filmed on Friday at...

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    Gerald Chverchko, 42, of the 10900 block of Mayfield Lane in Huntley, was charged with punching a Chicago police officer after a Dave Matthews concert Friday night at Northerly Island.

    Huntley man charged with punching cop after Dave Matthews concert

    A Huntley man faces charges alleging he punched a Chicago police officer after a Dave Matthews concert Friday night at Northerly Island. Gerald Chverchko is charged with aggravated battery of a police officer and resisting a police officer.

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    The Oak Brook Polo Club play Motor Werks on Sunday to kick off the 2014 polo season in Oak Brook. Sunday was also Hat Day at the polo club, one of several theme days planned for the season.

    Hats, mallets and horses: Polo season opens in Oak Brook

    The 2014 polo season got under way Sunday in Oak Brook. Hundreds of people turned out for Hat Day at the polo grounds, where spectators were encouraged to wear their most (or least) beautiful headwear. "It's such an exciting game. When those horses start moving at top speed, it's thunderous," said James Pehta, head of the Oak Brook Polo Committee.

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    Genevieve Nacario of Lisle tries out the new iFly indoor sky-diving venue, which opened Friday in Naperville.

    Sky diving comes to Naperville’s north side

    The sport of indoor sky diving is an adrenaline rush that simulates the free fall of outdoor sky diving, and it’s available beginning Friday at iFly in Naperville to thrill-seekers who want to stop one step short of jumping out of an airplane. “Here it’s all about precision, agility, speed and movement,” said David Janossy, general manager of iFly Naperville.

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    Shoes collected for poor

    New and used shoes are being collected to help the poor at Brad Hempton — Farmers Insurance Agents, 701 E. Irving Park Road, Suite 107, Roselle. The donated shoes are delivered to Soles4Souls, an international anti-poverty organization.

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    Lincolnshire residents named citizens of the year

    Lincolnshire residents Bob and Pat Gregory have been named the town’s 2014 Citizens of the Year, officials announced last week. The Gregorys were selected for their many years of leadership and active community service.

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    St. Charles police warn of suburban IRS scam

    St. Charles police are warning of a suburban scam in which a caller with a 202 area code tells potential victims they owe money to the IRS and immediate payment is needed to avoid arrest and eviction; an Elgin man faces up to six years in prison for a gang fight last year.

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    A break on flood insurance for Lake Co. residents?

    Residents in unincorporated Lake County may be able to save up to 20 percent on their flood insurance policies. Lake County is recertified each year through the Federal Emergency Management Agency based on floodplain and building code regulations and community information and education. With this rating, there is a potential savings of up to $227 per policy, saving Lake County residents $244,290...

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    When the NSA intercepted the online accounts of legally targeted foreigners over a four-year period it also collected the conversations of nine times as many ordinary Internet users, both Americans and non-Americans, according to an investigation by The Washington Post published on Sunday,

    Report: Ordinary Americans caught up in data sweep

    When the U.S. National Security Agency intercepted the online accounts of legally targeted foreigners over a four-year period it also collected the conversations of nine times as many ordinary Internet users, both Americans and non-Americans, according to a probe by The Washington Post.

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    Some states are considering crafting a law along the order of a Connecticut law that allows judges to order guns temporarily seized after police present evidence that a person is a danger to themselves or others.

    States look to gun seizure law after mass killings

    As state officials across the country grapple with how to prevent mass killings like the ones at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown and near the University of California, Santa Barbara, some are turning to a gun seizure law pioneered in Connecticut 15 years ago. Connecticut’s law allows judges to order guns temporarily seized after police present evidence that a person is a danger to...

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    Demonstrators react outside the Supreme Court in Washington after hearing the court’s decision on the Hobby Lobby case on June 30. shows The next difficult question likely to be resolved by the court: how much distance from an immoral act is enough?

    Nonprofits’ contraceptive cases next for justices

    How much distance from an immoral act is enough? That’s the difficult question behind the next legal dispute over religion, birth control and the health law that is likely to be resolved by the Supreme Court.

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    Lt. Gordon Ambelas

    NYC mourns death of firefighter in high-rise blaze

    Lt. Gordon Ambelas died Saturday after suffering multiple injuries while on the 19th floor of the 21-story building in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, officials said. “We lost a real hero tonight and our hearts are heavy,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said of the 14-year veteran of the force. “I ask every New Yorker to keep the lieutenant in their prayers.”

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    Thief returns 9/11 firefighter’s flag with apology

    An American flag stolen from the family of a firefighter killed on Sept. 11 has been returned with a note that says: “I am so sorry, I had no idea.”

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    Philadelphia firefighters walk past burned row homes on Saturday in Philadelphia after a fast-moving row house fire early Saturday left four children dead. Fire department officials say there is no immediate word on how many others were injured in the blaze that destroyed eight homes in the row and engulfed a total of 10 houses.

    Investigators seek cause of deadly row house fire

    Fire officials planned to return to a charred block of row homes Sunday to investigate the cause of a blaze that killed three 4-year-olds and a baby and engulfed at least 10 residences. The fire erupted early Saturday and raced from row home to row home, leaving behind only charred frames. One witness said the blaze may have begun on a couch on a porch.

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    4 shot at Houston festival, 2 hurt when leaving

    A man opened fire on an arena floor at a Caribbean music festival, wounding at least four people, police said, and two women were injured as the crowd rushed to flee the shooting. Several thousand people had gathered at the arena for a Fourth of July party at the Houston Caribbean Festival, which was supposed to run until around 5 a.m., Houston Police spokesman Jodi Silva said.

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    Waves crash against rock embankments that protect the Escuminac road against erosion Saturday during Tropical storm Arthur in Escuminac, New Brunswick. Tropical storm Arthur hit Canada’s Maritime provinces with near-hurricane strength winds and torrential rains, knocking out power to nearly 200,000 customers.

    Arthur hits eastern Canada, causes power outages

    Arthur hit Canada’s Maritime provinces with near-hurricane strength winds and torrential rains, knocking down trees and leaving about tens of thousands of people without power. Canadian Hurricane Centre spokesman Chris Fogarty said that winds were easing, but more rainfall is predicted for already drenched southwestern New Brunswick.

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    Raging California wildfire burns right up to homes

    Firefighters saved about 40 homes in a rural Northern California neighborhood as a fast-moving blaze came dangerously close during a holiday weekend that saw several destructive fires across California, officials said. Tinder dry conditions and hot weather fueled the fire on the southeast shore of Lake Berryessa and it rapidly chewed through thousands of acres of thick brush near Golden Bear...

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    Rancher Cliven Bundy speaks at a news conference near Bunkerville, Nev. U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials say they agree with a Nevada sheriff’s position that rancher Bundy must be held accountable for his role in an April standoff between his supporters and the federal agency. Clark County Sheriff Doug Gillespie said Bundy crossed the line when he allowed states’ rights supporters, including self-proclaimed militia members, onto his property to aim guns at police.

    Sheriff, feds: Rancher must be held accountable

    U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials say they agree with a Nevada sheriff’s position that rancher Cliven Bundy must be held accountable for his role in an April standoff between his supporters and the federal agency. Clark County Sheriff Doug Gillespie said Bundy crossed the line when he allowed states’ rights supporters, including self-proclaimed militia members, onto his...

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    2 police officers shot near Denver; suspect held

    A man shot and wounded two suburban Denver police officers Saturday night when they went to his residence to check on his welfare, authorities said. The injured female and male officers returned fire, wounding the gunman, and he was arrested following the shooting in Lakewood, a few miles west of downtown Denver.

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    Two men carry a swimmer, second from right, after he was bitten by a great white shark Saturday, as lifeguards close in at left in the ocean off Southern California’s Manhattan Beach. The man, who was with a group of long-distance swimmers when he swam into a fishing line, was bitten on a side of his rib cage according to Rick Flores, a Los Angeles County Fire Department spokesman. The man’s injuries were not life-threatening and he was taken to a hospital conscious and breathing on his own, Flores said.

    Shark bites man near Southern California beach

    A swimmer was bitten by a juvenile great white shark that grew agitated trying to free itself from a hook a fisherman had thrown into the water off Southern California’s Manhattan Beach Pier, officials said. The man, who was with a group of long-distance swimmers when he swam into the fishing line, was bitten on a side of his rib cage around 9:30 a.m. Saturday, said Rick Flores, a Los...

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    Expert warns of secondary drowning, water risks

    Secondary drowning can cause death hours after a near-drowning experience, said Jacqueline Corboy, a physician on staff at Northwest Community Hospital in Arlington Heights. “Vigilance is the most important thing,” Corboy said.

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    Construction is underway on the first phase of the Play for All playgrounds and gardens in Wheaton. Organizers are hoping the project, which is intended to provide recreation for everyone, regardless of disabilities, will open in the fall.

    First phase of Wheaton sensory playground, gardens opening soon

    If the weather starts to cooperate, planners say the first phase of a nearly $2.5 million sensory playground and garden project in Wheaton will be complete and ready for visitors in just a few months. “It's a place for everyone,” said Sarah O'Donnell, director of development for the Wheaton Park District.

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    Students Rachel Morin, left, and Sarah Parsons talk about their company, The Study Project, with teacher Hagop Soulakian during a gathering of the Business Incubator class at Barrington High School. The Study Project aims to provide an online meeting place for students to collaborate on school work.

    Barrington High Business Incubator program poised to spread

    To say that the Business Incubator program at Barrington High School had a successful first year would be putting it lightly. The architects of the class aimed to teach the tenets of entrepreneurship and business acumen to 16- and 17-year-olds hoped one student startup company would get $10,000 in seed money. Instead, five companies ended up with $80,000.

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    Harry Barko, a former contact worker for Kellogg, Brown and Root, is seen in Ashburn, Va. on June 20, 2014. In 2005 Barko, while working for KBR at an air base in Iraq, came forward to say he had witnessed fraud in a multibillion dollar program to provide support services on U.S. military bases in Iraq. Barko says his computer was confiscated by the company, which tried to transfer him away from the base.

    Workplace secrecy agreements rising, whistleblower lawyers say

    Lawyers who represent whistleblowers say they are seeing a rise in the use of overly restrictive nondisclosure agreements, which prevent employees from reporting fraud, even to government investigators. In recent months, agreements criticized as overly restrictive have surfaced a defense contractor and a nonprofit organization.

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    Corn crops are seen surrounded by water on Wednesday, July 2, at a farm in Silvis, Illinois. A round of severe thunderstorms Monday, June 30, damaged area crops and dumped a record amount of rain. The U.S. Department of Agriculture said this week that most of Illinois’ corn crop is in great shape. But some farmers in western and central Illinois suffered extensive damage from the storms.

    Storms knock down some Illinois corn crops

    Most of Illinois’ corn crop is considered strong this year, but farmers in western and north-central parts of the state may not fare so well after recent storms. High winds, some 60 mph and stronger, and heavy rain knocked down fields of corn on Monday, June 30.

Sports

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    In this March 5, 2014, file photo, New York Knicks’ Carmelo Anthony, right, leaves the floor as he drives around Minnesota Timberwolves’ Dante Cunningham in the second half of an NBA basketball game in Minneapolis. The wait continues on Anthony’s decision. Though some say we could find out Monday if he’ll be a Bull.

    Answers to questions about ’Melo’s quest for happiness

    There wasn't any news on the Carmelo Anthony watch Sunday. No news should mean the Bulls are still in contention. Maybe an answer will arrive Monday, but no one knows for sure.

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    Cougars fall in 14 innings

    The Kane County Cougars dropped a 2-1 decision in 14 innings Sunday against the Clinton LumberKings in Midwest League action.

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    Boomers sweep past Cornbelters

    The host Schaumburg Boomers captured their fourth straight victory, a 9-3 triumph over the Normal Cornbelters on Sunday for a sweep of their three-game Frontier League series.The Boomers (25-19), who are 18-5 at home this sesaon, batted around in the second inning and again in the third to grab a 7-0 lead.

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    Butler, Bandits blast Racers

    Kristen Butler went 3-for-4 including a home run and drove in 4 runs to help boost the Chicago Bandits to a 14-2 rout over the Akron Racers at the Ballpark at Rosemont. The Bandits (13-9) took three of four in the series.

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    Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro is headed to the All-Star game for the third time in four seasons.

    Cubs' Castro an all-star; Rizzo too?

    Cubs shortststop Starlin Castro has made his third all-star team, as he was chosen Sunday as a reserve for the July 15 game at Minneapolis. First baseman Anthony Rizzo is among the finalists for the fan online voting. Pitcher Jeff Samardzija was chosen by the players, but he was traded to Oakland over the weekend and cannot play in the All-Star Game.

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    Oakland Athletics’ Jeff Samardzija works against the Toronto Blue Jays in the first inning of a baseball game Sunday, July 6, 2014, in Oakland, Calif.

    Trade costs Samardzija a spot in the All-Star game

    The trade that put Jeff Samardzija on a postseason contender cost him a chance to pitch in his first All-Star game. A day after Samardzija was dealt from the Cubs to Oakland, a big league-high six Athletics were picked Sunday for the game at Target Field in Minnesota on July 15.

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    White Sox starter Hector Noesi throws against the Seattle Mariners during the first inning of a baseball game Sunday in Chicago.

    Noesi gets job done against former team

    Facing a Seattle team that traded him to Texas for cash considerations earlier in the season before the White Sox claimed him off waivers from the Rangers, Hector Noesi seemed to have plenty of motivation Sunday in an impressive start vs. the Mariners.

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    Chicago White Sox starter Hector Noesi throws against the Seattle Mariners during the first inning of a baseball game in Chicago, Sunday, July 6, 2014.

    Noesi helps White Sox edge Mariners

    Hector Noesi pitched five-hit ball into the seventh inning for his first win in a month, leading the White Sox to a 1-0 victory over the Seattle Mariners on Sunday.Noesi (3-6) struck out five and walked two in 6 2-3 innings, a crisp performance against one of his former teams. The right-hander pitched for Seattle for parts of three seasons before he was cut in April.Chicago finished with just two hits after it had four in Saturday’s 3-2 loss in 14 innings. But Conor Gillaspie scored on a wild pitch in the first and Noesi combined with two relievers on a five-hitter.Eric Surkamp got Robinson Cano to fly out with the bases loaded for the final out of the seventh, and Jake Petricka pitched two innings for his third save in four chances. The solid relief work came one day after the White Sox blew a 2-0 lead in the ninth inning. Seattle right-hander Taijuan Walker (1-1) lasted just four innings in his second start of the season. The 21-year-old Walker, one of baseball’s top pitching prospects, struggled with his control in his first loss in five major league appearances.The White Sox used Walker’s wildness to grab the lead in the first. Gillaspie walked with two outs, advanced to third on Jose Abreu’s single and scored when Walker threw his first of two wild pitches on ball four to Adam Dunn.Walker then got Alexei Ramirez to bounce into a fielder’s choice, ending the threat. The White Sox left a runner in scoring position in each of the first five innings.Walker allowed two hits and struck out three while throwing 83 pitches on a warm, humid day. He tossed six innings in a 10-4 victory at Houston last Monday in his season debut.Dustin Ackley and Brad Miller had two hits apiece for the Mariners, who had won five of six.Gillaspie also walked in the third before he left with a bruised right knee after he was hit by a pitch from Dominic Leone in the fifth inning. Gillaspie took a few shaky steps toward first before he was replaced by pinch-runner Leury Garcia.Second base umpire Dana DeMuth also departed in the fifth after colliding with White Sox second baseman Gordon Beckham. The game continued with three umpires.NOTES: Seattle ace Felix Hernandez will make his next start Friday against AL West-leading Oakland. Hernandez’s next turn was slated for Thursday, but manager Lloyd McClendon said he wanted his best pitcher going up against the A’s. McClendon also said he isn’t sure yet who will start Thursday against Minnesota. ... Mariners CF James Jones got the day off. Endy Chavez started in center. ... Petricka has a string of eight consecutive scoreless appearances. “His progression and his rise through the bullpen’s been pretty impressive,” manager Robin Ventura said. ... Seattle returns home to face Minnesota in the opener of a four-game series Monday night. Mariners RHP Hisashi Iwakuma (6-4, 3.33 ERA) and RHP Kevin Correia (4-10, 4.95) are slated to pitch the first game. ... The White Sox begin a four-game set at Boston on Monday night. RHP Scott Carroll (2-5, 5.05 ERA) takes on Red Sox RHP Clay Buchholz (3-4, 6.22) in the series opener.

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    Abreu, Ramirez both deserving of star status

    Unless you’ve been marooned on an island for the last three months, you’ve heard about White Sox rookie Jose Abreu. And unless you’ve just returned from a walkabout in the Australian Outback, you know that Abreu has played the first half like an all star. But if any of those apply, you returned home just in time to find out that Abreu has been rewarded with an All Star Game appearance in his first season in the big leagues. If you’re one of these people, let me just tell you that his selection is absolutely deserving.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Chris Sale needs the support of fans to make the all-star team via the Final Vote. He is 8-1 with a 2.16 ERA.

    Two White Sox players make the All-Star Game, but not Sale

    The White Sox are sending two players to the All-Star Game - first baseman Jose Abreu and shortstop Alexei Ramirez. Ace starter Chris Sale has to wait on the Final Vote to see if he makes his third straight all-star appearance.

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    Some bigwigs around baseball believe the Cubs got the short end of the stick in the trade that sent Jeff Samardzija, above, and Jason Hammel to the A’s.

    Did Cubs’ Epstein get taken for a ride?

    Not everyone believes the Cubs made a great trade while sending Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel to Oakland. Some insist the exchange rate would have been higher by trading the two pitchers separately.

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    Washington Nationals first baseman Adam LaRoche, left, tags Chicago Cubs’ Ryan Sweeney, right, out at first base during the third inning of a baseball game at Nationals Park, Sunday, July 6, 2014, in Washington. Sweeny was called safe, but the play was overturned and he ruled out.

    Cubs lose 2-1 in Washington

    WASHINGTON — Ryan Zimmerman’s eighth inning single drove in the go-ahead run as the surging Washington Nationals capped a strong weekend with a 2-1 win over the Cubs on Sunday.Nationals starter Jordan Zimmermann outdueled Jake Arrieta over six innings and left with a 1-0 lead. The Cubs tied it in the seventh on Starlin Castro’s sacrifice fly against Drew Storen.Denard Span’s hustle turned a soft hit to right field off Pedro Strop (1-4) into a double leading off the eighth. Two outs later, the Cubs intentionally walked Adam LaRoche to bring up Zimmerman, who ripped a single to left that scored Span.Tyler Clippard (6-2) pitched the eighth inning, and Rafael Soriano earned his 21st save for the Nationals, who have won seven of eight.Washington took two of three games in the series, including 13-0 on Saturday to break Chicago’s four-game winning streak.Zimmermann allowed seven hits with one walk and struck out five. He has allowed two earned runs or fewer in seven straight starts. The right-hander is 3-2 with a 1.26 ERA in that span.The Cubs had at least one hit in each of the first six innings, but couldn’t generate a clutch one versus Zimmermann. Chicago left 12 runners on base and went 1 for 9 with runners in scoring position.Following this weekend’s blockbuster trade that sent starters Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel to the Oakland A’s, Arrieta inherited the No. 1 role in the Cubs rotation. He has pitched to that level lately.The righty won his four previous starts and flirted with no-hitters in his last two. Arrieta carried a perfect game into the seventh inning on June 24 against Cincinnati and went 7 2-3 innings without allowing a hit at Boston on June 30.Washington ended such hopes immediately as leadoff hitter Span hit a fly ball that sailed over the outfielders for a double. Span moved to third base on Anthony Rendon’s grounder to second and scored on Jayson Werth’s groundout for a 1-0 lead.Arrieta allowed four hits and one run over six innings with three walks and five strikeouts. He gave up two singles to open the fifth, but escaped the jam when Zimmermann struck out while attempting to bunt the runners over.Storen entered having allowed only three earned runs this season and only one in 17 appearances since May 17.The Cubs threatened in the eighth, putting runners at second and third with one out against Clippard, but didn’t score. Pinch-hitter Wellington Castillo struck out looking, and Ryan Sweeney grounded out.Justin Ruggiano, Anthony Rizzo, and John Baker all had two hits for the Cubs.NOTES: The Cubs recalled RHP Blake Parker from Triple-A Iowa before the game. Parker takes the roster spot created by the trade with Oakland. ... Chicago hasn’t announced who will replace Samardzija and Hammel when their rotation spots come up Wednesday and Thursday. Edwin Jackson (5-8, 4.99) will open the five-game series at Cincinnati on Monday against fellow RHP Mike Leake (6-7, 3.47). ... Nationals RHP Stephen Strasburg (7-6, 3.53) will face RHP Chris Tillman (7-4, 4.21) on Monday when Baltimore visits Washington.

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    Novak Djokovic of Serbia holds the trophy after defeating Roger Federer of Switzerland in the men’s singles final at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, Sunday July 6, 2014.

    Djokovic tops Federer at Wimbledon

    LONDON — Novak Djokovic’s large lead in the rollicking Wimbledon final was slipping away, due in no small part to Roger Federer’s regal presence and resurgent play.No man has won tennis’ oldest major tournament more often than Federer, and he was not about to let it go easily. Djokovic went from being a point from victory in the fourth set to suddenly caught in the crucible of a fifth, and knew all too well that he had come up short in recent Grand Slam title matches.Steeling himself when he so desperately needed to, Serbia’s Djokovic held on for a 6-7 (7), 6-4, 7-6 (4), 5-7, 6-4 victory after nearly four hours of momentum shifts Sunday to win Wimbledon for the second time — and deny Switzerland’s Federer what would have been a record eighth championship at the All England Club.“I could have easily lost my concentration in the fifth and just handed him the win. But I didn’t, and that’s why this win has a special importance to me, mentally,” Djokovic said. “I managed to not just win against my opponent, but win against myself, as well, and find that inner strength.” Cradling his trophy during the post-match ceremony, Djokovic addressed Federer directly, saying: “I respect your career and everything you have done. And thank you for letting me win today.”Even Federer had to smile at that line.Truth is, Djokovic deserved plenty of credit for figuring out a way to raise his Grand Slam total to seven titles and allows him to overtake Rafael Nadal at No. 1 in the rankings. “Novak deserved it at the end, clearly,” said Federer, who hadn’t been to a Grand Slam final since winning his 17th major at Wimbledon in 2012, “but it was extremely close.” Federer, who turns 33 next month, won 88 of 89 service games through the semifinals and produced 29 aces in the final, but Djokovic broke him four times. Federer went to the net aggressively, only to see Djokovic zoom more than a dozen passing shots past him. And with most of the Centre Court crowd of about 15,000 raucously cheering for Federer, the 27-year-old Djokovic kept believing in himself.That part might have been the most difficult, given that Djokovic lost his past three major finals, and five of his past six, including against Andy Murray at Wimbledon last year, and against Nadal at the French Open last month.“Started doubting, of course, a little bit,” Djokovic said. “I needed this win a lot.”Boris Becker, the three-time Wimbledon champion who began coaching Djokovic this season, called the new champion “the biggest competitor” and praised “his sense of not giving up, giving it always another try.”“It could’ve gone either way in the fifth set,” said Becker, whose former rival as a player, Stefan Edberg, coaches Federer. “Novak finds another way. He digs deep and finds another way.” Djokovic built a 5-2 lead in the fourth set and served for the championship at 5-3. But Federer broke there for the first time all afternoon, smacking a forehand winner as Djokovic slipped and fell on a patch of brown dirt. Djokovic took a nastier tumble in the second set, hurting his left leg and prompting the first of two medical timeouts; he got his right calf massaged by a trainer in the fifth.With Federer serving at 5-4 in the fourth, he double-faulted to 30-all, then netted a backhand for 30-40 — handing Djokovic a match point. Federer hit a 118 mph (190 kph) serve that was called out, but he challenged the ruling, and the replay showed the ball touched a line for an ace. That was part of Federer’s five-game run to force a fifth set. It would be another 42 minutes until Djokovic again stood so close to triumph.

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    Cubs starting pitcher Jake Arrieta has been flirting with no-hitters and appears to be throwing with a lot of confidence. Like Vince Scully, broadcaster Len Kasper believes he's not doing his job if he doesn't alert baseball fans of a no-hitter in progress.

    Broadcasters have a duty to talk about no-hitters

    The amount of nasty and incoherent tweets that Len Kasper gets every time there’s a no-hitter in progress is astounding to him. As he explains in today's Cubs Insider column, "Our job in the booth is to tell people what’s happening (duh!). It’s also to keep people watching (double duh!). And if we don’t mention that a no-hitter is in progress, I am completely whiffing on my duties."

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    Cubs starting pitcher Edwin Jackson has excellent stuff, but, like always, his inconsistency can be maddening.

    Too much bad to go around for Cubs, White Sox

    As the Cubs and Sox barrel toward 90 games (and 50 losses), Matt Spiegel refuses to wait for the All-Star Game break to dissect what we’ve seen.

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    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for July 6

    Joe Kristufek's selections for July 6 racing at Arlington International.

Business

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    Jay Palmer, a whistleblower against Infosys, an Indian firm that eventually paid a hefty fine for H1 B visa infractions, poses during a New York visit Thursday. Amid calls for expanding the nation’s temporary skilled worker program, some Americans are pushing back.

    Backlash stirs in U.S. against foreign worker visas

    Kelly Parker was thrilled when she landed her dream job in 2012 providing tech support for Harley-Davidson’s Tomahawk, Wisconsin, plants. The divorced mother of three hoped it was the beginning of a new career with the motorcycle company. The dream didn’t last long. Parker claims she was laid off one year later after she trained her replacement, a newly arrived worker from India. Now she has joined a federal lawsuit alleging the global staffing firm that ran Harley-Davidson’s tech support discriminated against American workers — in part by replacing them with temporary workers from South Asia.

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    Career Coach: Staying mindful at work

    Stressed? Overworked? Feeling out of control? Sound familiar? Thanks to technology and the 24/7 world we live in, the pressure seemingly never ends. Workers feel they are on call at all times, day or night, and that they are never caught up. Most would say they work too many hours, and often with few real breaks.

  •  
    An electronic cigarette is demonstrated in Chicago. E-cigarettes may or may not be healthier, but they can save smokers some money.

    For smokers, can e-cigarettes save money?

    It’s difficult to say yet if electronic cigarettes are less harmful than regular fire-and-tobacco smokes, but they can save smokers hundreds or even thousands of dollars a year, but it may not stay that way for long as states are increasingly looking to tax e-cigarettes as they tax other tobacco products.

  •  
    The Showboat Casino Hotel announced it would shut down Aug. 31. It will be the second Atlantic City to close this year, along with The Atlantic Club, and a third may shut down as well if Revel Casino Hotel can’t find a buyer in bankruptcy court. Atlantic City started the year with 12 casinos. By Labor Day, it could be down to nine.

    Casino freebies fail to lift Atlantic City revenue

    Promotions such as free stays and meals aren’t translating into the spending boom that Atlantic City needs, 20 months from the five-year deadline that Governor Chris Christie set for a turnaround. Freebies totaled 26 percent of gross revenue for casino owners last year, as North American gambling operators tracked by Bloomberg Industries averaged as little as 6 percent.

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    Work Advice: When colleagues are expected to carry a co-worker who is suffering

    I work in a small government office. Over the last few months, one co-worker, “Steve,” has lost both his parents, and his adult child was permanently disabled in an accident. I am sympathetic, but he has spent every day at his desk calling funeral homes, insurance companies, doctors, etc., and then going home without having done any work.

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    Just over one in four Americans don’t have any emergency savings, according to a June phone survey commissioned by personal finance portal Bankrate.com. And among those who have money put away, half have saved less than three months’ expenses.

    Yes you can: 5 tips to beef up your savings

    Just over one in four Americans don’t have any emergency savings. “People are woefully under-saved for both emergencies and retirement,” said Greg McBride, senior financial analyst at Bankrate.com. “You can raise your income or you can cut your expenses, but either way, emergency savings doesn’t happen without discipline.” Here are five steps to help boost your savings.

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    Packed with 62 grams of sugar and 160 milligrams of caffeine per can, Rockstar accounted for 4 percent of the $27.5 billion global energy drink market last year, according to London-based research firm Euromonitor International.

    Rockstar turns 44-year-old into billionaire

    Packed with 62 grams of sugar and 160 milligrams of caffeine per can, Rockstar accounted for 4 percent of the $27.5 billion global energy drink market last year. The surge in Rockstar’s popularity has made Russell Weiner, its 44-year-old founder, a billionaire.

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    The IRA has started imposing 30 percent taxes on many overseas payments to financial institutions that don’t share information with the IRS.

    Offshore crackdown kicks off with 30% penalties for banks

    The IRS is about to get an unprecedented look at bank accounts and investments U.S. citizens hold abroad, through a law that is making it harder to hide assets from the tax collector. The government started imposing 30 percent taxes on many overseas payments to financial institutions that don’t share information with the IRS.

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    If British Airways could wire up its passengers to in-flight lie detectors, would it? Before this weekend, the idea might have sounded preposterous. But that was before the airline rolled out a video promoting what it calls its “Happiness Blanket.”

    British Airways has your mind-reading mood blanket

    If British Airways could wire up its passengers to in-flight lie detectors, would it? Before this weekend, the idea might have sounded preposterous. But that was before the airline rolled out a video promoting what it calls its “Happiness Blanket.”

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    Elvira Nabiullina, chairman of Russia’s central bank, speaks during a briefing at the headquarters of Bank Rossii in Moscow, Russia, on Friday, Feb. 14, 2014. Nabiullina signaled readiness to follow countries including India, Turkey and South Africa in tightening monetary policy after the ruble’s plunge to a record low this month increased inflation risks.

    Russia Bank head is no Putin yes man

    A year into the job, Russia’s central bank chairman is proving to be anything but a yes man for President Vladimir Putin. Bank of Russia head Elvira Nabiullina’s determination to tackle inflation and bolster the ruble has led to two interest-rate increases since February, to 7.5 percent, and a warning that more may be on the way.

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    For buyers with public listings, all-cash offers made up about one-third of the takeovers announced in the second-quarter, data compiled by Bloomberg show. A year earlier, all-cash bids accounted for two-thirds of deals, and in the five years through 2013 they averaged 50 percent, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

    Cash no longer king as acquirers use stock to fund takeovers

    Big deals are back. To fund them, buyers are using a little creative thinking and a lot of common stock to fuel the best quarter for global takeovers since 2007. As they agreed to more than $900 billion of purchases in the second quarter, acquirers turned to their rising stock prices to finance the deals.

Life & Entertainment

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    Optimus Prime in the film, “Transformers: Age of Extinction,” which continued to lead the box office in its second weekend of release.

    ‘Transformers’ tops ‘Tammy’ on weak July 4 weekend

    The Fourth of July went off like a dud at the box office, as the Michael Bay sequel “Transformers: Age of Extinction” and the Melisa McCarthy comedy “Tammy” led the weakest summer holiday weekend in at least a decade.

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    Blues Traveler plays RiverEdge Park in Aurora as part of the Under the Sun Tour on Sunday, July 6.

    Sunday picks: Blues Traveler plays Under the Sun

    Blues Traveler joins the Under the Sun Tour with Sugar Ray and Uncle Kracker at RiverEdge Park. More than 100 artists display and sell their work for the Chicago Botanic Garden Art Festival. And many festivals, including Eyes to the Skies, RibFest, Frontier Days and Mount Prospect Lions Club Village Fest, will be wrapping up the holiday weekend today.

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    Disney announced Sunday that shooting will be halted for two weeks in August to adjust the production schedule following Harrison Ford’s injury. The 71-year-old broke his leg in June during filming of the much-anticipated “Star Wars” sequel at Pinewood Studios outside of London.

    Ford injury to halt ‘Star Wars’ for 2 weeks

    Harrison Ford’s injury will cause production on “Star Wars: Episode VII” to be suspended for two weeks. Disney announced Sunday that shooting would be halted for two weeks in August to adjust the production schedule following Ford’s injury. The 71-year-old broke his leg in June during filming of the much-anticipated sequel at Pinewood Studios outside of London.

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    Jessica Simpson and Eric Johnson married Saturday at San Ysidro Ranch in Montecito, Calif., her publicist Lauren Auslander confirms.

    Jessica Simpson weds ex-NFL player Eric Johnson

    Singer and TV personality Jessica Simpson married retired NFL player Eric Johnson Saturday at San Ysidro Ranch in Montecito, California, her publicist Lauren Auslander confirms.

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    Eighteen bulls will be released in groups of six, providing three passes for fans at the Great Bull Run in Cicero.

    Can't make it to Spain? Run with the bulls locally

    If you've ever wanted to run with the bulls in Spain, you can take your shot at a version coming to Cicero. “There's nothing like running with 1,500-pound bulls," says Rob Dickens, The Great Bull Run's chief operating officer. "People like to test themselves against real danger. It's an adrenaline rush."

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    Costumes are the height of fashion at the Anime Midwest convention in Rosemont.

    Anime Midwest in Rosemont home to the fantastical

    Almost 10,000 fans of Japanese animation convened in Rosemont this weekend for an event that features bizarre costumes, foam weapons, formal dances and plenty of free ramen. “I like dressing up,” says Abbi Witt, 15, of Cary, who's dressed as Harley Quinn, wife of the Joker in Batman comics.

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    This June 2, 2014 photo shows left to right, Chateau Viranel, Domaine De Fontsainte and Scalabrone rose wines in Concord, N.H.

    Rose wines a hot seller this summer

    Pink wines are white hot right now, and there’s never been more to choose from. “It’s really amazing how people are drinking rose so much,” says Michael Madrigale, head sommelier at New York’s Bar Boulud and Boulud Sud restaurants.

  •  
    Once they finish blooming, bearded iris can be divided and replanted.

    Tips for saving your plants from common garden ailments

    Looking for ways to keep your plants healthy this year? Try these tips from Tim Johnson, director of horticulture at the Chicago Botanic Garden.

  •  
    Singer Josh Groban is showing people there’s a personality behind his vocal stylings.

    Josh Groban shows he’s more than a big voice

    Josh Groban admits he was hesitant to show that he was more than a guy with a big voice who could perform sweeping ballads. “For so much of my career I think I was a little bit protective of the brand or the image of the voice,” he said in a recent interview. “And that’s half of me. But I think I’ve been less afraid to let my freak flag fly a little bit — it has waved gloriously in the wind — and it’s been fun.”

  •  
    For $45, Taste of Chicago visitors can enjoy a sit-down, three- or four-course meal at the Pure Leaf Celebrity Chef du Jour air-conditioned tent.

    Diverse menus draw thousands to Taste of Chicago

    Why should Taste of Chicago be on your to-do list? Because this year’s five-day extravaganza offers palate-pleasing fare that reflects the Windy City’s growing reputation as a world-class culinary destination. Twenty-two new vendors join the fun Wednesday through Sunday, July 9-13, in Grant Park offering the likes of marinated white fish, chicken potpie, fried cheesecake bites, and beet and apple gazpacho.

  •  
    Actress Melissa McCarthy, right, a cast member, co-writer and producer of the upcoming film “Tammy,” and her husband Ben Falcone, co-writer/director of the film, attended CinemaCon 2014 in Las Vegas.

    McCarthy and Falcone are goofballs in matrimony

    “There’s the Mooch,” says Ben Falcone brightly as his wife, Melissa McCarthy, enters the room. It’s a term of endearment, a long-used nickname between the two who have been paired in love and comedy since they were aspiring performers at the Groundlings, the Los Angeles improv school. Their long partnership reaches a professional crescendo Friday with the release of “Tammy,” a road trip comedy they wrote together that McCarthy stars in and Falcone directs.

  •  

    How you phrase a question key to politeness

    While I’m away, readers give the advice.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: Keep up pressure against power politics

    A Daily Herald editorial says a court setback should not stop the momentum of a drive for a fairer system for distributing political power in the state.

  •  

    We must not be enemies

    Columnists Steven and Cokie Roberts: Howard Baker wrote his own epitaph. The Tennessee Republican served in the Senate for 18 years — eight of them as his party’s leader — before retiring in 1984. When he died recently at 88, we looked up a speech Baker gave in 1998, in which he described his leadership style.“Very often,” he said, he found himself “engaged in fire-breathing, passionate debate” with fellow senators. But afterward, “I would usually walk to the desk of my most recent antagonist, extend a hand of friendship, and solicit his support for the next issue for the following day.”

  •  

    On Iraq, difficult choices now and to come

    Columnist Michael Gerson: The summary moment of Barack Obama's foreign policy came in August 2013 during a consequential stroll.

  •  

    Look more closely at anti-liberal claims
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: Mr. Caldarola (HYPERLINK "http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20140626/discuss/140629060/"“Ponder these ‘gifts’ of liberalism,” June 26) states that a year ago he decided that the Obama administration was the most unethical, immoral and criminal presidency in history. He seems to have skipped over Harding and Nixon, who come to mind. He then lists several example some which are incoherent and others that are just plain wrong.

  •  

    U.S. team doesn’t deserve such criticism
    A Wheeling letter to the editor: The comments made by Brian DeValk on June 28 sound like your typical soccer hater. If you don’t like soccer, no need to tell the rest of the world — we don’t care what you like and don’t like. It’s obvious you have never played, let alone coach. Let me address one point at a time.

  •  

    Why change path of Illinois government?
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: Our state is billions of dollars in debt, taxes keep rising, businesses are leaving for other states, every month more people leave Illinois, every year another member of state government is convicted of wrongdoing. All this must be the fault of Tea Party members and conservative Republicans.

  •  

    What rules govern construction crews?
    A Lake Zurich letter to the editor: We were on our way to Wisconsin recently and were on Rt. 83 going north near Peterson Road, Grayslake. The time was about 10:45 a.m.Bad choice.

  •  

    If Walmart move is such an awful idea ...
    A Carpentersville letter to the editor: In a June 15 letter, former Village President Bill Sarto chastised Carpentersville for considering a new Walmart Superstore in the Route 25 TIF District. Unfortunately his letter was filled with inaccuracies and innuendo; and for a former village president, it displayed an astonishing lack of vision.

  •  

    Let government deal with medical liability
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: Just allow the government to pick up the responsibility for medical liability, as it surely does in Britain’s socialized system, and then adopt the British system of making the plaintiff pay all court costs if a lawsuit is found to have no merit.

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