Football Focus 2014

Daily Archive : Friday July 4, 2014

News

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    The former Ace rental car agency sits on a 5-acre site owned by Des Plaines would be included within the city’s proposed seventh Tax Increment Financing district at Higgins and Mannheim roads. City officials this week move forward with plans to create the new district.

    Des Plaines aldermen move ahead with plans to restructure TIF

    Des Plaines’ city council has started the process of restructuring an existing special taxing district plagued by a growing deficit. The city’s sixth Tax Increment Financing district, encompassing a triangle-shaped piece of land roughly bounded by Higgins and Mannheim roads and Greco Avenue, is in an estimated $6.8 million in the hole this year, and on track to be $20 million in the...

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    Caylle Del Boccio, 5, of Mount Prospect breaks boards for the Mount Prospect parade audience as part of her training from Kaya Martial Arts of Arlington Heights.

    Images: Independence Day parades, festivals, and community events
    Patriotism was on colorful display Friday, July 4 throughout the suburbs in parades, festivals, and community parties.

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    Michael Johnson and Jake Priester, both of Prospect Heights, try their best to get candy at the Arlington Heights Fourth of July parade Friday.

    Parades, picnics, festivals, fireworks as suburbs celebrate Fourth
    A healthy dose of good ol’ Americana came to hometown streets, parks and backyard picnics Friday as suburban residents celebrated our nation’s freedom with Fourth of July parades, feasts, festivals and fireworks. A warm, bright day drew thousands to parades from Arlington Heights to Elgin and Vernon Hills to Wheaton, and crowds packed festivals from relaxed neighborhood gatherings...

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    George Ryan

    Former Gov. Ryan: ‘Americans should come to their senses’

    George Ryan, an ex-Illinois governor and now an ex-convict, says he’d like to re-engage with the cause he left behind when he went to prison in 2007 — campaigning for the end of the death penalty in the U.S. “Americans should come to their senses,” Ryan said this week, in an hourlong interview with The Associated Press at his kitchen table. Newly free to speak after a year...

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    Susanne Atanus faces Jan Schakowsky, right, in the 9th Congressional District race in the 2014 general election.

    Atanus disputes email announcing withdrawal from 9th district race

    Susanne Atanus said Friday evening that she did not send an email announcing her withdrawal from the 9th Congressional District race, citing health issues. Atanus, of Niles, made national headlines in January after telling the Daily Herald Editorial Board that "God is angry. We are provoking him with abortions and same-sex marriage and civil unions."

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    Toronto Mayor Rob Ford holds back his emotions Monday while speaking during an invite-only press conference at City Hall in Toronto after his stay in a rehabilitation facility.

    Toronto mayor can’t promise he will stay sober

    Embattled Toronto Mayor Rob Ford said Friday that he won’t guarantee he will stay sober if he’s re-elected, telling a radio show that people will just have to trust him.

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    Palestinian women walk Friday through the Qalandia security checkpoint on their way to Jerusalem, behind two Israeli border guards officers, on the outskirts of the West Bank city of Ramallah.

    Clashes break out during Palestinian funeral

    During the procession, scores of masked Palestinians threw rocks at Israeli police on duty nearby, and they responded with stun grenades, spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said. He said more than 2,000 people attended the funeral.

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    Indian nurses who were trapped in territory captured by Islamic militants wait for the plane Friday to begin their journey home.

    Iraq’s al-Maliki signals intent to stay in charge

    The U.S. has urged the formation of a more inclusive government but has not explicitly called for al-Maliki to bow out.

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    Man suffers minor injuries after getting hit by car in Arlington Hts.

    An 89-year-old man injured his elbow when he was struck by a car in downtown Arlington Heights Friday, fire officials said. He did not need to be taken to a hospital after the collision on the 100 block of Vail Avenue, Battalion Cmdr. Bill Kidd said.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn

    Federal subpoena issued for anti-violence program emails

    A federal grand jury has subpoenaed the emails of officials involved in Gov. Pat Quinn’s troubled anti-violence program, the latest chapter in a story that has become a major issue in Quinn’s re-election campaign.

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    Health insurance grants available

    Illinois is accepting applications for grants to help with the next insurance enrollment period under President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. The Department of Public Health announced Thursday that community groups can apply through Aug. 1 for the “Get Covered Illinois” outreach grants.

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    Quinn signs military support expansion plan

    Gov. Pat Quinn has approved an expansion of a program that assists military families in Illinois during conflicts or wars.

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    Father sues school district over son’s suicide

    The father of a southern Illinois teenager who killed himself a day after watching an anti-bullying movie at school has filed a wrongful-death lawsuit against the district, accusing administrators of failing to stop the relentless taunts targeting his son.

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    Chicago must pay legal fees in gun store lawsuit

    Chicago lost its legal battle to keep gun stores out of the city, and now it must pick up the tab for nearly $1 million in legal fees that the winners spent on the case.

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    Man drives on carnival midway at Frontier Days

    A man in his 60s who police say has a medical condition veered into the carnival midway at the Frontier Days festival in Arlington Heights late Thursday.

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    Kids day at Mundelein farmers market

    Face painting, balloons and crafts will be part of the “Kids’ Day” festivities at the Mundelein Farmers Market on July 11. The event will run from 3 to 7 p.m. at the village hall, 300 Plaza Circle. The market features more than 20 vendors selling fruits, vegetables, meats, pastries and other products every week.

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    Kingswood UMC service gives thanks for first responders

    Kingswood UMC Church in Buffalo Grove offers “A Time To Give Thanks for First Responders” on Sunday, July 13, with a special prayer and blessing for first responders at both the 9 and 10:30 a.m. worship services.

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    Three injured in Fox River watercraft accident

    Three juveniles were injured in a personal watercraft accident on the Fox River in Elgin Friday afternoon, authorities said. The three were taken to an area hospital with minor injuries. The accident happened near the Voyageur’s Landing Forest Preserve.

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    Washington Street to reopen in Lake County

    The Lake County Division of Transportation will reopen Washington Street to through traffic from Cedar Lake Road to Hainesville Road in Round Lake Park the week of July 21. The closure has been necessary as part of the Washington Street reconstruction and widening project.

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    Golf outing raises $30,000 for CLC scholarships

    About $30,000 to help fund student scholarships at College of Lake County was raised through the Joan Legat Memorial Golf Outing in June at Glen Flora Country Club in Waukegan. The event is an annual fundraiser for the College of Lake County Foundation, which was founded in 1974 to help keep college education affordable for students in Lake County.

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    While players are expected in daylight at Bittersweet Golf Club in Gurnee, a movie for the Families in the Fairway promotion is on tap for Saturday night. “The Legend of Bagger Vance” starts at 8:45 p.m.

    Movie night Saturday at Bittersweet Golf Club fairway in Gurnee

    Gurnee’s Bittersweet Golf Club will get an extra workout Saturday. After golfers traverse the 18-hole course in daylight, village government and the Gurnee Park District will welcome guests for a free movie starting at 8:45 p.m. “To me, it’s the most beautiful piece of property in Gurnee and the only people who see it are the golfers,” Mayor Kristina Kovarik said.

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    Tess Boghossian, 12, of Palatine won a contest to represent Illinois in a state dinner later this month hosted by Michelle Obama.

    Palatine student, 12, will dine at first lady’s dinner

    A Palatine girl, 12, has earned an invite to a White House state dinner hosted by first lady Michelle Obama. How Tess Boghossian won the trip has something to with President Abraham Lincoln, quinoa and a little persistence. "It's a real honor," she said.

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    A Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputy walks past half the remains of a Tesla that wedged between two walls at Congregation Kol Ami synagogue in West Hollywood.

    Stolen Tesla torn apart in fiery crash

    A stolen Tesla speeding through Los Angeles-area streets went out of control and was torn in half in a fiery crash with other vehicles that injured six people.

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    A man crosses a flooded Highway 64 as wind pushes water over the road as Hurricane Arthur passes through Nags Head, N.C., Friday, July 4, 2014.

    Arthur moving away from NC’s Outer Banks

    While state and local officials worked to restore access to Hatteras Island and help those who had suffered storm and flooding damage, the effects of the hurricane were mostly confined to that part of the state. Farther south, the beaches were once again packed with people soaking up the sun.

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    Gertrude Weaver, right, talks Thursday with her son Joe Weaver, at Silver Oaks Health and Rehabilitation Center in Camden, Ark., a day before her 116th birthday.

    Arkansas woman named oldest American

    Although no birth record exists for Weaver, she celebrates her birthday each year on July 4 and did the same this year.

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    Carrie Adams, 8, of Mundelein, celebrates the Fourth of July in style Friday in Vernon Hills.

    Festive Fourth

    With a beautiful day as the backdrop, people are celebrating throughout the suburbs with parades, festivals, picnics and concerts. Still making plans? Get the scoop on fireworks shows across the suburbs on as well as a list of the best displays.

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    Fire in St. Charles leaves apartment uninhabitable

    A fire Thursday left a St. Charles apartment uninhabitable, according to a news release from the St. Charles Fire Department. The fire department responded to a fire alarm about 9:40 p.m. from a building at 1320 Covington Court.

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    Picking up trash is a common job for many of the 4,000 volunteers Ribfest organizers need to keep the fest running smoothly each year.

    31 committees, 4,000 volunteers who make Ribfest run

    Naperville Exchange Club members divide themselves into 31 committees to plan, organize and host Ribfest each year. All 31 are necessary, Ribfest spokesman Don Emery says, even ones as specific as the ice committee. “When I first started, I worked on the ice committee. We just lugged ice around all day,” Emery said. “We turned it into the most important job at Ribfest.”

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    Mental health experts and veterans advocacy officials remind residents living near veterans that fireworks displays may trigger post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in neighboring combat veterans.

    Experts warn fireworks may trigger PTSD episodes in veterans

    Fireworks aren't the symbols of freedom and liberty to many suburban combat veterans like they are to everyone else. Instead, the loud explosions and intermittent flashes trigger the anxiety and stress symptomatic of post-traumatic stress disorder. “What’s worse for these veterans are the days before or after and the unexpected booms,” said Amanda Feiner, an Arlington Heights...

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    Fireworks light up the sky for the Firework Festival during the fireworks display on Thursday, July 3, 2014, over the Saginaw River in downtown Bay City. Mich.

    July Fourth celebrations around the U.S.

    The United States marks 238 years as an independent nation as it celebrates the Fourth of July with fireworks, food and music. Here are some highlights from around the country.

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    In this picture taken Thursday evening July 3, 2014, former NSA employee Thomas Drake, center, arrives at the parliamentary NSA investigation committee in Berlin, Germany, German lawmakers began hearing expert testimony for a probe into the activities of foreign intelligence agencies in Germany. The inquiry was sparked by reports based on documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, which showed that German citizens, including Chancellor Angela Merkel, were targeted by U.S. intelligence.

    Report: German intel worker allegedly spied for US

    Chancellor Angela Merkel’s spokesman said Friday that she had been informed of the arrest of a German man who, according to media reports, is an intelligence service employee accused of spying for the United States.

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    A damaged house is seen after shelling in the city of Kramatorsk, Donetsk region, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, July 3, 2014. Residential areas came under shelling on Thursday from government forces.

    Ukraine: Rebels attack from both sides of border

    Ukrainian troops have recaptured more than a dozen eastern villages from pro-Russia separatists but Russia is allowing the rebels to attack Ukrainian border posts from its territory, a top security official said Friday.

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    33 injured after train rams truck in Germany

    Police say a train has collided with a truck at a railway crossing in southwestern Germany, leaving 33 people injured — four of them seriously.

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    Ex-basketball coach acquitted of sex charges

    A former Chicago charter school basketball coach has been acquitted of charges he forced a student to perform a sex act in his automobile and attempted to assault another girl.

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    Charges mount against teacher in videotaping case

    A southern Illinois math teacher already accused of videotaping girls in a high school locker room and motel bathroom now faces federal charges.

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    Des Plaines aldermen question appointments for prosecutor, hearing officer

    A Des Plaines city council committee wants the city’s administrative hearing officer and prosecuting attorney — hired to handle local ordinance violations — to stay the same, while the mayor and city manager are seeking new appointees for the roles.

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    A woman lays down a blanket alongside hundreds of other blankets, plastic tarps, and chairs placed along Dunton Avenue to reserve places to watch the Fourth of July parade in Arlington Heights.

    One man's battle plan for Arlington Heights parade lawn invasion

    I was awakened at dawn on July 4 by the sounds of an idling car engine and the clanging of metal lawn chairs. I looked out my bedroom window to see a middle-aged man in Bermuda shorts arranging the chairs, a blanket and a cooler on my front lawn. I live on Dunton Avenue, the route of our town's annual Fourth of July parade. Since that rude awakening 16 years ago, I have worked through the five...

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    In this Oct. 12, 2013, file photo, following a closed-door meeting of House Republicans, Rep. John Fleming, R-La., tells reporters that President Obama is not negotiating in good faith with the GOP, at the Capitol in Washington. Traditional ties between the business community and the Republican Party are fraying on Capitol Hill, where the House GOP has bucked corporate interests on a series of priorities this year, from immigration to highway funding to trade. “I think it’s the Chamber that’s drifted away from conservative pro-business values, not Republicans,” said Fleming, a conservative who said that the Chamber of Commerce and other business groups may speak for corporate America, but they don’t speak for him.

    GOP bucking business priorities on Capitol Hill

    Traditional ties between the business community and the Republican Party are fraying on Capitol Hill, where the House GOP has bucked corporate interests on a series of priorities this year, from immigration to highway funding to trade. Rebuffed in Congress, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other business groups have found more success backing pro-business candidates for election, but even they...

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    Lois Lerner

    Al Salvi remembers run-in with IRS’s Lois Lerner
    As the IRS scandal continues to play out in Washington — most recently with the revelation of the loss of former top official Lois Lerner’s emails — the saga reminds Lake County attorney Al Salvi of his experience with Lerner. “It ruined my political career, so I remember this pretty well,” he said.

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    After a thunderstorm rolled through the Badlands of South Dakota, a tourist watches as the sky turns brilliant colors.

    Images: Photo Contest Finalists
    Each week you submit your favorite photo. We pick the best of the bunch and select the finalists. Here are the finalists for the week ofJune 30.

Sports

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    Press, Red Stars rally for tie

    Forward Christen Press scored her first 2 goals of the season — in the 76th and 82nd minutes — to rally the Chicago Red Stars to a 2-2 tie against Portland on Friday.

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    Cougars shut out LumberKings 4-0

    Three pitchers combined for the visiting Kane County Cougars' ninth shutout of the year as Duane Underwood, Jose Arias and Michael Heesch silenced Clinton’s bats for nine innings. A 4-0 win guaranteed a series win for the Cougars (12-3, 57-28) as the LumberKings (5-10, 35-48) will try to avoid the sweep Sunday.

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    Cubs starter Jeff Samardzija, reportedly on his way to Oakland, has a 2.83 earned run average this season.

    Sources: Cubs trade Samardzija, Hammel to Oakland

    The Oakland Athletics have an agreement in place to acquire right-handers Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel from the Cubs for three top-line prospects in a surprising trade for baseball’s top team, two people with knowledge of the deal said Friday night.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Chris Sale struck out 12 with no walks while allowing 6 hits in his complete-game victory Friday night over the Mariners.

    Sale again makes all-star pitch for White Sox

    Chris Sale was sidelined for five weeks earlier in the season with a strained flexor muscle, but the White Sox' ace starter is back at full strength and once again showing he's one of the best pitchers in the game.

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    White Sox avoiding distraction of trade rumors

    Dayan Viciedo's name always seems to pop up in trade rumors, and this season is no different. The White Sox outfielder has been linked to the Mariners, Red Sox and Giants, but Viciedo said he doesn't worry about things he can't control.

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    Boomers rally past CornBelters

    The host Schaumburg Boomers treated an Independence Day crowd of 7,178 to a come-from-behind 6-4 victory over the Normal CornBelters in Frontier League action Friday.

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    Chicago White Sox catcher Tyler Flowers, left, and starting pitcher Chris Sale, right, celebrate their 7-1 victory against the Seattle Mariners during the ninth inning of a baseball game on Friday, July 4, 2014, in Chicago.

    Sale pitches complete game in Sox victory

    Jose Abreu hit his 27th home run, Chris Sale struck out a season-high 12 in a complete game and the Chicago White Sox beat the Seattle Mariners 7-1 on Friday night.Sale (8-1) allowed six hits and walked none in his fourth double-digit strikeout game of the season and 14th of his career.Dayan Viciedo and Paul Konerko also homered for the White Sox, who have won five of seven.Willie Bloomquist went 2 for 4 for the Mariners, who saw their four-game winning streak snapped. Rookie Roenis Elias (7-7) allowed five runs in five innings. He struck out six and walked one.Viciedo went 4 for 4 including a leadoff homer in the fourth that gave the White Sox a 1-0 lead. His 10th homer came on a 2-1 pitch.The White Sox added four runs in the fifth. Adam Eaton hit an RBI double and Gordon Beckham followed with a sacrifice fly after Moises Sierra singled and Tyler Flowers was hit by a pitch. Abreu then extended his hitting streak to 18 games with a two-run home run that put the White Sox ahead 5-0. He was tied for the major league lead for homers entering Friday. Abreu has eight home runs and 18 RBIs during his hitting streak, the longest active in the majors. The Mariners put runners at second and third in the sixth after two singles and a wild pitch, but Sale struck out two to end the inning. Konerko hit a two-run homer, his fifth, off Charlie Furbush for a 7-0 lead in the eighth. Sale allowed a single to Bloomquist and a one-out double to Robinson Cano in the ninth. Sale stayed in the game after manager Robin Ventura visited the mound. He allowed a sacrifice fly to Corey Hart and got Kyle Seager to ground out to end the game. The Mariners had six left-handers in their lineup against Sale. Hart returned from the disabled list to give the Mariners another right-handed bat. Sale was limiting left-handers to an .089 average this season entering Friday. The White Sox improved to 28-7 since 2010 against the Mariners.

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    Phoenix Mercury center Brittney Griner has written “In My Skin,” a book about her life that chronicles her struggles growing up gay, and she is in the process of creating an anti-bullying smartphone application.

    WNBA’s Griner takes on bullying in a big way

    On the court, Brittney Griner certainly makes a difference.The 6-foot-8 center for the Phoenix Mercury, known for her dunks since her college days at Baylor, had 11 rebounds and 5 blocks Wednesday in an 87-69 win over the visiting Chicago Sky. She is averaging 15.9 points, 8.5 rebounds, and a WNBA-leading 4.1 blocks per game. Last week, she set the WNBA record for most blocks in a game with 11 against Tulsa. Off the court, Griner is trying to have just as much of an impact. She is taking on bullying, staring it down like a hated opponent.

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    Former University of Illinois standout Sean Harrington is launching a new basketball venture with a training program, The Players Camp, that employs college players as coaches.

    Harrington giving back to the game of basketball

    A decade after Sean Harrington hit the final shot of his Illinois career, he is standing in a hometown gym with a basketbaall in his hands. At 33 years old, the former star for Elgin High School and the Fighting Illini is still not ready to let go. He plans to give back to the game he loves by launching The Players Camp with college basketball players as coaches.

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    Brazil’s Neymar is carried away after getting injured during the World Cup quarterfinal soccer match between Brazil and Colombia at the Arena Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil, Friday, July 4, 2014. Brazil’s team doctor says Neymar will miss the rest of the World Cup after breaking a vertebrae during the team’s quarterfinal win over Colombia.

    Brazil striker Neymar to miss rest of World Cup

    FORTALEZA, Brazil — Brazil’s team doctor says Neymar will miss the rest of the World Cup after breaking a vertebrae during the team’s quarterfinal win over Colombia. Neymar was kneed in the back by Colombia defender Juan Camilo Zuniga in the second half of Brazil’s 2-1 win, and was in tears when he was carried off the field on a stretcher.He was taken to a local clinic and team doctor Rodrigo Lasmar said after the match that the star striker had broken his third vertebrae.Neymar is the Brazil’s biggest star and has scored four goals for the team so far in the tournament.Brazil plays Germany in the semifinals on Tuesday.

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    Gascoigne, Bandits shut down Racers

    The Chicago Bandits extended their winning streak to four straight with a 7-2 victory over the Akron Racers on Friday at the Ballpark at Rosemont. Michelle Gascoigne of the Bandits (12-8) shut down the Racers (10-12) with a complete game, allowing 2 runs on 5 hits with 7 strikeouts en route to her third win of the season.

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    Brazil’s Marcelo celebrates at the end of the World Cup quarterfinal soccer match between Brazil and Colombia at the Arena Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil, Friday, July 4, 2014. Brazil won the match 2-1.

    Brazil beats Colombia, goes to semifinals

    Brazil made its way into the World Cup semifinals for the first time in 12 years, with goals coming from defenders Thiago Silva and David Luiz in a 2-1 win over Colombia on Friday. Brazil, which had been eliminated in the quarterfinals at the last two World Cups, will next play Germany on Tuesday in Belo Horizonte.

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    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for July 5

    Joe Kristufek's selections for July 5 racing at Arlington International.

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    A photographer on a motorcycle rides alongside Team Sky during a training ride Friday. The Tour de France will start on Saturday in Leeds and finishes in Paris on July 27.

    Tour de France gears up for UK start

    So your national team is out of the World Cup in Brazil, Wimbledon doesn’t seem the same without Serena Williams or Rafael Nadal and your baseball team is slumping. This weekend, fans of many stripes could join die-hard cycling buffs and tune in to the start of the 101st Tour de France for that much needed sports fix.

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    Victoria Duval, shown on June 27, received her cancer diagnosis after the first round of qualifying at Wimbledon but decided to continue playing.

    Duval has Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    American tennis player Victoria Duval has been diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma but expects to make a full recovery. Duval, who lost in the second round at Wimbledon last week, was diagnosed after a biopsy was taken in England before the tournament.

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    Alberto Contador was stripped of the 2010 Tour title and was suspended for two years after testing positive for clenbuterol in the final week of the race that year. Contador claimed he ate a contaminated steak. He’s a favorite to win this year’s Tour.

    5 things to know about doping at the Tour de France

    Doping has been an unfortunate part of the Tour de France since its inception in 1903. Instead of today’s high-tech performance enhancers like blood-booster EPO, riders juiced up on wine and cocaine, even strychnine, to get a lift in the race. As the sport went prime-time and grew more competitive and lucrative, the crackdown on doping cheats also intensified. Here are five things to know about doping before the race starts on Saturday.

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    Germany’s Mario Goetze and France’s Mathieu Debuchy challenge for the ball during their World Cup quarterfinal match Friday at Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Germany knocks France out of World Cup

    Joachim Loew’s decision to reshuffle his lineup and return captain Philipp Lahm to right back paid off immediately Friday, galvanizing the defense and earning Germany a place in the semifinals of the World Cup. “The team was not surprised by the changes,” Loew said. “We need all the players and when I have the feeling that I have to give the team a push, I do it. The team is improving from match to match.”

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    Novak Djokovic celebrates defeating Grigor Dimitrov in their men’s semifinal match Friday at Wimbledon.

    Wimbledon men’s final will be Djokovic-Federer

    After so much buzz about the rise of a new generation at Wimbledon, Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic turned aside up-and-comers in Friday’s semifinals. Djokovic overcame dips in his play to beat 11th-seeded Grigor Dimitrov of Bulgaria 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (7). Federer, tied with Pete Sampras and William Renshaw with seven Wimbledon titles, followed with a 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 victory over 11th-seeded Milos Raonic of Canada.

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    The Cubs’ Chris Coghlan slides safely into home as Nationals catcher Wilson Ramos waits for the throw during the fifth inning Friday in Washington, D.C.

    Cubs’ bats hot in 7-2 win over Nationals

    Jason Hammel pitched six-plus innings and Justin Ruggiano homered for the second straight game, leading the Cubs to a 7-2 victory over the Washington Nationals. The Cubs broke it open in the ninth when Ruggiano singled in Darwin Barney and Starlin Castro added a two-run single. Chris Coghlan had two hits and scored three times as the Cubs collected 14 hits in their fourth consecutive victory.

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    Now that Brandon Bollig is gone, Mike Spellman has a pretty good idea of which Blackhawks player the fans will love to hate.

    Spellman’s Scorecard: Offering up some sparklers for your holiday

    It's the Fourth of July, so you know there's a lot going on ... in Spellman's Scorecard.

Business

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    Billionaire Richard Mellon Scaife, owner and publisher of the Tribune Review newspapers in Pittsburgh and Greensburg, Pa., greets visitors as they enter the paper’s new facility in Warrendale, Pa. during the dedication of the building.

    Billionaire Richard Mellon Scaife dies at 82

    Richard Mellon Scaife died early Friday at his home, his newspaper, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, reported. Scaife’s death comes less than two months after he announced in a first-person, front-page story in his Pittsburgh Tribune-Review that he had an untreatable form of cancer.

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    Blue Bird recalls school buses

    Blue Bird is recalling more than 2,500 All American school buses and some transit buses to fix a problem that could make steering more difficult.

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    Radio shock jocks Greg “Opie” Hughes, left, and Anthony Cumia, right, leave CBS Radio studios on 57th Street with fans after finishing their first morning show, in New York.

    SiriusXM fires ‘Opie & Anthony’ host over tweets
    “Opie & Anthony” radio show host Anthony Cumia has been fired by satellite radio company SiriusXM, which cited his “racially charged” and “hate-filled” remarks on Twitter as the reason.

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    Thousands of public school teachers rally outside the Chicago Public Schools district headquarters.

    Unions gain in government sector

    The typical union worker now is more likely to be an educator, office worker or food or service industry employee rather than a construction worker, autoworker, electrician or mechanic. Far more women than men are among the union-label ranks.

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    Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson arrives Friday at London’s Old Bailey court to be sentenced.

    Ex-editor Coulson gets 18 months for hacking

    Judge John Saunders said editor Andy Coulson “has to take the major share of the blame” for the vast amount of hacking that took place while he was editor between 2003 and 2007.

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    Smoke rises from railway cars carrying crude oil after derailing in downtown Lac-Megantic, Quebec. Lac-Megantic still struggles to recover as it marks the disaster’s one-year anniversary.

    Grim brotherhood: Oil train firefighters reuniting

    All told, about 30 Maine firefighters and nine trucks headed north. They arrived in Lac-Megantic to what Fire Chief Tim Pellerin described as an “eerie quiet.”The only sound was the roar of the fire — like a blow torch. By then, part of downtown was destroyed.

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    E-commerce has been doubling in size about every five years, a pace that’s likely to accelerate. While the Web accounts for only 10 percent of total U.S. retail sales, in such categories as computers, online sales have reached more than a third of the total. Products once deemed relatively Web-proof — furniture, daily necessities — are moving online.

    Millennials shunning malls speed Web shopping revolution

    Millions of Americans are abandoning stores faster than retail executives and the stampede online will only accelerate as 80 million U.S. millennials start families, buying homes and filling them with stuff. Traditional retailers, for the first time ever in 2014, will generate half their sales growth on the Web.

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    This product image provided by Philip Morris International shows the iQOS device. Marlboro HeatSticks _ short, cigarette-eqsue sticks _ are heated to more than 660 degrees Fahrenheit (350 degrees Celsius) in the device to create a tobacco-flavored nicotine vapor.

    Marlboro tries to catch alt-smokers with HeatStick

    Philip Morris International Inc. is hoping to capitalize on the growing appetite for alternatives to traditional smokes like e-cigarettes with a new Marlboro-branded product that heats tobacco rather than burning it. Now, a surging e-cigarette industry has tobacco companies hoping for a resurgence of the technologies that some argue are less harmful than lighting up.

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    In this July 11, 2012 file photo, Steve Niedbalski shows his drought and heat stricken corn while chopping it down for feed in Nashville, Ill. Higher temperatures will reduce Midwest crop yields by 19 percent by midcentury and by 63 percent by the end of the century, according to a report backed by a trio of men with vast business experience that was released Tuesday, June 24, 2014.

    Money men tally cost of climate change

    Climate change is likely to exact enormous costs on U.S. regional economies in the form of lost property, reduced industrial output and more deaths. Among the predictions: Between $66 billion and $106 billion in coastal property will likely be below sea level by 2050.

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    European Commissioner for Digital Agenda Neelie Kroes addresses the media, at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels. The EU will cut the price caps for data downloads by more than half: down from 45 to 20 euro cents per megabyte (plus VAT).

    EU slashes mobile data roaming fees by 55 percent

    The European Union says the surcharges for surfing the Internet on mobile devices while traveling across the 28-nation bloc will be more than halved.

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    The U.S. market is missing the sales jolt provided by immigration. Last year, the number of immigrants granted U.S. residency — typically a requirement to get a mortgage — hit a nine-year low, according to government data. Immigrants, deterred by a weak American labor market since 2008, aren’t likely to get encouragement from Congress, where support for a reform bill has mostly evaporated.

    Housing sales hurt as fewer immigrants chase dream

    The U.S. market is missing the sales jolt provided by immigration. Last year, the number of immigrants granted U.S. residency -- typically a requirement to get a mortgage -- hit a nine-year low, according to government data. Immigrants, deterred by a weak American labor market since 2008, aren’t likely to get encouragement from Congress, where support for a reform bill has mostly evaporated.

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    Bottles of Budvar beer on sale in Moscow. As the summer season begins to sizzle, Czech brewers are lining up against other international brands to win over drinkers in former Soviet republics to the east and Asia.

    Czech brewers tout hometown lagers, giant goats as they look east

    The success of Czech beermakers in finding a foothold in more exotic destinations will depend on how well they address unfamiliar regulations, different drinking habits and low incomes among new consumers, analysts say. Plus they're using props such as 49-foot-tall wooden goats.

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    This May 14, 2014 file photo shows then-Health and Human Service Secretary nominee Sylvia Mathews Burwell testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Obama administration has been struggling to clear up data discrepancies that could potentially jeopardize coverage for millions under the health overhaul, the government’s health care fraud watchdog reported.

    Report: Health law sign-ups dogged by data flaws

    The Obama administration is struggling to resolve widespread data discrepancies that could call into question coverage for millions under the health overhaul, the government’s health care fraud watchdog reported this week.

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    This screen shot shows settings for Harman Kardon’s Clari-Fi and LiveStage features on an Android phone. Clari-Fi aims to restore some of the audio signal that is lost because of digital compression in today’s download and streaming formats. LiveStage claims to tune your listening experience to the specific Harman Kardon earphones you are wearing.

    Review: Equalizer apps work better than Clari-Fi

    Bring back the equalizers! That’s my conclusion after trying out Clari-Fi, a new technology from audio equipment maker Harman Kardon. Clari-Fi aims to restore some of the audio signal that is lost because of digital compression in today’s download and streaming formats.

  •  
    For a week in 2012, the social network’s staff scientist Adam Kramer and two collaborators used algorithms to doctor the news feeds of 689,003 English-speaking Facebook users. They reduced the number of posts containing “positive” and “negative” words, tracked their lab rat users’ own posts, and found that their mood was influenced by that of the news feed. The term, well-known to psychologists studying real-world communications, is “emotional contagion.”

    Is Facebook really turning us into lab rats?

    How shocking: Facebook had the temerity to conduct an experiment on its users without telling them. For a week in 2012, the social network reduced the number of posts containing “positive” and “negative” words, tracked their lab rat users’ own posts, and found that their mood was influenced by that of the news feed.

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    In this June 26, 2013 file photo, the warning signs are printed on the cigarette packets on sale in Bangkok.

    More countries adding graphic warnings to cigarettes

    Indonesia became the newest country to mandate graphic photo warnings on cigarette packs. The warnings, which showcase gruesome close-up images ranging from rotting teeth and cancerous lungs to open tracheotomy holes and corpses, are an effort to highlight the risks of health problems related to smoking.

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    The Internet may never truly forget, but Google is starting to. The tech giant began filtering out results for some users under Europe’s new “right to be forgotten.”

    Google begins removing user data under ‘right to be forgotten’

    The Internet may never truly forget, but Google is starting to. The tech giant began filtering out results for some users under Europe’s new “right to be forgotten.”

Life & Entertainment

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    Joey Chestnut won last year's Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest on Coney Island by eating 69 dogs in 10 minutes. Can he beat his own record in 2014? Find out at 1 p.m. Friday on ESPN2.

    Fourth fun from home — hot dogs included

    If the weather and the crowds keep you away from your town's Independence Day events this weekend, you can still enjoy the trappings of the holiday from your couch with TV shows that feature both gastronomic and pyrotechnic fireworks.

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    Competitive eater Joey Chestnut proposes to his girlfriend and fellow competitor Neslie Ricasa before the Nathan’s Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog Eating contest.

    Chestnut gets mustard yellow belt and fiancee

    High-ranking chowhound Joey “Jaws” Chestnut dropped to one knee and proposed to his longtime girlfriend before Friday’s annual hot dog eating contest, then packed away 61 franks and buns to hold onto his coveted mustard yellow winner’s belt.

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    Use branches of fresh rosemary as skewers to hold vegetables or small pieces of meat for grilling.

    Six great backyard plants for garden-to-table use

    Back in the day, an ambitious homeowner might set out a sturdy row of marigolds, add a mound of petunias, toss in a few gaudy gladiola bulbs and call it a garden. Today’s weekend warriors have grander plans. They start gardens in order to grow food and eat the harvest, sharing with friends and family.

  •  
    Luxury often means creating a unique space unattainable by everyone.

    Think of luxury as a trial run for affordable goods

    People all over the world — those who can afford it — want the best of the best for their home. But just what is it that they consider luxury? Every day there is something newer and better in technology, and in some cities, there is always a taller, nicer building to call home. Defining luxury is hard to do.

  •  
    Visitors watch the roaring Minnehaha Falls, which tumbles 53 feet into a basin before it continues to to the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. Visitors can get a view from above the falls or take stairs to creek level to see them from below.

    Twin Cities: 5 free things for visitors

    Like many places that endure long, difficult winters, Minnesota comes alive when the weather warms up. So many people from the Twin Cities — as Minneapolis and St. Paul are known — head to lakes in northern parts of the state that the city’s attractions truly open up to out-of-towners. And as in any urban area, some of the best are free.

  •  
    Mira Jacob’s prose is sharp and deeply funny in “The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing.”

    ‘Sleepwalker’s Guide’ is a beautiful family saga

    At the start of Mira Jacob’s beautiful debut, “The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing,” Amina Eapen’s mother summons her home to Albuquerque, New Mexico, claiming that her father is acting strangely. When Amina arrives, however, she learns that her father’s condition is more serious than her mother let on, and bears some connection to the feud 20 years earlier with the family back in Salem, India.

  •  

    Faulty septic system not disclosed
    Q. When we bought our house, the sellers disclosed that the septic tank was only two years old. They also gave us a report from a local septic contractor that said the system had passed inspection. Recently, we had a sewage backup in our home and have now learned that the septic tank is old and needs to be replaced.

  •  

    Fighting back on maternity discrimination
    It doesn’t get much publicity compared with other home mortgage issues, but it appears to be a persistent problem: Lenders and mortgage insurers allegedly delay or deny loan applications when a borrower is pregnant or heading for maternity leave.

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    Tips for buyers wanting a successful walk-through
    Savvy buyers always include a contingency in their offers to allow for a last-minute check of the property before the sale closes.

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    Planning a move this summer? Here are our useful tips
    Summer is the most popular time to make a move to a new house. School is out, and we have more vacation time. You can save a lot of money if you do some of the moving yourself, so here are some of our favorite moving tips:

  •  
    Homes along Chick Evans Lane in Woodridge’s Seven Bridges subdivision, where streets have golf-themed names.

    Neighborhood spotlight shines on Seven Bridges

    In 1997 after Denise and Kelly Keegan had started a family, they looked to move from their townhouse in Hinsdale to a newer and more spacious home within a good school district. That criteria led them to Seven Bridges in Woodridge where the second phase of homebuilding was in process.

Discuss

  •  
    Today is a day to celebrate our nation’s independence, as these suburban residents did by watching Fourth of July fireworks in Libertyville.

    Editorial: Today, let us celebrate our evolving freedom

    A Daily Herald editorial reflects on the evolving nature of the freedom the Founders declared 238 years ago today. You don't embrace freedom, the editorial says, until you embrace it for everyone else.

  •  
    Mary Shesgreen

    Poverty at the core of school failure

    Guest columnist Mary Shesgreen: I oppose charter schools because they address the wrong problem. The real cause of academic failure is not, as charter proponents contend, bad teachers, teachers unions and bureaucratic school systems. The real cause is poverty. Charter schools not only do not solve poverty, they create a major distraction from that simple fact.

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    Clearing the confusion about smart meters
    A letter to the editor: Smart meters are digital electric meters that provide customers with access to more information about energy use through online energy-management tools that can help customers manage their electric bills. Additionally, because smart meters automatically send meter readings to ComEd, they also help eliminate estimated bills and reduce operating costs, creating savings on customers’ electric bills.

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    Ruling is not about ‘war on women’
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: The Democrats’ reaction to the Supreme Court’s decision to protect the Hobby Lobby owner’s freedom of religion shows how low they will go to fan the flames of the phony “war on woman.” First, Hobby Lobby had no problem with contraceptives and willingly paid for 16 of the 20 forms of contraception for their employees for years.

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    Fly the flag on days of victory
    An Elgin letter to the editor: As the sea washed over the wounded and the salt water stung the bodies that lay on the beaches of Normandy, could the world have known what freedom was given to those still in their cradles and schools ... freedom for a new world for those whose lives were saved by the brave souls in combat from around the world?

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