SCGT

Daily Archive : Thursday July 3, 2014

News

  •  
    Bob Mariano, former CEO of Dominick’s and founder of the Mariano’s grocery store chain, speaks at the Schaumburg Business Association’s “Good Morning Schaumburg” program Tuesday. His appearance drew a large crowd to the monthly SBA program.

    Wisdom of Bob Mariano draws a big crowd to Schaumburg event

    The opportunity to hear from Bob Mariano, founder and namesake of the popular Mariano’s grocery store chain, created the rare phenomenon Tuesday — a line to get into the monthly morning gathering of the Schaumburg Business Association. More than 150 association members turned out to listen to the grocery innovator discuss his business principles.

  •  
    A car loaded down with bikes, kayaks and surfboards heads north on NC 12 through Buxton on Hatteras Island, N.C., at dawn on Thursday. The island is under a mandatory evacuation order because of approaching Hurricane Arthur.

    Arthur threatens July 4th plans along East Coast

    A strengthening Hurricane Arthur forced thousands of vacationers on the North Carolina coast to abandon their Independence Day plans while cities farther up the East Coast rescheduled fireworks displays threatened by rain from the storm. Arthur strengthened to a Category 2 hurricane Thursday night, with winds of 100 mph as the storm neared North Carolina.

  •  
    Wheaton College for the moment will be allowed to write a letter to the Department of Health and Human Services stating it objects to providing emergency contraception to its employees.

    Women on Supreme Court blast Wheaton College ruling

    A divided Supreme Court allowed Wheaton College, which objects to paying for contraceptives in its health plan, to avoid filling out a government document, at least for now, that the college says would violate its religious beliefs. “On the eve of Independence Day, we are grateful to God that the Supreme Court has made a wise decision in protecting our religious liberty,” Wheaton...

  •  
    The Illinois Supreme Court today dealt a big setback to Gov. Pat Quinn and lawmakers who wanted to cut teachers' and state workers' retirement benefits.

    Ruling deals big blow to teacher retirement cuts

    An Illinois Supreme Court ruling Thursday casts serious doubts on whether sweeping retirement benefit cuts for teachers and state workers will ever become reality. But as union leaders praise the potential protection of their members' pensions, supporters of the cuts advanced by lawmakers and Gov. Pat Quinn are cautioning against reading too far into Thursday's ruling and arguing the real case is...

  •  
    Jessica Lotesto gives her 13-year-old brother Dominic Laskero a kiss on top of his head as they reflect on their escape from a fire in their Hoffman Estates home Sunday morning. Nicky was instrumental in getting his sister and 77-year-old grandmother out of the burning house.

    Hoffman Estates teen detects fire, evacuates family out of burning home

    Dominic Laskero, 13, was instrumental in getting his 19-year-old sister and 77-year-old grandmother out of their burning Hoffman Estates house early Sunday morning. He also got their dog out, and firefighters arrived quickly enough to recover and resuscitate two cats who'd been trapped inside. “I got up and tried to go back to sleep,” Dominic said. “But after 30 seconds, I...

  •  

    One injured in 3-car Huntley crash

    One person had to be extricated from a car after a three-vehicle accident Thursday night in Huntley, officials said. Huntley fire and police, as well as the Kane County sheriff’s office, responded about 5 p.m. to the crash at the intersection of Big Timber Road and Route 47, Fire Lt. Ken Madziarek said.

  •  
    Gov. Pat Quinn

    Quinn halts IDOT political hiring

    Reacting to persistent problems at a state agency, Gov. Pat Quinn on Thursday ordered a moratorium on political hiring at the Illinois Department of Transportation and directed that executive-level staff in every state agency undergo training about proper hiring practices.

  •  
    Alex Stanco on lead vocals and drums and Buddy Wiegelman on lead guitar, both of Fox River Grove, play to fans big and little Thursday during the Cary Summer Celebration at Lions Park. The band, which includes Lisa Lamanna of Kildeer and Bob Osters of Hoffman Estates, not shown, plays often summer concert series.

    Cary celebrates the Fourth with music, fireworks

    The Cary Summer Celebration at Lions Park in Cary drew large crowds to the pre-Fourth of July event, hosted by the Cary Park District, on Thursday night. Families and friends gathered on blankets and lawn chairs as they listened to the 70s and 80s tunes covered by local band, Alex and The AllStars, and munched on snacks. Children danced on the lawn and shook tambourines provided by the band.

  •  
    Monica Pedila, 8, of Bartlett and her sister Hania, 11, ride the Tilt A Whirl on Thursday at Bartlett’s Fourth of July Festival.

    Bartlett starts its Fourth of July celebration

    Opening day of Bartlett's Fourth of July Festival.

  •  
    Former Chicago Bull Rick Brunson, left, shown here during a 2003 game against the Houston Rockets, was arrested last week in Vernon Hills on charges of attempted criminal sexual assault, criminal sexual abuse and aggravated battery, according to reports.

    Former Bull Brunson charged with attempted sexual assault

    Former Bulls player and coach Rick Brunson has been charged with the attempted sexual assault of an employee of a Vernon Hills fitness center.

  •  
    Conrad Dick, 10, rides the mechanical bull during the first day of Lincolnshire’s Red, White & Boom celebration Thursday at Spring Lake Park. The Lincolnshire Community Association festival featured a mechanical bull riding competition, vintage car show, games, food and entertainment.

    Lincolnshire celebrates with a party in the park

    Boys lined up along the street eating snow cones and ice cream to watch vintage cars arrive for Classic Cars on Display at Lincolnshire’s Red, White & Boom celebration Thursday night. Families packed the park on the first day of the annual Lincolnshire Community Association festival at Spring Lake Park.

  •  

    Man files ADA complaint against Fox Valley Repertory

    A Schaumburg man has filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice alleging his 90-year-old father was discriminated against while attending a recent performance at the Fox Valley Repertory. The complaint says the theater does not meet requirements under the Americans with Disabilities Act to accommodate low-mobility seniors with vision problems.

  •  
    Gilberto L. Herrera

    Bartlett teen hospitalized, Chicago man charged with aggravated battery

    A Chicago man faces a felony charge of aggravated battery after Bartlett police said he delivered a controlled susbtance to a 13-year-old boy. Police said the boy is still hospitalized in stable condition.

  •  
    Mount Prospect resident Henry Blim, a 90-year-old veteran of World War II, will receive a free roof for his house as part of local business Peterson Roofing’s No Roof Left Behind contest.

    WWII vet, school counselor from Mt. Prospect wins free roof

    Mount Prospect resident Henry Blim, a 90-year-old veteran of World War II, will receive a free roof for his house as part of the "No Roof Left Behind" porgram run by local business Peterson Roofing. After serving his country, Blim settled in Mount Prospect and worked for nearly 30 years in Northwest Suburban District 214.

  •  

    5 arrested in Lake County crime spree

    A high-speed chase on Tuesday led police to arrest five men who had been on a recent crime spree through Lake County that included home burglaries, car thefts and arson, authorities said.

  •  
    Louis Zamperini, a U.S. Olympic distance runner and World War II veteran who survived 47 days on a raft in the Pacific after his bomber crashed, then endured two years in Japanese prison camps, died Wednesday, July 2, 2014, according to Universal Pictures studio spokesman Michael Moses. He was 97.

    War hero Zamperini lived ‘unimaginable drama’

    Louis Zamperini, an Olympic distance runner and World War II veteran who survived 47 days on a raft in the Pacific after his bomber crashed, then endured two years in Japanese prison camps, has died. He was 97. Zamperini is the subject of Laura Hillenbrand’s best-selling book “Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption,” which is being made into a...

  •  
    Protesters turn back three buses carrying 140 immigrants as they attempt to enter the U.S. Border Patrol station for processing on Tuesday in Murrieta, Calif.

    California city is latest immigration flashpoint

    When American flag-waving protesters forced busloads of migrants to leave Murrieta earlier this week, the Southern California city became the latest flashpoint in an intensifying immigration debate that could heat up even more as patriotism surges on the Fourth of July. A second protest is planned for July 4, when another convoy of buses with immigrants is rumored to arrive.

  •  
    Passengers queue at the security checkpoint at the Rhein-Main airport in Frankfurt, Germany, Thursday. U.S. intelligence officials are concerned al-Qaida is trying to develop a new and improved bomb that could go undetected through airport security.

    What’s behind the new airport security measures

    The Obama administration is implementing tighter security measures at foreign airports that have direct flights to the U.S. out of concern that al-Qaida is trying to develop a new and improved bomb that could go undetected through airport security. Some questions and answers about the enhanced security measures:

  •  
    A board above the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange shows the closing number for the Dow Jones industrial average Thursday. The Dow Jones industrial average topped 17,000 for the first time Thursday, the index’s first big 1,000-point milestone this year, following news that hiring in the U.S. accelerated last month.

    Dow tops 17,000 after strong jobs report

    The Dow Jones industrial average topped 17,000 for the first time Thursday, the index’s first big 1,000-point milestone this year, following news that hiring in the U.S. accelerated last month.

  •  

    Work beginning on third-floor renovations at Glen Ellyn library

    Work is expected to begin next week on the third floor of the Glen Ellyn Public Library as part of a roughly $1.5 million renovation project, officials said. The project is focused on redesigning parts of the facility’s second and third floors. “Basically, we wanted to redesign the space that we have to meet the needs of our community now,” Director Dawn Bussey said.

  •  
    Six-year-old Kate Elliott of Mundelein eats ice cream Thursday after having her face painted by Allison Halver of Just For Fun during the first day of Mundelein Community Days at Kracklauer Park. The festival runs through Sunday, featuring music, food tents, games, and carnival rides.

    Mundelein Community Days ready for a fun weekend

    The annual Mundelein Community Days kicked-off Thursday at Kracklauer Park with live musical performances, the “Mundelein Munch” with food and drink tents, carnival rides and craft activities for children. “I think it’s going to be the best ever,” said Mundelein Assistant Village Administrator Mike Flynn.

  •  
    Willard Helander

    Madigan won’t defend Lake County election commission

    SupremeLake...8-10 inches.The Lake County Election Commission is dead after the Illinois Attorney General's office says they'll drop an appeal to the Supreme Court.

  •  
    Attorney General Lisa Madigan

    Madigan opposing ComEd, Peoples Gas rate increases

    Illinois’ attorney general is trying to block rate increases proposed by ComEd and Peoples Gas. Lisa Madigan says Madigan says a plan by ComEd to pay $87 million in employee bonuses from a requested $275 million rate increase is illegal.

  •  
    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel

    Emanuel super PAC raises $1 million in 2 weeks

    A super PAC created to help re-elect Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and his allies on the Chicago City Council has raked in $1 million largely from high profile members of Chicago’s business community.

  •  
    A statue of famed film critic Roger Ebert sits on a trailer awaiting installation Tuesday outside the Virginia Theatre in Champaign, Ill.

    Ebert sculpture outside theater to be dedicated

    CHAMPAIGN — A sculpture of Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic Roger Ebert that sits outside a theater where he watched movies as a child will be dedicated.According to the News-Gazette in Champaign, Ebert’s wife, Chaz Ebert, is expected to be at the dedication outside the Virginia Theater in Champaign on Thursday.

  •  
    Chicago police Cmdr. Jon Burge is now in prison for lying about the torture of suspects decades ago.

    Court upholds police pension in Chicago torture case

    An imprisoned former Chicago police commander accused of overseeing the torture of dozens of men — almost all of them black — to coerce confessions will keep his pension of more than $3,000 a month, under a decision Thursday by the Illinois Supreme Court.

  •  
    Cheryl L. Boyk

    Woman accused of selling cocaine near East Dundee school

    A 30-year-old Carpentersville woman was arrested and charged with selling cocaine to an undercover officer in East Dundee. Cheryl L. Boyk is being held on $100,000 bail and faces a minimum of six years in prison if convicted of selling drugs within 1,000 feet of a school. She is next due in court on July 9.

  •  
    Marcus L. Arvizo

    West Dundee man accused of assaulting 3 children

    A 34-year-old West Dundee man is being held on $500,000 bail after his arrest this week on charges that he sexually assaulted and sexually abused three children, two of whom were under 12, from January 2013 through June 2014. Marcus L. Arvizo faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted of the most severe charge.

  •  

    Geneva seeks public’s help on Swedish Day parade burglary

    While the South Shore Drill Team was performing in the Swedish Days parade in Geneva, someone was burglarizing their bus. Geneva police are asking the public for help in catching the perpetrators.

  •  

    Tri-Cities police reports
    Tri blotter

  •  
    After more than 150 years, Lake County plans to get out of the nursing home business by leasing Winchester House to a private operator that would eventually tear down the Libertyville facility and build a new home somewhere else in the county. County officials say financial losses and changes in the industry necessitate the move.

    Lake County’s long involvement in Winchester House could be ending

    A tradition spanning more than 150 years likely will be ending as Lake County considers an exit from the nursing home business. County officials on Tuesday are expected to follow the unanimous recommendations of two county board committees and seek proposals from private operators to lease and replace Winchester House.

  •  
    Elgin Mayor David Kaptain give out fruit kabobs as he and Chef Quincy Owens make healthy side dishes for kids at the Downtown Elgin Harvest Market Thursday afternoon.

    Elgin mayor, chef, show kids joy of healthy eating

    A hot dog's OK ... as long as it has healthy sides. Elgin Mayor David Kaptain and local chef Quincy Owens demonstrated that at Thursday’s Downtown Elgin Harvest Market. The pair made "patriotic" fruit kebabs with blueberries and raspberries. Followed by a coleslaw out of red and green cabbage, cranberries, and raspberry vinaigrette — but no mayonnaise.

  •  
    Alyssa Smith, 9, of Plainfield, bites into a rib Thursday during the opening day of the 27th annual Naperville Exchange Club Ribfest.

    Plenty of firsts as 27th Naperville Ribfest opens

    Ribfest in Naperville opened its gates Thursday for the 27th year, but there were still plenty of firsts for visitors hungry for a rack of ribs and a fun time. The first chords by performers in the festival’s 45 bands. The first circles on rides like “Dragon Wagon.” The first lunch rush for all 12 ribbers, and the first rating of "really good" from Ribfest newbies like...

  •  
    Students and teachers participate in a holiday parade Thursday at Jefferson Early Childhood Center in Wheaton.

    Wheaton students participate in their own 4th of July parade

    Dozens of July 4 parades are stepping off this weekend, but a special one took place Thursday morning in front of the Jefferson Early Childhood Center in Wheaton. Accompanied by their teachers and dressed in patriotic colors, a group of 3- to 5-year-old students took two laps around the school, delighting the parents and friends who came to watch the annual celebration.

  •  

    80-year-old cyclist hit by car in Des Plaines

    An 80-year-old bicyclist is in the hospital after being hit by a car in Des Plaines on Thursday, police said.

  •  

    Waukegan motel robbed at gunpoint

    Waukegan police are investigating the armed robbery of a motel Wednesday night by two men wearing ski masks. According to police, the suspects entered the business, forced an employee to open the cash register and stole an undisclosed amount of cash.

  •  

    New playground equipment in Lincolnshire park

    New playground equipment and a safe play surface has been installed at Lincolnshire’s Balzer Park, 30 Windsor Drive. To share feedback on the changes, email Public Works Director Brad Woodbury at bwoodb@village.lincolnshire.il.us.

  •  
    Artist Mary Hecht painted reading-themed images on a Mundelein utility box for a public art project. The project features three public utility boxes along Seymour Avenue painted by local artists.

    Mundelein utility boxes become canvas for public art project

    Lake County’s latest public art program launched this week in Mundelein with the completion of three painted utility boxes. Local artists decorated the metal boxes, each with different designs and themes. Costs were covered by the village.

  •  

    Items valued at $7,643 stolen in one night in Bartlett

    Burglars entered 13 unlocked vehicles in one night in Bartlett, stealing items valued at $7,643. Missing items included headphones, iPads, iPods, GPS units, camera, computers, wallet, purse and the owner’s manual for a 2001 Toyota Camry. Value was estimated at $7,643.

  •  

    Mount Prospect man charged with sexual assault

    A Cook County judge set bond at $300,000 for a 54-year-old Mount Prospect man charged with sexually assaulting a 10-year-old. Judge Jill Cerone-Marisie ordered that Maximino Camacho-Landa have no contact with the girl or anyone under age 18.

  •  
    Emergency personnel respond to a two-car crash that took place in Palatine during the morning rush on Thursday.

    Police investigate two-car crash in Palatine

    Palatine police are investigating a two-car crash that occured shortly before 9 a.m. Thursday near the intersection of Quentin Road and Colfax Avenue. Both drivers were hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries, police said.

  •  

    Northwest suburban police blotter

    After a small child playing with a remote lock control unlocked the vehicle, burglars stole $520 out of a 2009 Nissan Versa on the 1000 block of Boxwood Drive in Mount Prospect.

  •  
    Gilbert R. Boucher II/gboucher@dailyherald.com, May 2014 A Lake County judge will decide next week whether Carly Rousso, shown here walking into the Lake County Courthouse early this year, was convicted unconstitutionally on charges she was driving under the influence when her car struck and killed a 5-year-old girl in Highland Park.

    Highland Park huffing case decision delayed until July 10

    A Lake County judge will take a week to decide whether a Highland Park teen ruled to be driving under the influence of drugs when she struck and killed a 5-year-old girl was convicted unconstitutionally. Judge James Booras said “he had a lot to think about” Thursday after prosecutors and a defense attorney argued Carly Rousso’s aggravated driving under the influence of an...

  •  
    Wendi Cali and her dog Rango during play time in Arlington Heights. She saved Rango and Rango saved her after her other dog died.

    Rango is Arlington Hts. woman’s miracle dog
    We wrote in February about the special bond Harley, an Australian shephard/border collie mix, had with his neighborhood and his owner Wendi Cali, who was brokenhearted over his death. The story drew an outpouring of interest. After a long search, Cali, of Arlington Heights, has a new dog, Rango.

  •  
    Deerfield-based Walgreen Co. said Thursday that pharmacy revenue from its established stores climbed more than 11 percent in June.

    Pharmacy sales boost major drugstores in June

    A jump in pharmacy revenue fueled June sales growth for two of the nation’s largest drugstore chains, and they may start adding gains from the health care overhaul later this year. Deerfield-based Walgreen Co. and Rite Aid Corp. said Thursday that pharmacy revenue from their established stores climbed more than 11 percent at Walgreen and 5 percent at Rite Aid last month.

  •  
    Ken Gough flips through his book at the Gail Borden Public Library in Elgin. He is a Civil War historian who spent nine years researching Elgin soldiers and has published a book called “Elgin, Illinois Soldiers of the Civil War.” He updates the book as new information is found.

    Elgin historian documents local soldiers

    More than 620,000 soldiers lost their lives in the Civil War. One local man has given new life to the ones who hailed from Elgin. It took Elgin historian Ken Gough nine years to document the more than 3,200 men and women who volunteered for their country, and lived in Elgin at some time before, during or after the war.

  •  
    Iraqi security forces celebrate after clashes with followers of Shiite cleric Mahmoud al-Sarkhi, in front of his home in the Shiite holy city of Karbala, 50 miles south of Baghdad, Iraq, Wednesday.

    Kurdish leader calls for independence referendum

    The leader of Iraq’s Kurdish north called on lawmakers in the self-rule region’s parliament to take the necessary steps toward holding a referendum on independence, a move that would likely spell the end of a unified Iraq.

  •  
    A burnt poster of Shiite cleric Mahmoud al-Sarkhi at a checkpoint in front of his home in the Shiite holy city of Karbala, 50 miles south of Baghdad, Iraq, Wednesday.

    Dempsey: Iraqi forces can defend Baghdad

    The U.S. is not close to launching a military assault against an Iraqi insurgent group, but “may get to that point” if the militants become a threat to the American homeland, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said Thursday.

  •  
    Tookula, a 60-voice student choir from Germany, will visit St. Charles this week and perform two free concerts.

    German choir to perform in St. Charles

    The Tookula Student Choir of Minden, Germany is visiting St. Charles from July 7 to 10 as part of the Blue Lake International Exchange Program. While in St. Charles, Tookula will perform two free concerts.

  •  
    Wonders, the multisensory room in SEASPAR’s new space at Lisle’s Recreation Center, invites participants like 11 year-old Franncesca Strawser-Miller of Lisle to listen to music, experience changing lights and interactive pictures, and more.

    SEASPAR brings special recreation programs to Lisle rec center

    SEASPAR was in need of space to offer special parks and recreation programs to children and adults in 11 communities. A 2,000-square-foot addition to the Lisle Park District's Recreation Center opened in May, giving SEASPAR a dedicated space for a sensory room as well as general programs.

  •  

    Shedd, Openlands team for Great Lakes Action Days

    Openlands is partnering with the Shedd Aquarium for the Great Lakes Action Days program, to protect and conserve the Great Lakes. The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, July 11 at Openlands Lakeshore Preserve in Highland Park.

  •  

    Great Lakes Navy Band to play Mundelein event

    Mundelein’s Fort Hill Heritage Museum will hold its 27th annual patriotic celebration on Saturday, featuring bands, speakers and refreshments. Activities start at 9:45 a.m. with a performance by the Great Lakes Navy Band at the museum, 601 E. Noel Drive.

  •  

    Residents escape uninjured from Mount Prospect house fire

    Working smoke alarms appear to have saved the residents of a Mount Prospect home early Thursday morning, authorities said. The residents of the home were awakened at about 1:40 a.m. by their smoke detectors after a fire ignited in the basement. No one was injured, but damage was estimated at $100,000.

  •  

    Report: Siblings sue Big Brothers Big Sisters, say volunteer abused them

    A trio of siblings is suing Big Brothers Big Sisters out of DuPage for sexual abuse they received in the 1990s, the Chicago Tribune reports.

  •  

    Bartlett police cite nearly 30 people for underage drinking

    Bartlett police cited nearly 30 people for underage drinking Wednesday at a house party on the 900 block of Longford Drive, authorities said. Alexander R. Claveria, 20, hosted the party Wednesday night while his parents were on vacation, police said. He was charged with unlawfully permitting a minor to become intoxicated and unlawful consumption of alcoholic liquor, both misdemeanors.

  •  

    Detective: Man said he killed 2 during rough sex, hid bodies in suitcases

    A detective in Wisconsin says a former police officer told him that he killed two women during rough sex and then put their bodies in suitcases that he hid for months before dumping them in rural Wisconsin. The suitcases were found June 5 about 50 miles southwest of Milwaukee.

  •  
    Retired Marine Gunnery Sgt. Brian Meyer awaits treatment at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego. Meyer lost his right leg above the knee, his right hand above the wrist, and three fingers on his left hand while disarming a bomb in Afghanistan in 2011. The Naval Health Research Center is launching a major, six-year study on wounded warriors to track their quality of life and better understand the road to recovery.

    Young, active war wounded pushing medical science

    The blood is not the most jarring part of the photograph taken shortly after the bomb blew off Marine Gunnery Sgt. Brian Meyer’s leg and hand. It’s his smile. His attitude set the tone for the long journey the double amputee is taking along with nearly 2,000 troops who lost one or more limbs from combat injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan.

  •  
    Ribfest’s family area includes all-day attractions such as laser tag, an obstacle course and a potato sack slide.

    12 tips for families attending Naperville’s Ribfest

    Even if your little festgoer isn't into ribs and rock, they'll find plenty to do at Naperville's Ribfest. Family Fun Time — daily from noon to 3 p.m. — offers discounted adult admission and unlimited carnival rides, while the family area offers a petting zoo, kid-centric shows and a visit from Radio Disney.

  •  
    Tameka Lawson, executive director of a local non-profit group called ‘I Grow Chicago’ leads a yoga class along the often violent streets of Chicago’s Englewood neighborhood. Lawson said yoga’s meditative focus could help cooler heads prevail the next time violence or vengeance looms.

    Chicago group answers street violence with yoga

    With their brightly colored mats spread along a sidewalk, Tameka Lawson’s yoga students try to follow her instructions: concentrate on their breathing and focus on the beauty of their surroundings. But this is Englewood, one of Chicago’s most dangerous neighborhoods, where streets are dotted with boarded-up houses and overgrown lots, and residents are as familiar with the crackle of...

  •  

    DuPage forest preserve reviewing $81 million in unfunded projects

    Roughly $81 million in master planning, $18 million in proposed trail work and $11 million in proposed repairs to structures in DuPage County forest preserves are unfunded, based on a report presented this week to forest preserve commissioners.

  •  

    Censorship claims as Google cuts search results in Europe

    Google’s removal of some search results in Europe is drawing accusations of censorship. The U.S. firm has to comply with a strict privacy ruling made in May by the European Union’s top court that enables citizens to ask for the removal of embarrassing personal information that pops up on a search of their names.

  •  
    Barbara Intihar

    District 200 hopes to have new superintendent by mid-August

    The search for a new superintendent in Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200 has been narrowed to about four candidates, school board President Barbara Intihar says. Since Brian Harris stepped down from the position in late May, the board has conducted initial screening interviews with at least eight candidates, Intihar said. All but one was recommended to the board by Harris.

  •  

    Learn what it’s like to be a police officer in Mount Prospect
    The village of Mount Prospect is accepting applications for its Citizens Police Academy, a program that takes residents through the daily tasks of a law-enforcement officer. Applications are due by Sept. 1.

  •  

    District 204 names three new principals

    New principals stepped into their new posts this week at two middle schools and an elementary school in Indian Prairie Unit District 204. The top administrators started July 1 at Granger and Scullen middle schools as well as McCarty Elementary School in the district that serves parts of Naperville, Aurora, Bolingbrook and Plainfield.

  •  
    Singer and College of DuPage student Alexa Lee Torres recently released a new single, “Never Forgotten.”

    COD student releases new single

    Singer and College of DuPage student Alexa Lee Torres recently released her new single “Never Forgotten” during a performance at an event sponsored by the From the Barrio Foundation.

  •  

    Text of COD president’s email
    This is the text of the email College of DuPage President Robert Breuder sent to the board of trustees on May 9 concerning the school’s pursuit of $20 million in state funding from Gov. Pat Quinn’s office.

  •  
    The Cal Fire helitack crew from Boggs Mountain puts out flames Tuesday around a Cal Fire dozer transport as the Butts Canyon fire jumps Butts Canyon Road, outside Middletown, Calif., near the border between Napa and Lake counties. By early evening 140 homes were evacuated and 2,500 acres were burned.

    California wildfire threatens wine country homes

    wildfire in rural Northern California’s Napa County damaged two homes and forced the evacuation of 200 others, but so far is not posing a to the vineyards that are the region’s claim to fame. The fire in Pope Valley grew to nearly six square miles Wednesday, a day after it broke out, said Daniel Berlant, a spokesman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

  •  
    Emergency personal near a section of the facade Wednesday inside an underpass of the Brooklyn Bridge after it had collapsed. A fire department spokesman says five people were injured.

    Brooklyn Bridge underpass facade collapses

    NEW YORK — Authorities say a section of the facade inside an underpass of the Brooklyn Bridge has collapsed, injuring five people.It happened just before 8 p.m. Wednesday in Brooklyn during a passing thunder shower.A fire department spokesman says the collapse involved a roughly 25-foot wide section of the facade.

  •  

    Worker safety agency investigating prison rape

    Arizona’s workplace safety agency on Wednesday launched a full investigation of the prison system’s safety policies after the rape of a teacher inside a state prison classroom. The teacher was alone in a classroom with no guard nearby on Jan. 30 when a convicted rapist assaulted her. Details of the case were the subject of a June 19 report by The Associated Press.

  •  
    Fireworks illuminate the Charles River after the Boston Pops concert at the Hatch Shell as part of the Fourth of July celebrations in Boston. The annual Fourth of July outdoor concert and fireworks show, one of the city’s signature events, has been moved up a day to Thursday because of potential heavy rain ahead of Hurricane Arthur.

    Boston Pops’ annual July Fourth show a day early

    The annual Boston Pops Fourth of July outdoor concert and fireworks show, one of the city’s signature events, has been moved up a day because of potential heavy rain ahead of Hurricane Arthur. The celebration is being rescheduled for Thursday, to what appears to be the better of two potential bad weather days, organizers and public safety officials said Wednesday.

  •  
    Matthew Coniglio, 46. was arrested in April 2014, after a Pooler, Ga., police officer identified him as someone who possessed and distributed child pornography. Officers found videos of Coniglio molesting or raping unconscious girls. Coniglio hanged himself while in custody, days after his arrest. The FBI is trying to identify and find his victims.

    FBI seeks victims of child rape after suspect dies

    Investigators combing through a stash of more than 50,000 images and videos of child pornography hidden in a bedside table in Matthew Coniglio’s Georgia home made an even more horrifying discovery: cassette tapes they say show him raping and molesting girls.

  •  
    Customers walk into a Red Hot Fireworks tent Wednesday in Phoenix. Although Phoenix has gone a full 120 days without any measurable precipitation there has not been any serious effort in the drought-stricken states to restrict fireworks. Arizona actually loosened its restrictions this year and allowed residents of the two most populated cities to set off fireworks around Independence Day.

    Drought won’t stop fireworks in dry western states

    While some places in the West ban fireworks altogether, or greatly limit what you can light off when conditions are ripe for fire, other states are going in the opposite direction. Arizona actually loosened its restrictions this year and is now allowing residents of the two most populated cities to set off fireworks in the days around Independence Day, and an effort by the New Mexico governor to...

  •  

    FAA: Pilot killed in ultralight plane crash

    POYGAN, Wis. — A Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman says an ultralight airplane crashed in central Wisconsin and the pilot was killed.Elizabeth Isham Cory said Wednesday in a statement that the pilot was the sole occupant of the single-engine plane. It crashed in a field west of Omro around 7:15 p.m. Wednesday.

  •  

    ‘Drive Sober’ campaign returns for July 4th

    SPRINGFIELD — Illinois and federal officials are teaming up to enforce safe driving this holiday weekend.

  •  

    Illinois health officials share picnic safety tips

    Illinois health officials have some food safety tips ahead of the Fourth of July holiday weekend for those planning to picnic. Department of Public Health Director Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck issued some reminders Wednesday.Among the ideas:— Temperature is the key to avoiding foodborne illness, so keep hot food hot and cold food cold.

  •  

    Crawfordsville to gain 300 book publishing jobs

    CRAWFORDSVILLE, Ind. — Book publisher Penguin Random House LLC has announced plans to consolidate a major portion of its U.S. distribution and fulfillment operations in the west central Indiana city of Crawfordsville, creating up to 313 new jobs by 2016.

  •  

    Northwestern Indiana officials hope images help ID victim

    GARY, Ind. — Northwestern Indiana police are hoping newly-created renderings of the face of an unidentified young woman found dead in Gary seven years ago can lead them to her family.

  •  

    Lawrence police acquire armored military vehicle

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A central Indiana city has acquired an armored military vehicle for use in highly dangerous situations.The Lawrence Police Department in Marion County acquired the 48,000-pound, mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicle through a federal military surplus program.

  •  

    INDOT suspends high road work for holiday weekend

    INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana Department of Transportation has told highway crews to suspend road work during the Fourth of July weekend to try to improve the flow of traffic.

  •  

    Pence picks 8 for public university boards

    INDIANAPOLIS — Gov. Mike Pence is filling the boards that oversee Indiana’s public universities.Pence appointed eight trustees to four university boards Wednesday.

  •  

    INDOT: Most of US 30 reopened

    MERRILLVILLE, Ind. — The Indiana Department of Transportation says it has reopened most of U.S. 30 sooner than expected after repairs to power lines damaged by recent severe weather were completed quickly.

  •  

    13-year-old charged in shooting of 3 teens

    A 13-year-old Chicago boy is being held in a juvenile facility on charges he shot three teens.The boy, unidentified because of his age, is charged with three counts of attempted first-degree murder and aggravated battery with a firearm.

  •  

    Federal money for South Side fire department

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency is making nearly $1.8 million available to a fire department in one of Chicago’s southern suburbs.U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin’s office says the money goes to the Homewood Fire Department. Homewood applied for the grant on behalf of the region’s joint dispatch center.

  •  

    Daley seeks to avoid testifying in restaurant case

    Former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley is seeking to avoid testifying during the trial of the city’s lawsuit seeking to break the long-term agreement for a restaurant in Millennium Park.

  •  

    Appeals court upholds priest sex abuse lawsuit dismissal

    A federal appeals court says an Illinois man cannot sue the Vatican or Archdiocese of Chicago over allegations of sexual abuse dating back decades.The U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals released its opinion Wednesday upholding a lower court ruling in the case of Charles Anderson, who claimed he was abused by priests and other church employees in the 1950s and 60s.

  •  

    Illinois suspending roadwork over holiday weekend

    SPRINGFIELD — Those hitting the roads for the holiday weekend should find fewer delays from highway construction.The Illinois Department of Transportation says it is suspending non-emergency roadwork where possible starting Thursday afternoon and continuing through the end of the day Sunday.Thousands of motorists are expected to use state roadways over the Fourth of July weekend.

  •  

    Dawn Patrol: Boy walks after sinkhole fall; fatal Naperville motorcycle crash

    Elgin boy takes steps after sinkhole accident. One killed, one injured in Naperville motorcycle crash. Local clergy hand out condoms at Hobby Lobby. Email prompts Quinn to withhold COD funding. Geneva doctor’s license suspended. Tollway named for Medal of Honor holder. Cubs beat Red Sox, sweep series. Bulls waiting on Carmelo, have options. Cubs beat Red Sox, sweep series. Fireworks,...

  •  
    Beth Raseman, the Barrington White House project coordinator, discusses details of the exterior of the house during a community open house at Barringtonīs White House last November.

    Fourth of July open house at Barrington White House set

    Those joining in Barrington's Fourth of July celebrations Friday will have the chance to tour the historic Barrington White House for one of the last times before the village renovates the building into a cultural and community center. The 116-year-old White House at 145 W. Main St. will be open to the public after the 10 a.m. parade Friday until 3 p.m.

  •  
    Sheri Jesiel

    Jesiel sworn in as state's new 61st House District representative

    Republican Sherri Jesiel of Winthrop Harbor was sworn in Wednesday as the new House District 61 state representative. She replaces JoAnn Osmond, who resigned Tuesday. Jesiel said she is looking to assist in fixing the state, which she said is "broken."

  •  
    Des Plaines aldermen are debating whether to allow residents to raise chickens in the city.

    Des Plaines debating allowing chickens in city

    Des Plaines aldermen appear willing to let the Historic Methodist CampGround raise up to six chickens on site as part of a 4-H program, but whether chickens would be permitted throughout the rest of the city is undetermined. “This is what was in the forefront of my mind. I didn't have in mind that anybody on the block would have a chicken coop,” Alderman Jack Robinson said.

  •  

    Hanover Township opens up clinic for back-to-school physicals, immunizations

    Hanover Township will hold back-to-school physicals and dental screenings as part of a summer-long program. The Office of Community Health will bring the clinic to three township sites in Bartlett, Elgin and Hanover Park.

  •  

    State buys airfield to use for future airport

    State transportation officials are announcing a step forward in their plans for an airport south of Chicago. The Illinois Department of Transportation said Tuesday the state has purchased the Bult Field general aviation airport for $34 million. It plans to absorb that facility into the future South Suburban Airport it wants to build outside the Will County village of Peotone.

Sports

  •  
    Bruce Duchossois, center, at the 2008 Olympic Games.

    ‘Fantastic horseman’ Bruce Duchossois dies at 64

    Bruce Duchossois, a well-known figure in American eventing and son of Arlington chairman Richard L. Duchossois, died Wednesday at the age of 64 after a lengthy battle with cancer. “He was a fantastic horseman,” said Arlington trainer Louie Roussel III. “He could ride and show horses. He was a wonderful individual."

  •  
    Grayslake North’s Titus Booker, an incoming senior, announced that he will attend and play college football at Indiana.

    Grayslake North’s Booker to rush for Indiana

    With a bit of LeBron James enthusiasm, Grayslake North incoming senior Titus Booker made his “decision” Thursday, announcing on Twitter where he plans to play college football: Indiana.

  •  

    Williams, Cervantes spark Bandits past Racers

    Tammy Williams belted a 2-run homer and drove in 3 runs, and Brittany Cervantes also had 3 RBI as the host Chicago Bandits beat the Akron Racers 8-5 at the Ballpark at Rosemont on Thursday.

  •  

    Bulls best chance for Anthony to win now?
    While some believe Carmelo Anthony has no interest in leaving New York or taking less than a full maximum contract, there is reason to believe he does value winning as he makes his free-agent decision. The Bulls are trying to sell Anthony as his best chance to win now.

  •  

    Cougars notch 55th victory

    The Kane County Cougars won 55 games all of last season. With a lopsided 10-2 victory over the Peoria Chiefs on Thursday, the host Cougars (10-3, 55-28) have already matched that total.The Cougars won the first-half Western Division title, thrown a no-hitter and have not lost a series at home. With 10,515 watching at Fifth Third Ballpark in Geneva, the Cougars improved to 35-10 at home.

  •  
    Center Pau Gasol looks to be a part of the Bulls’ Plan B if Carmelo Anthony decides not to sign up to play in Chicago.

    If not Anthony, Bulls could turn to Gasol

    Carmelo Anthony's three-day free agent tour ended Thursday with the New York Knicks reportedly promising to offer a full maximum-salary contract, worth five years and $129 million. The Bulls can't match the money, but hope their sales pitch of offering Anthony the best chance to win can still succeed.

  •  

    Bowling boosts Boomers past Slammers

    Coverage of the Schaumburg Boomers:Cal Bowling received some early run support and turned in a solid pitching performance as the host Schaumburg Boomers captured a 5-2 victory over the Joliet Slammers in Frontier League action Thursday night.

  •  
    White Sox starter John Danks has been able to cut down on his walks since the first month of the season, and now he’s working with young pitchers on the staff to do the same.

    White Sox’ pitchers making it too easy

    Hitting a baseball might be the toughest challenge in sports. The White Sox' pitching staff has been making it easier for the opposition, and their 325 walks are the most in the major leagues.

  •  
    Posting huge baseball card images of the starting lineups outside Fenway Park is one way the Red Sox cater to fans who gather around the 102-year-old ballpark before games.

    All that Wrigley Field can and should be

    While in Boston with the Cubs, beat writer Bruce Miles took a long look around Fenway Park to see how the Red Sox did in renovating a ballpark that is now 102 years old. With a few exceptions, it is everything Wrigley Field can and should become, as he explains in this report.

  •  

    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for July 4

    Joe Kristufek's selections for July 4 racing at Arlington International.

  •  

    5 key stages on the Tour de France

    With more mountain stages, only one time trial, and cobblestones on the menu, there’s an exciting smorgasbord of routes in store on the Tour de France. The three-week race, which starts on Saturday in Leeds, features only 33.5 miles of time-trialing. This could disadvantage defending champion Chris Froome, who beat his main rival, Alberto Contador, in both of last year’s individual time trials.

  •  
    Defending champ Chris Froome rides with his teammates during training on Thursday. The Tour de France starts on Saturday in Leeds, England, and finishes in Paris on July 27.

    Froome senses pressures as Tour repeat bid looms

    Defending champion Chris Froome says he’s feeling the pressure on the eve of the Tour de France. Ahead of Saturday’s race start, the Kenyan-born Briton says his main rivals “have upped their game” and two-time Tour champ Alberto Contador is looking more competitive than a year ago.

  •  
    Nicole Pauly

    Pauly to lead Palatine softball program

    A onetime multi-sport standout at Palatine, Nicole Pauly has been named the Pirates' softball head coach. She succeeds Jeff Manz, who recently finished up a 12-year run with a record of 257-155-2.

  •  
    Mick Viken

    Schroeder caps prep softball career with multiple honors

    Maria Schroeder capped her high school softball career the same way she did following her junior season. The Lake Zurich senior was named to the first team all-stater by the Illinois Coaches Softball Association for the second straight year and was also named to the National Fastpitch Coaches Association All-Region North second team. Schroeder finished this spring with a .593 batting average and hit .481 for her career. She finished her career with 200 hits and is tied for tenth in Illinois high school history for career triples with 28.

  •  

    Mike North video: The Carmelo saga continues
    Mike North talks about the who, what and where of some of the top free agents in the NBA.

  •  
    A Lou Gehrig signed baseball mitt and autographed picture given to Howard Henderson, who played catch with Gehrig as a boy, at Henderson’s Greenwich, Conn. Gehrig, a Yankee first baseman and a friend of Henderson’s songwriter father, visited his home and Henderson visited him when he had ALS. The mitt that was autographed by Gehrig with a hot instrument, will be auctioned in July, expecting to fetch $200,000 to $300,000.

    Signed Lou Gehrig glove could sell for $200K

    A mitt signed by legendary New York Yankees slugger Lou Gehrig is going up for auction. Howard Henderson was a boy some 80 years ago when the first baseman befriended him during front-yard games of catch. The glove Gehrig gave his fellow lefty will be auctioned off July 15.

  •  

    New name to know: Alcantara

    Every Cubs fan can reel off the names of top prospects such as Kris Bryant, Javier Baez and Albert Almora. But according to general manager Jed Hoyer, the forgotten man in the mix is infielder-outfielder Arismendy Alcantara, who is tearing it up at Class AAA Iowa.

Business

  •  
    U.S. employers accelerated their hiring last month, adding a robust 288,000 jobs and helping drive the unemployment rate to 6.1 percent, the lowest since September 2008.

    June jobs report shows U.S. recovery accelerating

    U.S. employers accelerated their hiring last month, adding a robust 288,000 jobs and helping drive the unemployment rate to 6.1 percent, the lowest since September 2008. It was the fifth straight monthly job gain above 200,000 — the best such stretch since the late 1990s tech boom.

  •  
    Knowles Corp. said it has developed a digital microphone for a smartphones or tablet with touchless gesture recognition, phone-to-phone data transmission, and other features.

    Itasca’s Knowles takes microphone to new level

    Kukec's eBuzz column features a new digital microphone that will be going into new smartphones and other devices that will eliminate swiping the screen when turning on and off any calls. The device will also allow you to transfer data just by holding up the smartphone to another device.

  •  
    Schaumburg Mayor Al Larson, left, speaks during groundbreaking ceremonies this week for the new five-story, 142-room Radisson Hotel at the southwest corner of Roselle Road and the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway. With Larson are representatives of developers Swift Hospitality and Sand Companies.

    Radisson starts wave of new Schaumburg hotels

    Schaumburg officials joined representatives of Swift Hospitality and Sand Companies at the groundbreaking ceremony this week for a five-story, 142-room Radisson hotel expected to open next summer at the southwest corner of Roselle Rod and the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway. The 93,000-square-foot building was first approved as a Cambria Suites hotel, but was delayed nearly eight years by the recession and lingering economic concerns.

  •  
    Average U.S. mortgage rates are near historically low levels. Mortgage company Freddie Mac said Thursday that the nationwide average rate for a 30-year loan dipped to 4.12 percent, down from 4.14 last week. The average for the 15-year mortgage, which had taken a big dip the previous week, was unchanged this week at 3.22 percent.

    Average rate on 30-year mortgages dips this week

    Average U.S. mortgage rates are near historically low levels. Mortgage company Freddie Mac said Thursday that the nationwide average rate for a 30-year loan dipped to 4.12 percent, down from 4.14 last week. The average for the 15-year mortgage, which had taken a big dip the previous week, was unchanged this week at 3.22 percent.

  •  
    The U.S. trade deficit fell in May as U.S. exports hit an all-time high, helped by a jump in exports of petroleum products. Imports dipped slightly. The trade deficit narrowed 5.6 percent in May to $44.4 billion after hitting a two-year high of $47 billion in April, the Commerce Department reported Thursday.

    U.S. trade deficit drops to $44.4 billion in May

    The U.S. trade deficit fell in May as U.S. exports hit an all-time high, helped by a jump in exports of petroleum products. Imports dipped slightly. The trade deficit narrowed 5.6 percent in May to $44.4 billion after hitting a two-year high of $47 billion in April, the Commerce Department reported Thursday.

  •  

    Applications for U.S. unemployment benefits edge up

    The number of Americans filing applications for unemployment benefits edged up slightly last week but remained at a level that indicated a healthy labor market. The Labor Department says weekly unemployment benefit applications rose by 2,000 to 315,000. The four-week average, which smooths out week-to-week volatility, was essentially unchanged at 315,000.

  •  

    Express Scripts cuts payments for compounded medications

    The nation’s largest pharmacy benefit manager, Express Scripts, is dramatically scaling back its coverage of compounded medications, saying most of the custom-mixed formulas are ineffective or overpriced. The company, which manages prescriptions for 90 million Americans, plans to drop coverage of 1,000 drug ingredients commonly found in compounded medications.

  •  
    The Supreme Court’s 5-4 ruling this week in favor of Hobby Lobby gave more oomph to the concept of “corporate personhood” when it ruled that certain businesses are entitled to exercise religious rights just as do people.

    Corporations are people? It’s a real legal concept

    There may be more to that “we the people” notion than you thought. These are boom times for the concept of “corporate personhood.” Corporations are people? It turns out the principle has been lurking in U.S. law for more than a century, and the Supreme Court, in a 5-4 ruling, gave it more oomph this week when it ruled that certain businesses are entitled to exercise religious rights, just as do people.

  •  
    Subaru is recalling more than 660,000 cars and SUVs because the brake lines can rust and leak fluid, and that can cause longer stopping distances. For about half the vehicles, it’s the second recall for the same problem.

    Subaru recalls 660K vehicles for brake line rust

    Subaru is recalling more than 660,000 cars and SUVs because the brake lines can rust and leak fluid, and that can mean it will take longer to stop the vehicles. For about half the vehicles, it’s the second recall for the same problem. Affected are 2005 through 2009 Legacy and Outback, the 2008 through 2014 Impreza and the 2009 through 2013 Forester.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    ON THE COVER: Jenny Youngwith of Carol Stream and her service dog, Bode, go everywhere together. Bode even carries Jenny’s oxygen.

    ‘He’s my best friend’
    Whether cheerleading, singing in a local community choir, performing in a dance recital, shopping, navigating the corridors at Community High School in West Chicago, or hanging out with friends, Jenny Youngwith of Carol Stream and her 3-year-old service dog, Bode, are never far apart.

  •  
    The two-day Great Lakes Naval Station Fourth of July celebration returns in a big way for 2014 to the base at Sheridan Road and Route 137 near North Chicago.

    The top six fireworks shows in the suburbs

    If you're looking for someplace to watch Fourth of July fireworks in the suburbs, you probably don't have to go too far. The Independence Day fireworks shows are a point of pride for many suburbs, but the biggest bangs can be found in Arlington Heights, Elgin, Great Lakes, Hoffman Estates, Itasca and St. Charles. Check out our interactive graphic to find times and locations for all shows in the suburbs.

  •  
    The Chicago-style dogs at Tony's Steamers in Winfield have a cultlike following.

    Readers pick top 4 hot dog places in the suburbs

    As we head into National Hot Dog Month and the Fourth of July weekend, we've got hot dogs on the brain. Whether you like mustard and onions or pickles and peppers, you've got to check out these four spots that joined the ranks of Daily Herald readers' top hot dogs.

  •  

    Director, 2 more indicted in fatal Ga. train crash

    Three people, including the director, have been indicted on criminal charges stemming from a fatal crash in which a freight train plowed into the crew working on a movie about rocker Gregg Allman in southeast Georgia.

  •  
    Chicago film critic Roger Ebert enjoys a movie during Steve James' excellent documentary “Life Itself.”

    Thumbs-up: Ebert documentary a revealing, personal portrait

    Steve James' unflinchingly honest, highly detailed and personally revealing documentary “Life Itself” accurately captures the late Roger Ebert. Using interviews, archival materials, and wonderfully narrated passages from Ebert's published 2011 biography “Life Itself” (delivered in a perfect Ebertian voice by actor Stephen Stanton), James' movie goes straight for the heart, mind and gut.

  •  
    Spice rubs add flavor to lean proteins and keep sodium in check.

    Eat right, live well: Spices, herbs rubs meat the right way

    Several recent studies have shown that eating food flavored with spices and herbs resulted in a nearly 1,000 milligram sodium reduction, and reduced fat in meals by nearly 70 percent. Summer is a perfect time to put these study findings to the test. Mix together a rub mixture and fire up the grill to perk up the flavor of lean proteins like skinless poultry, lean beef, pork and fish.

  •  
    Mason (Tilda Swinton), center, is taken prisoner by rebel leader Curtis (Chris Evans), left, and Tanya (Octavia Spencer), right, in “Snowpiercer.”

    'Snowpiercer' a mind-blowing visual class struggle

    Bong Joon-ho's bleakly futuristic drama “Snowpiercer” is a mindblower. The only movie that I can compare it to would be Peter Greenaway's once-X-rated 1989 masterpiece “The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover,” a political allegory that takes place inside a French restaurant, a microcosm of the world ruled with impunity by a cultured thug. The political allegory “Snowpiercer” takes place inside a super train, a microcosm of the world ruled by a never-seen Oz-like inventor named Wilford. In a concise introduction, we witness how humanity has overreacted to global warming by seeding the planet with cooling chemical enzymes that wind up plunging Earth into another Ice Age.

  •  

    Theater events: ‘Merry Wives’ opening at First Folio
    This week in suburban theater, Falstaff tries to seduce two wealthy, happily married women in "The Merry Wives of Windsor" at First Folio Theatre and Metropolis Performing Arts Centre tickles audiences funny bone with its revival of Neil Simon's "Laughter on the 23rd Floor." Coming up, Steel Beam welcomes folk singer Mark Dvorak July 11.

  •  
    Use colorful bandannas to fashion boy-howdy bases for topiaries.

    Show your USA spirit with these delightful displays

    Easy to find and inexpensive, red, white and blue bandannas provide plenty of decorative bang for your buck. For example, use colorful hankies to fashion boy-howdy bases for topiaries.

  •  

    Reel life: See, discuss 'Jaws' at Elk Grove Cinema

    See why "Jaws" heralded the era of blockbuster movies with a screening at the Elk Grove Cinema, followed by a discussion session. Also, quadruple amputee Travis Mills will attend and discuss a screening of the documentary "Travis: A Soldier's Story" at the River East 21 Theaters in Chicago.

  •  
    Liatris elegans, which are native to the Southeast below North Carolina, have tall flower spikes that tend to flop.

    Three alphas for the dog days of summer

    Years ago, I discovered that the July garden can be elevated from its drab lassitude to something dreamy and fun by getting three high-performing perennials to play together, namely the perovskia, the coneflower and the liatris. By mixing them together, rather than planting in discrete blocks, one can convey a summery cottage garden atmosphere to sunny beds.

  •  
    Director/writer Paul Haggis, center, interacts with Adrien Brody on the set of “Third Person.”

    Haggis on ‘Third Person,’ Bond and Wilde sex scene

    Dann Gire interviews Oscar-winning filmmaker Paul Haggis on his movie “Third Person.” “Usually I open veins for my movies, but for this one I really did open an artery,” he said. “I wanted to make a film like the films that I loved from the 1960s and 1970s. Godard. Bunuel. Antonionio. Films that left you with an emotional reaction at the end. You didn’t necessarily have all the answers.”

  •  
    Luca Simeone, left, founder of bike-sharing start up called “bike tour Napoli,” pedals along a cyclists’ path in Naples, Italy. In the background is Mt. Vesuvius.

    Naples, green and clean, now bike-friendly

    Luca Simeone rides his bike along the sunny beachfront of Naples while his little daughter sleeps on the baby seat. It may sound ordinary, but this simple act is revolutionary. Three years ago Naples’ seafront was an urban highway, noisy and smoggy, jammed with car traffic. Three years later, Naples has a new mayor, clean streets, a wide pedestrian beachfront and a 20-mile cycling lane overlooking a beautiful bay.

  •  
    Spice rubs add flavor to lean proteins and keep sodium in check.

    Summer Rubs
    Spices and herbs rub meat the right way.

  •  
    Red and purple potatoes, roasted red peppers, cubes of white goat cheese and several cups of blueberries provide patriotic colors that reflect the spirit of the Fourth of July holiday.

    A potato salad with a patriotic — and tasty — side

    Thanks to red and purple potatoes, roasted red peppers, cubes of white goat cheese, and several cups of blueberries, the American flag is well represented in this Patriotic Potato Salad. This salad also would be delicious with the addition of chicken or crumbled bacon.

  •  
    Red and purple potatoes, roasted red peppers, cubes of white goat cheese and several cups of blueberries provide patriotic colors that reflect the spirit of the Fourth of July holiday.

    Red, White and Blue Potato Salad
    Red and purple potatoes and goat cheese give this potato salad a patriotic look.

  •  
    Award-winning director/choreographer Rachel Rockwell makes her Goodman Theatre directing debut with “Brigadoon.” The major revival earned the blessing of Liza Lerner, daughter of lyricist/librettist Alan Jay Lerner, who wrote the 1947 musical with composer Frederick Loewe.

    Rockwell hand-picked for Goodman's revival of 'Brigadoon'

    “So, do you want to direct and choreograph ‘Brigadoon’”? Rachel Rockwell didn’t ponder the question long before accepting the offer from Liza Lerner, daughter of legendary lyricist/librettist Alan Jay Lerner, to helm a revival of the 1947 musical. “Our ideas aligned,” Rockwell said. And thus the stage was set to bring the rarely staged musical to Chicago's Goodman Theatre, running now through Aug. 10.

  •  
    Adam Levine makes his film debut in “Begin Again,” also starring Keira Knightley. The Maroon 5 frontman found it easy to identify with the role of a young musician who strikes it big.

    Adam Levine tries big-screen turn in ‘Begin Again’

    Adam Levine knows pop stars-turned-actors are greeted suspiciously. But following his movie debut in the recently released “Begin Again,” the Maroon 5 frontman is exuberant about a potentially budding movie career. “It really made me fall in love,” said Levine in a recent interview. “It’s the very beginning of something really cool.”

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: Frat party politics bad for Illinois

    A Daily Herald editorial says voters deserve better than sophomoric gimmicks from the candidates for governor.

  •  

    Don’t let Congress decide what’s ‘reasonable’

    Columnist Byron York: While much of Washington grapples with international crises, chronic economic troubles and upcoming midterm elections, Senate Democrats are steadily pushing forward with what they hope will become the 28th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

  •  

    How to define an American

    Columnist Ruben Navarrette: It’s a summer night in Washington. On the Mall, across from the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, people are sitting on lawn chairs and huddled on blankets staring at a white screen. The feature: “Documented,” the new film by journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, one of most famous undocumented immigrants in the country — and one of the most outspoken.

  •  

    ECC women chapter celebrates 40 years
    An Elgin letter to the editor: The Elgin Community College chapter of the American Association for Women in Community Colleges celebrates 15 years along with 40 years of the National Chapter of the AAWCC this year.

  •  

    Volunteers save fireworks display
    A Lake Villa letter to the editor: After a long, curvy, rough and narrow road the KeepTheSparkAlive.com Committee has raised enough funds for the Chain O Lakes fireworks display on the evening of Friday, July 4.

  •  

    Always important to remember Holocaust
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: Thank you for your beautiful "Our View" on remembering the Holocaust.

  •  

    Thanks for helping ducks cross safely
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: This morning it restored my faith in humanity to see all four lanes of traffic on a very busy road during rush hour come to a complete stop to allow a duck and her brood to cross safely.

  •  

    Trump not the only one touting a name
    A Wheeling letter to the editor: I understand how the architectural gurus feel about the TRUMP sign downtown Chicago, but I also seem to remember when I was young Prudential had their name prominently posted on their building and nobody seemed to mind.

  •  

    Early liftoff
    Towns with Fireworks on July 3

«Jun

Jul 2014

S M T W T F S
29 30 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 1 2