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Daily Archive : Tuesday July 1, 2014

News

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    Fourth of July events in the Fox Valley
    Fourth of July events in the Fox Valley

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    A now-shuttered Ace rental car agency sits within Des Plaines’ seventh proposed tax increment financing district at Higgins and Mannheim roads.

    Des Plaines plans to restructure special tax district

    Des Plaines officials want to restructure a special taxing district that’s long operated in the red, with an eye toward making the area more enticing for developers. City officials want to take out three properties from TIF 6 and put them in a new TIF 7 that would set up lower baseline property values. “Those properties have been bringing this whole thing down,” said City...

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    San Juanita Pineda found herself inside a sinkhole early Tuesday morning on Thomas Road in Kane County while out delivering newspapers. After her car fell into the hole, a pickup truck drove over it.

    Elgin mom, son fall into sinkhole, run over

    An Elgin teenager suffered serious injuries after the car he was riding in early Tuesday morning plunged into a sinkhole on a rural Kane County road and then was run over by a pickup truck. “It was dark, it was pitch black, and all of a sudden I'm in the hole,” the boy's mother, San Juanita Pineda said. “The impact was pretty hard."

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    Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth, Illinois’ 8th District speaks Tuesday at Northrop Grumman’s 2014 America’s Day in Rolling Meadows.

    Northrop Grumman celebrates employees, veterans on America Day

    Northrop Grumman is hosting its 23rd annual America Day at its branch in Rolling Meadows.

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    Customers arrive for Tuesday’s grand opening of Mariano’s grocery store in Gurnee. Mariano’s is owned by Roundy’s Inc., a leading grocer in the Midwest, and has taken over the site once occupied by Dominick’s.

    Newest Mariano’s opens in ex-Gurnee Dominick’s site

    Excited customers browsed fresh produce and shopped the aisles when Roundy’s Inc. opened its newest Mariano’s grocery store in Gurnee. Mariano’s opened at 6 a.m. Tuesday and held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to introduce the store and make donations to the COOL Food Pantry and the Warren Township Food Pantry. “I think it’s great,” said Amanda Puck, the...

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    Jonah Rawitz of Buffalo Grove Monday won $10,000 and a Jimmy Award for best performance by an actor at the National High School Musical Theater Awards.

    Buffalo Grove teen wins national theater award

    Buffalo Grove teen Jonah Rawitz, 16, who counts “Les Miserables” at Marriott Theatre in Lincolnshire and “Sweeney Todd” at Drury Lane Theatre in Oak Brook among his professional credits, earned top honors Monday at the sixth annual National High School Musical Theater Awards in New York City. Rawitz, 16, received the best-actor Jimmy Award and a $10,000 scholarship.

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    Naperville, Carol Stream cops near top in Illinois DUI arrests

    Police in Naperville and Carol Stream again are among the state’s leaders in DUI arrests based on an annual survey by the Alliance Against Intoxicated Motorists. For the seventh consecutive year, the Rockford Police Department ranked first among municipal departments with 556 DUI arrests.

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    Beth Farina of Marengo gave birth to her son, Tobias Benjamin, at 5:50 a.m. Monday on Interstate 90 just before the Randall Road while her husband, Trevor, rushed her to Advocate Sherman Hospital in Elgin. Tobias is six pounds, 14 ounces, and both he and mom are healthy and happy.

    Marengo woman gives birth to son on tollway

    The commute from Trevor and Beth Farina's home in Marengo to Advocate Sherman Hospital in Elgin is typically a 35-minute drive. Early Monday morning he made it there in 20, and it still wasn't fast enough. Beth gave birth to the couple's son on the way. “This is my third child, so I know what it feels like,” Beth said. “Very soon, I knew we were not going to make it to the...

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    Aurora police investigating pre-paid card scam

    The Aurora Police Department is investigating two incidents where businesses were tricked into making payments with Green Dot MoneyPak pre-paid cards to fake ComEd employees. Both incidents followed the same thread where people pretending to be ComEd employees called the businesses and told them they owed thousands of dollars, according to a news release. The impersonators said their power would...

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    Gov. Pat Quinn poses for photos after signing a bill that will allow Illinois voters to register on Election Day, have more time to vote early, and not be required to bring photo identification to vote early Tuesday in Oak Park. The new law only applies to the November election.

    Quinn signs Election Day registration bill

    County clerks across Illinois began preparing to offer Election Day voter registration after Gov. Pat Quinn signed a measure Tuesday that’ll also give voters more time to cast early ballots and remove a photo identification requirement to vote early.

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    In this 2013 photo, Illinois Transportation Secretary Ann Schneider speaks at a news conference in Chicago. Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn’s office announced Monday that Schneider will step down next week to be replaced by Veterans Affairs Director Erica Borggren.

    GOP attacks Quinn after IDOT chief resigns

    Despite Gov. Pat Quinn’s contention that he took swift action after learning last summer of improper patronage hiring in his Department of Transportation, the head of the agency abruptly resigned Monday, just four months before the Democrat faces voters in a re-election bid.

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    Gerry Beckley, right, and Dewey Bunnell sing as the band “America” performs during the Mid-Summer Classics Concert Series in Elk Grove Village Tuesday.

    America opens Elk Grove concert series

    Elk Grove Village opened with America on Tuesday, and before July is through four more star-studded bands will have passed through — Survivor, Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo, John Michael Montgomery and Kenny Loggins. The sixth annual Mid-Summer Classics Concert Series kicked off Tuesday with America, known for hits “A Horse with No Name,” “Sister Golden Hair” and...

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    This is a general view of the Wadi al-Salam, or “Valley of Peace” cemetery in the Shiite holy city of Najaf, 100 miles south of Baghdad. Violence has claimed the lives of 2,417 Iraqis in June, making it the deadliest month so far this year, the United Nations said on Tuesday, underlining the daunting challenge the government faces as it struggles to confront Islamic extremists who have seized large swaths of territory in the north and west.

    Militant urges Muslims to build Islamic state

    leader of the extremist group that has overrun parts of Iraq and Syria has called on Muslims around the world to flock to territories under his control to fight and build an Islamic state. In a recording posted online Tuesday, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi declared he wants to turn the enclave his fighters have carved out in the heart of the Middle East into a magnet for militants. He also presented...

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    Timothy Love, 55, of Louisville, Ky., speaks to reporters Tuesday at his attorney’s office in Louisville. A federal judge earlier in the day struck down the state’s ban on same-sex couples getting marriage licenses and overturned the state’s ban on gay couples getting married. The judge put the order on hold pending appeal. Love is the lead plaintiff in the case.

    Judge strikes down Kentucky’s gay marriage ban

    A federal judge in Kentucky struck down the state’s ban on gay marriage on Tuesday, though the ruling was temporarily put on hold and it was not immediately clear when same-sex couples could be issued marriage licenses.

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    A gravel drive leads to a camp inhabited by convicted sex offenders behind Triumph Church near Clanton, Ala., on Monday. A law that took effect the next day shut down the refuge.

    Alabama shuts down church’s sex offender housing

    Believing it was his calling to reach out to people Jesus called “the least of these,” Pastor Ricky Martin built a little church and opened a camp out back for some of society’s most unwanted people: Sex offenders. With the help of some former inmates convicted of rape, sodomy, child sexual abuse and other crimes, Martin raised a gray-block chapel in a rural patch of central...

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    Richland Public Health nurse Sue McFarren talks with a Mennonite mother and child at a Measles, Mumps, & Rubella (MMR) clinic for the Mennonite community in Richland County in Shiloh, Ohio.

    Measles outbreak complicates 2 big Amish events

    Visitors from around the world to two upcoming events in the state’s Amish country could come away with more than they bargained for, health officials fear — a case of measles from the nation’s largest outbreak in two decades. The outbreak, with more than 360 cases, started after Amish travelers to the Philippines contracted measles this year and returned home to rural Knox...

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    The Illinois attorney general’s office has sued the Aurora Sportsmen’s Club over lead shot contamination at the Bliss Woods Forest Preserve near Sugar Grove, where the club used to shoot until July 2009. The club said it is aware of the lead and has been working with authorities to clean up the site.

    Aurora Sportsmen’s Club sued over contamination at Sugar Grove site

    The Illinois Attorney General’s office has filed a lawsuit against the Aurora Sportsmen’s Club, seeking damages and clean up of lead shot deposited on several acres at the Bliss Woods Forest Preserve, where the club used to shoot until five years ago. The club's president said its aware of the situation and has been working with authorities to resolve the matter.

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    President Barack Obama arrives to speak about transportation and the economy at the Georgetown Waterfront Park in Washington Tuesday. Gridlock in Washington will lead to gridlock across the country if lawmakers can’t quickly agree on how to pay for transportation programs, Obama administration officials warn. States will begin to feel the pain of cutbacks within weeks — peak summer driving time.

    Highway crisis looms as soon as August, U.S. warns

    Gridlock in Washington will lead to gridlock across the country if lawmakers can’t quickly agree on how to pay for highway and transit programs, President Barack Obama and his top officials warned Tuesday. States will begin to feel the pain of cutbacks in federal aid as soon as the first week in August — peak summer driving time — if Congress doesn’t act,...

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    Health and Human Service Secretary Sylvia Mathews faces having to clear up data discrepancies that could potentially jeopardize coverage for millions under the health overhaul, the government’s health care fraud watchdog reported Tuesday.

    Report: Health law sign-ups dogged by data flaws

    Many of the 8 million Americans signed up under the new health care law now have to clear up questions about their personal information that could affect their coverage. A government watchdog said Tuesday the Obama administration faces a huge task resolving these “inconsistencies” and in some cases didn’t follow its own procedures for verifying eligibility.

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    Gurnee bridge to be named after Medal of Honor recipient

    The Grand Avenue bridge over the Tri-State Tollway will be named in honor of Medal of Honor recipient Allen J. Lynch of Gurnee. A ceremony is planned for Wednesday.

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    In this photo taken on Friday, eastern Ukraine Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, left, visits troops. Poroshenko in a televised address early Tuesday said he was abandoning a unilateral cease-fire in the conflict with pro-Russian separatists and sending military forces back on the offensive after talks with Russia and European leaders failed to start a broader peace process. The cease-fire expired Monday evening.

    Pro-Russian rebels capture police HQ in Ukraine

    The Interior Ministry headquarters in eastern Ukraine’s largest city fell to pro-Russia separatists Tuesday after a five-hour gunbattle that erupted hours after the Ukrainian president ended a cease-fire. The shaky cease-fire had given European leaders 10 days to search for a peaceful settlement, and its end raised the prospect that fighting could flare with new intensity in a conflict...

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    Avi and Rachel Fraenkel embrace during the funeral of their son, Naftali, a 16-year-old with dual Israeli-American citizenship, in the West Bank Jewish settlement of Nof Ayalon on Tuesday.

    As Israel buries teens, new threats against Hamas

    Israel’s prime minister threatened Tuesday to take even tougher action against Hamas following an intense wave of airstrikes in the Gaza Strip, as the country buried three Israeli teens it says were kidnapped and killed by the Islamic militant group.

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    Police: Boy accidentally shoots brother with rifle

    A 15-year-old boy was accidentally shot in the abdomen by his brother Tuesday, officials said.Police responded to the 9700 block of Wright Road in an unincorporated area near Harvard around 11 a.m., according to a news release from the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office.

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    Donate to food pantry at Bartlett July 4 parade

    Bartlett chamber of commerce members will push shopping carts during the Independence Day parade to collect donations for the Hanover Township food pantry. The parade steps off on Oak Avenue 1 p.m. Sunday.

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    Elizabeth Gray

    Daily Herald, family celebrate life of Elizabeth Gray

    Elizabeth Gray enjoyed adventurous pastimes like piloting a plane and skiing, but her real passions were her children and her home, says her husband, Thomas Gray. Mrs. Gray, who also had a 22-year career as an award-winning senior customer service representative for the Daily Herald, died recently at age 70. “Her generosity was boundless,” said her husband. “She was generous...

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    Lisle’s Eyes to the Skies festival offers all sorts of entertainment, but one of the major highlights continues to be the balloons.

    Eyes to the Skies ready to take flight

    Lisle's Eyes to the Skies festival offers all sorts of entertainment over the Fourth of July weekend, but the highlight is still all the hot-air balloons. “Watching all of those balloons in the air shows the kind of artistry behind what these people do,” co-chairman Fred Haber says.

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    With plans for a cross country facility and golf course update at Settler’s Hill in Geneva finally in harmony, county officials now are trying to figure out how to bring 300,000 yards of soil and fill to the site to complete the work.

    Kane County needs lots of dirt for planned track

    Architects and land planners have found a way to bring a proposed cross country facility into harmony with the future upgrades of Settler's Hill Golf Course. If elected officials like the plan, construction of the cross country track may begin soon. But first they need dirt, and lots of it.

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    Demonstrator react to hearing the Supreme Court’s decision on the Hobby Lobby case outside the Supreme Court on Monday, when the Supreme Court ruled corporations can hold religious objections that allow them to opt out of the new health law requirement that they cover contraceptives for women.

    Democrats hope decision will energize female supporters

    Their Senate majority in peril, anxious Democrats have seized the Supreme Court decision that some companies need not provide birth control to women as fresh evidence of the GOP’s “war on women” — an argument they hope will energize female voters who could decide the balance of power on Capitol Hill.

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    Nick Cetera and Jonah Schemn, both Elgin summer employees, watch the animals as visitors walk around the free Lords Park Farm Zoo. Cetera and Schemn prepare the grounds and animals for visitors each day.

    Crowds flock back to Lords Park Farm Zoo

    After closing five years ago because of budget constraints, the Lords Park Farm Zoo in Elgin is thriving again, with 3,400 visitors in the first three weeks since reopening. The farm zoo is free and only asks for a donation near the gate, where volunteers count visitors and answer questions.

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    Supreme Court justices found more common ground than usual this year, and nowhere was their unanimity more surprising than in ruling that police must get a judge’s approval before searching cellphones of people they’ve arrested. But the conservative-liberal divide was still evident in other cases, including this week’s ruling on religion, birth control and the health care law.

    Justices sometimes do agree: Your privacy matters

    Supreme Court justices found more common ground than usual this year, and nowhere was their unanimity more surprising than in a ruling that police must get a judge’s approval before searching the cellphones of people they’ve arrested. The term that just ended also had its share of 5-4 decisions with the familiar conservative-liberal split, including Monday’s ruling on...

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    D. “Dewey” Pierotti

    DuPage forest preserve approves early retirement program

    DuPage County Forest Preserve commissioners unanimously approved an early retirement program Tuesday. The program will take effect Aug. 31 and offer early retirement packages to about 65 eligible employees who are 50 and older and have at least 20 years of service credit with the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund.

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    A car attempts to make its way through the flooded intersection of University Boulevard and North Midvale Road in Madison, Wis., after heavy rain moved through the area Monday. Severe thunderstorms packing high winds and heavy rain have downed trees and power lines all across southern Wisconsin.

    More torrential rain worsens Midwest flooding

    More torrential rain worsened flooding in the Midwest, spawning high water that swept away an Iowa teenager, caused a traffic nightmare near one of the nation’s busiest airports and threatened to swamp a Missouri town for the fifth time in less than a decade.

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    The Netherlands national softball team is coming to Elgin this week to take part in the John Radtke Memorial Women’s Fastpitch Softball Tournament at the Elgin Sports Complex. The team is prepping for the world championships next month.

    Dutch national women’s softball team to play in Elgin

    A longtime staple on the summer fastpitch softball circuit will have an international flavor this year as the Netherlands national team will take part in the 10th annual John Radtke Memorial Women’s Fastpitch Classic this weekend at the Elgin Sports Complex.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Fox blotter

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    Victor Salinas-Corona

    Zion teen pleads guilty to killing infant son

    A Zion man will spend 20 to 30 years in prison for killing his 5-month-old son in February 2013. Victor Salinas-Corona, 18, pleaded guilty to the murder of Aiden Salinas. Sentencing is Aug. 14.

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    Waukegan History Museum opens photo exhibit

    The Waukegan History Museum, of the Waukegan Park District and the Waukegan Historical Society, has a new temporary exhibit titled “Waukegan: Then & Now.”

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Tri blotter

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    Warren Twp. Dist. 121 seeks to fill board vacancy

    The Warren Township High School District 121 school board is seeking to fill a vacancy created by the resignation of Larry Stried.

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    Democrat Dick Durbin, left, and Republican Jim Oberweis, right, are candidates U.S. Senate in November.

    Oberweis wants to square off with Durbin seven times

    Republican state Sen. Jim Oberweis wants Democratic U.S. Sen Dick Durbin to agree to seven debates in their race for U.S. Senate.

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    Sixth-grade gifted students of Sycamore Trails Elementary School in Bartlett are supporting a project to build an orphanage in the Cape Coast region of Ghana led by Two Pennies Ministry. Six teachers from Elgin Area School District 46 are traveling to the African nation later this year to show educators there how to use storybooks and computers in the classroom.

    U-46 educators to train teachers in Ghana

    A group of Elgin Area School District U-46 elementary school teachers will visit Ghana over winter break to train teachers there on how to use storybooks and computers in their classrooms. The effort is part of the Books for Ghana project led by sixth-grade gifted students at Sycamore Trails Elementary School in Bartlett. “They have never had the opportunity or access to books like...

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    Lake sheriff’s department has most DUI arrests in state

    The sheriff’s department in Illinois with the most DUI arrests in 2013 is Lake County, with 348, the Alliance Against Intoxicated Motorists reported Tuesday in its 24th annual survey. The Cook County Sheriff’s Department came in second in the state with 306.

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    Both Pace and CTA reported no problems with the first full-day conversion to Ventra card or cash only payment options at their respective transit agencies.

    This time, Ventra launch going smoothly so far

    The first full-day of Ventra or cash only transactions at Pace and CTA have gone smoothly, according to transit agency officials. Nearly a year since it's ill-fated introduction, the Ventra card fare system allows commuters to switch between the two transit options seamlessly.

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    Adam K. Domini, the 23-year-old driver of this 1997 Dodge Ram, faces multiple charges after police said he drove into this house in the 10100 block of Bennington Drive Monday after ignoring a stop sign and striking a car, police said.

    Huntley driver hits car, house with truck

    A 23-year-old Huntley man faces several charges after police said he ran a stop sign Monday evening before hitting a car with his truck and plowing into a nearby house before fleeing the scene. The truck hit the Huntley home's gas meter, causing a leak and power outage, and displacing its resident, police said.

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    Lightning strike suspected in Naperville house fire

    A lightning strike may have sparked a fire that caused roughly $75,000 damage Monday night to a house in Naperville. Firefighters said they were called around 9:45 p.m. and arrived to find a fire in the attic of the house on the 3600 block of Schillinger Court. The fire was brought under control within minutes, they said, and largely was confined to the attic.

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    Former Iowa State University researcher Dong-Pyou Han leaves the federal courthouse Tuesday in Des Moines, Iowa.

    AIDS researcher pleads not guilty to faking data

    A former Iowa State University scientist has pleaded not guilty to charges alleging he falsified his research for an AIDS vaccine to secure millions of dollars in federal funding.

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    Ivan V. Dimitrov

    Police: Palatine man solicited undercover cop posing as 14-year-old boy

    A Palatine man was arrested after he went online and solicited sex from an undercover Lake County sheriff’s detective, authorities said Tuesday.

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    Dennis DeYoung, founding member of Styx, will be part of the Fourth of July entertainment lineup in Elgin.

    Fourth of July fireworks return to Elgin

    After years of partnering with a neighboring town, the city of Elgin is bringing its fireworks show back within city limits. The city teamed up with the Grand Victoria Casino to create the Rock and Roll Jackpot Fourth of July Concerts and Fireworks in Festival Park.

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    A 21-year-old Wayne man, Rick Judge, was found guilty Tuesday of charges related to a fatal accident in December 2011 near Bartlett that claimed the life of a Hanover Park man. Judge was driving this yellow Hummer when the crash occurred.

    Wayne man guilty in fatal Bartlett 2011 crash

    A 21-year-old Wayne man was found guilty Tuesday of charges relating to a 2011 fatal car crash near Bartlett. DuPage Judge Robert Kleeman found Rick Judge, of the 30W700 block of Bradford Parkway, guilty of aggravated driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs or intoxicating compounds and driving with a suspended license during the accident that killed Ramiro Dominguez, 38, of Hanover Park.

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    Hidalgo County sheriff Eddie Guerra speaks about the 11-year-old Guatemalan immigrant whose body was discovered on June 15 during a press conference Monday in Edinburg, Texas. When authorities found the body of the boy in South Texas, a phone number for his brother in Chicago was scribbled on the inside of his belt buckle.

    Boy’s death highlights danger of border crossings

    While hundreds of immigrants die crossing the border each year, the discovery of Gilberto Francisco Ramos Juarez’s decomposed body in the Rio Grande Valley on June 15 highlights the perils unaccompanied children face as the U.S. government searches for ways to deal with record numbers of children crossing into the country illegally. “Down here finding a decomposed body ... we come...

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    House Speaker John Boehner told President Barack Obama the House will not vote on overhauling the nation’s troubled immigration system during this election year. So, Obama announced Monday he would deal with immigration through executive actions without congressional approval.

    Obama faces advocate demands on immigration

    President Barack Obama faced immediate demands for bold action to stem deportations Tuesday, a day after declaring immigration legislation dead and announcing plans to act on his own. At the same time GOP opposition to the president’s go-it-alone strategy mounted, setting up an election-year clash with no certain outcome.

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    An electric vehicle road trip organized by the Illinois Green Economy Network and 10 participating community colleges made its final stop at the College of Lake County in Grayslake on June 25.

    Electric vehicle ends statewide road trip at CLC

    An electric vehicle road trip organized by the Illinois Green Economy Network and 10 participating community colleges made its final stop recently at the College of Lake County in Grayslake.

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    Great Lakes Naval Station’s July Fourth celebration returns to Ross Field Thursday, July 3, and Friday, July 4.

    Join Great Lakes Naval Station to celebrate Independence Day

    Join the Great Lakes Naval Station in celebrating freedom and patriotism at one of Lake County’s largest Fourth of July celebrations with two days of music, fun and fireworks on Ross Field.

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    Federal defender Julia Gatto requests bail for her client, New York City police Officer Gilberto Valle, right, at Manhattan Federal Court in New York. A federal judge has overturned the conviction of Valle, who was accused of kidnapping, killing and eating young women.

    Conviction overturned in NYC cop cannibalism case

    A former New York Police Department officer was set to leave jail on Tuesday after a judge overturned his conviction in a bizarre case accusing him of plotting to kidnap, kill and eat young women. Judge Paul Gardephe ruled that there was insufficient evidence to support a jury’s guilty verdict in the kidnapping conspiracy conviction of Gilberto Valle. His lawyers had argued that the...

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    The U.S. Supreme Court granted Wheaton College temporary relief from a mandate to provide contraceptives to female employees, according to a news release from The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty.

    U.S. Supreme Court grants Wheaton College relief from contraceptive mandate

    On the same day it ruled Hobby Lobby could hold religious views under federal law, the U.S. Supreme Court granted Wheaton College temporary relief from a mandate to provide contraceptives to female employees, according to a news release from The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty. The court’s decision to enter a temporary injunction with the college came Monday night, just hours before the...

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    Michael N. Seelye

    Round Lake Beach man pleads guilty to supplying fatal drug to friend

    A Round Lake Beach man accused of supplying the heroin that led to a friend's death pleaded guilty in Lake County court to unlawful delivery of a controlled substance. Michael Seelye, 32, was sentenced to 6 years in prison and 2 years parole.

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    Consider parking at a remote location and taking a shuttle, bringing a towel or chairs and checking the schedule of performances and activities in advance to have a good time at Ribfest.

    6 tips for a good time at Naperville’s Ribfest

    Consider parking at a remote location and taking a shuttle, bringing a towel or chairs and checking the schedule of performances and activities in advance to have a good time at Ribfest in Naperville, which runs from noon to 10 p.m. July 3 to 6 in Knoch Park.

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    Storm damage in Lemont.

    Storms cause major delays on I-190, flooding in suburbs

    Flood warnings remain in effect for the entire area after torrential downpours overnight caused flash flooding and standing water on major roadways. The National Weather Service said the I-190 spur was flooded between River and Manheim roads, causing major delays for people trying to get to O’Hare International Airport.

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    Associated Press U.S. soccer fans cheer minutes before a live broadcast of the soccer World Cup match between USA and Ghana, during a music concert inside the FIFA Fan Fest area on Copacabana beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. With “I believe that we will win!” American soccer fans finally have a World Cup chant that doesn't just involve shouting their country's name.

    5 memorable World Cup chants

    With “I believe that we will win!” American soccer fans finally have a World Cup chant that doesn't just involve shouting their country's name. In terms of creativity, though, it's a notch below Argentina's elaborate sing-alongs or even the boisterous chants of the English.

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    Naperville’s Parkview lot closed two additional weeks

    What was supposed to be a three-day project to resurface Naperville’s Parkview parking lot near the downtown train station now will take at least two more weeks, officials said. Crews working over the weekend at the lot discovered foundation issues that will require substantial reconstruction work to ensure the safety and long-term performance of the lot’s driving surface, officials...

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    Kane County crews look over a sink hole on Thomas Road in Kane County Tuesday morning. Two cars were entrapped in the hole after driving into it earlier this morning.

    Images: Storms in the suburbs and Chicago
    Storms moved through the suburbs Monday evening dumping heavy rains and leaving residents without power. High winds caused damage and some homes were struck by lightning.

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    Houston police officers learn learn how to apply a tourniquet to a leg at the police academy in Houston. Cities across the country are training and equipping police officers to use tourniquets and combat gauze.

    Tourniquets make comeback with American police

    Rushing into a Houston home, police officer Austin Huckabee encountered a drunken, combative man bleeding profusely on the kitchen floor. He quickly realized the blood was spurting in rhythm with the man’s heart and cardiac arrest was just moments away.Pulling a tourniquet from his belt, the former Army captain and his partner restrained the man, wrapped the band around his arm and twisted...

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    DuPage residents invited to share views on county budget

    Before drafting a proposed budget for next year, DuPage County officials want to know what county services are most important to the public. Officials are hoping to get the answer to that other questions by inviting county residents to respond to an online survey. “The survey is one of a few pieces that go into creating the budget,” county board member Paul Fichtner said.

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    St. Charles police officer helps family escape fire

    An alert St. Charles police officer spotted a house on fire early Tuesday morning and helped its occupants escape safely, authorities said. The cause of the fire remains under investigation, but authorities said it could be related to the severe storms that moved through the area Monday night and early Tuesday morning.

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    Apparent lightning strike damages Lombard house

    No injuries were reported Monday night when an apparent lightning strike triggered a house fire that caused roughly $100,000 damage in Lombard. Authorities said there was heavy damage to both the home on the 1100 block of East Adams Street and nearby trees.

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    Illinois residents are being urged to spend some of their grocery money on products that were made or grown in the state.

    State wants people to buy Illinois-made products

    Illinois residents are being urged to spend some of their grocery money on products that were made or grown in the state.The Illinois Department of Agriculture on Monday encouraged residents to take its “Buy Illinois Pledge.” It asks each household to dedicate $10 of its weekly grocery budget to Illinois products.

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    Lawsuit loan company to leave state after new law

    A new Tennessee law targeting loans to finance the costs of lawsuits is leading an Illinois company to leave the state.Oasis Legal Finance, one of the country’s largest consumer legal funding services, announced it is leaving the Tennessee market as the law goes into effect Tuesday.

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    Gilda Brown, 59, a personal health care assistant speaks during a news conference held by Service Employee Illinois Union Healthcare on Mondayin Chicago.

    Illinois union officials take stock after court decision

    A union representing Illinois’ home health care workers took stock Monday of the potential for lost revenue and dues-paying members after the U.S. Supreme Court dealt a blow to public sector unions. The High Court ruled unions can’t collect fees from home health care workers who object to being union-affiliated, arguing that taking so-called “fair share fees” violate...

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    Northbound Route 53 now ends at Lake-Cook Road.

    Panel to study potential Route 53 cost savings

    A panel charged with studying ways to finance the proposed extension of Route 53 north into Lake County will be examining some of the innovations associated with the $2.87 billion project for cost reductions. “We must think of the impact of the road design on future generations,” said George Ranney, co-chairman of a blue ribbon committee of local, business and other leaders.

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    Streaks of lightning illuminate the sky over Hidden Lake Forest Preserve near Glen Ellyn as a storm passes through DuPage County on Monday.

    Dawn Patrol: Storms blow through suburbs; Team USA plays Belgium today

    Storms blow through suburbs. Arlington Hts. golfer hits identical holes-in-one. Driver avoids state prison for racing crash. Private schools to continue shooter drills. Last night's rain means a Sox doubleheader today. The Bulls are meeting with Carmelo Anthony today. And Team USA is back in World Cup action, playing Belgium in an elimination game.

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    Kane County Judge F. Keith Brown speaks after taking his oath in 2009 as the 16th Judicial Circuit’s chief judge.

    First black judge in Kane County set to retire

    F. Keith Brown, the first black judge and chief judge in the 16th Judicial Circuit, is stepping down after nearly 23 years on the bench. The 57-year-old Elgin native held his final court call last week, and now plans to work for a Chicago mediation firm, among other things. “This is a great job, and I love it. I could do it another 20 years and still be a happy person,” Brown said

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    Construction is ongoing at the new Community Unit District 300 administration building in Algonquin. The district hasn’t decided how to pay for the $3.9 million project, but a pair of officials say an anticipated $35 million to $60 million from the state won’t come through in time to cover the costs.

    District 300 losing faith in state’s ability to pay them back

    Officials from Community Unit District 300 aren’t convinced the state will repay the millions of dollars it has owed them for more than a decade in time to pay for a new district headquarters. As a result, district leaders likely will rely on debt to finance the $3.9 administration building still under construction in Algonquin.

  •  
    A new two-story addition atop the west building at Edward Hospital in Naperville is complete with a 36-bed Orthopedic and Spine Center on the third floor and a 24-bed medical and surgical intensive care unit on the fourth floor. The hospital will move patients into the $63.7 million addition on July 8 and 9.

    Edward addition to ease Naperville hospital's 'chronic overflow'

    The medical and surgical intensive care unit at Edward Hospital in Naperville has been in a “chronic overflow state” for the past few years, but officials say overcrowding soon will ease with the opening of a $63.7 million addition. “We are moving from a 13-bed unit to a 24-bed unit,” Jean Rader, director of inpatient and orthopedic/spine services, said. “It's giving...

  •  
    When hats, banners and body paint aren't enough to show support for a favorite team in the World Cup, a fan can hang a flag in the windows of the soul. This Brazilian fan sports her nation's flag in her contact lenses.

    World Cup fandom that's beyond rose-colored glasses

    The success and hopes for the U.S. team has Americans seeing the World Cup through new eyes this time around. But will any fans see matches through red-white-and-blue contact lenses? Online shoppers can buy USA lenses featuring some white stars on a blue background with a few red and white stripes for about 25 bucks.

  •  

    Northwest suburban police blotter

    An Arlington Heights resident avoided a scam when he received a call around 9:27 a.m. June 27 from a man pretending to be a Cook County Sheriff’s deputy. The scammer said there was an arrest warrant for the resident for missing jury duty. The scammer said the resident could avoid arrest by purchasing money orders and calling him with the serial numbers. No money was exchanged. According to...

  •  
    Throughout July, cardboard cutouts of the Founding Fathers and Uncle Sam will grace store windows at Algonquin Commons. If you take a photo of one and post it to the shopping center’s Facebook page, you will be entered to win a gift certificate to the mall.

    Find the forefathers at Algonquin Commons

    Just in time for the celebration of our nation’s birthday, Algonquin Commons along the Randall Road corridor is hosting a Find the Forefathers contest. Throughout this month, if you spot one of the nation’s Founding Fathers inside one of the outdoor mall’s stores, you could win a gift certificate.

  •  

    Butler warns students, staff, alums of data breach

    INDIANAPOLIS — Butler University officials are warning more than 160,000 students, faculty, staff and alumni that hackers may have accessed their personal information.

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    Shimkus to visit Marion veterans’ hospital

    MARION, Ill. — U.S. Rep. John Shimkus plans to tour a veterans’ hospital in southern Illinois.

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    O’Hare airport tram to be closed overnight

    Chicago aviation officials are warning that the transit system at O’Hare International Airport that moves travelers around the facility won’t be operating at night through Friday morning.

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    Apparent tornado hits rural southern Wisconsin

    DODGEVILLE, Wis. — An apparent tornado has damaged homes and farm buildings in rural southern Wisconsin.The storm hit around 10:30 p.m. Sunday. Damage stretches from south of Highland to north of Dodgeville.

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    Federal grants to help homeless vets in Indiana

    INDIANAPOLIS — Three Indiana groups are receiving more than $650,000 in grants to provide homeless veterans with job training.

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    Man gets probation for slashing Ball State tires

    MUNCIE, Ind. — A Muncie man who pleaded guilty to criminal mischief for slashing the tires on dozens of vehicles owned by Ball State University has been sentenced to two years of probation.

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    State police remind residents of fireworks laws

    INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana State Police are urging state residents to be careful with fireworks during July Fourth celebrations and reminding people to obey the law.

  •  

    Illinois to mark anniversary of Civil Rights Act

    A ceremony is planned in Chicago to mark the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.The Illinois Department of Human Rights says it will commemorate the event on Wednesday at the Thompson Center in downtown Chicago. Among the speakers will be Thomas Armstrong of Naperville. Armstrong as a Freedom Rider who took buses with other activists in the southern United States in 1961.

  •  

    DNR lowers deer bag limits in 19 Indiana counties

    KOKOMO, Ind. — State wildlife officials have lowered the number of deer that hunters in 19 Indiana counties can take in response to waning deer populations in those counties.

Sports

  •  
    La La Vasquez, who is married to Knicks star Carmelo Anthony, has her own career as an actor and designer.

    Anthony’s decision could come down to La La

    The fate of the Bulls' free agent chase may be in the hands of La La Anthony, Carmelo's wife. She's been on TV, acted in popular movies and co-wrote a best-seller. Here's more on why it might be tough to pull La La away from New York.

  •  
    United States' goalkeeper Tim Howard, reacting after Belgium's Kevin De Bruyne scored the opening goal Tuesday, kept his team in the game with 16 saves.

    U.S. soccer team far from a disappointment

    As much as we wanted to believe in this U.S. national soccer team, we always knew a long run through this World Cup was a lot to ask. Just getting out of the Group of Death was an accomplishment and a surprise. In the Round of 16, Belgium was just plain better than the United States, though the Americans showed heart to the bitter end.

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    Julian Green, middle, celebrates after scoring the United States' goal Tuesday during the World Cup Round of 16 match won by Belgium 2-1.

    U.S. soccer loss or not, things are different now

    Belgium eliminated the United States from the World Cup. Soccer, however, gained so much momentum the past couple weeks that indications are that it isn't about to retreat into oblivion again. This isn't a time even as recent as 2002 when soccer essentially went away again after the U.S. lost in the quarterfinals.

  •  
    Brad Richards, a 20-goal scorer who was a victim of the salary cap squeeze with the Rangers, has agreed to a one-year deal with the Blackhawks.

    Richards thrilled to land with Blackhawks

    What looked like a quiet day for the Blackhawks turned into anything but when they signed Peter Regin in the afternoon and then provided some pre-Fourth of July fireworks a few hours later by announcing they had inked center Brad Richards to a one-year deal. “It's a big moment for us to be able to add someone of his caliber as a hockey player and an individual,” Blackhawks GM Stan Bowman said of Richards.

  •  

    Certain scenario just might favor Knicks

    One hangup in the Carmelo Anthony chase is he could get more money in New York than he could with the Bulls. There is a debatable scenario, though, where the Knicks might be in better shape for the future if they trade Anthony to the Bulls.

  •  

    Boomers fall 5-0 to Joliet

    The Schaumburg Boomers suffered their second shutout loss of the season, falling 5-0 to the visiting Joliet Slammers in the opener of a series Tuesday night.

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    Cougars roll to 6-1 win

    The Kane County Cougars used a crooked third inning to grab a large lead Tuesday night over the Peoria Chiefs on their way to a 6-1 victory in front of 6,961 at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark.

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    Abreu, Sale, Ramirez all make their All-Star cases

    The White Sox are struggling through another tough season, but three players - first baseman Jose Abreu, starting pitcher Chris Sale and shortstop Alexei Ramirez - could be getting some good news when rosters for the All-Star Game are announced on Sunday.

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    Chicago White Sox’s Conor Gillaspie safely dives back to first after teammate Dayan Viciedo lined out against the Los Angeles Angels during the eighth inning of the second baseball game of a doubleheader on Tuesday, July 1, 2014, in Chicago.

    Sox hitting can’t stop Angels doubleheader sweep

    Hector Noesi and Scott Carroll have struggled throughout the season and that was the case again Tuesday night. Noesi and Carroll started for the White Sox in a doubleheader vs. the Angels and they both took losses.

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    Luis Valbuena, left, and Justin Ruggiano celebrate their 2-1 victory over the Boston Red Sox Tuesday night at Fenway Park. Solid pitching and timely hitting fueled the Cubs’ win.

    Cubs find way to grind out 2-1 win over Boston

    The Cubs opened the second half of their season Tuesday night with a 2-1 victory at Fenway Park over the Red Sox. Much like the first half, the Cubs had to grind one out. Manager Rick Renteria said that's been the character of his club over the first half.

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    Bulls star Derrick Rose leaves the United Center after the Bulls met with NBA free agent Carmelo Anthony at the facility Tuesday. The Bulls believe they have a strong pitch and a simple selling point: Anthony can transform a playoff team into a championship contender. They believe uniting Anthony with Rose and Joakim Noah, who arrived earlier at the arena, would put them in position to contend for their first title since Jordan and Scottie Pippen led the way to two three-peats in the 1990s.

    Family matters could keep Anthony in N.Y.

    Selling Carmelo Anthony on the idea he could play on a better team with the #Bulls than he'd have in New York, that part is easy. Convincing Anthony's wife, La La, to leave New York and move the family to the Midwest could be a challenge.

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    Cubs outfield plays tricky Fenway perfectly

    Playing the Green Monster is only one aspect for outfielders at Fenway Park. That's why Cubs first-base and outfield coach Eric Hinske has been working and talking to his charges during the ongoing interleague series in Boston.

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    The Cubs’ Luis Valbuena watches his RBI sacrifice fly in the ninth inning of Tuesday night’s game at Fenway Park in Boston. The Cubs beat the Red Sox 2-1.

    Valbuena’s sacrifice fly puts Cubs over Red Sox

    Luis Valbuena broke a ninth-inning tie with a sacrifice fly that sent the Chicago Cubs to a 2-1 win over the Boston Red Sox on Tuesday night. Anthony Rizzo started the inning with a single off Koji Uehara (3-2) and went to third on a double by Starlin Castro. Valbuena then lined a shot to medium right field. Mookie Betts made the catch, but his throw was offline and Rizzo scored easily.

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    The White Sox’s Jose Abreu hits a three-run home run off Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Garrett Richards, also scoring Gordon Beckham and Adam Eaton, during the first game of a doubleheader Tuesday at U.S. Cellular Field. The Sox lost the first game 8-4.

    Abreu’s HR isn’t enough for White Sox in 8-4 loss

    Albert Pujols hit his 509th home run, Mike Trout connected for a three-run drive and Garrett Richards allowed two hits in eight innings to lead the Los Angeles Angels past the Chicago White Sox 8-4 Tuesday in the first game of a doubleheader.Pujols’ solo shot, his 17th of the season, came off starter Hector Noesi (2-6) and put the Angels ahead in a four-run fifth. Trout’s homer tied the score earlier in the inning.

  •  
    The addition of veteran center Brad Richards, if nothing else for the Blackhawks, is an upgrade over Michal Handzus.

    Richards’ price right for Blackhawks

    It wasn't sexy, but the Blackhawks' signing of Brad Richards didn't cost much and he has to be an upgrade over Michal Handzus.

  •  
    United States’ goalkeeper Tim Howard leaps in between his teammates to clear the ball during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match between Belgium and the USA at the Arena Fonte Nova in Salvador, Brazil, Tuesday, July 1, 2014. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

    U.S. holds Belgium off until extra time, loses 2-1

    The United States held tough against Belgium’s relentless pressure and took Tuesday’s second round match to extra time in the World Cup round of 16, but finally in the extra period Belgium struck and held on to win 2-1.

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    Niskanen to Caps biggest move on busy day in NHL

    When the NHL free agent market opened Tuesday, a flurry of moves were made as teams tried to make a splash to improve their rosters and fire up their fans.Some franchises, though, stayed out of the fray and allowed other teams to perhaps overpay for the best players available.

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    Serena Williams prepares to play a return with partner Venus Williams of the U.S in their women's doubles match against Kristina Barrios of Germany and Stefanie Voegele of Switzerland at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, Tuesday July 1, 2014. The Williams sisters retired after 3 games. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

    At Wimbeldon, Nadal, Sharapova lose; Serena leaves with illness

    Rafael Nadal ran out of comebacks at Wimbledon.Maria Sharapova, somehow, seemed on the verge of a turnaround despite a flurry of unforced errors, saving six match points before finally succumbing on the seventh with — what else? — a missed shot.And in the most striking sight of a memorable day of departures by past Wimbledon champions, Serena Williams couldn’t get the ball over the net in a doubles match with her sister Venus, stopping after three games because of what was called a viral illness.

  •  
    Jordan Spieth, who finished second at the Masters, will defend his John Deere Classic title next week in Silvis, Ill. Spieth is ranked No. 10 in the world.

    Spieth ready to defend his lone PGA title

    Jordan Spieth earned his first PGA Tour win at the John Deere Classic. Now he hopes to win the tournament again. Len Ziehm has more in this week's golf column.

  •  
    Argentina’s Angel di Maria reacts after missing a chance to score Tuesday during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match against Switzerland at the Itaquerao Stadium in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Argentina beat Switzerland 1-0 after extra time.

    Argentina beats Switzerland 1-0 after extra time

    Angel Di Maria scored in the 118th minute Tuesday to give Argentina a 1-0 win over Switzerland after extra time and a spot in the World Cup quarterfinals. With a penalty shootout looming, Lionel Messi made a surging run toward the Swiss area and laid the ball off to Di Maria on the right, and the winger sent a left-foot shot past diving goalkeeper Diego Benaglio.

  •  
    Sources say the Chicago Fire may lose its jersey sponsorship with Quaker, a move that would be a blow to the club.

    5 things the Chicago Fire must fix

    Not even the most loyal Chicago Fire employee would call the first part of this season a rousing success, especially on the field. OK, so it wasn’t a total disaster either.

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    Argentina soccer fans cheer outside Maracana Stadium as they arrive to the group F World Cup soccer match between Argentina and Bosnia in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Argentine fans have an impressive repertoire of chants and even came up with a new one specifically tailored for the World Cup in Brazil.

    5 memorable World Cup chants

    With “I believe that we will win!” American soccer fans finally have a World Cup chant that doesn’t just involve shouting their country’s name. In terms of creativity, though, it’s a notch below Argentina’s elaborate sing-alongs or even the boisterous chants of the English. All players can testify to the goose bump-inducing effect of thousands of fans joining together for a synchronized chant.

  •  
    Cubs starter Jake Arrieta walked one and struck out 10 before giving up his first hit with two outs in the eighth inning Monday night. He left to a standing ovation from Red Sox fans.

    Cubs pitcher Arrieta has another night to remember

    It's been quite some roll for Cubs pitcher Jake Arrieta. Last week at Wrigley Field, he took a perfect game into the eighth inning. Monday night at Fenway Park, he had a no-hitter until Stephen Drew singled with two outs in the eighth inning. Arrieta got the win as the Cubs beat the Red Sox 2-0.

  •  
    Not enough White Sox fans — young or old — have been making a trip to the ballpark this year. The Sox rank 28th in attendance.

    Disconnect with Sox fans hurting attendance at Cell

    Ranked 28th in average attendance, the White Sox are coming a forgotten team in Chicago, says Mike North. They have two huge stars in Jose Abreu and Chris Sale, but there's a disconnect with the fan base that needs to be fixed.

Business

  •  
    Dick Portillo is founder of the Portillo Restaurant Group based in Oak Brook. Portillo's announced plans Tuesday for Warren Buffett's Berkshire Partners to acquire the company.

    Berkshire Partners to buy Portillo's restaurants for almost $1 billion

    Oak Brook-based Portillo Restaurant Group Inc. confirmed Tuesday afternoon that it has agreed to sell its restaurant chain to Berkshire Partners, a private equity firm in Boston. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but some reports say it could be about $1 billion. Berkshire Partners said in a statement that it will work closely with Dick Portillo, founder of Portillo's, to support the growth of the company.

  •  
    Taking over routes flown by AirTran Airways, Southwest Airlines flew into new territory on Tuesday — Jamaica, the Bahamas and Aruba. Southwest purchased AirTran in 2011.

    Southwest opens new chapter: international flights

    After four decades of expanding to all corners of the lower 48 states, Southwest Airlines flew into new territory on Tuesday — Jamaica, the Bahamas and Aruba. Southwest is taking over routes flown by AirTran Airways, which it bought in 2011. The company plans to eliminate the AirTran brand by year end.

  •  
    The Federal Trade Commission is alleging that T-Mobile USA, Inc., made “hundreds of millions” of dollars off its customers through bogus charges.

    Regulators accuse T-Mobile of bogus billing

    T-Mobile US became the target of a federal investigation and lawsuit Tuesday amid allegations that it bilked potentially hundreds of millions of dollars from its customers in fraudulent charges.

  •  
    Evidence that global manufacturing is expanding pushed the stock market to another all-time high on Tuesday. The Dow Jones industrial average climbed within two points of 17,000 for the first time after separate surveys showed that manufacturing grew in both China and the U.S., the world’s two largest economies.

    Stocks rise as surveys show stronger manufacturing

    Evidence that global manufacturing is expanding pushed the stock market to an all-time high on Tuesday. The Dow Jones industrial average climbed within two points of 17,000 for the first time after separate surveys showed that manufacturing expanded in the world’s two largest economies.

  •  
    Hillshire CEO Sean Connolly

    Pinnacle Foods lets Hillshire out of sale pact

    Pinnacle Foods said Monday it has scrapped its sale to Chicago-based Hillshire Brands, freeing Hillshire to be acquired by Tyson Foods. Pinnacle Foods, which makes Birds Eye frozen vegetables, Duncan Hines cake mixes and Hungry-Man frozen dinners, said it will get a $163 million breakup payment from Hillshire. The Parsippany, New Jersey, company said it expects about $25 million in one-time costs connected to the scotched sale.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    It’s not kicking out, it’s teaching responsibility

    I told my 20-year-old son that if he cannot cooperate without constant reminders and nagging, he will have to make other living arrangements. He claims this would be “kicking me out because I won’t clean a bathroom.” What should I do?

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    Mount Prospect native Lee DeWyze plays Aurora's RiverEdge Park Saturday, July 5, and Lake in the Hills Rockin' Ribfest Friday, July 11.

    Lee DeWyze plays Aurora's RiverEdge today

    “I can't wait,” Mount Prospect native Lee DeWyze says of playing Aurora's RiverEdge Park Saturday, July 5, and Lake in the Hills Rockin' Ribfest Friday, July 11. “I really love taking my songs out of the studio, it's a kind of musical release for me. And then to be able to play them in front of friends and family, that's really going to be cool.”

  •  
    The Modern Day Romeos plays the Northwest Fourth-Fest at the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates.

    Weekend picks: Fests, fireworks and more fests for the 4th

    Catch bands like Smash Mouth and Modern Day Romeos amid the rides and carnival games at the Northwest Fourth-Fest this weekend at the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates. The Mount Prospect Lions Club hosts its annual Village Festival in Melas Park this weekend. And “Mad About You” comedian Paul Reiser returns this Saturday to do standup comedy at Zanies in Rosemont. The Eyes to the Skies Festival promises a carnival, fireworks and its famous array of colorful hot air balloons.

  •  
    Judy Monaco, of Glendale Heights, has been making her Antipasto Salad for summer gatherings for more than 20 years.

    Four readers share spectacular sides for the Fourth

    Want the guests at your Fourth of July picnic or barbecue to oooh and aaah over your menu? Work these reader-submitted side dishes into the rotation.

  •  
    Christina Blanton, of Florida scrubs down the exterior of Sugar Babies Treats, getting it ready for Wednesday’s Frontier Days opening.

    Northwest suburban Fourth of July festivals open Wednesday

    The blockbuster Fourth of July festivals are finally here. In the Northwest suburbs, three open Wednesday — Frontier Days in Arlington Heights, the Lions Village Festival in Mount Prospect and the Hometown Celebration in Palatine. Starting Thursday are the Barrington Fourth of July festival, the Bartlett Fourth of July festival and Northwest Fourth-Fest, held at the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates.

  •  
    Judges Diana Martinez, left, Beth Waller, John Flamini and Barbara Vitello gave performance advice to the Top 20 contestants for Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent at the Prairie Center for the Arts in Schaumburg on Sunday, June 22. The field is now down to 15.

    Top 15 named for Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent

    The Top 15 finalists of Suburban Chicago's Got Talent for 2014 have been announced, and they will perform at the Prairie Center for the Arts in Schaumburg at 7 p.m. Sunday, July 13.

  •  

    Diana Martinez reviews the world premiere of The Last Ship

    Short and Sweet host, Diana Martinez of Broadway in Chicago, reviews The Last Ship.

  •  
    Pearl (Susan Sarandon) and her granddaughter (Melissa McCarthy) share a rare peaceful moment in “Tammy.”

    McCarthy's 'Tammy' no comic whammy

    In Melissa McCarthy's new comedy “Tammy,” both a deer and a human being appear to be dead, dead, dead. But it turns out they're not, not, not.The only thing actually dead in “Tammy,” at least during most of its 96-minute running time, would be the riotous sense of fun that McCarthy usually brings to her comic movies. Here, the jokes hit with the accuracy of bullets in a Michael Bay movie.

  •  
    Jonah Rawitz of Buffalo Grove won a Jimmy Award for best performance by an actor at the National High School Musical Theater Awards.

    Buffalo Grove teen wins National High School Musical Theater Award

    Jonah Rawitz, of Buffalo Grove, who sang an aching Jason Robert Brown song and another teen from Georgia who chose to sing “Raise the Roof” — and almost did so — have won top honors at the National High School Musical Theater Awards in New York. Rawitz got the best-actor crown and Atlanta resident Jai’Len Josey was named best actress Monday night at the sixth annual “Glee”-like competition. “I can’t emphasize enough how humbled I am to be within this crowd of such amazing actors and individuals," Rawitz said.

  •  

    ‘Billy Elliot’ regional premiere set for Drury Lane

    Drury Lane Theatre in Oak Brook will stage the regional premiere of the hit musical "Billy Elliot" in April 2015.

  •  
    Starting July 5, Disney’s Hollywood Studios in central Florida will add to the “Frozen” frenzy by offering a daily character procession, singalongs and a nightly party based on the hit animated movie.

    Disney adding ‘Frozen’ characters, fireworks at Hollywood Studios

    Disney’s Hollywood Studios in central Florida will add to the “Frozen” frenzy by offering a daily character procession, singalongs and a nightly party based on the hit animated movie. Disney recently announced that “Frozen Summer Live” — a character-driven procession down the park’s Hollywood Boulevard with Anna, Elsa and Kristoff — will begin July 5 and run through Sept. 1, each day at 11 a.m.

  •  
    Rickey Brew Cocktail

    American craft brews mixing up the cocktail scene

    Beer as a mixer isn't new, but it has seen an uptick in recent years, fueled largely by the flourishing market of excellent craft beers, according to bar consultant Jacob Grier, who's publishing a book on beer cocktails next year called “Cocktails on Tap.”

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    Readers give advice while Carolyn Hax takes a break

    Readers offer their advice while Carolyn Hax is away.

  •  
    Greta (Keira Knightley) preps for her musical break in John Carney's street musical “Begin Again.”

    'Once' director scores 'Again' with musical optimism, restraint

    The title of John Carney's “Begin Again” doesn't do justice to this polished little gem of a street musical, a joyously optimistic film. The plot and characters don't rack up many originality points. On the romantic rebound, a poet/singer girl comes to the big city, falls in with a bunch of dysfunctional musicians, and the power of music compels them to become better versions of themselves.

  •  

    Dining events: Get specialty burgers with the works at Ted's Montana Grill

    Now through mid-July, try one of Ted's Montana Grill's specialty beef or bison burgers. Just one example is George's Cadillac, which comes with cheddar cheese, smoky bacon and barbecue sauce. The International House of Pancakes celebrates 56 years in business with 56-cent short stacks on Tuesday, July 8.

  •  
    Alex (Teo Halm) befriends a special outer space buddy in the well-acted but derivative sci-fi adventure “Earth to Echo.”

    Family-friendly ‘Earth’ an echo of ‘E.T.’ and other kid hits

    Another “found footage” film, “Earth to Echo” is the pleasant, family-friendly feature directorial debut of music video and shorts director Dave Green, who fashioned this admittedly derivative film as a nostalgic throwback to such kid hits as “E.T.,” “Stand By Me” and “The Goonies.” But Green fails to establish a separate identity for his film outside of its obvious cinematic inspirations.

  •  
    Visitors take pictures of Johannes Vermeer’s “Girl with a Pearl Earring” (approx. 1665) at the Mauritshuis in The Hague, Netherlands.

    ‘Girl with Pearl Earring’ comes home to Holland

    “The Girl With a Pearl Earring” has come home. After a two-year global tour that drew record crowds in Japan, Italy and the United States, Johannes Vermeer’s 1665 masterpiece and other works from the Netherlands’ 17th-century Golden Age have returned home to the newly renovated Mauritshuis museum in the Hague. Both the museum, which reopened June 27, and the collection have been changed by their time apart.

  •  

    Swedish Meatballs
    Marija Benson's Swedish Meatballs can be served over butter noodles or as an appetizer.

  •  

    Maple Oatmeal Bread
    Marija Benson insists on real maple syrup in her Maple Oatmeal Bread.

  •  
    Cinnamon, cloves and orange flavor Marija Benson’s Swedish Spice Cake.

    Swedish Spice Cake
    Cinnamon, cloves and orange flavor Marija Benson’s Swedish Spice Cake.

  •  
    Marija Benson, of Naperville, has enjoyed baking since she was a girl. Watch her make Swedish Spice Cake, pictured, at dailyherald.com/video. Head to dailyherald.com/lifestyle/food for her Maple Oatmeal Bread recipe.

    Cook of the Week: Competition fuels creative spark

    Cook of the Week Marija Benson received rave reviews through the years for her oatmeal maple syrup bread and chocolate chip cake but she never had the desire to test her mettle in a competition. A baking instructor encouraged her to try and now she's on a winning streak.

  •  
    Vacationers relax at Caye Caulker, Belize. The beach town is a laid-back, low-cost base for tourists looking to explore a nearby barrier reef.

    Jungle ruins and sea life await in tiny Belize

    The same turquoise waters that lure tourists to Caribbean destinations slosh around Belize’s island chain. But tiny Belize has a major advantage in reeling in the holidaymakers — spectacular Maya ruins tucked away in a lush jungle. The nation is home to more prehistoric buildings than modern-day ones, according to its Institute of Archaeology. That ancient appeal draws in backpackers eager for adventure as well as divers ready to gawk at its bustling reefs or plunge into its famed Blue Hole. Belize has all the ingredients for a surf and turf vacation — at least for those who don’t mind the odd giant cockroach or neon green frog that may invade their jungle dwellings.

  •  
    When Molly Sutton craves a traditional summer side dish, she breaks out her mom’s recipe for Sweet Sour Beans.

    Sweet Sour Baked Beans
    When Molly Sutton wants a traditional side dish for summer cook outs, she breaks out her mother's recipe for Sweet and Sour Baked Beans.

  •  
    A variety of beans mingle with sweet peppers, onion and celery in a summery side dish that Jill Von Boeckman, of Arlinton Heights, and her mother, Martha Grossweiler, have sharing at family gatherings for years.

    Mom’s Vegetable Salad
    Mom's Vegetable Salad is a favorite summer side dish that has been in Jill Von Boeckman's family for three generations.

  •  
    Judy Monaco says her Antipasto Salad is even better if you let the flavors mingle several hours or overnight.

    Antipasto Salad
    Judy Monaco's Antipasto Salad is chock full of olives and cheese.

  •  
    Cilantro adds a vibrant bite to Linda Lenhardt’s colorful Cucumber Vegetable Salad.

    Cucumber Vegetable Salad with Cilantro
    Cilantro adds vibrant flavor to Linda Lenhardt's cucumber salad.

  •  
    Basil and white wine transform cucumbers into a deliciously refreshing accompaniment to sausages and antipasto.

    From the Food Editor: Cool cucumbers, celebratory shots for a fabulous Fourth

    With a garden full of basil and beautiful crops of cucumbers at the store, Food Editor Deborah Pankey is eager to re-create a cucumber salad of sorts she had earlier this year at Quartino in Chicago. Lucky for her (and you!) chef John Coletta has shared his recipe.

  •  
    John Verdon’s cleverness shines in “Peter Pan Must Die.”

    John Verdon’s cleverness shines in new thriller

    John Verdon’s skillful melding of the puzzle mystery with the police procedural and the psychological thriller brings a unique spin to his series about retired NYPD homicide Detective Dave Gurney. “Peter Pan Must Die” again presents Dave with a seemingly insurmountable problem — a murder that, on the surface, was impossible to perform. Verdon expertly takes the novel through a labyrinth of twists that, however outlandish at first, are totally believable.

  •  
    Rickey Brew Cocktail

    Rickey Brew
    Lime juice, gin and raspberry lambic combine for a yummmy beer-based cocktail called a Rickey Brew.

  •  
    Black Cream Cocktail

    Black Cream
    Black Cream Cocktail uses stout as a mixer.

  •  

    Night life events: Celebrate Fourth with Oak Brook Hills Resort
    Oak Brook Hills Resort launches its first Fourth of July bash; Gnarly J's now open in Downers Grove; Finn McCool's cruise nights every Monday throughout summer.

Discuss

  •  
    The Kane County morgue is a repurposed facility that dates back to the days when the government center was a monastery.

    Editorial: Sharing morge could save money for Kane, DuPage

    The discovery of mold in its aging morgue led the Kane County coroner to move operations to DuPage County. Instead of upgrading the Kane County facility and moving back in, officials should determine whether sharing saves money for taxpayers in both counties, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    Into the morass

    Columnist Gene Lyons: Remember the Iraqi journalist who threw his shoes at President George W. Bush? It happened on Dec. 14, 2008, near the end of the president’s second term. Bush had traveled to Baghdad for a news conference with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. The two announced the signing of the U.S.-Iraqi Status of Forces Agreement promising that all American soldiers would leave Iraq by Dec. 31, 2011.

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    The power of authenticity

    Columnist Michael Gerson: There are many ways to succeed in American politics, but most of them involve authenticity. Voters are often not interested in (or even capable of) of making decisions based on a carefully sorted list of policy priorities. They often take politicians in the totality of their acts. They develop a composite picture that includes a candidate’s general policy predispositions (left or right), but also his or her public persona (“A least he knows what he believes.” “What a character; I like her.”).

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    Be skeptical when reading letters
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: Telling the truth, your newspaper’s founder is quoted as saying, is one of the aims of the paper. I believe that when you publish readers’ letters that contain incorrect information presented as facts, you are entirely complicit in lying to your readers. In my opinion, to be true to your stated aim and to your obligation to your readers, you should — at all times — edit out any statements that you know to be untrue, or provide a disclaimer that you have elected not to fact-check the letter.

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    Recognize impact of Civil Rights Act
    A letter to the editor: As we prepare to gather with friends and family to celebrate the 4th of July, I want to encourage everyone to take a moment to commemorate another important event in our nation’s history. Fifty years ago on July 2, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 became law, which outlawed discrimination based on race, creed, gender or national origin. The landmark civil rights law prohibited racial segregation in schools, at work and at public facilities, and ended unfair voting registration practices.

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    Some questions to ask about area’s traffic
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: The idea for this letter started when I heard the morning traffic reporter state that it was a 62-minute ride from Thorndale on in at 6:22 a.m. and remain at 62 minutes for over two hours. I contend that vehicular travel in Chicagoland does not work, and these are my observations.

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    (No heading)
    Recognize impact of Civil Rights Act As we prepare to gather with friends and family to celebrate the 4th of July, I want to encourage everyone to take a moment to commemorate another important event in our nation’s history. Fifty years ago on July 2, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 became law, which outlawed discrimination based on race, creed, gender or national origin. The landmark civil rights law prohibited racial segregation in schools, at work and at public facilities, and ended unfair voting registration practices.Having been a student at Alabama State College — now Alabama State University — in Montgomery in the early 1950s, I experienced some of the inequalities that prompted the civil rights movement. Coming from Chicago to Montgomery brought challenges and frustrations due to the racial climate in the south. African-American students faced the inequality of a segregated school system. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 ushered in widespread legal changes for which activists had fought for years. It was a monumental step in the direction of racial equality and fairness. I encourage those who would like to learn more about this important milestone in our nation’s history to read the feature article on the Civil Rights Movement in the 2013-14 Illinois Blue Book, published by my office. The Illinois Blue Book is available online at www.cyberdriveillinois.com or can be found at your local library. As we prepare to celebrate the birth of our great nation 238 years ago, let us also remember those heroes who organized, protested and marched so we could live in a society where people, as my former minister, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., famously said, “will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”Jesse White Illinois Secretary of StateSome questions to ask about area’s trafficThe idea for this letter started when I heard the morning traffic reporter state that it was a 62-minute ride from Thorndale on in at 6:22 a.m. and remain at 62 minutes for over two hours.I contend that vehicular travel in Chicagoland does not work, and these are my observations.1. Suburban motorists cannot plan any normal commuting times. One spends more time on the road from Wheaton to Wrigley Field than actual attending a night game.2. Rush hour can actually last most of the day — not just the traditional morning and afternoon hassles.3. Inaccurate radio traffic reports and unannounced lane closures add to the frustration. (“Unusually heavy” and “normal situation” mean what?)4. I am suggesting that construction tie up no more than three miles of roadway and not be allowed on parallel roadways during the same season. (I am aware of economies of scale!)5. Truckers, once the best drivers, add driving stress by going too fast or slow, tailgating, making unnecessary lane changes and clogging up the left and middle lanes.6. There is a glaring lack of law enforcement against speedy and road rage-prone drivers who do not follow the rules of the road and who put others at risk daily.7. Why aren’t there dedicated toll lanes on all major expressways — it is working in the Miami and Fort Lauderdale areas.8. Why haven’t poorly designed interchanges been updated? Why haven’t inadequate suburban roads been widened? Why hasn’t public transportation helped?One of the major functions of the media, including this newspaper, is to hold traffic leaders accountable. It is not being done.This problem will not be solved until the need for traffic reports is no longer needed.Jim LentzWheaton

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