Daily Archive : Tuesday June 24, 2014

News

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    A sign in the Wauconda village hall lobby welcomes visitors as trustees meet in the boardroom.

    Wauconda may change meeting schedule

    For the first time in decades, Wauconda’s village leaders are considering trimming their meeting schedule.

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    Matthew Nellessen

    No opportunity for redemption for Arlington Heights killer, judge says

    Matthew Nellessen was sentenced Wednesday to life in prison by a Cook County judge who said he saw no chance of redemption for the 22-year-old Arlington Heights man who killed his father. “I thought I’d seen everything until this case,” Judge Martin Agran said in sentencing Nellessen to natural life without parole, Illinois’ toughest penalty.

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    A funnel cloud was spotted in the skies Tuesday evening over the Oak Brook area, but it did not touch down and there were no reports or even warnings of tornadoes in DuPage County.

    Funnel clouds spotted over DuPage County not tornadoes

    The National Weather Service said it received reports of funnel clouds from places in DuPage and Cook County. The agency got reports, photos and videos of funnel clouds near Oak Brook, Western Springs, Hinsdale and other locations Tuesday, according to a National Weather Service online special weather statement. Pictures of the clouds were posted in social media.

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    Marvin Teel rode his antique Schwinn bicycle five days a week to deliver newspapers in downstate Christopher.

    Bike-riding newspaper carrier dies at 90

    A 90-year-old World War II veteran who rode his antique Schwinn bicycle five days a week to deliver newspapers in his southern Illinois town has died. Marvin Teel was admitted to the hospital only after he insisted on finishing his delivery of 40 newspapers.

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    Northwestern issues diplomas with misspelled word

    Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communication recently gave 30 diplomas to graduates on which the word “integrated” was spelled without the ‘n.’ The diploma would have been tagged with a “Medill F” — a stamp earned by students who commit factual or spelling errors.

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    Three Aurora men injured in Sunday shooting

    Three people were shot early Sunday morning when an unidentified male walked up a driveway and started shooting. The three Aurora victims were all men. One, age 21, was shot in the thigh. A second victim, 27, was shot in the foot. The third victim was 18 years old and he was shot in the thigh. None of the injuries were life-threatening, according to an email from Dan Ferrelli, media relations...

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    Teen charged in burglary at Elgin business

    A 14-year-old boy was charged with burglary and felony criminal damage to property after a witness allegedly saw him punch in the entry door window of a business, take items and ride away on a bicycle.

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    Woman’s dog dies after pit bulls attack

    An 83-year-old woman was injured and her dog killed Tuesday after an attack by two larger dogs believed to be pit bulls. The woman had injuries to her hands and legs and was taken to the hospital, but her dog died.

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    Several hundred people spread out on the grass at Wing Park Tuesday night for a concert by the R Gang band. The Chicago-based quintet played hits of the 1970s. The performance was part of the Elgin Concerts in the Park program.

    R Gang performs at Elgin’s Concert in the Park series

    Several hundred people spread out on the manicured lawn at Elgin’s Wing Park Tuesday evening as rhythm and blues band R Gang performed as part of the Concert in the Park series. The Chicago-based quintet continued to play hits of the 70s as people danced among the folding lawn chairs. “We love this,” said Dottie Schmitz of South Elgin, as she and husband John rested after...

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    Joe Lewnard/jlewnard@dailyherald.com This is the big red Weber grill outside the Schaumburg restaurant. There will be an even bigger one outside Weber-Stevens’ “headquarters of the Americas” in Rolling Meadows.

    Big red grill will mark Weber site in Rolling Meadows

    Weber-Stephens will install a signature big red kettle “grill” at its new “headquarters of the Americas” in Rolling Meadows. The kettle, measuring 20 feet tall and 13 feet wide, will sit on the south side of the building at 2900 Golf Road. It’ll be seven feet taller than similar grills in front of Weber Grill restaurants in Schaumburg and Lombard.

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    Lawmaker signs most subpoenas for Quinn program

    Five former state officials under Gov. Pat Quinn’s administration will be subpoenaed to testify about a troubled 2010 anti-violence program next month, but the rejection of two other subpoenas by a key Democratic lawmaker on Tuesday reignited claims of election year politics.

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    State to auction unclaimed coins, jewelry

    Thousands of coins, jewelry and silverware locked away in an Illinois Capitol vault will be auctioned off next month, including a 24-karat gold-covered John F. Kennedy commemorative dollar and several six-pound silver bars.

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    Portland Imam Mohamed Sheikh Abdirahman Kariye is one of 15 men who say their rights were violated because they are on the U.S. government’s no-fly list.

    Judge: No-fly list violated constitutional rights

    The U.S. government deprived 13 people on its no-fly list of their constitutional right to travel and gave them no adequate way to challenge their placement on the list, a federal judge said Tuesday in the nation’s first ruling finding the no-fly list redress procedures unconstitutional. U.S. District Court Judge Anna Brown’s decision says the procedures lack a meaningful mechanism...

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    Archivist of the United States David Ferriero testifies on Capitol Hill Tuesday before a House committee hearing on the the loss of IRS emails.

    Archivist: IRS didn’t follow law with lost emails

    The Internal Revenue Service did not follow the law when it failed to report the loss of records belonging to a senior IRS executive, the nation’s top archivist told Congress on Tuesday, in the latest development in the congressional probe of the agency’s targeting of conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status.

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    Denilson J. Martinez-Rodriquez

    Man accused in North Shore Bike Path attack

    A Honduran citizen living in Waukegan is held on $500,000 bail in connection with last week’s attack on a female jogger along the North Shore Bike Path near Libertyville, authorities said Tuesday. Denilson J. Martinez-Rodriquez, 21, admitted to police that he had a moment of weakness when he tried to grab the female jogger at the Route 176 underpass near Libertyville.

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    Syed Qadri

    Chicago man charged in theft of Audi in Prospect Hts.

    A Chicago man who was charged in the theft of an automobile when he went to meet with his parole officer will be in court Wednesday in Rolling Meadows.

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    S. Barrington woman, 86, drowns in family pool

    An 86-year-old South Barrington woman fell into her family’s pool and drowned Sunday in what police called a “terrible, tragic accident.” Betty Stas lived with her daughter, Cathy Guranovich, and her son-in-law, South Barrington Village Trustee Stephen Guranovich.

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    Russian Vladimir Putin has asked parliament to cancel a resolution that sanctions the use of military force in Ukraine. Putin wrote to the head of parliament’s upper house asking that a March 1 request authorizing the use of force in neighboring Ukraine be withdrawn.

    Ukraine’s cease-fire jeopardized by deadly attack

    The shaky cease-fire in Ukraine was thrown into peril Tuesday when pro-Moscow separatists shot down a Ukrainian military helicopter, killing nine servicemen. Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko warned he may end the weeklong truce ahead of time. The deadly attack came a day after the rebels vowed to respect the cease-fire, which began last Friday.

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    Nearly a year after Asiana Flight 214 crashed while landing in San Francisco, the National Transportation Safety Board is meeting to determine what went wrong, who’s to blame and how to prevent future accidents.

    NTSB faults pilot ‘mismanagment’ in Asiana flight

    Asiana Flight 214’s pilots caused the crash last year of their airliner carrying more than 300 people by bungling a landing approach in San Francisco, including inadvertently deactivating the plane’s key control for airspeed, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded Tuesday.

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    McHenry man dies when dump truck runs over him

    Authorities believe a McHenry man died Monday when he failed to secure the dump truck he operated, which then ran over him. Bryan J. Reid, 63, was pronounced dead Monday at 12:44 p.m. at the Elmhurst-Chicago Stone Co. quarry, 351 Royce Road, Bolingbrook, according to the Will County Coroner’s Office.

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    Dist. 101 school lunch prices again going up

    Batavia students will pay more for school lunches next year. Not because it costs more to make the lunches, but to reduce the difference between what the district charges and the higher reimbursement the federal government pays for lunches served to low-income students.

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    A 55,000-square-foot early childhood learning center is proposed for the east side of Holmes Junior High School in Mount Prospect.

    Architect to design drawings for Dist. 59 early learning facility

    An architect will design schematics for a proposed early childhood learning center in Elk Grove Township Elementary District 59. “It allows the district to develop more precise square footage estimates and cost estimates in terms of what would need to be in those spaces,” said Becki Streit, the district’s assistant superintendent for educational services.

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    The Barrington Countryside Fire Protection District and Barrington Fire Department have reached a deal governing when, how and where the two agencies will respond to emergencies in the other’s jurisdiction. The deal was ratified by both sides Monday night.

    Barrington fire agencies finally reach aid agreement

    Nearly six months after their acrimonious breakup, the Barrington Countryside Fire Protection District and the Barrington Fire Department have reached an automatic aid agreement governing when, how and where each will respond to emergencies in the other’s jurisdiction. The deal was ratified by both sides Monday evening.

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    George Lucas

    ‘Star Wars’ creator selects Chicago for museum

    “Star Wars” creator George Lucas announced Tuesday that he has picked Chicago to host his much-anticipated museum of art and movie memorabilia, in a major victory for the nation’s third-largest city. San Francisco and Los Angeles also had sought the museum. Lucas said in a written statement that he hopes to open the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art in 2018.

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    The Gail Borden Public Library board will place a referendum question on the November ballot asking district residents and unserved people near the western boundary if they want to become members of the library district so they can actually use the library, such as the Rakow branch on Bowes Road.

    Gail Borden referendum will be on November ballot

    Gail Borden Public Library District residents, along with residents of unserved areas on the western edge of the district, will be asked in November if they want to annex those areas. The library’s board of trustees unanimously voted at a special meeting Tuesday to place the referendum question on the Nov. 4 election ballot.

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    A hot-air balloon landed safely in Sun City in Huntley early Tuesday. The pilot said he was looking for a safe place to land and there was no emergency.

    Pilot: Huntley balloon landing wasn’t emergency

    What seemed like an emergency landing by a hot-air balloon in a Huntley neighborhood Tuesday morning wasn’t really an emergency at all, said pilot Chad Morin. It was planned and “perfectly executed,” said Morin, 37, of Marengo, a commercial hot-air balloon pilot and owner of Nostalgia Ballooning, which runs flights out of the Hampshire and Huntley area. “There were no...

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    A monarch butterfly eats nectar from a swamp milkweed on the shore of Rock Lake in Pequot Lakes, Minn. A new study published in the journal Nature Communications suggests monarch butterflies use an internal magnetic compass to help navigate on their annual migrations from North America to central Mexico.

    Monarch butterflies may have magnetic compass

    A new study suggests that monarch butterflies use an internal magnetic compass to help navigate on their annual migrations from North America to central Mexico.

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    Rolling Meadows, Des Plaines growing, survey says

    Rolling Meadows ranked fifth and Des Plaines 10th on a list of the fastest-growing cities in Illinois, according to a financial advice website called nerdwallet.com. Rolling Meadows experienced an 8.4 percent increase in the working-age population between 2009 and 2012. It also had a 4.2 percent growth in the percentage of employed residents, but a 4.6 percent decline in median income.

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    Hawthorn Woods storm cleanup:

    Hawthorn Woods village officials said Waste Management is providing residents with trash containers for disposing of fallen branches, tree limbs, and logs from last weekend’s storm.

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    CLC hosts benefit

    A benefit event featuring fashions from around the world, plus dance, live music, an art auction, world market vendors and fair trade products, is set for 6 p.m. Saturday, June 28, in the College of Lake County C Wing Auditorium, 19351 W. Washington St., Grayslake.

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    Libertyville history on display:

    Photos of the people, businesses and the key issues and events in Libertyville over 100 years will be on display in the foyer at St. Lawrence Church, 125 W. Church St., for three days each in June, July and August to coordinate with local events.

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    Elgin looking at 911-Twitter combo

    The Elgin Police Department is working on getting software that would automatically send some 911 calls to Twitter. The department signed a $10,000 contract with New World Systems, a Michigan-based company that is working on developing a way to tweet 911 calls — mainly about traffic accidents — via the police department’s Twitter account, Deputy Chief Bill Wolf said.

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    SIU board OKs fees for sports, newspaper

    The Southern Illinois University system’s governing board has signed off on two fee proposals meant to help the Carbondale campus’ sports programs and student newspaper.

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    Field Museum to return Aboriginal remains

    The Field Museum in Chicago is returning the remains of three Aborigines taken from Tasmania at a time when European colonists, doctors and natural history researchers were looting burial grounds and massacre sites.

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    2 workers killed in Pekin industrial accident

    Two workers have died from carbon monoxide poisoning at an agricultural products plant in central Illinois.

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    Aaron Toppen

    Mokena soldier laid to rest

    A 19-year-old soldier from Mokena who was killed in Afghanistan was laid to rest Tuesday after hundreds of mourners attended his funeral in Orland Park.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn’s office says cutting about 35 percent of paid parking spaces for state employees in downtown Chicago will save about $100,000 a year.

    Quinn cuts some free parking for state employees

    Gov. Pat Quinn says the state is going to cut about 35 percent of its paid parking spaces for state employees in downtown Chicago.

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    Camp coordinator Michele Christensen swims in a kiddie pool Tuesday during Wet Day at the Spotlight Youth Theater summer camp at The Chapel in Libertyville. The weeklong camp focuses on voice, drama and dance as children prepare for Friday’s presentation of “Surfin’ the High Seas.”

    Drama campers enjoy water fun on the high seas of Libertyville summer camp

    Excited children splashed down a wet slide and threw water balloons at each other Tuesday during Wet Day at the Spotlight Youth Theater summer camp at The Chapel in Libertyville. Thirty-four children were taking a break during the weeklong voice, drama and dance camp.

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    Christopher C. Aiston

    Batavia city economic consultant charged with felony DUI

    Christopher Aiston, a former economic development director for Kane County, St. Charles and Geneva, was indicted this week on felony charges that he committed his third DUI offense in January 2014 when arrested in Geneva after he rear-ended another vehicle, according to court records. Aiston, 55, of Geneva, currently serves as a contractor for Batavia. Aiston's attorney says he was not impaired...

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    Dorothy “Dee” Horky

    Arrest warrant issued for former Wheaton North booster club president

    The former president of the Wheaton North High School Booster Club, who recently pleaded guilty to stealing more than $11,000 from the organization, is in trouble with the law again. DuPage Judge Daniel Guerin on Tuesday signed a $50,000 bond arrest warrant for Dorothy “Dee” Horky, 58, of Carol Stream after she failed to attend her second consecutive court date related to her...

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    Gianna Brown, 4, of Naperville, dances to the music of the Ice Cream Vendors as they perform Tuesday as part of Naperville Park District’s Children’s Lunch Hour Entertainment series at Frontier Park.

    Ice Cream Vendors get kids dancing in Naperville

    The Ice Cream Vendors brought their collection of catchy lyrics, melodic rock and geeked-out songs to Naperville Tuesday during a performance at Frontier Park as part of HYPERLINK "http://www.napervilleparks.org/childrenslunchhourentertainment"Naperville Park District’s Children’s Lunch Hour Entertainment series. The duo of Jon Kostal and Greg Barnett got kids — and even some...

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    Josie Dolinsky

    Firefighters hold blood drive in Rolling Meadows

    The Rolling Meadows Fire Department is holding a blood drive Thursday, June 26, in memory of Josie Dolinsky, wife of Rolling Meadows firefighter Evan Dolinsky. She died in March of leukemia.

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    A committee will form to help decide the fate of Mundelein’s old village hall.

    Mundelein group to develop options for old village hall

    Now that Mundelein’s new village hall has opened, a six-member committee will form to help decide the fate of the former hall on Hawley Street.

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    Christina A. Santiago

    2-year-old child pepper sprayed during fight at Batavia complex

    Two Aurora women face felony charges after a fight Saturday that police say was prompted over Facebook comments. A 2-year-old and two adults were hit with pepper spray. Schaumere Causey, 20, and Christina Santiago, 24, are charged with mob action and aggravated battery to a child younger than 13, both felonies.

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    Holiday lights to cost Elk Grove Village $53,000

    Elk Grove Village will spend $53,817 on decorating its municipal complex with lights in the upcoming holiday season. The village board last week approved a contract extension with Oswego-based Temple Display to provide holiday lighting and decorating at the village-owned complex.

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    Hanover Township appoints volunteers to mental health board

    Hanover Township trustees have appointed three Bartlett residents to its mental health board. Kim Baffa, Meghan Nelson and Julia Thomas will sit on the panel charged with allocating funds to nonprofit agencies that provide services in fields of mental health, developmental disabilities and substance abuse.

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    Gurnee police now have two canine units instead of one. Introduced at a recent village board meeting were Officer Philip Mazur and Hunter, left, and Officer J.R. Nauseda with Bear, right. Police Chief Kevin Woodside, right, said the German shepherds rotate shifts, allowing for more daily coverage.

    Gurnee expands to two police dogs, chief says donations made it possible

    Gurnee police have an expanded canine unit despite the recent retirement of German shepherd Shane. Police Chief Kevin Woodside said the village's two police dogs have rotated shifts since starting last week, thus covering more hours daily.

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    The DuPage County Forest Preserve District is planning to replace its policy for dealing with historic buildings such as the McKee House at Churchill Woods Forest Preserve near Glen Ellyn.

    DuPage forest preserve considers new policy for historic buildings

    DuPage County Forest Preserve officials are acknowledging the district can’t live in the past when it comes to maintaining historic buildings. Forest preserve commissioners are looking to replace the district’s historic structures policy, which dates to 1986, with a new set of guidelines that would apply to all cultural resources, including prehistoric and historic archaeological...

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    Taste of Lombard will begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 1, at Madison Meadow Park.

    Taste of Lombard ready to rock ‘n’ roll

    Organizers are hopeful that new food, different carnival rides, more vendors and two national bands will be a good combination for a successful Taste of Lombard this year. The festival begins Tuesday, July 1, and runs through Saturday, July 5, in Madison Meadow Park. “It’s your typical fest with music and food and a carnival and vendors,” said Jackie West, president of the...

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    Alex Wallace, 8, of Batavia, traces Scooby Doo (his favorite comic character) via an overhead projector Tuesday at Batavia Public Library’s Comic Book Fun program. More than 30 kids attended the comic book themed activity, which included a comic book character search in the kids garden, coloring in and cutting out their own superheroes and creating their own comic strips.

    Comic Book Fun at Batavia Public Library

    Kids create their own comic book characters at the Batavia Public Library.

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    Rain brings no-wake restriction to Chain O’ Lakes, Fox River

    The Fox Waterway Agency in Fox Lake has placed a no-wake restriction on the Chain O’ Lakes because of rising water levels. Ron Barker, the executive director of the state-funded agency, said the restrictions were put in place at noon Tuesday after heavy rains north of Antioch forced water levels to significantly rise in Wisconsin.

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    Sen. Kirk Dillard, shown on the Senate floor, could be the new RTA chairman.

    Dillard expected to be next RTA chairman

    Looks like Sen. Kirk Dillard could be the next RTA chairman. A vote is expected Wednesday and the former GOP gubernatorial hopeful should have the votes, one board member says. As a Metra and CTA rider, Dillard said he knows about delays first-hand and "my blood boils" when service breaks down.

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    Members of an Iraqi volunteer force put on their newly issued boots in the Shiite holy city of Karbala, 50 miles south of Baghdad, Tuesday. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has put on hold plans for a counteroffensive to retake Iraqi cities captured by Sunni insurgents in the north and west of the country, instead deploying elite forces in Baghdad to bolster its defenses, Iraqi officials said.

    Kurdish leader cites ‘new reality’ in Iraq

    Iraq’s top Kurdish leader warned visiting Secretary of State John Kerry on Tuesday that a rapid Sunni insurgent advance has already created “a new reality and a new Iraq,” signaling that the U.S. faces major difficulties in its efforts to promote unity among the country’s divided factions.

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    A report released by The Federal Reserve Bank of New York on Tuesday found that a degree is still a good investment for college grads, including those whose jobs don’t require college. Seen here, a student walks past Old Main on the campus of Penn State University in State College, Pa.

    Is a college degree still worth it? Study says yes

    Some comforting news for recent college graduates facing a tough job market and years of student loan payments: That college degree is still worth it. Those with bachelor’s or associate’s degrees earn more money over their lifetime than those who skip college, even after factoring in the cost of higher education, according to a report released Tuesday.

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    Exotic dancer sues western Wisconsin strip club

    An exotic dancer is suing a western Wisconsin strip club, accusing the owners of violating state and federal labor laws by failing to paying dancers hourly wages and overtime.

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    2 from Waukegan die in Arkansas crash

    Authorities say two people from Waukegan were killed in a motorcycle wreck in the Ozark Mountains in northern Arkansas.

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    12-year-old Wisconsin stabbing victim is on the mend

    A 12-year-old Waukesha girl stabbed 19 times in the legs, arms and torso last month is making steady physical and emotional progress, and she recently enjoyed a movie date with her father, her family said Tuesday. The girl can walk but her movement is limited by breathing problems.

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    Taking a step backward isn’t always bad

    Our Stephanie Penick says a recent trip to see her parents reminded her that taking a step backward isn't always bad.

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    The Chicago Symphony Orchestra will perform three concerts this week at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle as part of an effort to reach more suburban classical music lovers.

    Morton Arboretum welcomes Chicago Symphony Orchestra

    The Chicago Symphony Orchestra will return to The Morton Arboretum in Lisle for three evening performances this week, presenting a wide variety of music ranging from Bernstein to Beethoven.

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    Explorer Steve Libert says a debris field at the bottom of Lake Michigan may be the remains of the long-lost Griffin, a vessel commanded by a 17th-century French explorer.

    Explorer believes debris at bottom of Lake Michigan is Griffin shipwreck

    A debris field at the bottom of Lake Michigan may be the remains of the long-lost Griffin, a vessel commanded by a 17th-century French explorer, said a shipwreck hunter who has sought the wreckage for decades. “This is definitely the Griffin — I’m 99.9 percent sure it is,” Steve Libert said. “This is the real deal.”

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    60 females, 31 boys abducted in northeast Nigeria

    Islamic extremists have abducted 60 more girls and women and 31 boys from villages in northeast Nigeria, witnesses said Tuesday. Security forces denied the kidnappings. Nigeria’s government and military have been widely criticized for their slow response to the abductions of more than 200 schoolgirls kidnapped April 15.

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    Two universities in DC make deal to buy solar power

    WASHINGTON — Two universities in the nation’s capital have agreed to a major energy deal to buy more than half their power from three new solar power farms that will be built in North Carolina, the schools announced Monday night.

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    The decision by the Mormon church to excommunicate Kate Kelly, the founder of a prominent women’s group, marks a stern statement at a time when the church is under pressure to recognize gay rights and allow women into the priesthood.

    Experts: Mormon excommunication ‘warns everybody’

    The decision by the Mormon church to excommunicate the founder of a prominent women’s group marks a stern statement at a time when the church is under pressure to recognize gay rights and allow women into the priesthood. Experts believe the move essentially draws a line in the sand to show church members how far they can go in publicly questioning church practices.

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    Chicago man, 50, killed in paraglider crash in Fox River near Ottawa

    Authorities have identified a man who died in a crash of a powered paraglider that plunged into the Fox River in near Ottawa. The LaSalle County Sheriff’s Office and the county coroner’s office say the victim was 50-year-old Jeffrey A. Carpenter of Chicago. He was a passenger in the two-seat paraglider.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Thieves stole copper cable valued at $14,213 between June 10 and 13 from a ComEd substation, 1101 E. Seegers Road in Des Plaines. The offenders started a forklift in the yard and used it to carry five spools of cable to the south end of the lot. They used the forklift to raise and drop the spools outside the fence and removed the cable from the spools.

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    Mississippi Republican Sen. Thad Cochran speaks Monday at a re-election rally on his behalf at the Mississippi War Memorial in Jackson, Miss. Voters head to the polls in seven states Tuesday, and two of the longest serving members of Congress face challenges that could end their careers. In Mississippi, six-term Cochran faces Tea Party challenger Chris McDaniel in a Republican primary runoff. McDaniel is a 41-year-old state lawmaker who led Cochran by less than 1,400 votes but didn’t win a majority in the first round of voting.

    Cochran, Rangel challenged on busy primary day

    Six-term Sen. Thad Cochran’s Republican runoff against Mississippi state Sen. Chris McDaniel stands as a test of whether decades of delivering federal largesse trumps conservative demands to slash government spending. The 76-year-old Cochran, the former Senate Appropriations Committee chairman who has steered billions of dollars back home, is locked in a tight race against the tea...

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    Items are being readied for display by the Wauconda Township Historical Society in the revamped Andrew C. Cook House.

    Revived Wauconda Township Historical Society looks to future

    The Wauconda Township Historical Society is experiencing a rebirth, and with a renovated home and renewed vigor is looking ahead.

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    Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson has been convicted Tuesday of phone hacking, but fellow editor Rebekah Brooks was acquitted after a months long trial centring on illegal activity at the heart of Rupert Murdoch’s newspaper empire.

    Ex-UK tabloid editor convicted of phone hacking

    Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson was convicted of phone hacking Tuesday, but fellow editor Rebekah Brooks was acquitted after a monthslong trial centering on illegal activity at the heart of Rupert Murdoch’s newspaper empire.

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    Prospect Heights grocery store has closed

    The Save-A-Lot Food Store in Prospect Heights, open just one year, closed last week, Mayor Nick Helmer announced Monday. Helmer said after the city council meeting that another person hopes to open a grocery appealing to the area's Hispanic residents in the building at 610 N. Milwaukee Ave. in the Palwaukee Center. “That area really needs a grocery store,” he said.

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    Mourners chant slogans against the al-Qaida breakaway group Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant Monday after they buried 15 bodies in the village of Taza Khormato near the northern oil-rich city of Kirkuk, Iraq.

    U.S. special forces face complex challenge in Iraq

    U.S. teams of special forces going into Iraq after a three-year gap will face an aggressive insurgency, a splintering military and a precarious political situation as they help Iraqi security forces improve their ability to battle Sunni militants. “They will be very good at improving the immediate tactical proficiency of some of the Iraqi military, but they will be less prepared to address...

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    A Kurdish security soldier checks the identity cards of Iraqi citizens at a check point Tuesday on a highway between the Iraqi city of Mosul and the Kurdish city of Irbil, in Khazer area northern Iraq. The president of Iraq’s ethnic Kurdish region declared Tuesday that “we are facing a new reality and a new Iraq” as the country considers new leadership for its Shiite-led government as an immediate step to curb a Sunni insurgent rampage.

    United Nations: At least 1,075 killed in Iraq in June

    United Nations human rights monitors say at least 1,075 people have been killed in Iraq during June, most of them civilians. The U.N. human rights team in Iraq says at least 757 civilians were killed and 599 injured in Nineveh, Diyala and Salah al-Din provinces from June 5-22.

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    President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi said Tuesday he will not interfere in court rulings, a day after three Al-Jazeera English journalists, including a Canadian, were sentenced to seven years in prison, sparking an international outcry. Egyptian-Canadian Mohamed Fahmy, Australian Peter Greste and Egyptian Baher Mohamed were found guilty on Monday on terrorism-related charges.

    Egypt president won’t interfere in court verdicts

    Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi said Tuesday he will not interfere in court rulings, a day after three Al-Jazeera journalists were sentenced to seven years in prison in a verdict that prompted an international outcry. The ruling, on terrorism-related charges, stunned their families and brought a landslide of condemnation and calls for el-Sissi to intervene.

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    Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon on electric car tour of Illinois

    SPRINGFIELD — Illinois’ lieutenant governor has hit the road to encourage more businesses to offer charging stations for electric cars.

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    Wheat harvest gets rolling in Illinois

    SPRINGFIELD — As Illinois latest corn and soybean crops grow taller, the state’s harvest of winter wheat is in full swing.

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    Amtrak offering free rides for kids this summer

    Kids may ride for free on Amtrak trains between Chicago and Milwaukee during weekends this summer.In a press release Monday, Amtrak officials say adults may bring kids ages 2 to 12 with them for free on Hiawatha Service trains. The free tickets are available most Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays through August.

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    Gang member sentenced for racketeering, assault

    A Chicago street gang member whose testimony for federal prosecutors led to the conviction of 25 fellow Latin King members has been sentenced to 16 years in prison for racketeering and armed assault.

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    Daniels to speak to committee on space flight

    WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind.— Purdue University President Mitch Daniels and a Cornell University planetary scientist will speak before a U.S. House committee about human space flight.

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    Appeals court OKs dead witness’ video testimony

    INDIANAPOLIS — The state Court of Appeals has upheld a northern Indiana judge’s decision to allow videotaped statements from a dead witness to be used in an upcoming murder trial.

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    Indiana man dies during water race

    INDIANAPOLIS — A friend of a central Indiana man who died while competing in a water race at Indianapolis’ Eagle Creek Park says he was an avid swimmer and cyclist.Forty-five-year-old Chris Clarke of Carmel was competing Sunday in the Indy Open Water Challenge with the Indy Aquatic Masters swimming club when he unexpectedly stopped moving.

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    Deadline approaches for Indiana field trip grants

    INDIANAPOLIS — Educators interested in taking students on field trips to an Indiana state park or reservoir are running out of time to apply for financial help.The Indiana Department of Natural Resources says applications for the Discovering the Outdoors Field Trip Grant Program for the coming school year must be postmarked no later than June 30.

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    Algae advisory issued for Northern Indiana reservoir

    PERU, Ind. — State officials are warning boaters and swimmers using a northern Indiana reservoir to take precautions when using the lake due to the presence of a toxic form of algae.The Indiana Department of Natural Resources issued a blue-green algae advisory Monday for Mississinewa (mis-ih-SIHN’-uh-wah) Lake about 70 miles north of Indianapolis.

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    Report prioritizes Chicago lakefront development

    A new report envisions wildlife areas, commerce and recreation along a large swath of open lakefront land along Lake Michigan southeast of downtown and near Lake Calumet.The 140,000-acre Millennium Reserve project is a joint effort by state, federal and local officials to restore onetime industrial land into recreational space.

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    Dawn Patrol: Marklund to expand; U-46 says ‘no’ to charter school

    U-46 says ‘no’ to charter school. Bloomingdale allows Marklund school for autism to expand. Barrington area residents can soon monitor well water. Road repairs slowing traffic in Carol Stream. Two men charged in Aurora prostitution sting. Lombard pedestrian underpass meeting set. Waukegan man charged in stabbings. Antioch man charged with having fraudulent ID. Kasper: Light at the...

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    Libertyville-Vernon Hills Area High School District 128 already has 1,900 Chromebooks, making it a likely choice for its learning initiative giving each student a mobile computer by the 2015-16 school year.

    District 128 plans to give all students computers in 2015-16

    Libertyville-Vernon Hills Area High School District 128 officials are planning to give every student a mobile computer starting in the 2015-16 term. Such efforts typically are dubbed “1:1 initiatives.” “We’re actually referring to this as our digital learning strategy rather than a 1:1 initiative,” spokeswoman Mary Todoric told the Daily Herald. “The...

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    St. Charles’ municipal parking lot is headed for a renovation that may cost more than $1 million.

    St. Charles parking project will cost more than expected

    A plan to transform St. Charles' municipal parking lot into a public plaza for community gatherings may cost $205,000 more than expected.

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    Chuck Bumbales, assistant superintendent of operations for Community Unit District 300, leads a tour through the district’s old Carpentersville administration building, which is being converted into a school for Oak Ridge School. For 17 years, the alternative school was housed nearby in about a dozen trailers.

    Official: Renovated Carpentersville school ‘a work of art’

    Community Unit District 300 officials on Monday showed off the progress they’ve made thus far in converting their former Carpentersville headquarters into Oak Ridge School. "I’m very impressed, it’s a work of art to take it from what it was to make it to what it is now." Trustee Susie Kopacz said after the tour. "... No parent wants their children to be educated in trailers."

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    American Legion Post 771 strategic planning chairman James Huisel discusses how video gambling would boost the organization's finances.

    Gurnee: Video gambling won't save American Legion Post 771

    While Gurnee trustees and Mayor Kristina Kovarik agreed Monday they weren't interested in allowing video gambling to boost the local American Legion's finances, she pledged to help find other ways for the organization to raise money. “I certainly want to find a way to help the American Legion,” Kovarik said. “No 'ifs' 'ands' or 'buts' about it.”

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    Coyotes, like this one spotted in Wasco in 2011, have become more aggressive Geneva residents say and they want the city council to take action.

    Geneva residents say coyotes are getting aggressive

    The Geneva city council is revisiting the issue of what the city should do, if anything, about coyote attacks and sightings, after residents of two neighborhoods complained Monday about increased attacks. “They seem to have picked up on our habits, our timetable,” said Brian Darnell, who said he was attacked by two coyotes while walking his dog.

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    Two groups have expressed interest in either purchasing or managing the Des Plaines Theatre, which has been closed since January because of building code violations. The theater's owner will meet city officials Tuesday to discuss the proposals.

    Des Plaines Theatre owner to review 2 takeover pitches

    The owner of the shuttered Des Plaines Theatre will meet with city officials to review two proposals from those who may be interested in purchasing or managing the historic venue. The facility has been closed since Jan. 15 after its owner failed to meet a city deadline to fix building code issues. “We would've liked to have gotten more (proposals), but we have two, and hopefully one of...

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    Three pig roasts are planned this weekend in the St. Charles area.

    Bring your appetite: 3 pig roasts this weekend in Kane County

    In just one weekend, pork lovers will have the opportunity to support Kane County organizations and their causes at three different pig roast fundraisers.

Sports

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    Golf course architect Tom Doak had the honor of the first ceremonial tee shot at Medinah Country Club’s Course No. 1 last week. The $6.5 million renovation took 21 months to complete.

    Rave reviews for Medinah’s renovated Course No. 1

    Medinah Country Club now has another course to rival its famed No. 3 layout, says Len Ziehm, who talks with members about the $6.5 million renovation to Course No. 1, which had six new holes created by architect Tom Doak and improvements made to 12 other holes.

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    United States midfielder Michael Bradley talks Friday during a press conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    Palatine’s Bradley unshaken as he chases World Cup goals

    Michael Bradley stuck out his right foot to meet Fabian Johnson’s pass, ready to slot the ball into the empty net from 6 yards out. Surely this would be a goal. Then the ball struck Portuguese defender Ricardo Costa on a knee in front of the goal line and ricocheted away. Bradley stopped at a post, put a hand on each cheek and closed his eyes in shock, as if he had seen a ghost. It’s been that type of World Cup for the U.S midfielder.

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    Cameron Green, who will be a senior at Stevenson, announced that he will play college football at Northwestern.

    Stevenson’s Green plans to don Northwestern purple

    Cameron Green will trade his green for purple. Sporting a gray Northwestern T-shirt, purple Northwestern cap and wide smile, the Stevenson incoming senior posted a picture on Twitter on Friday announcing his college choice. “Blessed to have the opportunity to continue playing football after high school at Northwestern University #gocats,” Green tweeted.

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    Cubs starting pitcher Jake Arrieta took a perfect game into the seventh inning Tuesday night at Wrigley Field. He allowed 2 runs on 3 hits in the seventh before being taken out of the game.

    Cubs’ Arrieta perfectly comfortable for 6 innings

    Cubs pitcher Jake Arrieta always has had the stuff. It's just been a matter of harnessing it. Arrieta did so in a big way Tuesday night, tossing perfect ball through 6 innings against the Cincinnati Reds at Wrigley Field. “I knew that’s kind of what was going on from the get-go; most guys do in a situation like that,” he said.

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    Alexei Ramirez reacts after being called safe at the plate on a single by Alejandro De Aza in the eighth inning Tuesday night as the White Sox snapped their five-game losing streak.

    GM Hahn looking for consistency from White Sox

    Before the White Sox beat the Orioles 4-2 Tuesday night to snap a five-game winning streak, general manager Rick Hahn said he's not expecting perfection. But Hahn said it's imperative for the Sox to be more consistent.

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    Martin, Cougars steal win from Timber Rattlers

    Troy Martin stole 5 bases to set a club record, and the Kane County Cougars soared to a 9-3 victory over the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers in Midwest League action at at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva on Tuesday night.

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    Boomers’ streak snapped at five straight

    Coverage of the Schaumburg Boomers:Schaumburg dropped a 4-3 decision to the host Gateway Grizzlies in 10 innings in Frontier League action on Tuesday night, snapping the Boomers’ season-best five-game winning streak.

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    Chicago White Sox second baseman Gordan Beckham, center, is congratulated in the dugout after hitting a solo home run against the Baltimore Orioles in the first inning of a baseball game, Tuesday, June 24, 2014, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)

    White Sox top Orioles 4-2 in hard-fought game

    The White Sox rarely breeze to an easy victory, and this was no exception. Although the White Sox experienced a few anxious moments in the ninth inning Tuesday night, that didn't make their 4-2 win over the Baltimore Orioles any less satisfying. "When you have the opportunity, you have to win those games," left fielder Alejandro De Aza said. "We have to enjoy it because it doesn't happen very often."

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    Pair of Cubs’ future stars get the nod

    It's just about all-star season in baseball. Cubs manager Rick Renteria said he'd gladly recommend pitcher Jeff Samardzija for the All-Star Game. First baseman Anthony Rizzo said he'd like to play in the Midsummer Classic. And Cubs prospects Kris Bryant and Javier Baez have been chosen to play in the Futures Game.

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    Whatever LeBron James wants in Miami, LeBron James will get in Miami. The Heat really has no other choice but to make King James happy.

    Most powerful man in sports will stay in Miami

    LeBron James opted out of his contract with the Heat. Don't expect him to play for the Bulls next season, however. He'll say in Miami and be acknowledged as the most powerful man in sports.

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    Blackhawk Duncan Keith won his second Norris Trophy as the league’s top defenseman Tuesday night at the league’s postseason awards ceremony in Las Vegas. Keith comfortably beat out Boston captain Zdeno Chara and Nashville’s Shea Weber for the Norris, which he also won in 2010. Keith led all defensemen with 55 assists while leading the Blackhawks in ice time for the ninth straight season.

    Duncan Keith wins his second Norris Trophy

    Blackhawk Duncan Keith won his second Norris Trophy as the league’s top defenseman Tuesday night at the league’s postseason awards ceremony in Las Vegas. Keith comfortably beat out Boston captain Zdeno Chara and Nashville’s Shea Weber for the Norris, which he also won in 2010. Keith led all defensemen with 55 assists while leading the Blackhawks in ice time for the ninth straight season.

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    Tiger Woods returns at the Quicken Loans National with big hopes and realistic expectations — and with no pain. Asked for an opening comment on where he is with his recovery, Woods smiled and said, “I’m right here.” “It’s been an interesting road,” Woods said. “This has been quite a tedious little process, but been one where I got to a point where I can play competitive golf again. And it’s pretty exciting.”

    Woods says he’s ahead of schedule and without pain

    Tiger Woods returns at the Quicken Loans National with big hopes and realistic expectations — and with no pain.Asked for an opening comment on where he is with his recovery, Woods smiled and said, “I’m right here.”“It’s been an interesting road,” Woods said. “This has been quite a tedious little process, but been one where I got to a point where I can play competitive golf again. And it’s pretty exciting.”

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    With Brazilian fans everywhere, this was the view as Mike Taylor caught some of the local flavor while watching a World Cup game from a local bar in Brazil.

    World Cup postcard: a street view

    Postcard from the World Cup: Copacabana beach with 10,000 people or a local bar with seats in the street were our choices to watch Brazil’s game. We choose the seats in the street and were not disappointed.

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    Colombia forward Jackson Martinez, right, scores past Japan defender Atsuto Uchida during the second half of a group C World Cup soccer match at the Arena Pantanal in Cuiaba, Brazil, Tuesday, June 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

    Colombia tops World Cup group by beating Japan 4-1

    James Rodriguez scored a brilliant goal and set up two more for Jackson Martinez as Colombia routed Japan 4-1 on Tuesday to confirm top spot in Group C and eliminate the Asian champions from the World Cup. Already assured of advancing, Colombia guaranteed first place with its third straight win, setting up a second-round match against Uruguay.

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    Miami Heat forward LeBron James has decided to opt out of the final two years of his contract with the Heat and become a free agent on July 1. Opting out does not mean James has decided to leave the Heat, however.

    How will the Bulls react to LeBron’s decision?

    Carmelo Anthony is not alone. LeBron James will also opt out of his contract and become a free agent, it was announced Tuesday. So what does this mean for the Bulls and their expected pursuit of Anthony? He strongly considered the Bulls in 2010, but didn’t feel the love he got in Miami and it’s difficult to imagine James revisiting a Chicago scenario, though he’s a fan of the city. A big question is whether the Bulls should risk alienating Anthony by chasing James.

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    Costa Rica players greet supporters Tuesday after the Group D World Cup match against England at the Mineirao Stadium in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Costa Rica has finished first in what many considered the World Cup’s toughest group after a 0-0 draw against a second-string England side.

    Costa Rica tops Group D after 0-0 draw with England

    Costa Rica finished first in what many considered the World Cup’s toughest group after a dour 0-0 draw against a second-string England side Tuesday. Costa Rica only needed a draw to top Group D and played that way, setting up in a defensive 5-3-2 formation.

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    Uruguay’s Martin Caceres, left, and Egidio Arevalo Rios celebrate Tuesday after their Group D World Cup match against Italy at the Arena das Dunas in Natal, Brazil. Uruguay edged 10-man Italy 1-0 to reach the second round of the World Cup.

    Uruguay edges Italy 1-0 to advance at World Cup

    Captain Diego Godin scored in the 81st minute as Uruguay edged 10-man Italy 1-0 Tuesday to reach the second round of the World Cup, although the victory was overshadowed by a biting incident involving the South American side’s star forward Luis Suarez. Four-time champion Italy, meanwhile, is heading home after the group phase for the second time in four years.

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    Italy’s Giorgio Chiellini complains after Uruguay’s Luis Suarez ran into his shoulder with his teeth Tuesday during a Group D World Cup match at the Arena das Dunas in Natal, Brazil.

    Suarez could be in trouble again after appearing to bite foe

    Uruguay striker Luis Suarez could once again be in trouble after appearing to bite an Italian opponent Tuesday in a key World Cup qualifying game. The incident, visible on television replays, showed Suarez apparently bite the shoulder of Italy defender Giorgio Chiellini as the pair clashed in the Italian penalty area. It happened about a minute before Uruguay scored in the 81st.

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    A report showed a prosecutor heading the Jerry Sandusky child molestation investigation sought to have him charged in 2010 but her higher-ups felt the single victim at that time wasn’t enough.

    Report shows prosecutor pushed for Sandusky charges in 2010

    A report showed a prosecutor heading the Jerry Sandusky child molestation investigation sought to have him charged in 2010 but her higher-ups felt the single victim at that time wasn’t enough. The review of how the Sandusky case was handled faults police and prosecutors for long delays in bringing charges but found no evidence that politics affected the investigation into the former Penn State assistant football coach. The report was issued Monday.

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    United States’ head coach Jurgen Klinsmann walks a practice field during a training session in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Monday, June 23, 2014. The United States will play Germany in group G of the 2014 soccer World Cup on June 26 in Recife, Brazil.

    No deal to draw, say Germany and U.S. before game

    There won’t be friendly phone calls, there won’t be any dirty deals. That’s the promise from both sides ahead of Germany’s final Group G match against the United States. A draw on Thursday would see both teams advance to the knockout stage at the expense of Portugal and Ghana. Both sides have been answering questions about a possible conspiracy, or as the Germans call it, a “non-aggression pact,” and both have sharply rejected any suggestions of a deal.

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    Uruguay’s Luis Suarez runs on the pitch during a training session Monday. The highlight of Tuesday’s matches is Italy’s game against Uruguay, a contest between two former world champions that will see the winner go through to the second round.

    World Cup: What to watch Tuesday

    It’s Day Two of the in-or-out matches of the World Cup, with five teams competing for two places in the knockout stages. The highlight of the early matches is Italy’s game against Uruguay, a contest between two former world champions that will see the winner go through to the second round. Here are some things to watch for Tuesday.

Business

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    Clayco CEO and Chairman Bob Clark presents Mike Foley, right, CEO of Zurich North America Commercial, with the official groundbreaking shovel as the insurance company begins construction on their new Schaumburg headquarters.

    Schaumburg sees Zurich office becoming 'icon for the area'

    Zurich North America broke ground Tuesday on its new Schaumburg headquarters, a 735,000-square-foot building expected to open in 2016. The insurance company will receive state and village incentives for the move from its Schaumburg office towers to a 40-acre site along Meacham Road near I-90, across from the Renaissance Schaumburg Hotel and Convention Center. "It will serve as an icon for the area," Mayor Al Larson said.

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    Walgreen’s fiscal third quarter earnings jumped 16 percent compared with last year, aided in part by a lower income tax rate, but the nation’s largest drugstore chain missed Wall Street’s expectations.

    Walgreen pulls 2016 goals as it mulls move

    Deerfield-based Walgreen Co., the largest U.S. drugstore retailer, withdrew its financial goals for fiscal year 2016 as it considers buying the remainder of Alliance Boots GmbH and possibly moving overseas to lower its tax bill.

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    Japanese android expert Hiroshi Ishiguro, second left, and National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation Miraikan Chief Executive Director Mamoru Mohri, second right, pose with a female-announcer robot called Otonaroid, right, and a girl robot called Kodomoroid during a demonstration of the museum’s new guides in Tokyo Tuesday.

    Woman or machine? New robots look creepily human

    The new robot guides at a Tokyo museum look so eerily human and speak so smoothly they almost outdo people — almost. Japanese robotics expert Hiroshi Ishiguro, an Osaka University professor, says they will be useful for research on how people interact with robots and on what differentiates the person from the machine.

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    The stock market had its biggest decline in two weeks Tuesday, led by a sell-off in blue-chip bank and energy stocks. Homebuilders rose after the government reported sales of new homes rose in May to the highest level in six years.

    Stocks end lower as traders sell blue chips

    The stock market had its biggest decline in two weeks Tuesday, led by a sell-off in blue-chip bank and energy stocks. Homebuilders rose after the government reported sales of new homes rose in May to the highest level in six years.

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    Jewel will open tonight at the former Dominick’s store at Route 22 and Rand Road in Lake Zurich.

    Jewel-Osco opens stores in Fox River Grove, Lake Zurich

    Two new Jewel-Osco stores will open their doors to shoppers Tuesday night in Fox River Grove and Lake Zurich. A celebratory gala is planned from 5 to 10 p.m. at both stores after which they will be open for shopping. Town officials and community members are invited to attend. The events will feature live music, sampling, and other entertainment.

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    Shinzo Abe, Japan’s prime minister, speaks Thursday during an interview at the prime minister’s official residence in Tokyo.

    Abe’s grand plan to revive Japan’s economic power

    Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced a slew of measures Tuesday aimed at restoring Japan’s global competitiveness. Past governments have sought and failed to enact many of the reforms Abe and other leaders say are needed to revamp an outdated post-World War II industrial model and sustain growth for decades to come.

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    U.S. new home sales rocket higher in May

    Sales of new U.S. homes rose in May to the highest level in six years, providing the strongest signal yet that housing is recovering from a recent slowdown. New home sales jumped 18.6 percent last month following a 3.7 percent increase in April, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. The gains followed declines in February and March that were blamed in part on harsh winter weather.

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    U.S. home prices rise at slowest pace in 13 months

    U.S. home prices rose in April from a year ago at the slowest pace in 13 months, reflecting a recent drop-off in sales. The Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 10.8 percent in April from 12 months earlier. That’s a healthy gain, but down from 12.4 percent in the previous month and the smallest since March 2013.

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    U.S. consumer confidence reaches a 6-year high

    U.S. consumers are more confident about the economy than they have been in more than six years. The Conference Board’s confidence index rose to 85.2 this month from a revised 82.2 in May, the private research group said Tuesday. The June figure is the highest since January 2008, a month after the Great Recession officially began.

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    Denmark’s sturdy social safety net helps explain why its wealth gap — the disparity between the richest citizens and everyone else — is second-smallest among the world’s 34 most developed economies, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, surpassed only by the much smaller economy of Slovenia.

    Danish welfare program helps narrow the wealth gap

    This is what it’s like to live in Denmark, a nation with a narrower wealth gap than almost anywhere else: You’ve been jobless for more than a year. You have no university degree, no advanced skills. You have to pay a mortgage. And your husband is nearing retirement. You aren’t worried.

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    Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, left, and former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson. Climate change will exact enormous costs on U.S. regional economies in the form of lost property, reduced industrial output and higher health expenses, according to a report backed by Bloomberg, Paulson and Thomas F. Steyer, a former hedge fund manager.

    Money men tally cost of climate change

    Climate change is likely to exact enormous costs on U.S. regional economies in the form of lost property, reduced industrial output and more deaths, according to a report backed by a trio of men with vast business experience. The report, released Tuesday, is designed to convince businesses to factor in the cost of climate change in their long-term decisions and to push for reductions in emissions blamed for heating the planet.

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    Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo formally announced an outline of his long-awaited growth strategy, a slew of reforms meant to revitalize the economy and restore its global competitiveness. The plan, approved by the Cabinet earlier in the day, includes dozens of proposed changes to labor regulations, government pension fund investments, corporate governance and tax policies that Abe says are needed to spur corporate investment and innovation.

    Japan unveils strategy to restore cutting edge

    Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe formally announced Tuesday an outline of his long-awaited growth strategy, a slew of reforms meant to revitalize the economy and restore its global competitiveness. “We have revved up our growth strategy,” Abe told a news conference. “We must do our utmost to ensure this recovery plan reaches all parts of the country.”

Life & Entertainment

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    Don’t hurt friend in trying to protect yourself

    Q. I have a great friend who I have kept some distance from, and sitting in my inbox is an email from him asking why. The truth is that his wife made a pretty blatant pass at me that I deflected.

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    Woman is hurt when others don’t support her charity work

    Q. Two years ago my adult daughter was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. We formed a team for our local MS Walk last year and invited our co-workers and family members to donate or walk or both. Unfortunately, I was hurt when her aunts and others we thought were close did nothing. Another walk is coming and I’m not sure how to proceed — swallow my pride and share my hurt, or just embrace the ones who show up?

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    A working draft of Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone,” one of the most popular songs of all time, sold for $2 million Tuesday.

    Dylan’s ‘Like a Rolling Stone’ draft sells for $2 million

    A draft of one of the most popular songs of all time, Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone,” sold Tuesday for $2 million, which the auction house called a world record for a popular music manuscript. A working draft of the finished song in Dylan’s own hand went to an unidentified bidder at Sotheby’s. The selling price, $2.045 million, included a buyer’s premium.

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    Spears's burgers, including the Hangover Burger, start with antibiotic- and growth-hormone-free, grass-fed beef.

    Service needs some sharpening, but Spears burgers, beers are on point

    Spears, a convivial new arrival on Wheeling's restaurant row, bills itself as a gourmet burger cafe with a bourbon and craft beer bar. Yet with its slew of oversize flat-screen TVs hung along the perimeter, blasted recorded music selections from the '70s and '80s and meandering custom-made bar, feels more like a sports bar.

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    This screengrab shows a tweet from the show “Scandal.” Hashtags make it easier to filter and search for a topic. More and more actors are getting into the game and tweeting with fans while a show is airing. The “Scandal” cast is notorious for making a huge effort to tweet when the show is airing.

    What’s the hash? Why hashtags for TV shows matter

    During fresh episodes of “Pretty Little Liars,” the marketing and publicity teams at ABC Family huddle in a conference room to tweet live with fans. So do cast members and the show’s producers from where and when they can — and the dialogue often pays off. Nielsen’s Twitter tracking division said “PLL” is the top-tweeted show and ranked No. 1 for the week of June 16-22.

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    The hosts of the Daytime Emmy Awards ceremony’s red carpet show drew sharp criticism for remarks they made to celebrities attending the Emmys. Ryan Peavey, center, was the subject of one of the red-carpet jokes that observers called inappropriate.

    Daytime Emmys red-carpet banter turns dark

    The Daytime Emmys are facing criticism for pre-show interviews that included bawdy humor about rape and an actor’s race. The ceremony’s organizers had drafted four women it described as respected “social media gurus” to chat with celebrities before the awards Sunday. The red carpet and backstage interviews were seen online as part of the streamed event.

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    Keith Urban, left, Jennifer Lopez, and Harry Connick Jr. will return as judges with Ryan Seacrest hosting for the 14th season of Fox’s “American Idol.”

    ‘American Idol’ bringing back same judging panel

    Fox says it’s bringing back the same trio of “American Idol” judges for the show’s 14th season. The network announced Monday that Jennifer Lopez, Keith Urban and Harry Connick Jr. will be judging singers again in 2015, and Ryan Seacrest will remain the host.

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    Prada men’s Spring-Summer 2015 collection, part of the Milan Fashion Week unveiled Sunday, goes for classic denim with topstiching.

    Prada classics recall ’70s with topstitched denim

    Miuccia Prada apparently does what many of us do when searching for fashion inspiration: She fishes the back of her closet. “You pick something that is old-fashioned. It is the only new thing,” Prada said backstage Sunday after the preview of her menswear looks for next summer at Milan Fashion Week. The collection’s foundation was classic denim looks with top-stitching, the only embellishment on very basic looks, worn mostly with simple a blue shirt, for a 1970s vibe.

  •  
    Nintendo’s “Tomodachi Life” doesn’t translate very well from Japan to the U.S.

    Nintendo’s ‘Tomodachi’ colorful but dull

    While Nintendo has made a fortune selling Mario, Pokemon and dozens of other video-game heroes to us, not everything makes it safely across the Pacific. “Tomodachi Life” has been a huge hit in Japan since its release last year — but something got lost in translation. “Tomodachi” (which means “friend”) is a simplified version of a “life simulator” like Electronic Arts’ “The Sims.” Overall, the “Tomodachi” island feels suffocating, probably because all your Miis lives in the same drab apartment complex and they all want something from you.

  •  
    Jennifer Lopez’s new album, “A.K.A.,” features collaborations with Iggy Azalea, Nas, Pitbull, Rick Ross and T.I.

    Jennifer Lopez says music has been ‘challenging’

    Jennifer Lopez remembers the days when her record label budgeted $1 million for one of her music videos. Today, she’s attempting to create the same magic with one-tenth of the money. The entrepreneur says being a singer has been “challenging” since she debuted on the pop scene in the late 1990s. Lopez, who released her eighth album, “A.K.A.,” last week, says the music industry no longer feels like Oz.

  •  
    Tomatoes, onions and peppers hit the grill before getting pureed for a boldly flavored gazpacho.

    Soupalooza: A cold soup that starts on a hot grill

    This recipe for Grilled Gazpacho adds just the right amount of smoke to the taste of the tomatoes, onions and red peppers. It’s also a great way to make gazpacho in early summer when the tomatoes aren’t nearly as tasty as they will be later on.

  •  
    Tomatoes, onions and peppers hit the grill before getting pureed for a boldly flavored gazpacho.

    Grilled Gazpacho
    Can you make soup on a grill? You can when it's Grilled Gazpacho.

  •  
    Brian Peterson of Elgin hunted and butchered the venison that goes into his Italian Hunter’s Pie. The dish can be made in a cast iron skillet, or the meat can be seared on the grill and transferred to a baking pan with the remaining ingredients.

    Cook of the Week: Hunter tracks down recipes to feed growing girls

    With Father’s Day a recent holiday, it seems appropriate that this week’s cook of the week was nominated by his two daughters. “We would like to nominate our father, Brian Peterson, because he is a great cook and he specializes in venison…venison was the first red meat we ever ate.”

  •  
    Brian Peterson of Elgin hunts and butchers the venison that goes into Italian Hunter’s Pie. The recipe is a family favorite.

    Italian Hunters Pie
    Cook of the Week Brian Peterson enjoys making Italian Hunters Pie.

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    Grilled Octopus
    Cook of the Week Brian Peterson isn't afraid to try different things on the grill, like grilled octopus

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    Pastina
    Pastina is an Italian soup Brian Peterson remebers from this childhood.

  •  
    Saba Imtiaz upends stereotypes of Pakistan — but not in a preachy way — in “Karachi, You’re Killing Me!”

    Pakistani author’s debut novel captures Karachi

    The blurb on the back of Saba Imtiaz’s debut novel “Karachi, You’re Killing Me!” compares the book to the single girl’s Bible, “Bridget Jones’s Diary.”I take issue with this.Bridget Jones would never be able to deal with half of the situations that Imtiaz’s heroine, Ayesha, successfully navigates. Ayesha, a journalist in her 20s working in Pakistan’s largest city of Karachi, has a toughness and professionalism that Bridget could never achieve.

  •  
    Dan Vapid & the Cheats, the new band led by Screeching Weasel vet Dan “Vapid” Schafer, will play Brauer House in Lombard Friday.

    Music notes: Dan Vapid & the Cheats play Brauer House

    Chicago punk-rock veteran Dan "Vapid" Schafer (formerly of Screeching Weasel) will bring his latest project, the punk band Dan Vapid & the Cheats, to Lombard Friday, June 27. Rich Robinson has ventured out on his own since the Black Crowes, and he will perform at the Arcada in St. Charles Friday, along with the current iteration of the Yardbirds.

  •  
    In this curbside garden, a gardener uses perennials to soften the look of the narrow area between sidewalk and street. The day lilies and ornamental grasses are attractive, easy to maintain and low enough to the ground that they don’t block sight lines.

    Hellstrips: Challenge lies beyond the sidewalk

    Making a yard and a community more beautiful begins at the curb. But that narrow space between sidewalk and street — sometimes called a boulevard, median, hellstrip, parkway, verge or tree belt — is a gardening challenge. For starters, it’s probably owned by the municipality but falls to the homeowner to maintain. So the first step in caring for it is to sort out what local rules allow.

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    Visitors walk around one of the rooms that has been reopened to the public at the Louvre museum in Paris. Paid for entirely by private patronage, the 9-year works have seen the creaky halls restored, corridors modernized and new rooms constructed to fit over 2,000 design objects that span the reigns of the most lavish kings of Europe. They start with France’s Louis XIV who actually lived in the Louvre, to his successors Louis XV and Louis XVI.

    From the dust, glittering Louvre show emerges

    For nearly a decade, one of the world’s greatest palaces has also housed a dusty building site. Now, thanks to a $35.4 million restoration, one of the Louvre Museum’s most exciting collections, the 18th-century decorative arts wing, has been reopened to its full glory. Paid for entirely by private donations, the nine-year restoration modernized creaky halls and corridors and built new rooms for over 2,000 design objects. They start with the reign of France’s Louis XIV, who lived in the Louvre, to his successors Louis XV and Louis XVI.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Weighing freedom, justice issues in DNA case

    Lake County State's Attorney Mike Nerheim's cautious sincerity is the right approach as officials sort through new DNA evidence that could mean the county's latest wrongful conviction, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    Iraq must be saved from extremists

    Columnist Michael Gerson: Right now, failure would cause not a party, not a president, but a nation to suffer — actually many nations. Who lost Iraq matters; helping to save it matters more.

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    Anyone can claim title of ‘professor’
    An article in the June 14 newspaper calls our president a professor of constitutional law. He is also referred to as a professor in many other articles and on TV. I wanted to find out how does one become a professor of constitutional law or any other subject. I used the Encarta World English Dictionary. Surprisingly, it appears if you teach, you or someone can bestow on you the title of professor. I volunteer to teach tennis at a local high school for nearly 20 years, call me professor of tennis? Must be more to it.I went to my New American Encyclopedic Dictionary (Pub. 1907 Vol. 4 of 6), a treasure trove of original information. In short, a professor is a teacher; however, one can also be a professor of the occult or a professor of magic, etc. It appears to be in the same category as Mr. (Master) or “The Honorable.”A doctorate in a given subject is an entirely different title. It requires several additional years of academic studies and a final thesis that is reviewed by your peers. It is important not to confuse the two.Prof. Dushan O. LipenskyProfessor of tennis Wheaton

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    Doing nothing allows evil to triumph
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Before welcoming Hamas into the law-abiding international community, Western leaders should have asked to see the terrorist organization’s certificate of completion of a 12-step recovery program. Had they done so, they might not now have blood on their hands.

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    A step in favor of sanctity of life
    A Barrington letter to the editor: Elections have consequences. We saw a positive this month in the Sunshine State, where Florida Gov. Rick Scott signed a life-affirming bill prohibiting horrific late-term abortions. What a novel idea, banning abortions where physicians have determined the child will live outside the womb (24 weeks).

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    The saga of the border kids

    Columnist Ruben Navarrette: Americans are trying to get a handle on the border kids — and what President Obama has called an “urgent humanitarian situation” along the U.S.-Mexico border. Americans want to know why, according to U.S. immigration officials, more than 47,000 young people — most of them from Central America — have streamed across the U.S.-Mexico border in the last eight months.

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