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Daily Archive : Wednesday June 18, 2014

News

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    The NEW 200 Foundation has helped fund a variety of innovative teaching methods and technology devices in recent years for Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200 students.

    NEW 200 Foundation seeks volunteers, donations from Wheaton community

    For years, the NEW 200 Foundation has helped support Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200 students with the purchase of new technology and textbooks and the funding of various projects and teaching methods. But recently, funding has declined due to foundation volunteers leaving after their children grew out of the district. Foundation leaders are hoping to revitalize NEW 200 by gathering new...

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    Oak Brook residents paid more than $67 million in income taxes in 2012, but received just 1.3 percent back from the state while other areas received far a greater percentage of what the workforce contributed.

    Which suburbs are income tax givers and takers?

    Since municipalities and counties share in the income taxes collected by the state, how much is coming back home? That depends on where you live. Some suburban workers pay a lot more to the state than what comes back through what's known as the Local Government Distributive Fund. But some places get much more back from the state — in one case, as high as 25 percent of what residents paid in.

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    Actor Michael Jace pleaded not guilty to murder Wednesday in the death of his wife and was ordered to stay away from his two young sons.

    ‘Shield’ actor pleads not guilty in death of wife

    Michael Jace, who played a police officer on “The Shield” TV series, pleaded not guilty to murder Wednesday in the death of his wife and was ordered to stay away from his two young sons. Jace entered the plea through his attorneys and was told by a judge to stay away from his two children and not contact them if he is eventually released on $2 million bail. Jace, 51, is accused of...

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    U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam, a Wheaton Republican, is trying to win a vote to move up to No. 3 on the House GOP leadership team.

    Thursday brings Roskam’s chance to move up

    U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam’s bid to become the No. 3 Republican in the House will be put to a vote Thursday as federal GOP lawmakers meet to pick their leaders. Roskam is vying against Reps. Steve Scalise of Louisiana and Marlin Stutzman of Indiana. He has stayed mostly quiet publicly about his effort but has spent hours at the Capitol trying to win support of Republicans. He devoted the...

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    Mount Prospect parents sue District 21, say son bullied

    A Mount Prospect family is going to court in a legal battle with an alleged bully at their son’s school, ABC7 reported. The family says that their son, a fourth-grader at suburban Robert Frost Elementary, has suffered serious and permanent injuries at the hands of his classmate.

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    House badly damaged in St. Charles fire

    Firefighters battled a house fire in St. Charles during Wednesday’s thunderstorms. The blaze, on the 3N400 block of Vachel Lindsay Drive, was reported about 6:30 p.m. No one was hurt. The attic and second floor of the house were badly damaged. A loss estimate was not available.

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    “Miss Lori” of the WTTW-TV show “Miss Lori’s Campus” entertained Wednesday at Gail Borden Public Library in Elgin. The program, for kids ages 3 to 8, included songs, games, stories and more.

    Miss Lori’s Campus visits Elgin

    Miss Lori of Miss Lori's Campus and WTTW Kids presented a fun-filled WTTW Kids Readers Are Leaders program Wednesday at the Gail Borden Public Library. The free community event for children 3 to 8 years old, inspired the whole family to sing along and participate in storytelling adventures. The live performance included original songs, engaging activities, story readings, and a free children's...

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    Magician Tim Glander performs a show about the magic of science Wednesday at the Town and Country Public Library in Elburn.

    Magician brings fun and science to Elburn library

    Magician Tim Glander presents "Magical Fizzes and Booms" for children at the Town and Country Public Library Wednesday in Elburn. The Wisconsin magician combined science with laughs and magic tricks for two dozen kids.

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    Paul Valade/pvalade@dailyherald.comStorm clouds roll in over Libertyville Wednesday morning.

    Storms sweep through suburbs; airport delays reported

    Severe thunderstorms packing large hail, strong winds and heavy downpours struck the Chicago area tonight including a strong storm with 60-70 mph winds that moved through the Aurora area. A lightning strike caused a small fire at a home in North Aurora. The severe weather caused delays at both airports.

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    Lightning sparks North Aurora fire

    A lighting strike at a North Aurora house ignited the lint inside a clothes dryer vent hose Wednesday night, creating a small fire, authorities said.

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    Expanding I-90 through the Northwest suburbs will mean filling in or paving over some wetlands. To compensate, the tollway will restore a wetland near Orland Park.

    Tollway moves on $7 million wetlands project

    By Marni Pyke


    Illinois tollway directors approved spending $7.1 million Wednesday to restore wetlands in the south suburbs as compensation for wetlands damaged during construction on the Jane Addams Tollway (I-90). Herlihy Mid-Continent Co. will convert 162 acres of farmland back to its natural state at the Forest Preserve District of Cook County's Orland Grassland South site near Orland Park.

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    At the podium, sisters Noemia Silva (L) and Alma Huerta of the Missionary Sisters of Saint Charles Borromeo Scalabrinians address marchers Wednesday in front of Club Allure Chicago, a strip club, to protest its proximity to their convent.

    Nuns march on strip club

    Nuns who’ve been praying for a strip club next door to close, and then sued when it didn’t, on Wednesday did something that anyone who went to Catholic school could have predicted: They marched right over there to let everyone know they mean business.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Tri blotter

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    A runner jogs on the North Shore Bike Path over the Des Plaines River Trail along Route 176 Wednesday morning. The Lake County Forest Preserve District is investigating an attempted assault reported Sunday near Libertyville.

    Attempted assault on bike trail near Libertyville under investigation

    The Lake County Forest Preserve District is investigating an attempted assault that was reported Sunday near Libertyville. A female runner was grabbed from behind but fended off the attacker, authorities said Wednesday.

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    Oak Brook wins appeal of former chief’s pension

    Oak Brook isn’t responsible for paying most of the $740,000 bill related to a pension bump former police Chief Thomas Sheahan received, a DuPage County judge ruled. The written opinion, issued Tuesday by Judge Terence Sheen, reversed a decision by the Illinois Municipal Retirement System Board by saying Sheahan violated the state pension code by attempting to transfer service credits from...

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    Duckworth to Congress: Buy stamps

    U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth wants members of Congress to lose their ability to send mass mailings from their offices with just a signature — no stamp needed.

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    Waukegan ArtWauk event:

    “Colorful Communications,” an art show by Kim Rahal, will open Saturday June 21, at Dandelion Gallery, 109 S. Genesee St., Waukegan. The opening reception, from 5 to 9 p.m., will be part of the Monthly ArtWauk in downtown Waukegan.

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    Disappearing middle class is talk topic:

    “The Disappearing Middle Class” is the subject of a talk Sunday, June 22, by U.S. Rep. Jan Schakowsky. The free event will be held 4 p.m. at the Adlai Stevenson Center on Democracy, 25200 N. St. Mary’s Road, Mettawa.

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    Discovery Museum gets grant:

    The Lake County Discovery Museum has been awarded a $750,000 state grant that will be used to store and protect its collection. The grant is part of a $20 million state jobs program.

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    The Vernon Hills village board has given tentative approval to a Menards store on the northwest corner of Milwaukee Avenue and Greggs Parkway, but emphasized it will work with neighbors to ensure the development is palatable.

    Menards receives tentative approval in Vernon Hills but details to be refined

    The Vernon Hills village board has given tentative approval to a Menards store with a promise it will hold the company's feet to the fire on several aspects of the plan for 18 acres at Gregg's Parkway and Milwaukee Avenue.

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    Nyasha Mbawa

    Sentencing delay for Gurnee-area man who pleaded guilty to sex assault

    Sentencing was delayed Wednesday for a Grandwood Park man who had pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting a 7-year-old girl, to give his defense attorney time to examine sex abuse charges filed against a juvenile sibling of the victim.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn and Naperville City Council members stand on the future site of the city’s environmental collection center, a one-stop drop-off facility for all kinds of recyclables that will be built for $1.2 million using $900,000 from a state grant.

    Recycling carts, collection center coming to Naperville

    Recycling recently took a couple of steps forward in Naperville as city council members approved a contract to build an environmental collection center and passed a funding plan to provide residents with new recycling carts. "I think it’d be great to be able to say ‘Here it is — go nuts. No cost to you, we found the money,’” council member Paul Hinterlong said.

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    Jody Ware

    Superintendent Jody Ware preparing to leave Mundelein High

    Outgoing Mundelein High School Superintendent Jody Ware is set to retire Friday after six years at the Hawley Street campus, but she will stick around for a little longer to assist her replacement.

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    This surveillance photo shows Walter Unbehaun robbing a bank in Niles in 2013

    Bank robber to spend extra 6 months in prison

    A federal judge in Chicago says a 74-year-old who gained notoriety for robbing a Niles bank so he could return to prison must serve an extra six months behind bars.

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    Crews install new traffic lights Wednesday as construction wraps up at Routes 31 and 72 in West Dundee. The almost $3 million project included new turning lanes.

    Route 31-72 intersection work finished

    The widening of the intersection at Routes 31 and 72 in West Dundee was declared finished Wednesday. The $2.96 million project resulted in new turning lanes to accommodate more cars. Daily traffic volumes were projected to increase to 61,200 vehicles this year.

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    Buffalo Grove Green Fair coming Sunday

    The third annual Buffalo Grove Green Fair, sponsored by the Buffalo Grove Park District’s Environmental Action Team, will be held from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, June 22, at Mike Rylko Community Park, 951 McHenry Road.

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    Term limit, political map lawsuit unfolds in court

    The decision of whether two November ballot measures dealing with term limits and redistricting are constitutional is in the hands of a Cook County judge. Oral arguments were heard Wednesday in Chicago in a lawsuit attempting to keep both measures off the ballot.

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    Rita Cheng

    SIU chancellor hired as president of Northern Arizona University

    The Arizona Board of Regents has approved the selection of Rita Cheng as president of Northern Arizona University. Cheng has been the chancellor of Southern Illinois University in Carbondale since mid-2010. She’ll begin as NAU’s 16th president on Aug. 15.

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    Elk Grove recycling and shredding event

    The Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County is hosting a document destruction and electronics recycling event Saturday in Elk Grove Village. Residents who live in the agency’s member communities are allowed to bring paper documents in need of shredding, such as medical forms, bank statements, personal files and retired tax forms.

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    Joe Curran works on sod Tuesday in the Danville National Cemetery in Danville, Ill. Curran was transferred temporarily this week from Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery near Joliet to help the Danville cemetery, which has had staff reductions.

    Cuts mean delays at veterans cemetery

    The staff at Danville National Cemetery has been cut in half, and that’s leading to delays in burying some veterans, a cemetery official says.

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    ‘Sovereign citizen’ guilty of filing bogus liens

    A self-proclaimed adherent of the “sovereign citizen” movement has been found guilty in Chicago of filing bogus liens against federal judges and law enforcement officials.

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    Sleepy Hollow may ask voters for 77 percent tax hike

    Sleepy Hollow leaders may ask voters to approve a 77 percent property tax increase. The village board finance committee recommended conducting a November referendum asking voters for $400,000 a year for operating and capital costs. That would mean additional $312 per year for a typical homeowner.

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    The first presidential portrait created from 3-D scan data.

    Smithsonian creates first 3D portrait of a president

    Digital imaging specialists have created a 3D printed bust and life mask of Obama, which will be his first presidential depictions in the National Portrait Gallery collection. Both were shown Wednesday at a gathering of inventors, entrepreneurs and students at the White House.

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    Mike Buffington

    Geneva mourns death of electrical boss

    Business took a back seat to mourning in Geneva this week as aldermen spent most of the city council meeting sharing memories of Michael Buffington. The city's electrical superintendent died at age 64 in a car accident in Sugar Grove last Thursday.

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    Philadelphia man, 89, held on Nazi death camp charges

    Legal filings unsealed Wednesday in the U.S. indicate the district court in Weiden, Germany, issued a warrant for Johann Breyer’s arrest the day before, charging him with 158 counts of complicity in the commission of murder.

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    Guests enjoy the first Lombard Cruise Night of the 2014 season.

    Lombard’s Cruise Nights off to a roaring start

    Lombard’s Cruise Nights are back and running in high gear. Guests are welcome to admire the vintage cars lined up in downtown Lombard from 6 to 10 p.m. every Saturday through Aug. 30. The only Saturday that Cruise Nights will not be held is July 5, due to Taste of Lombard.

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    Detainees sleep and watch television in a holding cell Wednesday where hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children are being processed and held at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Nogales, Ariz. CPB provided media tours Wednesday of two locations in Brownsville, Texas, and Nogales, that have been central to processing the more than 47,000 unaccompanied children who have entered the country illegally since Oct. 1.

    System can’t keep up with children crossing border

    Border Patrol stations like the one in Brownsville were not meant for long-term custody. Immigrants are supposed to wait there until they are processed and taken to detention centers. But the surge in children arriving without their parents has overwhelmed the U.S. government.

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    A new sound system for downtown Naperville is being considered, but city council members are waiting for answers to questions about music choice and use of the system before potentially seeking bids.

    Downtown music ‘pleasing’ or a turnoff? Debate begins in Naperville

    What counts as “pleasing” when it comes to music and who gets to choose were questions at the core of a discussion about a potential new sound system some want to see installed in downtown Naperville before the holiday season. “Music, carefully selected at a pleasing volume, is a wonderful amenity that infuses joy, a festive spirit and simply makes people want to dwell in our...

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    Cook County medical examiner to offer grief counseling

    The Cook County Board of Commissioners approved a pilot program Wednesday in which the county medical examiner’s office will offer grief counseling for families of homicide victims and in other selected death cases. Under an agreement between the county and the University of Illinois-Chicago, a second-year graduate student from UIC’s Jane Addams College of Social Work will be...

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    Residents of Prospect Heights watch the Prospect Heights Voice contestants perform.

    Prospect Heights block party is Saturday

    Residents of Prospect Heights will gather at Lions Park on Saturday, June 21 for the annual Prospect Heights Block Party, an afternoon and evening of music, games, the Prospect Heights Voice contest, food and drink. However, the teens among them will be there Friday night for the Battle of the Bands.

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    When God disappoints you, still trust in him

    Has there been something you really believed God should do for you that ended up in disappointment? All of us experience circumstances in our lives that God allows to happen and are beyond our human reasoning or understanding.

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    David L. Schaefer III

    Gilberts man gets 4 years in prison for gun burglary

    A 19-year-old from Gilberts was sentenced to four years in prison after admitting to a June 2013 burglary in town. In turn, prosecutors dismissed charges against David L. Schaefer III that he possessed two stolen guns and possessed a stolen vehicle in 2012.

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    Additional DNA tests ordered in 2000 North Chicago murder case

    DNA testing has been approved for more items recovered at the scene of a grisly 2000 murder in North Chicago to help determine if the man convicted of the killing may be innocent, authorities said Wednesday.

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    Twenty-three volunteers plant 160 trees and shrubs on a portion of Libertyville Township Open Space

    Volunteers plant native shrubs in Libertyville Township Open Space

    Twenty-three volunteers recently labored for four hours planting 160 trees and shrubs on a portion of Libertyville Township Open Space as part of a two-year project initiated by the Lake County Audubon Society.

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    Rashawn Clark

    Probation ordered in Darien pizza delivery theft

    A 21-year-old Darien man avoided additional jail time after prosecutors downgraded a 2011 robbery charge, stemming from the holdup of a pizza delivery driver, to a misdemeanor theft charge. Rashawn Clark, of the 7500 block of Farmingdale Road, pleaded guilty to the reduced charge last month and was sentenced Wednesday to two years of probation. He also was directed to undergo any psychiatric...

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    Bartlett police launching traffic enforcement campaign

    Bartlett police are cautioning drivers to follow the rules of the road over Fourth of July. The department will spend extra patrol hours checking motorists for traffic infractions as part of the "Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over" enforcement campaign.

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    People scammed out of rent in Des Plaines

    Two people were scammed when they attempted to rent apartments in Des Plaines. The description of the scammer was similar in both transactions, according to police reports.

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    General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Oversight and Investigations subcommittee hearing examining the facts and circumstances that contributed to General Motors’ failure to identify a safety defect in certain ignition switches and initiate a recall in a timely manner.

    Lawmakers press GM on report’s findings

    House members questioned whether the culture at General Motors could truly change, and whether the dismissal of 15 employees was enough, as they grilled CEO Mary Barra about the actions she’s taken since GM admitted that it failed to act on a deadly safety issue for more than a decade. A House subcommittee heard testimony Wednesday from Barra and attorney Anton Valukas.

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    A new leadership team for the Mount Prospect Police Department took their oaths of office Tuesday in a ceremony before the village board. the group includes, from left, Deputy Chief Timothy Griffin, Deputy Chief Michael Eterno and Chief Timothy Janowick.

    Mt. Prospect ushers in new police leadership

    The Mount Prospect Village Board ushered in a new era of law enforcement this week. A standing-room-only crowd in village board chambers watched as new police Chief Tim Janowick and his leadership team took their oaths of office. Sworn in along with Janowick were Deputy Chief Michael Eterno, Deputy Chief Timothy Griffin, Cmdr. Edward Szmergalski, Sgt. Anthony Lietzow and Sgt. Bart Tweedie.

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    Secret Service searches Schaumburg home

    Schaumburg police assisted the U.S. Secret Service in the execution of a search warrant Wednesday morning at a home on the 1700 block of Southbridge Court in the village. A neighbor reported that about six Schaumburg squad cars arrived at the house and officers entered it with guns drawn.

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    Thousands of Shiites from Baghdad and across southern Iraq answered an urgent call to arms, joining security forces to fight the Islamic militants who have captured large swaths of territory north of the capital and now imperil a city with a much-revered religious shrine.

    Iraq fights militants around oil refinery

    Iraqi security forces battled insurgents targeting the country’s main oil refinery and said they regained partial control of a city near the Syrian border Wednesday, trying to blunt a weeklong offensive by Sunni militants who diplomats fear may have also seized some 100 foreign workers. In a televised address, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki struck an optimistic tone and vowed to teach the...

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    House Speaker John Boehner said Wednesday he opposed outreach to Iran because it sends the wrong message to American allies in the Middle East given that the Islamic republic is alleged to have sponsored terrorism in the region.

    U.S. shifts focus away from Iraq airstrikes

    President Barack Obama has shifted his focus away from airstrikes in Iraq as an imminent option for slowing a fast-moving Islamic insurgency, in part because there are few clear targets that U.S. could hit, officials said. The president summoned top congressional leaders to the White House Wednesday afternoon to discuss the collapsing security situation.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Two men driving a black Chevrolet pickup truck entered a construction zone around 11:40 a.m. June 4 at 25 S. River Road in Des Plaines and loaded pieces of cast iron pipe into the truck’s bed. When confronted by an employee, the men claimed they had permission to take the items. One man was described in his 50s, disfigured right arm with large masses; the second man was described as 40-45...

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    Frank Schaefer lost his job but not his voice. Defrocked by the United Methodist Church six months ago for officiating his son’s same-sex wedding, He’s told his story dozens of times to largely sympathetic audiences around the country.

    Defrocked Methodist pastor appealing punishment

    Frank Schaefer lost his job but not his voice. Defrocked by the United Methodist Church six months ago for officiating his son’s same-sex wedding, Schaefer has gained a following among reformers who want the nation’s second-largest Protestant denomination to loosen its policies on homosexuality. Schaefer will appear before a church panel this week to argue that his punishment was...

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    Teen stowaway speaks about trip, mom

    A teenager who survived a trip to Hawaii as a stowaway in a plane’s wheel well says he hopped on the closest flight that was going west and can’t believe he survived the journey.

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    Naperville approves street resurfacing despite cost concerns

    Naperville will move ahead with roughly 13 miles of street resurfacing this summer even though bids for the work came in higher than expected. The city council on Tuesday approved a $5,049,362 contract with R.W. Dunteman Co. of Addison to overlay existing asphalt, replace deteriorated curbs and fix sidewalks along 12.83 miles of neighborhood streets.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Thieves stole several kitchen pans between 9 and 11 a.m. June 4 from Fat Tony’s Pizza, 1506 W. Algonquin Road, Palatine. Value was estimated at $2,000.

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    Across the yard tended by Ray and Gail Gersic, rows of variegated hostas, yellow cone flowers, Shasta daisies, gaillardia, day lilies in all colors and hanging geranium pots line a rustic split-rail fence.

    Lisle Woman’s Club sponsors annual Garden Gait Walk

    Gardens tended by families who love their yards are the highlight of this year’s Lisle Woman’s Club annual Garden Gait Walk. The homeowners are weed-pulling, dirt-under-the-fingernails, farmer-tanned connoisseurs who have a passion to make their little corners of world beautiful. Garden Gait visitors will be able to tour six diverse gardens from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 22, in...

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    Jennifer Koehler, director of Get Covered Illinois, at her office in Chicago. After getting a late start, Illinois officials last summer signed a $33 million contract with FleishmanHillard to promote insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

    Report: Tax credits cut health-insurance premiums by 76 percent

    The health officials said they have not yet analyzed the incomes of people who qualified for the subsidies. But overall, the report shows, the average monthly tax credit this year is $264. Without the federal help, the average premium chosen by people eligible for a tax credit would have been $346 per month, and the subsidy lowered the consumers’ premiums, on average, by 76 percent.

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    Bob Pruyn, left, of Elk Grove Village works alongside Carissa Lehning, 14, of Elk Grove Village and her sister, Ashley, 8, as they load boxes of personal items, food and candy destined for U.S. soldiers during an event Tuesday at the Lutheran Church of the Holy Spirit. “I remember getting care packages when I was in Vietnam,” Pruyn said. “This is my payback.”

    Elk Grove Village program marks 4 years of shipping to packages to the troops

    When Kathi Mode of Elk Grove Village was shipping packages to her son's friends in the military overseas, she never thought she'd continue to do so after they came home. But as her Packages 4 Patriots program celebrated its four-year anniversary on Tuesday, “Elk Grove is a very military-friendly community,” Mode said. “And, as always, you get more back than you give.”

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    Gas leak shuts down road in Downers Grove

    A roadway in downers Grove has been shut down due to a gas leak, authorities said. Prairie Avenue at Washington Street is shut down due to the gas leak.

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    FBI Director James Comey, backed by law enforcement personnel, addresses a news conference Tuesday at the FBI Minneapolis field office in Brooklyn Center, Minn. Comey said the arrest Sunday of a Libyan militant in the deadly attack on Americans in Benghazi is a very good day for law enforcement and added that the FBI’s No. 1 priority remains counterterrorism.

    U.S. aims for trial of Benghazi suspect held on ship

    The capture of an alleged leader of the deadly 2012 attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya, gave U.S. officials a rare moment of good news. Now, they are preparing to try the captured Libyan in the U.S. court system and pledging to double down on catching others responsible for the deaths of the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans in the attacks.

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    Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, right, meets Wednesday with acting Ukrainian Defense Minister Mykhailo Koval, center, in Kiev, Ukraine. Ukraine’s president said Wednesday that government forces will unilaterally cease-fire to allow pro-Russian separatists in the east of the country a chance to lay down weapons or leave the country, a potential major development to bring peace to the country.

    Ukraine president offers cease-fire

    Ukraine’s president said Wednesday that government forces will unilaterally cease fire to allow pro-Russian separatists in the east of the country a chance to lay down weapons or leave the country, a potential major development to bring peace to the country.

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    Rep. Peter Roskam, a Wheaton Republican, is one of three GOP lawmakers vying for the majority whip post.

    Roskam in hot race for No. 3 spot in GOP leadership

    The contest for the No. 3 spot in the House GOP has turned into conservatives’ last, best shot at joining the congressional leadership after getting shut out of the two top jobs in the shake-up that followed Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s surprise primary defeat. All three — Reps. Steve Scalise of Louisiana, Peter Roskam of Illinois and Marlin Stutzman of Indiana — were...

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    Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks Tuesday during CNN’s Town Hall interview in New York. The former secretary of state expressed caution Tuesday about the United States working with Iran to combat fast-moving Islamic insurgents in Iraq, saying the U.S. needs to understand “what we’re getting ourselves into.”

    Clinton: ‘Unanswered questions’ remain on Benghazi

    Hillary Rodham Clinton says many unanswered questions remain about the deadly 2012 terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya, even as U.S. authorities have captured their first suspect in the case. Clinton, speaking in separate interviews with CNN and Fox News, said Tuesday she was still seeking information on the attacks that killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans and led to...

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    John E. Winfield was the second inmate put to death in the United States since a botched execution in Oklahoma in April.

    First U.S. executions since botched lethal injection

    Within an hour, Georgia, then Missouri carried out the nation’s first executions since a botched lethal injection in Oklahoma in April raised new concerns about capital punishment. Neither execution had any noticeable complications. Another execution, the third in a 24-hour span, is scheduled Wednesday evening in Florida.

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    Bloomington zoo adding money with state grant

    BLOMMINGTON — The Miller Park Zoo in Bloomington will use a $700,000 state grant to pay for a new monkey exhibit, parking and other work.According to the Pantagraph in Bloomington, the zoo is getting the money from the Illinois Public Museum Capital Grant Program. The funds are generated by the state capital program Illinois Jobs Now.

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    Banners unveiled for Lincoln funeral anniversary

    SPRINGFIELD — Banners marking the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral have been unveiled. The banners commemorating the event include a replica of the horse-drawn hearse and are being hung on light posts at the entrance of Oak Ridge Cemetery. The will also line a Springfield thoroughfare leading to the cemetery where Lincoln is entombed.

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    Illinois prisoner accused in inmate’s death

    PINCKNEYVILLE, Ill. — An inmate of a southern Illinois prison has been accused of causing the beating death of a fellow inmate.The (Carbondale) Southern Illinoisan reports 22-year-old former Barry resident Austin Sherfy is charged in Perry County with involuntary manslaughter and aggravated battery.

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    Smashing Pumpkins singer to receive Illinois award

    The front man for the rock group Smashing Pumpkins is set to receive an award for his work with helping kids in Chicago. The Illinois State Crime Commission on Wednesday will give singer Billy Corgan Jr. the “Jesse White Award” at a ceremony in Oak Brook. Corgan is being honored along with brothers Gabe and Jacques Baron.

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    Appeal of mine permit scheduled for conference

    HARRISBURG, Ill. — Opponents of Peabody Energy’s plans for a coal mine near Harrisburg in southern Illinois soon could know whether their appeal of a permit for the project may go forward.The (Carbondale) Southern Illinoisan reports an Illinois Department of Natural Resources has scheduled a July 2 pre-hearing conference on the matter.

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    ‘Woodhenge’ summer solstice fete set at Cahokia

    COLLINSVILLE, Ill. — Visitors to the Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site in the southern Illinois community of Collinsville will get a glimpse at a sacred moment in the lives of Native Americans who lived there a thousand years ago.In a news release, officials at the site say on Sunday the dawn of the summer solstice will be observed at “Woodhenge.”

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    Lawsuit alleges overbilling by hospitalist company

    Federal prosecutors have filed a civil lawsuit in Chicago claiming a California-based company systematically overbilled Medicare and other government programs for hospital physician services.

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    Quinn, industry urged to speed lock-and-dam fixes

    Members of Illinois’ congressional delegation are urging Gov. Pat Quinn and industry to pursue public-private partnerships to fix the state’s aging locks and dams.

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    Cold, wet Chicago hikers rescued in central Oregon

    BEND, Ore. — A Deschutes County sheriff’s officer says two women hikers from Chicago who called for help along the Pacific Crest Trail in central Oregon have been rescued.Deputy Liam Klatt says 29-year-old Johannah Hail and 23-year-old Andra Sturtevant had been hiking a 500-mile section of the trail from Willamette Pass, Oregon, bound for Mount Rainier in Washington.

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    Woman shot, toddler bound in Richmond attack

    RICHMOND, Ind. — Police say a woman was shot in the face and a toddler was bound with duct tape during an apparent home invasion at an eastern Indiana apartment complex.Richmond police say the shooting was reported Tuesday night at the Robert F. Smith Apartments on the city’s north side.

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    Driver leads chase from state park into Fort Wayne

    FORT WAYNE, Ind. — A driver has been arrested after police say he led officers on a chase topping 100 mph from a northeastern Indiana state park into Fort Wayne.The Noble County Sheriff’s Department says the chase started about 1 a.m. Wednesday after a call about a possibly intoxicated man causing a disturbance while driving around Chain O’ Lakes State Park.

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    Teacher starts fund to pay for funeral for 2 boys

    GARY, Ind. — A teacher of an 8-year-old Gary boy who drowned with his 9-year-old brother in a water-filled pit has started a fund to help their family pay for their funerals.

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    Indiana county treasurer says judge also mishandled funds

    MUNCIE, Ind. — A treasurer for an eastern Indiana county accused of mishandling public funds wants the judge handling his case to step aside, arguing she did the same thing.Delaware County Treasurer John Dorer was charged in April with 47 counts, 44 of which involve failing to deposit public funds within 24 hours of receipt as required by state law.

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    42 arrested in Indianapolis on immigration charges

    INDIANAPOLIS — U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials say 42 people have been arrested in the Indianapolis area on charges they were in the country illegally.A news release says the arrests were part of a month-long operation conducted by officers in six Midwestern states and led to the arrests of 287 men and 10 women from 29 countries.

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    Homeless advocate quits board over camping ban

    JEFFERSONVILLE, Ind. — An advocate for the homeless has resigned from a homelessness task force in a southern Indiana city after its City Council approved a camping ban on public and private properties.

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    Dawn Patrol: Teens hurt in crash; Wauconda OKs new noise rules

    Teens seriously injured in ATV accident near Lily Lake. Wauconda approves noise rules. Carpentersville approves medical pot rules. West Chicago church bells given new lives. Two motorcyclists charged in April crash. Ventra deadline approaching for Pace, CTA: 10 things to know. Conservative icon Roeser remembered for his generosity. Beckham, Viciedo power White Sox past Giants 8-2.

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    Anna Payton, executive director of the Naperville Area Humane Society, asks the Naperville City Council to consider banning the sale of pets from so-called puppy mills.

    Puppy mills debate pops up in Naperville

    The puppy mills debate has come to Naperville, and it’s likely to be sticking around for the next two months. “The best commercial breeder is still inadequate for a dog or cat,” said Dee Santucci, co-chairwoman of the education committee of the Puppy Mill Project, a Chicago-based nonprofit that opposes puppy mills. “They are not going to cut into their profits in order to...

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    Paul I. Hettich, chairman of the Lakes Region Historical Society in Antioch, talks about an ambitious project to record the names of all veterans and current military personnel from the village of Antioch and Antioch Township.

    Project to honor past, present Antioch-area military personnel

    The Lakes Region Historical Society wants to ensure Antioch-area residents who have served or are serving in the military will never be forgotten. The group is launching a project to record the names of local residents who have served in the U.S. armed forces. “The main point is we want to remember our service people before it's forgotten,” said Paul I. Hettich, chairman of the...

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    Crews from Powell Tree Care on Tuesday haul away branches cut away from an ash tree infested by the emerald ash borer along John F. Kennedy Boulevard in Elk Grove Village.

    Elk Grove Village to remove 2,050 more ash trees

    Some 2,050 ash trees infested with the emerald ash borer in Elk Grove Village are targeted for removal by next spring — the last trees to be taken down as part of a multiyear program to combat the pest. It’s an expense that will cost the village $739,000 — but it’s something that officials have been anticipating for some time.

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    District 220 Superintendent Tom Leonard, left, attended his final school board meeting in Barrington Tuesday night. Amid the tributes, district spokesman Jeff Arnett praised Leonard’s engaging personality. Here, Leonard and board President Brian Battle greet students from Lines School in 2008.

    Dist. 220 bids farewell to superintendent

    Tom Leonard, the longtime Barrington Area Unit School District 220 superintendent, received a fond farewell from members of the district at his final school board meeting Tuesday night at Barrington High School. Board President Brian Battle said Leonard has accomplished above and beyond what is normally asked of a superintendent during his seven years on the job.

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    Antioch launches monthly villagewide cleanup initiative

    Antioch has a new initative called Pride in Antioch Day organized by the village's evironmental commission and the parks and recreation department. Pride in Antioch Day is planned for every fourth Saturday of the month through October.

Sports

  •  

    Magee back in action with desperate Fire
    The Chicago Fire, desperately needing any kind of victory, found itself in something of a no-win situation Wednesday night.

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    Breland scores 22 in her return to the Sky

    The Sky snaps its 4-game skid with a 105-100 overtime victory over the New York Liberty.

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    Pennsylvania tops Bandits to end losing streak

    Locked in a pitching duel for much of the night, the Chicago Bandits came up just short in their first road game against the Pennsylvania Rebellion, falling 2-1 in Washington, PA, on Wednesday night at Consol Energy Park.

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    Flash stymies Red Stars, 2-0

    Missing five players who were called up for national team duty, the short-handed Chicago Red Stars failed to score against the Western New York Flash on Wednesday night in Rochester, N.Y., falling 2-0.

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    Mario Mandzukic scored two goals Wednesday to keep Croatia in the mix at the World Cup with a 4-0 win over 10-man Cameroon, which will be going home after the group stage.

    Mandzukic scores 2 as Croatia beats Cameroon 4-0

    Mario Mandzukic scored two goals Wednesday to keep Croatia in the mix at the World Cup with a 4-0 win over 10-man Cameroon, which will be going home after the group stage.

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    Boomers shut out frst-place Rascals

    Before the largest crowd in their three-year history, the Schaumburg Boomers scratched out a 3-0 shutout over the first-place River City Rascals on Wednesday at Boomers Stadium.

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    While he tries to make the team as a backup running back, Jordan Lynch (26) also is getting in work on the kick coverage teams. Bears coaches like his focus and hard work.

    Lynch tackles role on Bears kick coverage team

    Bears special teams coordinator Joe DeCamillis is impressed with the effort and attitude that undrafted free agent Jordan Lynch has shown in making the conversion from college quarterback to special teams player -- and with the interest that fans all over Chicagoland have shown in the rookie's progress.

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    Chris Williams, trying to break free of defensive back Al Louis-Jean at Chicago Bears minicamp on Wednesday, hopes to earn a spot on special teams. He is the smallest of four possible returners in Bears camp.

    Bears special teams have big shoes to fill

    There is a crowded competition to succeed Devin Hester as the Bears' return specialist, and special teams coordinator Joe DeCamillis considers it a talented and experienced group, which could make it one of the more entertaining training camp battles this year.

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    Giants catcher Buster Posey tags out Adam Eaton of the White Sox in the third inning Wednesday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    No matter how you say it, White Sox are believers

    The White Sox "repudiate" all of the talk they're a non-factor this season. The Sox were sluggish while being swept by the Royals over the weekend, but they bounced back with a two-game sweep of the Giants, capped by Wednesday's 7-6 win.

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    Ozzie visits Sox, Cell for the first time since 2011

    Ozzie Guillen was back watching a game at U.S. Cellular Field Wednesday for the first time since 2011, his last season as manager. Guillen's nephew, Ehire Adrianza, plays shortstop for the Giants.

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    Bernhard Langer, the only multiple winner on the Champions Tour this season, is leading the money list and Charles Schwab Cup standings.

    These guys can (still) play

    Starting Friday, 81 pros will fight for a share of the $1.8 million purse for the Encompass Championship starting at North Shore Country Club in Glenview. Len Ziehm offers a look at 5 players to watch as the Champions Tour's best contend for the $270,000 first-place check.

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    Prince leads Sky past Liberty, 105-100 in OT

    Sky guard Epiphanny Prince is making up for lost time after missing the first seven games of the season.Prince, away for several weeks on a personal leave after playing overseas, scored a season-high 30 points and the Sky snapped a four-game losing streak with a 105-100 overtime victory over the New York Liberty on Wednesday.

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    There’s no perfect lure, but in-line spinners come close

    Inline spinners often prove to be just the kind of flashy, fish-triggering lures that get the job done.

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    State eases Lake Michigan perch fishing ban

    Starting in 2015, yellow perch fishing will be allowed in July on Lake Michigan, but it will not be allowed from May 1 through June 15 to protect spawning stock. Mike Jackson looks back on the controversial ban's history in today's outdoor notes.

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    Jake Arrieta made it look easy, then made it sound easy. The Cubs right-hander had a career-high 11 strikeouts in seven innings to beat the Miami Marlins 6-1 on Wednesday. Arrieta (3-1) lowered his ERA to 1.98, and he has 55 strikeouts in 50 innings. "I'm not doing anything different," he said. "I'm just commanding everything down in the strike zone and trying to force early contact. Strikeouts are just a byproduct of throwing several plus pitches for strikes."

    Arrieta on cruise control as Cubs win 6-1

    Jake Arrieta made it look easy, then made it sound easy. The Cubs right-hander had a career-high 11 strikeouts in seven innings to beat the Miami Marlins 6-1 on Wednesday. Arrieta (3-1) lowered his ERA to 1.98, and he has 55 strikeouts in 50 innings. "I'm not doing anything different," he said. "I'm just commanding everything down in the strike zone and trying to force early contact. Strikeouts are just a byproduct of throwing several plus pitches for strikes."

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    Chicago White Sox's Jose Abreu hits a single off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Tim Hudson during the fifth inning of an interleague baseball game Wednesday, June 18, 2014, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Abreu, Dunn homer to lead White Sox past Giants 7-6

    Jose Abreu hit his 20th homer, a two-run shot in the first inning, Adam Dunn added a three-run home run, and the White Sox beat San Francisco 7-6 on Wednesday, handing the Giants their fifth straight loss.

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    Spain's Fernando Torres, second from right, is surrounded by Chilean defenders during the group B World Cup soccer match between Spain and Chile at the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, June 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

    Stunner! Spain's World Cup reign ends with loss to Chile

    Defending champion Spain, the dominant global football power for the past six years, was eliminated from World Cup contention Wednesday with a 2-0 loss to Chile. Spain's famed passing game failed against a high-tempo, tenacious Chile team.

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    Netherlands' Ron Vlaar celebrates after the group B World Cup soccer match between Australia and the Netherlands at the Estadio Beira-Rio in Porto Alegre, Brazil, Wednesday, June 18, 2014. The Netherlands won the match 3-2. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

    Dutch beat tough Australia to take Group B lead

    The Netherlands had to work much harder for victory over the World Cup’s lowest-ranked team than it did against the defending world and European champion.A goalkeeping blunder by Maty Ryan handed substitute Memphis Depay his first international goal and the Netherlands the winner Wednesday after a spirited Australia had brought the Dutch back down to earth with a bump following their 5-1 thrashing of Spain in their Group B opener.

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    Chicago Sky forward Elena Delle Donne, right, was honored with a leadership award from the WNBA on Wednesday for her work in the community.

    Sky’s Delle Donne honored for community work

    The WNBA honored Elena Delle Donne of the Chicago Sky with its Dawn Staley Community Leadership Award on Wednesday for her community work in 2013.

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    While Illinois and head coach John Groce, right, beat Indiana last December in Champaign, the Hoosiers led the Big Ten in attendance and finished sixth in attendance nationally. Illinois finished 15th in attendance nationally.

    Big Ten basketball leads nation in attendance

    The Big Ten leads the nation in men's basketball attendance for the 38th consecutive season, and three conference teams finished in the Top 10 nationally.

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    Kane County Cougars fans will get to see former Indiana catcher Kyle Schwarber, right, when he joins their team this week. Schwarber was promoted from Class A Boise by the Cubs.

    Cubs promote top picks Bryant, Schwarber
    After missing out on Kris Bryant lastyear, fans of the Kane County Cougars will get to see Kyle Schwarberthis season. The Cubs announced Tuesday thatSchwarber, their first-round draft choice this season out of IndianaUniversity, has been promoted from short-season Class A Boise to the Class A Cougars of the Midwest League.

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    The U.S. Patent Office ruled Wednesday, June 18, 2014, that the Washington Redskins nickname is “disparaging of Native Americans” and that the team’s federal trademarks for the name must be canceled.

    Trademark board rules against Redskins name

    The U.S. Patent Office ruled Wednesday that the Washington Redskins nickname is “disparaging of Native Americans” and that the team’s federal trademarks for the name must be canceled. Redskins owner Dan Snyder has refused to change the team’s name, citing tradition, but there has been growing pressure including statements in recent months from President Barack Obama, lawmakers of both parties and civil rights groups.

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    Mike North video: Carmelo to the Bulls?
    Mike North thinks Carmelo Anthony coming to the Bulls just might be what the doctor ordered for a team desperately in need of some offense.

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    Quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo was selected by the Patriots in the second round of the NFL draft in May. That is four rounds earlier than the Patriots picked Tom Brady in 2000. Brady will begin his 15th season running the New England offense.

    Rolling Meadows’ Garoppolo focuses on transition to NFL

    New England Patriots rookie quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo, who played his high school football at Rolling Meadows High School, is more concerned with preparing for the next practice, film session and team meeting. “Each day is different and you have to be consistently good, not occasionally great,” he said Tuesday. “You have to come out here and do your best every single day and let the coaches see what you can do.”

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    Spain’s head coach Vicente del Bosque looks on during an official press conference the day before the group B World Cup soccer match between Spain and Chile at the Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, June 17, 2014. Spain will play in group B of the Brazil 2014 World Cup. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

    3 things to watch for Wednesday at the World Cup

    The magnitude of Spain’s opening 5-1 loss to Netherlands comes into sharper focus Wednesday when the defending champions must fend off World Cup elimination against Chile, less than a week into the tournament. The Dutch play Australia, the lowest-ranked team in the tournament, in the first of Wednesday’s three matches. That is followed by Spain vs. Chile and the Group A match between Croatia and Cameroon.

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    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler reacts to a question during a news conference after minicamp Tuesday in Lake Forest.

    Bears QB Cutler seems to have found his comfort zone

    Quarterback Jay Cutler's life has changed drastically since he joined the Bears in 2009, including a heightened familiarity with the offensive system, coaching staff and personnel, which he says will benefit him and the entire offense in 2014. “Looking back at my younger days in Denver, and even when I first got here, you do some things that are foolish and you regret, I think anyone does that,” Cutler said.

Business

  •  
    A new tool accessible from every ad on Facebook explains why you’re seeing a specific ad and lets you add and remove interests that the social networking site uses to show you ads.

    Tech Tips: Facebook ads, tracking and you

    Facebook even considers your offline shopping behavior. Facebook’s advertisers can see, for example, whether the ad for detergent you saw on Facebook led you to buy that brand in a drug store the following week. Facebook works with outside analytics firms to match what Facebook knows with what the retailers have on you and what you bought. Your name isn’t attached to this, but it may still feel creepy.

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    Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos introduces the new Amazon Fire Phone, Wednesday, June 18, 2014, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    Amazon unveils new smartphone

    The phone has a screen that measures 4.7 inches diagonally. That’s larger than current iPhones, but smaller than leading Android phones. CEO Jeff Bezos says the size was chosen to be ideal for one-handed use.

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    Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen’s news conference Wednesday appears on a television monitor on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

    Stocks close higher four days in a row

    The market had been in a wait-and-see mode in advance of the Fed statement, drifting lower for much of the day. The afternoon rebound gave the stock market its fourth consecutive gain.

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    Janet Yellen, chair of the U.S. Federal Reserve, speaks Wednesday during a Joint Economic Committee hearing in Washington, D.C.

    Fed says economy rebounding, trims bond buying

    The personal consumption expenditures index, the Fed’s preferred inflation gauge, rose 1.6 percent from a year earlier in April, the most since November 2012. The consumer price index, a separate inflation measure, rose 2.1 percent in May.

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    Argentina’s Economy MInister Axel Kicillof talks to the media Tuesday. He says the government is working on a debt swap that would make payments in Argentina to creditors who accepted previous debt restructurings.

    Argentina plans debt swap that analysts say is doomed

    Argentina has until June 30 to pay a group of U.S. hedge funds an initial down-payment of $907 million on the $1.5 billion judgment. If it fails to comply, it will be unable to use the U.S. financial system to pay an equal amount to a much larger group of bondholders, provoking a disorderly default on their bonds, collectively worth $24 billion.

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    General Motors CEO Mary Barra listens as she testifies Wednesday on Capitol Hill in Washington before the House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee.

    Lawmakers press GM on car safety

    Lawmakers at the hearing were skeptical of many of the conclusions in Valukas’s report, which was paid for by GM and released June 5. The report found that a lone engineer, Ray DeGiorgio, was able to approve the use of a switch that didn’t meet company specifications. Years later, he ordered a change to that switch without anyone else at GM being aware.

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    Sherri Mason, left, a New York environmental scientist who led a research team studying microplastics in the Great Lakes, examines a trawling device used to collect plastic “microbeads” from the water’s surface with SUNY-Fredonia student Rachel Ricotta in Lake Erie’s Buffalo Harbor.

    Illinois effort may mark beginning of end for microbeads

    Environmentalists in Illinois expected a battle royal over their call for a statewide ban on “microbeads” — tiny bits of plastic used in personal care products such as facial scrubs and toothpaste that are flowing by the billions into the Great Lakes and other waterways. Discovered only recently, they’re showing up inside fish that are caught for human consumption, scientists say.

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    Customers purchase fuel Tuesday at a Road Ranger gas station in Princeton, Illinois. Lawmakers have been reluctant to raise fuel taxes despite calls from several blue-ribbon commissions to do so.

    Senators propose 12-cent gas tax increase

    Revenue from gas taxes and other transportation user fees that for decades hasn’t kept pace with promised federal transportation aid promised to states. People are driving less per capita and cars are more fuel efficient, keeping revenues fairly flat. At the same time, the cost of construction has increased, and nation’s infrastructure is aging, creating greater demand for new and rebuilt roads and bridges.

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    Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., partnered with Sen. Bob Corker, a R-Tenn, to pitch a plan to raise federal gasoline and diesel taxes for the first time in more than two decades to replenish the federal Highway Trust Fund. That fund is forecast to go broke in late August.

    Senators propose 12-cent gas tax increase

    Two senators unveiled a bipartisan plan Wednesday to raise federal gasoline and diesel taxes for the first time in more than two decades, pitching the proposal as a solution to Congress’ struggle to pay for highway and transit programs.

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    Sustainable energy hub for Asia launched

    MANILA, Philippines — The Asian Development Bank and two U.N. agencies launched a hub Wednesday to mobilize investments and innovation to bring clean energy to the Asia Pacific region, where more than 600 million people lack electricity and 1.8 billion use firewood and charcoal at home.Energy demand is soaring in the region on the back of economic and population growth, and the ADB said that by 2035 developing countries in the region will account for 56 percent of global energy use, up from 34 percent in 2010. They will need more than $200 billion in energy investments by 2030.ADB will host and manage the Sustainable Energy for All hub — one of three such regional hubs under an initiative of U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon. The U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific and the U.N. Development Programme are ADB’s partners.“We can overcome energy poverty through sustainable, low-carbon energy means, and through this new hub we are gathering together investors, innovators and experts to make this happen,” said ADB Vice President Bindu Lohani.One of the goals of the center is to support developing Asian countries in preparing country action plans to meet the U.N. targets of ensuring universal access to modern energy by 2030, and doubling both the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency and the share of renewable sources of energy like solar or wind power.Kandeh Yumkella, Ban’s special representative on sustainable energy, called for an energy revolution that will power an industrial revolution that creates jobs and wealth in a sustainable way. He urged policymakers to ensure that public policies have transparency, longevity and credibility to lessen risks that will dampen needed investments in energy.Finding innovative solutions to energy poverty can save lives, because 3.3 million deaths in Asia annually are associated with inhaling toxic fumes from wood, charcoal, coal or dung, said Caitlin Wiesen, Asia-Pacific regional manager of UNDP.The world needs a staggering amount of investments in energy for the next two decades equivalent to half of the global economy to meet the U.N. goals, said Christoph Frei, secretary general of the World Energy Council composed of 3,000 private and government organization in 90 countries.He said it is important to address political risks that come when there is a lack of balance in policies and the objectives of attaining energy security, environmental security and social equity. Investing in diverse sources of energy also cuts risks, he added.By 2050, Frei said, solar power and gas are expected to have a dramatic growth rate as a source of energy while fossil fuel that currently contributes 80 percent of the world’s source of power will have its share down to between 60 and 70 percent. Oil is seen to stagnate while there is uncertainty with regard to the growth or decrease in the use of coal.

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    World stocks muted as investors await Fed

    HONG KONG — World stocks were muted as investors awaited an update on the U.S. economy later Wednesday from the Federal Reserve following its two-day policy meeting, while Japanese markets rose on a weaker yen. Equity investors have been holding back this week as they looked ahead to the Fed’s meeting and its implications for the economy. The central bank was expected to update its forecasts for the world’s biggest economy and scale back economic stimulus another notch. It was less certain whether policymakers would give any hints on when they want to start raising short-term interest rates from record lows.“Markets will focus on any adjustments to growth and inflation outlook, and especially on any shifts in guidance provided on the timing of the first hike,” analysts at Mizuho Bank said in a report.Investors will be looking for clear signs on the direction of the U.S. economy following some mixed data that showed U.S. inflation hitting its highest level in more than a year but home construction data disappointed. In early European trading, the FTSE 100 index of leading British companies gained 0.4 percent to 6,793.60 while Germany’s DAX rose 0.3 percent to 9,952.61. France’s CAC 40 added 0.2 percent to 4,546.27. U.S. stocks were little changed, with Dow futures nearly flat at 16,732.00 and broader S&P 500 futures up less than 0.1 percent to 1,934.40. In Asia, most benchmarks ended lower, except in Japan, where the Nikkei 225 rose 0.9 percent to close at 15,115.80 as the dollar strengthened 0.1 percent to 102.25 yen. A weaker yen means the cars and electronics made by the country’s export giants are less costly for overseas buyers. South Korea’s Kospi shed 0.6 percent to 1,989.49 while Hong Kong’s Hang Seng was flat at 23,181.72. In mainland China, the Shanghai Composite Index lost 0.5 percent to 2,055.52. Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 slipped 0.3 percent to 5,382.70. Woodside Petroleum Ltd. led declines on the Australian market, falling 4.6 percent a day after oil giant Royal Dutch Shell PLC said it’s selling a 19 percent stake worth around $5 billion.Benchmarks in New Zealand, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines also fell. In energy trading, benchmark crude oil for July delivery added 41 cents to $106.77 in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract dropped 54 cents to settle at $106.36 on Monday.The euro fell to $1.3561 from $1.3547 in late trading Tuesday.

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    A drop in U.S. exports and lower income from overseas investments drove the U.S. current account deficit to its highest level in 18 months, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday.

    U.S. current account deficit jumps from 14-year low

    WASHINGTON — A drop in U.S. exports and lower income from overseas investments drove the U.S. current account deficit to its highest level in 18 months. The Commerce Department says the deficit jumped to a seasonally adjusted $111.2 billion in the January-March quarter, up from a revised total of $87.3 billion in the October-December quarter. The fourth quarter’s total was the smallest in 14 years. The current account is the country’s broadest measure of trade, covering not only goods and services but also investment flows. A wider deficit can act as a drag on growth because it means U.S. companies are earning less from their overseas markets.Rising petroleum exports have narrowed the gap in recent years, though such exports fell in the first quarter, widening the deficit. Overall exports dropped to $399.7 billion from $407.1 billion in the previous quarter, according to the report released Wednesday. Exports of food and feeds also fell, mostly because of a drop in soybean exports. Harsh winter weather harmed many U.S. harvests.A larger trade gap in the first three months of this year cut nearly a full percentage point from growth. Economists now estimate the economy contracted at an annual pace of 2 percent in the first quarter. But they expect growth will resume in the current quarter at roughly a 3.5 percent rate.Americans received $196.5 billion in income from overseas investments, down from $198.8 billion in the previous quarter.The current account gap is still relatively low by historical standards. It regularly topped $150 billion in the four years before the recession.Two principal trends have narrowed the deficit in the past four years. First, the U.S. has benefited from an oil and gas boom, mostly because new drilling technologies have made it feasible to drill for oil and gas in states such as North Dakota, New York and Pennsylvania.That’s pushed down the trade deficit by boosting petroleum exports and lowering oil imports. Petroleum exports reached a record high last year, while imports dropped nearly 11 percent.Secondly, low U.S. interest rates have reduced the payments foreigners have received on their holdings of U.S. Treasury bonds and other investments. Meanwhile, the payments that Americans receive on overseas investments have risen, boosting the nation’s investment surplus.

  •  
    FedEx Corp. reported Wednesday, June 18, 2014, that quarterly profit is up as growth in online shopping boosted its ground-shipping business.

    FedEx 4Q profit rises on growth in ground shipping

    FedEx Corp. says its quarterly profit rose as growth in online shopping gave its ground-shipping business a lift. The earnings of $2.46 per share beat Wall Street’s forecast by a dime. Revenue also topped expectations.

  •  

    Small business lending reaching ‘new normal’

    Banks are making it easier for small businesses to get loans, and they’re giving companies better terms and lower interest rates. That’s the conclusion of researchers at Pepperdine University’s Graziadio School of Business and Management and Dun & Bradstreet Credibility Corp., who Wednesday released the results of a survey on small business financing.

  •  
    A new congressional report says the Social Security Administration has been closing a record number of field offices, even as millions of baby boomers approach retirement.

    Social Security closes offices as demand soars

    The Social Security Administration has been closing a record number of field offices because of budget constraints even as the demand for services soars, according to a congressional report being released today. As a result, seniors seeking information and help from the agency are facing increasingly long waits, in person and on the phone, the report said.

  •  
    This week’s Federal Reserve meeting is the third at which Janet Yellen will preside as chair since succeeding Ben Bernanke in February.

    Investors to seek clues from Fed on rate increase

    A stay-the-course message is expected from the Federal Reserve on Wednesday after it ends a two-day policy meeting. The Fed will likely approve a fifth cut in its monthly bond purchases because the job market has steadily strengthened. But no clear signal is expected on when the Fed will start raising short-term interest rates from record lows.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Riders brave the first drop for Goliath during a special preview Wednesday at Six Flags Great America in Gurnee. The ride opens to the public Thursday.

    Goliath wooden roller coaster gets thumbs-up at Six Flags Great America in Gurnee

    Six Flags Great America in Gurnee hosted a special preview for invited guests to experience the new Goliath wooden roller coaster Wednesday. “You’ve got the drop, you’ve got the inversion, you’ve got the zero-G roll,” rider Mike Bare, 36, of Schaumburg, told the Daily Herald. “I mean, everything about this ride is very smooth. You’ll love it.”

  •  
    Sous chef Mireya and executive chef Javiel Villalobos show off some of their favorite dishes on the Chicago Prime Italian menu.

    Chicago Prime Italian a vibrant addition to Schaumburg scene

    Chicago Prime Italian's recent opening attests to the continuing vibrancy of Schaumburg's dining-out scene. The restaurant's extensive menu plays it by the book, offering diners a full complement of classic dishes. Portions are geared toward ravenous appetites, and the pastas — either house-made or imported — are affordably priced.

  •  

    Night life: Gibsons rolls out summer drinks
    Gibsons Bar and Steakhouse rolls out summer drink specials; Max’s Deli’s celebrates summer with sangria and s'mores; Alibi Bar & Grill offers new eats and drink specials.

  •  
    “The Wizarding World of Harry Potter — Diagon Alley,” which features shops, dining experiences and the next-generation thrill ride at Universal Orlando, will officially open on July 8.

    Universal: New Harry Potter area will open July 8

    Universal officials announced Wednesday that the new Happy Potter attraction at Universal Studios Park will open July 8. It will double the size of the Harry Potter landscape in the park and will be tied via the Hogwarts Express train to the original Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal’s Island of Adventure.

  •  
    Newly retired from “The Tonight Show,” Jay Leno will be honored with the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor Oct. 19 in Washington, D.C.

    Jay Leno to win nation’s top humor prize in D.C.

    Newly retired from “The Tonight Show,” Jay Leno is now being awarded the nation’s top humor prize for following in the tradition of satire and social commentary of Mark Twain, the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts announced Wednesday. Leno will be honored with the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor in a performance by his fellow comedians Oct. 19 in Washington. The show will be broadcast nationally Nov. 23 on PBS stations.

  •  
    Turn a raw-bar treat until a summertime favorite with a recipe for grilled oysters with fermented black beans and chili garlic inspired by chefs at the South Beach Wine and Food Festival in Miami Beach, Fla.

    Oysters on the grill are a fine start to summer

    At a rooftop oyster outing in Miami Beach, numerous chefs offered up grilled oysters fresh off the flames. One amazing variation topped the oyster with a thick slab of chorizo and manchego cheese. But J.M. Hirsch's favorite was from Hung Huynh, the chef at Catch Miami and winner of the third season of Bravo’s “Top Chef.”

  •  
    Stephen Moyer, left, and Anna Paquin arrive at the Los Angeles premiere of the seventh and final season of “True Blood” at the TCL Chinese Theatre on Tuesday. “True Blood” may live on as a musical in the future.

    ‘True Blood’ headed for a musical afterlife

    Like the vampires it portrays, “True Blood” won’t seem to die. Even if it means breaking out in song. After the final scene of the upcoming final season of “True Blood,” fans may be able to take another fresh bite out of the HBO vampire drama. In the works: “‘True Blood’: The Musical.” Seriously.

  •  
    Nicollette Parra serves up wings and new summer martinis Red Headed Sunset and Deep Blue Sea at the Claddagh Irish Pub in Geneva during the World Cup.

    Suburban bars offering drink specials for World Cup watchers

    The hockey and basketball seasons are over and the Cubs and White Sox have less than spectacular records. If you're feeling short on good options to get in your sports-watching fix, you're in luck since the World Cup, one of the biggest athletic events on the planet, is going on right now. Bars throughout the suburbs are screening the games, decking themselves out in flags and offering drink specials and giveaways to get you into the soccer spirit.

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    Artist Molly Hatch shows her chinoiserie vases made during her residency at the Kohler Co. in Wisconsin. Hatch says the residency helped her launch a second career as a product designer. Photo/John Michael Kohler Arts Center Arts/Industry Artist Archive)

    Kohler brings artists to factory to learn, inspire

    The Kohler sink in your bathroom may be more of a work of art than you realize. The company known for kitchen and bathroom fixtures has opened its factory floor to artists for the past 40 years, allowing them to share ideas and techniques with factory workers so that both can be inspired. Three artists have created pieces produced by Kohler Co., and many more have gone on to design for other companies.

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    Outrageous and fun describe Janet Evanovich’s “Top Secret Twenty-One.”

    Stephanie Plum’s back for more in ‘Top Secret Twenty-One’

    Janet Evanovich delivers another hilarious entry in her Stephanie Plum series with “Top Secret Twenty-One.” Life is never dull for bounty hunter Stephanie Plum. When a simple task of bringing in a Trenton, New Jersey, car dealer named Jimmy Poletti who sold more than cars goes awry, things begin to fall apart for Stephanie and everyone she knows.

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    Clint Eastwood’s latest movie is the Warner Bros. Pictures’ musical “Jersey Boys.”

    Clint Eastwood reflects on age, America and acting

    Ahead of his Broadway adaptation “Jersey Boys” on Friday, Clint Eastwood, 84, shares his thoughts on how to stay young, his first time acting and why America is “floundering.”

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    A father and son watch Thomas the Tank Engine roll down the track at an annual Day Out with Thomas event at the Edaville USA theme park in Carver, Mass. Groundbreaking for the first permanent Thomas Land in the U.S. is set for July 2014 at Edaville USA, and is expected to be open for business in the summer of 2015.

    Thomas the Tank Engine chugs its way to Edaville

    Thomas the Tank Engine, the iconic talking cartoon train that has thrilled millions of children around the world, and Edaville USA Railroad, a favorite destination of generations of southeastern New England families, are teaming up on a permanent Thomas-themed park. Thomas Land, being built on about 11 of Edaville’s 250 acres, will have 14 rides based on the television show, with the highlight being a 20-minute train ride on a life-sized Thomas the Tank Engine.

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    Models wear designs by Christopher Raeburn during London Collections for Men Spring/Summer 2015 at Victoria House in London.

    Modern meets tradition at London’s menswear shows

    In the world of women’s fashion, London often plays second fiddle to other style capitals — it lacks the allure of Paris’s haute couture or the polish of Milan’s luxury labels. Yet when it comes to dressing the gentleman, no city can rival the British capital’s heritage. As trendy designer labels like Alexander McQueen and Burberry kick off the new season’s menswear shows in London this week, the catwalks will be staged just blocks away from the elite tailoring houses that have been perfecting their craft for over a century.

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    Chef Gale Gand, of Riverwoods, wants people to give lunch its due and offers dozens of ways to celebrate the midday meal in “Gale Gand’s Lunch!”

    Chef du Jour: Catching up with Gale Gand over 'Lunch!'

    Chef Gale Gand is not one to sit around the house. The celebrated pastry chef has just released her new book, "Gale Gand's Lunch," opened a casual dinner joint in Chicago with her buddies The Hearty Boys earlier this year and weeks after knee surgery spent the weekend taping a show for PBS.

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    Cookbook author Paula Wolfert places asparagus in with other vegetables to slow cook for lunch at her home in Sonoma, Calif. Wolfert spent more than 50 years researching and writing about food. Now she’s enlisting food as an ally in a fight to stay mentally sharp.

    Cookbook author Paula Wolfert fighting Alzheimer’s with food

    A diagnosis of an early stage of Alzheimer’s disease hasn’t stopped cookbook author Paula Wolfert’s decades-long career with food. But it has changed the direction. It has been the end of following the kind of complex, meticulous recipes for which she’s known. But it has been the beginning of looking at food in terms of healing, rather than hedonistic properties.

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    Shrimp with Strawberry Cocktail Sauce

    Fruity shrimp cocktail suited for a summer picnic

    Most of us know the secret to amazing homemade cocktail sauce — spike some ketchup with horseradish, lemon juice and Worcestershire sauce and you’re good to go. But for summer, we wanted to update this classic companion to chilled shrimp. So we looked to what was seasonal and decided to try a strawberry-based cocktail sauce.

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    Strawberry Pistachio Torte

    Pistachios and strawberries combine for easy torte

    The sweet, slightly acidic flavor of fresh strawberries begs for a rich, crunchy accompaniment. And for that, we turned to pistachios. We start by finely chopping the nuts and mixing them into the dense batter of this rich cake.

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    Dan Smith, left, Gale Gand, Pete Evans and Steve McDonagh celebrate their day of taping “A Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking” with a gin cocktail. The show is scheduled to air this fall.

    Behind the scenes with chef Gand, ‘Moveable Feast’

    More than a decade after she pioneered Food Network's first all-pastry cooking show, chef Gale Gand was tapped for an episode of PBS's "Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking." Food Editor Deborah Pankey tagged along as Gand taped with restaurant partners Dan Smith and Steve McDonagh and host Pete Evans in southwestern Michcigan.

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    Turn a raw-bar treat into a summertime favorite with a recipe for grilled oysters with fermented black beans and chili garlic inspired by chefs at the South Beach Wine and Food Festival in Miami Beach, Fla.

    Grilled Oysters With Miso Black Beans And Chili Garlic
    Grilled Oysters with black beans and miso was inspired by a "Top Chef" winner.

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    Like the tomatoes in ketchup, strawberries offer a balance of sweet and acidic that makes it a perfect base for a seasonal shrimp cocktail sauce.

    Shrimp with Strawberry Cocktail Sauce
    Shrimp with Strawberry Cocktail Sauce is a cool seasonal twist on a favorite appetizer.

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    Strawberry Pistachio Torte is a deliciously easy was to showcase the season’s brightest berries.

    Strawberry Pistachios Torte
    Make the most of fresh berries with Strawberry Pistachio Torte.

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    In her new book, “Lunch,” Gale Gand shares several takes on chicken salad, like this one with dried cranberries and almonds.

    Chicken Salad with Dried Cranberries, Fennel and Toasted Almonds
    Poach some chicken breasts or roast a chicken and you've got the base for Gale Gand's Classic Chicken Salad as well as her teriyaki and Mexican versions or one studded with dried cranberries and almonds.

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    Mexican Chicken Salad
    Roast chicken is the base for Gale Gand's Mexican Chicken Salad. Enjoy it on greens, as a sandwich or in a wrap.

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    Reality television star from the MTV Series “Jersey Shore,” Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino was arrested Tuesday after a faight at his family’s tanning salon in New Jersey.

    The Situation charged in fight at tanning salon

    It was gym, tan, jail for The Situation as he was arrested Tuesday after a fight at a tanning salon. The former “Jersey Shore” cast member, whose real name is Mike Sorrentino, was charged with simple assault after the afternoon confrontation at the Boca salon in Middletown Township, which he and his family own and operate.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Don’t let summer outings turn tragic

    Too many recent local news stories tell of fun summer outings that ended with a drowning. The best way to prevent such a tragedy is to learn the skills to swim or boat safely and how to anticipate and react to danger, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    For Obama, the wages of doing nothing

    Columnist Richard Cohen: Other than avoiding war, it’s hard to know what Obama wants. I know what he says, but actions always speak louder than words.

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    Cantor’s swan song

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: Conventional Wisdom, that self-righteous propagandist, has it that Republican House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s trouncing by an academic, tea-sipping nobody marks the end of the GOP establishment. The Tea Party candidate crushed Cantor, they say. The old-guard Republican Party is toast! It’s over. Finito. And those were the Democrats talking.

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    So much money spent on district logo
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: The District 214 marketing gurus recently sent a mailing describing and glorifying their new logo and “marketing approach.” What a great waste of tax money. Why does this board think they need to do this?

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    This is celebrating Flag Day?
    A Lily Lake letter to the editor: On Flag Day, June 14, this year, I decided it would be appropriate to finally replace my old faded Old Glory with a bright new American flag I had acquired a few years ago.

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    The case for public election financing
    A Geneva letter to the editor: It isn’t a secret that big money holds more sway over our elected officials than the common voter. Members of our Congress spend hours each day looking to raise campaign cash for their next heated battle over which candidate gets to represent the rich and mighty for the next term.

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    Proud of dad’s D-Day experiences
    A West Dundee letter to the editor: As I read your articles marking the 70th anniversary of D-Day, I could not help but be moved to tears at the stories of survivors, and the sacrifice and honor they truly gave to our country.

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