Football Focus 2014

Daily Archive : Tuesday June 10, 2014

News

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    Bill Young of Naperville is being remembered for creating the Naperville Park District police force and mentoring generations of students and wrestlers as a teacher, dean and coach at Naperville Central High School. Young, seen here in 2003, will be remembered during a memorial toast June 21 at the Riverwalk Grand Pavilion.

    ‘My Way’ the best way for Naperville’s Bill Young

    Relatives and friends are exchanging memories of Naperville Park District police founder Bill Young in advance of a memorial toast scheduled for 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Saturday, June 1 at the Riverwalk Grand Pavilion. They’re remembering him as a good listener and an understanding leader whose goal was to help teens discover their path. “He really enjoyed his life and his jobs and he...

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    A sign stands outside the home of Aaron Toppen and his family in Mokena Tuesday. A family spokeswoman told The Associated Press that Topper, 19, was among five American troops killed this week during a friendly fire airstrike in Afghanistan.

    Mokena family remembers soldier killed by friendly fire

    Family members are remembering a 19-year-old soldier from Mokena who was among five Americans killed this week in Afghanistan as a classy young man who dreamed of a career in the military or law enforcement.

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    House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia, left, won't even be in the next Congress as he's lost his Republican primary election. Does that mean House Chief Deputy Whip Peter Roskam of Wheaton, front, will rise up the ranks further?

    What does Cantor's loss mean for Roskam?

    Former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert said it's too early to tell if House Majority Leader Eric Cantor's stunning primary loss Tuesday could spark a Republican leadership change that sends U.S Rep. Peter Roskam of Wheaton further up the GOP power ladder. “It's more complicated,” said Hastert, who rose to the speakership in 1999 from the spot Roskam occupies. “I don't think...

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    Petcoke handler says it will consolidate terminals

    A company that stores giant mounds of petroleum coke on Chicago's Southeast Side says it's consolidating operations at one location. KCBX Terminals has operated two sites along the Calumet River, where it stores “petcoke,” a grainy byproduct of oil refining often used as a fuel in industry.

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    Will Arlington Heights car stickers soon be a thing of the past?

    Arlington Hts. discusses cutting vehicle, dog licenses

    Arlington Heights may eliminate vehicle stickers and dog licenses, but first officials need to find a way to plug the $1.4 million budget hole those cuts would create. This essentially amounts to a voluntary tax,” one trustee said. “Any one of us could choose not to buy (one) and the chances are that you aren’t going to be punished.”

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    Laptops stolen from Barrington High School storage closet

    Police are investigating the theft of 59 MacBook Air computers from a locked storage closet at Barrington High School.

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    House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, joined by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., center, and Rep. Pat Tiberi, R-Ohio, talks to reporters Tuesday on Capitol Hill after a Republican Conference meeting. Commenting on problems with the troubled health care system in the Department of Veterans Affairs, Boehner said, “We have a systemic failure of an entire department of our government.”

    House votes to ensure speedier care for veterans

    “We often hear that the care that veterans receive at the VA facilities is second to none — that is, if you can get in,” said Rep. Mike Michaud of Maine, top Democrat on the committee. “As we have recently learned, tens of thousands of veterans are not getting in.”

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    A Kurdish policeman stands guard while refugees from Mosul head Tuesday to the self-ruled northern Kurdish region in Irbil, Iraq.

    Militants overrun most of Mosul

    Regaining Mosul poses a daunting challenge for the Shiite prime minister. The city of about 1.4 milliion has a Sunni Muslim majority and many in the community are already deeply embittered against his Shiite-led government.

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    Two Lake Zurich schools evacuated for minor gas leak

    Officials said a very small amount of natural gas escaped into Lake Zurich’s Middle School South ventilation system Tuesday. Both Middle School South and Isaac Fox Elementary School were evacuated as a precaution.

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    Naperville looks to extend fire training to other departments

    The Naperville Fire Department recently trained a group of new hires in-house, and officials say they would like to offer their training program to new members of other departments in the future. “Working together to train people because we have the means and the facilities — that's a good thing,” said Kevin Lyne, Division Chief for Training.

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    Poet, actress and civil rights champion Maya Angelou died in May.

    Harvey to name community center after Maya Angelou
    The city will rename the Harvey Community Center to “The Dr. Maya Angelou Community Center of Harvey, Illinois.” Angelou died May 28 at age 86. She was known worldwide as a literary pioneer and civil rights champion.

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    The “Summit of Hope” held Tuesday at the Illinois State Fairgrounds was billed as one-stop opportunity for parolees and probationers to get services and information to help with their re-entry to society.

    Corrections department hosts ex-offender fair

    Hundreds of ex-offenders attended a “one-stop” expo hosted by the Illinois Department of Corrections on the state fairgrounds in Springfield. The “Summit of Hope” event was aimed at helping former inmates adjust to life outside prison.

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    Monika Urana, left, and Julie Nischik hold hands during their wedding ceremony Saturday in Madison, Wisconsin. On Friday a federal judge struck down the state’s gay marriage ban.

    Office holding Wisconsin gay marriage licenses

    The Wisconsin Vital Records Office is holding, but not processing, marriage licenses of gay couples who married after a federal judge overturned the state’s same-sex marriage ban.

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    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel

    Chicago pension overhaul could reverberate in 2015 election

    A new law overhauling two of Chicago’s pension systems is already November election fodder for Gov. Pat Quinn’s Republican challenger, but the issue could also ripple into Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s 2015 re-election bid.

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    State Rep. Derrick Smith, center, speaks to reporters Tuesday at the federal building in Chicago.

    Chicago legislator convicted of bribery

    A federal jury convicted state Rep. Derrick Smith of bribery and attempted extortion Tuesday for taking $7,000 from a purported day care operator seeking a state grant.

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    Libertyville Mayor Terry Weppler, left, unveiled the village’s first honorary street sign for World War II veteran and longtime resident Don Carter, right.

    Street sign honors Libertyville WWII veteran

    The first honorary street sign installed in Libertyville was unveiled Tuesday for World War II veteran Don Carter. "What more can you say about Don? He's been involved in so much," Mayor Terry Weppler said.

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    David Miles was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in October 2013. There will be a fundraiser to help offset mounting medical bills June 21 at Bowl Hi Lanes in Huntley. He is pictured with his son, Ethan, daughter, Sarah, and ex-wife, Lisa.

    Benefit set for Huntley man with cancer

    When David Miles got a piece of steak lodged in his throat, it changed his life forever. Miles, 53, of Huntley was diagnosed with stage four esophageal cancer in October 2013. Since then, he has been treated with radiation and chemotherapy to shrink the cancer, and endured a seven-hour surgery to remove his esophagus. A fundraiser for Miles is planned at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, June 21 at the Bowl Hi...

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    Elk Grove District 59 students getting computers and tablets

    Nearly all students in Elk Grove Township Elementary School District 59 will be getting their own computer devices next school year that officials say will provide opportunities for expanded learning. “It’s deeper, richer learning, not just for the sake of having technology, but how do we prepare our kids to make them successful for whatever path they choose,” said Ben Grey,...

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    Lengthy delays for trains at crossings like Route 14 in Barrington have prompted concerns from Sen. Dick Durbin.

    CN fights back against Durbin’s safety claims

    Canadian National Railway officials pushed back against a warning from Sen. Dick Durbin who last week accused the railroad of ignoring the suburbs and ruining a plan to extend Amtrak to Galena.

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    Bob Chwedyk/bchwedyk@dailyherald.com, May 2012 Avoid the Kennedy Expressway near downtown for the next three weekends, officials warn.

    Avoid the Kennedy this weekend, IDOT warns

    You'll regret it. You'll stew in traffic for hours. You'll waste gas. You'll miss your ballgame or concert. It's crazy. State officials gave multiple reasons to convince drivers to stay off the Kennedy Expressway near downtown Chicago this weekend because of construction.

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    Character Caravan at Woodfield Mall June 21

    Children and families are invited to the Character Caravan to meet, greet and play with some of the Northwest suburbs’ lovable attraction mascots from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 21, in the grand court of Woodfield Mall in Schaumburg. This one-of-a-kind free event, presented by Meet Chicago Northwest, provides a fun family experience with contests, games, giveaways, and the chance to...

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    Mundelein bike rodeo set for June 22

    The Mundelein police department and Ray’s Bike and Mower of Mundelein will host a bike rodeo Sunday, June 22.

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    Lindenhurst man killed in Lake Villa Township crash

    A Lindenhurst man was killed Monday in a crash on Grass Lake Road in Lake Villa Township, the Lake County Sheriff’s office said.

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    Lindenhurst community cleanup is June 21

    Lindenhurst residents are invited to a community clean up on the beach at Linden’s Landing, 2100 Sprucewood Lane, on Saturday, June 21.

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    MainStreet Libertyville to host classic car show

    MainStreet Libertyville hosts the Car Fun on 21 classic car show, on Wednesday, June 18, from 6 to 9 p.m. on Church Street in downtown Libertyville.

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    Bartlett police warn of IRS telephone scam

    Bartlett police say scam artists have targeted residents over the telephone. The scammers claim to be IRS agents or from the U.S. Treasury Department, police said in a news release Tuesday.

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    Arlington Hts. family hosts golf challenge to raise money for liver cancer

    Rona Wolf, of Arlington Heights, will host the second Rona & Stuart Wolf Golf Challenge — a benefit for liver cancer research — at noon on July 31. The golf tournament will take place at the Highland Park Country Club and raise money for research to cure the disease that took Rona’s husband Stuart’s life last year.

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    Peter Oprisko performs for ABC News.

    Peter Oprisko opens Hoffman Estates concert series

    Singer Peter Oprisko and a seven-piece orchestra will open Hoffman Estates’ “Summer Sounds on the Green” concert series June 19 at the Village Green - the first of eight summer shows presented by the Hoffman Estates Arts Commission and the Hoffman Estates Park District.

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    Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says she feels emboldened to run for president because of Republican criticism of her handling of the deadly 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya.

    Clinton returns to local roots for book tour

    As Hillary Clinton rolls through Chicago on her book tour and presidential campaign warm-up, Democrats from her former suburban home of Park Ridge and the surrounding area will be watching. A 2016 run for the White House could give local Democrats a boost to back the Chicago native and Maine South High School alumna four years after Illinois’ Barack Obama won his second term in office.

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    Eric Galarza Jr.

    Will Hernandez take stand in his murder trial?

    Five-year-old Eric Galarza Jr. died from a gunshot wound to his head, Kane County coroner’s physician Dr. Larry Blum testified Tuesday as Cook County prosecutors prepared to conclude their case alleging Miguel Hernandez Jr. killed the Elgin boy. Defense attorney Ralph Meczyk insists police have the wrong man and that another gang member is responsible.

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    Trucker killed in Long Grove crash

    A semitrailer-truck driver was killed Tuesday morning in a collision with a dump truck on Route 22 in Long Grove, police said.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Juan G. Martinez Del Rio, 30, of Elgin, was charged Monday with manufacture/delivery of a controlled substance and possession of a controlled substance related to a Dec. 14 incident, court records show. His bail was set at $100,000 in Kane County bond court, and his next court date is June 23.

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    Elgin Art Showcase might move if fire system isn’t upgraded

    The Elgin Art Showcase might move if its building is not outfitted with a code-compliant fire system, city officials said. Meanwhile, the city of Elgin hasn’t paid rent since January for the space occupied by the Art Showcase in the 8th floor of the Professional Building at 164 Division St. The city, in turn, rents out that space to theater, arts and music groups.

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    Waukegan man arrested in June bank robbery

    A Waukegan man has been arrested in a June 6 bank robbery, according to a Waukegan Police Department news release. Kenneth Kormoi, 29, was charged with aggravated battery and burglary.

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    Jeff Schielke

    Batavia mayor reappointed to paid spot on Pace board

    With his reappointment as Kane County's representative to the Pace board Tuesday, Batavia Mayor Jeff Schielke's tenure has now spanned through three different county board chairmen. The position pays $10,000 a year. He will serve until mid-2018, a full 16 years as the county's representative.

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    Police recovered boxes, scales and other items in a retail store on the city’s West Side.

    Hoffman Estates man faces drug charges in Chicago

    A Hoffman Estates man and owner of a Chicago retail store faces felony drug charges after police recovered $60,000 worth of narcotics paraphernalia inside the store on the city's West Side, authorities said. Bruce Kim, 44, was released on a $10,000 I-bond Tuesday.

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    Billy J. Collins

    Navy man charged with child porn after cyber investigation

    A Navy petty officer 3rd class was charged with several felony counts involving child pornography after authorities using a search warrant found images on electronic devices in his home near the Great Lakes Naval Station. Billy J. Collins, 33, remained in the Lake County jail Tuesday on $250,000 bond.

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    Motorcyclist injured in Lake in the Hills crash dies

    A motorcyclist involved in a collision with a car Monday afternoon near Lake in the Hills has died of his injuries, authorities said. Christopher Q. Gramer of Lake in the Hills was riding a 2004 Suzuki motorcycle westbound on Algonquin Road at Lake Drive when it crashed into a 2010 Ford Focus traveling eastbound on Algonquin Road, turning north onto Lake Drive.

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    State’s attorney: Sleepy Hollow officers justified in fatal shooting

    No charges were filed against two Sleepy Hollow police officers involved in a fatal shooting in early March, and the case has been closed, following an Illinois State Police investigation. "In the end, the officers were justified in the use of force," said Kane County State's Attorney Joe McMahon.

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    Prosecutors get more time to prepare case against Palatine man

    The prosecutors aiming to put James P. Eaton, the man accused of killing a 14-year-old Palatine girl in 1997, behind bars were granted more time to prepare their evidence at a court hearing in Wisconsin Tuesday morning. Judge Timothy Boyle set the next status hearing for Aug. 11.

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    Nicholas “Nico” Contreras was killed while sleeping at his grandparents’ house in Aurora in 1996, by a bullet shot through a window in an attempted gang-related hit on his uncle.

    Kane state’s attorney wants review of murder conviction reversal

    Kane County might ask the state Supreme Court to uphold the conviction of Mark Downs in the 1996 shooting death of 5-year-old Nico Contreras of Aurora. An appellate court reversed the conviction recently, saying the jury had been given improper instruction about the meaning of "reasonable doubt."

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    Francois Smit of South Africa and Maurico Rojas of Mexico set up the Matterhorn ride at the 2014 RotaryFest carnival.

    RotaryFest ready to kick off summer fest season

    The first major festival in the Northwest suburbs opens Wednesday in Elk Grove Village. Crews were on site Tuesday making final preparations for the annual RotaryFest, which features a carnival, food and drinks, live entertainment, a classic car show and much more.

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    Proposed improvements to Circle Park in Bloomingdale include upgrading a roller hockey rink so it could be used for ice skating during the winter. John Hower, left, of Itasca, Mike Ferrante, center, of Bloomingdale, and James Trout of Roselle, were using the rink on Tuesday.

    Bloomingdale seeking funding for park improvvements

    The Bloomingdale Park District is going to apply for a state grant to raise money to pay for various improvements to Circle Park, which is located at 163 Fairfield Way in Bloomingdale. Proposed improvements to the park include replacing the existing playground with a new "nature playground" and upgrading an existing roller hockey rink so it could be used as an ice rink during the winter.

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    Roger Johnson

    Warrenville man’s plea, sentencing put on hold

    A 24-year-old Warrenville man expected to plead guilty Tuesday and accept a 6-year prison term on charges of selling cocaine to undercover agents was not ready to sign off on the deal. Roger Johnson, 24, of 30W161 Maplewood Drive, is accused of selling less than 15 grams of the cocaine to undercover agents from Wheaton and Warrenville on Feb. 4 and Feb. 20.

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    Parents wait at the Fred Meyer grocery store parking lot Tuesday in Wood Village, Ore., to be reunited with students after a shooting at Reynolds High School.

    Deputy: Suspect dead in shooting at Oregon school

    A lone gunman armed with a rifle shot and killed a student Tuesday and injured a teacher shortly after classes started at a high school in a quiet Columbia River town in Oregon and was later found dead as police arrived, authorities said.Authorities have tentatively identified the gunman but weren’t ready to release the name, Troutdale Police Chief Scott Anderson said.

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    Rondout Elementary School fourth-grader Gloria Barbosa-Gomez places a newspaper in a time capsule during a ceremony Tuesday. As part of the school’s sesquicentennial celebration, the time capsule included a flash drive, cellphone, newspaper, Post-it’s, a Toobaloo and the school mascot Falcon toy.

    Rondout School celebrates milestone with time capsule

    Rondout Elementary School students watched Tuesday as a time capsule was buried on the last day of classes as part of the school’s sesquicentennial celebration. Teachers and student watched the Rondout time capsule ceremony as the student historical department led the assembly to place items in the long, metal tube that would be used as the capsule celebrating the school’s 150th...

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    While willing to talk about the tough times that led her to a food pantry, mom and new college graduate Ellen Tucker shares a happy moment with daughters Sydney, 14, and Emma, 11, who has life-threatening disabilities.

    How Hinsdale single mom’s food pantry visit led to college degree

    A single mom with two daughters, one with life-threatening disablities, Ellen Tucker went to a mobile food pantry in Hinsdale for help. She came home with a meal, a mentor and the help that led her to her college degree, grad school and plans for a career. “I’m in a much better place now than when I met them,” Tucker says of the people she connected with through that trip to the...

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    Two sides to political statements on education

    As election season gears up, politicians often include their views on education in their campaigns. Glenbard High School District 87 Superintendent David Larson says some politicians' words can be code for attacks on public education.

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    Libertyville Township officials are seeking public input on a concept plan for 303 acres along rural Casey Road.

    Give your input on open space planning in Libertyville Twp.

    Libertyville Township residents are invited to attend a public open house Thursday, June 19, to learn about and provide comments on a draft conceptual plan for the future use of 303 acres of protected open space along rural Casey Road north of Libertyville.

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    Annie, a golden retriever, watched folks at the Lake Zurich farmers market in Paulus Park from her owners’ booth, Meat Goat.

    Lake Zurich farmers market returns for its second season

    Lake Zurich's weekly farmers market will return Friday, June 13.

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    This Cary home was flooded with sewer backup last year.

    State could change regulations to help limit flooding

    One of the best ways to curb flooding in the suburbs, an environmental advocate says, is to keep rainwater from going down the drain in the first place.

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    Gun charge dropped against retired cop

    Lake County officials on Tuesday dropped the gun charage filed against a retired Indiana police officer who was accused of trying to carry a concealed weapon into the BMW Championship golf tournament in Lake Forest last year.

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    Newlyweds Michael Wolber and April Hartley pose for a picture near Bend, Ore., as a wildfire burns in the background. Because of the approaching fire, the minister conducted an abbreviated ceremony and the wedding party was evacuated to a downtown Bend park for the reception.

    Wildfire sparks amazing wedding photo in Oregon
    A wildfire that disrupted an Oregon couple’s wedding also gave them the photograph of a lifetime. After evacuation orders came, the minister conducted an abbreviated ceremony. As guests headed for the cars, the wedding photographer took some photos of the couple with the wildfire raging in the background.

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    St. Charles shuns large west-side development

    A plan to annex 96 acres of land into St. Charles that would be home to 285 new residential dwellings met a sour reception when presented to aldermen Monday night. Opponents of the Bluffs of St. Charles project say the plan would violate the city's land use plan and create an “island of development” in a rural area.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Thieves stole a designer watch valued at $8,500 between 11 p.m. May 30 and 8 a.m. May 31 out of a guest room at Courtyard by Marriott, 100 W. Algonquin Road, after the owner left it behind by mistake.

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    A New Jersey highway crash that severely injured Tracy Morgan and killed another comedian is drawing attention to the dangers of tired truckers just as the industry and its allies in Congress are poised to roll back safety rules on drivers’ work schedules.

    Morgan crash underscores danger of tired truckers

    A New Jersey highway crash that severely injured Tracy Morgan and killed another comedian is drawing attention to the dangers of tired truckers just as the industry and its allies in Congress are poised to roll back safety rules on drivers’ work schedules. A proposed change to federal regulations backed by the trucking industry and opposed by safety advocates and the Obama administration...

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    Ken Arndt, retired superintendent of Community Unit District 300, has returned to the district as interim superintendent.

    Retired District 300 superintendent to temporarily run district

    A familiar face will temporarily run Community Unit District 300 until the superintendent the district hired is certified to work in Illinois. Ken Arndt, the district's superintendent from 2001 until his 2011 retirement, returns as interim superintendent and will make $472 for each day he works.

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    Devan A. Bald

    Round Lake man charged with indecent solicitation of a child

    A Round Lake man has been charged with indecent solicitation of a child after trying to set up a meeting to have sex with a 9-year-old girl he was communicating with on Facebook.

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    Hillary Rodham Clinton said Tuesday that she and former President Bill Clinton “fully appreciate how hard life is for so many Americans,” seeking to refine remarks she made about the pair being “dead broke” when they left the White House.

    Hillary Clinton says she understands ‘hard life’

    Hillary Rodham Clinton said Tuesday that she and former President Bill Clinton “fully appreciate how hard life is for so many Americans,” seeking to refine remarks she made about the pair being “dead broke” when they left the White House. At the same time, the former secretary of state dropped another hint that she might be leaning toward a second run for the...

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    Dr. Kevin Lally, center, with Emily, left, and Caitlin Copeland, right, in Houston. Lally is the pediatric surgeon who performed the twins’ separation. They were born joined at the liver. On Tuesday, June 10, 2014, they celebrate their 18th birthday and graduate as co-valedictorians from a Houston high school.

    Conjoined twins celebrate 18th birthday in Houston

    For a set of Texas twins, being joined at the hip is not just a cliche — that was basically the first 10 months of their life. On Tuesday, Emily and Caitlin Copeland, who were born conjoined at the liver, are celebrating their 18th birthday by enjoying the success of a separation surgery that has allowed them to lead normal lives and graduate from high school as co-valedictorians.

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    Fifteen CIA employees were found to have committed sexual, racial or other types of harassment last year.

    AP: CIA cites officers for harassment

    Fifteen CIA employees were found to have committed sexual, racial or other types of harassment last year, including a supervisor who was removed from the job after engaging in “bullying, hostile behavior,” and an operative who was sent home from an overseas post for inappropriately touching female colleagues, according to an internal CIA document obtained by The Associated Press.

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    Las Vegas Sheriff Doug Gillespie wears a black band across his badge during a news conference, Monday, June 9, 2014, in Las Vegas.

    Vegas police killer decried government on YouTube

    His face painted to look like the comic book villain the Joker, a man who would months later gun down two police officers and a good Samaritan punctuates his political rant with manic glares at the camera. In another online video, he warns that police can’t be trusted. Investigators are studying those videos and a range of other social media posts by the 31-year-old.

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    5 U.S. troops killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan

    Five Americans troops were killed in an apparent coalition airstrike in southern Afghanistan, officials said Tuesday, in one of the worst friendly fire incidents involving United States and coalition troops since the start of the nearly 14-year war.

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    Nobel Peace Laureate Tawakkol Karman urges students at Naperville’s North Central College to get involved as she shares her experiences as the female leader of Yemen’s peaceful revolution.

    Nobel Peace Laureate urges North Central students to make a difference

    Tawakkol Karman, 2011 Nobel Peace Laureate, shared her experiences as the female leader of Yemen’s peaceful revolution during a recent visit to Naperville’s North Central College.

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    Rick Polad, an Earth science instructor at the College of DuPage, recently released the third installment of his mystery novel series.

    COD science instructor releases third mystery novel

    Rick Polad, an Earth science instructor at College of DuPage, recently released his third Spencer Manning mystery novel, “Harbor Nights.” The book is the third in the series, following “Change of Address” and “Dark Alleys.”

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    Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation Monday to help Chicago reduce a multibillion-dollar pension shortfall for two of its pension systems, but advised Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the City Council not to raise property taxes for needed revenues.

    Gov. Quinn signs partial Chicago pension overhaul

    Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation Monday to help Chicago reduce a multibillion-dollar pension shortfall for two of its pension systems, but advised Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the City Council not to raise property taxes for needed revenues.

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    Fred Goldman, father of murder victim Ronald Goldman, has not rested since a jury acquitted O.J. Simpson 20 years ago. Goldman and the family of Simpson's slain ex-wife took the former football hero to civil court, got a $33.5 million judgment and Goldman then seized anything that could help pay that award.

    Dad on Buffalo Grove native Ron Goldman's death: O.J. had to pay

    For years, Fred Goldman was adamant that he would never rest until he had held O.J. Simpson accountable for the killings of his son, Buffalo Grove native Ron, 25, and Simpson's ex-wife 20 years ago. After the trial, Goldman joined with the family of Simpson's ex-wife in winning a $33.5 million wrongful death judgment in civil court. “It's not the kind of punishment I would have...

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    Dawn Patrol: Metea mourns teacher; Dist. 34 kindergarten unconstitutional?

    Metea Valley mourns death of young teacher, coach. Suit calls Dist. 34 kindergarten fee unconstitutional. Cantigny tree branch collapse ‘isolated incident.’ Rolling Meadows police looking for parolee. Teens could be prosecuted as adults in Elgin robbery, beating. Gurnee man reported missing. Sox notch sweet win over Tigers. Graduation season comes to a close.

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    30,000 catfish to be released in Chicago River

    The Illinois Department of Natural Resources and Friends of the Chicago River plan to release 30,000 catfish into the river as part of a habitat restoration project.Friends of the Chicago River said the channel catfish will be released near Blue Island and a spot in downtown Chicago on Tuesday.

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    U.S. Army allocates $110M for Rock Island Arsenal

    ROCK ISLAND — U.S. lawmakers from Illinois and Iowa say the Rock Island Arsenal will receive $110 million to help it adapt and compete for new work.Illinois Sens. Dick Durbin and Mark Kirk were among members of Congress who announced Monday the U.S. Army has allocated the money for the arsenal.

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    3 states team up on aquatic invasive species

    ST. PAUL, Minn. — Midwest boaters are being urged to drain and clean their boats and trailers to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species across their borders.

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    Quinn to sign Illinois’ new ‘cupcake’ regulations

    Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn is expected to sign the so-called “cupcake bill” introduced after a young girl’s home baking operation was shut down by regulations. Quinn’s office says he’ll sign the bill Tuesday in 12-year-old Chloe Stirling’s home in Troy as he salutes her “for making a difference.”

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    Washington rebuilding, but no end in sight

    WASHINGTON, Ill. — At an intersection in the middle of Washington, a quick listen usually tells Ben Davidson the town is bouncing back from last November’s destructive tornado.“Just stop and be quiet. You’ll hear all the nail guns, the saws going. It’s pretty neat,” said Davidson, a pastor at Bethany Community Church.

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    Indiana Dunes project to help endangered butterfly

    PORTER, Ind. — The Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore and the Indiana Dunes State Park will begin restoring a black oak savanna they share this summer to save the homes of the endangered Karner blue butterfly and other native species.

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    Lime maker announces plans to expand in Gary

    GARY, Ind. — A company that produces lime, high calcium limestone and dolomitic stone plans to buy 200 acres from the Majestic Star Casino in Gary so it can expand its operations in the city and add more than 30 full-time jobs.

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    Illinois Department of Agriculture starts recycling program

    SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois Department of Agriculture is starting a new program for farmers to recycle fertilizer and pesticide containers.

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    Challenges to Wisconsin candidates to be heard

    MADISON, Wis. — The Wisconsin elections board is scheduled to consider challenges to nomination papers filed by 17 candidates seeking to be on the ballot, including four incumbents.The Government Accountability Board planned to consider the challenges Tuesday as it met to certify candidates for the Aug. 12 primary ballot.

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    Wisconsin DNR offers waste guide

    MADISON, Wis. — The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is offering contractors and construction firms a new guide on handling hazardous materials during demolition.

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    Bill Balling, former Buffalo Grove village manager, might be hired to help Prospect Heights hook up to Lake Michigan water.

    Prospect Hts. closer to hiring lake water consultant

    The Prospect Heights City Council got closer Monday night to hiring Bill Balling, retired village manager of Buffalo Grove, to find the city a source for Lake Michigan water and then help bring the project to fruition. “It’s so intricate a problem we need someone like Bill who knows all the players,” Mayor Nick Helmer said.

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    New signs around Barrington will point out village bike routes as well as destinations around town such as village hall here, the Metra station, village parks and public schools.

    Barrington to encourage biking with new signs, street markings

    A series of village projects encouraging Barrington residents to use their bikes around town will be rolled out this summer. Jennifer Tennant, the assistant director of development services, said the village will replace dozens of bike route signs, some of which she said have “gotten a little loopy and incorrect over the years.”

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    Man charged in deadly holdup bid headed to court

    BENTON — A southern Illinois man allegedly involved in a deadly bank robbery attempt is to appear in federal court.

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    Vet urges owners to watch pets’ summer health

    WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — The arrival of summerlike weather is a good time for pet owners to remember their animals can suffer from the heat and seasonal complications as much or more than humans.

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    Indiana designates 15 as College Success Counties

    INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana’s Higher Education Commission is recognizing 15 more of the state’s counties for their efforts to boost the number of residents completing a post-secondary education program.

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    Chicago kicks off summer reading program for kids

    Chicago has started its annual summer reading program. The program is called Rahm’s Readers Summer Learning Challenge after the mayor and designed to encourage children of all ages to pick up books.

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    Arlington Heights is heading toward regulating e-cigarettes in public places the same way it regulates traditional cigarettes.

    Arlington Heights might regulate e-cigarettes in public places

    Arlington Heights may soon start regulating e-cigarettes the same as tobacco cigarettes. The village board later this month will vote whether to approve a legal change to the Clean Indoor Air Ordinance that would prohibit the use of electronic cigarette devices in public places and within 15 feet of the door. “The research on e-cigarettes is ongoing, so the thought was that we need to be...

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    District 59 is considering building a 55,000-square-foot early childhood center on the east side of Holmes Junior High School in Mount Prospect.

    Early childhood center ‘likely to be a reality’ in District 59

    Elk Grove Township Elementary District 59 officials have proposed building an early childhood learning center that could open as soon as August 2015. The proposed $14.3 million facility would be built as a 55,000-square-foot addition on the east side of Holmes Junior High School, 1900 Lonnquist Boulevard in Mount Prospect. “In the past we’ve only dreamt about this, and now it’s...

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    Men’s Health and Fitness Day in Des Plaines

    The first Men’s Health and Fitness Day in Des Plaines is scheduled for Tuesday afternoon at the Prairie Lakes Community Center. The event will include exhibitors from Dick Pond Athletics, Juice Plus, the Des Plaines Public Library, Presence Health’s “Keys to Recovery,” Park Ridge Psychological Services, professional trainers from the Des Plaines Park District and more.

Sports

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    San Antonio Spurs forward Kawhi Leonard (2) goes to the basket against the Miami Heat in Game 3 of the NBA basketball finals Tuesday night in Miami. The Spurs won 111-92.

    Leonard, record half help Spurs roll in Game 3

    Kawhi Leonard scored a career-high 29 points, and the San Antonio Spurs made an NBA Finals-record 75.8 percent of their shots in the first half in a 111-92 victory over the Miami Heat on Tuesday night that gave them a 2-1 lead. The Spurs made 19 of their first 21 shots and finished 25 of 33 in the first half, bettering the 75 percent shooting by Orlando against the Lakers in the 2009 finals.

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    Injured White Sox right fielder Avisail Garcia is keeping his focus on getting back into the lineup.

    Injured Garcia can’t bear to watch White Sox

    Out for the season after having surgery to repair a torn labrum in his left shoulder, right fielder Avisail Garcia said one of the hardest parts of the rehab process is watching the White Sox play without him. Garcia keeps tabs on the score, but he doesn't watch the Sox on TV.

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    The Cubs’ Anthony Rizzo watches his two-run home run off Pittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Francisco Liriano during Tuesday’s game in Pittsburgh. The Cubs won 7-3.

    Rizzo’s big game leads Cubs over Pirates 7-3

    Anthony Rizzo homered, doubled twice and drove in three runs to lead the Chicago Cubs over the Pittsburgh Pirates 7-3 Tuesday night, spoiling Gregory Polanco’s much-anticipated debut. Rizzo hit a two-run homer in the first inning off Francisco Liriano, who left in the fourth with discomfort on his right side. Rizzo also doubled and scored in the fourth and hit an RBI double in the seventh, a drive to deep right-center that struck Polanco’s left wrist as the touted rookie tried to make the catch.

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    Sky can’t seem to escape injury bug, fall to Storm

    Plus one, minus two. That’s Chicago Sky math these days. All-star guard Epiphanny Prince, who sat out the start of the season due to personal reasons, made her Allstate Arena debut Tuesday night against the Seattle Storm. And yet the Sky was short-handed again. Forwards Elena Delle Donne and Jessica Breland suddenly found themselves on the bench in street clothes.

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    Rainout brings some rotation shuffling for Sox, Tigers

    The White Sox and Tigers were rained out Tuesday night at U.S. Cellular Field. John Danks and Chris Sale are now scheduled to start the final two games of the series against Detroit.

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    Cougars game postponed by rain

    Tuesday’s game between the Kane County Cougars and the Peoria Chiefs was postponed due to rain, according to Cougars’ website. To make up the game, the teams will play a doubleheader that starts at 5 p.m. Wednesday at Dozer Park, the website said.

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    Storm beat short-handed Sky 80-76

    Seattle Storm coach Brian Agler didn’t find out until just before the game that Chicago would be missing star Elena Della Donne. Even without the league’s No. 2 scorer, who was sidelined with a flare-up of Lyme disease, the Sky almost pulled off the win, falling 80-76 to the Storm on Tuesday night. “It didn’t alter (game plans) from the standpoint of our intent of what we wanted to do on the offensive end,” Agler said. “But defensively Delle Donne is a different kind of player so we would have had to give her a lot of attention.”

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    Elgin’s Kelly Bremer (18) is a recipient of an Elgin Sports Hall of Fame Foundation scholarship.

    Elgin Sports Hall of Fame awards scholarships

    The Elgin Sports Hall of Fame Foundation recently awarded its scholarships for the 2013-14 school year. The ESHOF Foundation, founded in 1980, awards $1,300 scholarships to worthy student-athletes from high schools within the City of Elgin, as well as from Elgin Community College.

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    Maybe the Cubs shouldn’t move so fast to either trade starting pitcher Jeff Samardzija, at right, or sign him to a long-term contract.

    Third option might be best one for Cubs

    The debate is whether the Cubs will re-sign Jeff Samardzija or trade him. Maybe the appropriate option is behind Door No. 3.

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    The New York Rangers are down 0-3 in the Stanley Cup Finals against the Los Angeles Kings. Game 4 is Wednesday night at Madison Square Garden in New York.

    Stanley sweep? Rangers regroup after 0-3 start

    The gravity of the situation was etched on the face of New York Rangers coach Alain Vigneault. One more loss Wednesday night to the Los Angeles Kings and his squad gets the distinction of being swept in the Stanley Cup Finals. No team has been swept in the finals since Detroit did it to Washington in 1998, completing a run of four straight Stanley Cup sweeps. So while the Kings are trying to close out the series, New York’s focus is strictly on moving past disappointment and getting back to LA for Game 5.

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    Jordan Spieth, left, and caddie Michael Greller talk on the 14th hole during a practice round for the U.S. Open golf tournament in Pinehurst, N.C., Tuesday, June 10, 2014. The tournament starts Thursday.

    U.S. Open a reunion for 2 players, 1 caddie

    Michael Greller never imagined that a simple act of kindness eight years ago could lead to a moment like this at the U.S. Open. Greller, the caddie for Jordan Spieth, stood on the 18th tee at Pinehurst No. 2 on Tuesday and conferred with his 20-year-old boss on an important tee shot in a match they didn’t want to lose against Phil Mickelson and Rickie Fowler. Moments later, Greller was sharing a laugh with Spieth’s partner, 21-year-old Justin Thomas, who is playing in his first U.S. Open.It was an amazing reunion among two players and one caddie — not because they were together, but the peculiar path that brought them here.

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    Kelly: Summer workouts will help players get ahead

    Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly hopes new NCAA rules allowing coaches to work with players over the summer will help players get ahead for the fall, especially freshmen. “We’re installing our offense and defense again,” Kelly said Tuesday evening.

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    Kevin Streelman, a Wheaton Warrenville South grad, has struggled a bit on the PGA Tour season. This week he returns to play in the U.S. Open in North Carolina, not far from where he went to college at Duke.

    Family-man Streelman looks to get his game on track

    Winfield’s Kevin Streelman remains one of golf’s most promising up-and-coming players, but he’s not going into this week’s U.S. Open with any momentum. Chicago’s only homegrown PGA Tour player missed the cut in his last three tournaments. “It’s been a strange year golf-wise,” Streelman told golf columnist Len Ziehm, “but it’s been a wonderful year off the course thanks to Sophia (his daughter). The former Duke golfer talks with Ziehm about his family and the U.S. Open, which begins Thursday on the famed No. 2 course at Pinehurst, N.C.

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    Unusual move helps Astros beat Arizona 4-3

    PHOENIX — A lot of things are going right for the Houston Astros these days.Take Monday night’s 4-3 victory over the Arizona Diamondbacks, for instance.Even when a left-handed reliever went to the outfield for one batter then came back to pitch, everything worked out just fine.With his bullpen worn down, Astros manager Bo Porter took Tony Sipp off the mound and sent him to right field while right-hander Jerome Williams faced Paul Goldschmidt. Goldschmidt walked, then Sipp went back to pitching, striking out left-handed hitting Miguel Montero.Porter had told Sipp to be ready for the switch.“I didn’t think it actually was going to happen,” Sipp said. “He gave me a warning but I’m like ‘All right, OK Bo.”’Sipp hadn’t played in the outfield since his days at Clemson.“I think I had more focus in right field than I did on the mound,” he said. Sipp left for good and Kyle Farnsworth fanned Martin Prado to end the inning.“ It was a good play unless Goldy hit one to him,” Arizona manager Kirk Gibson said. “I have seen it done before. I think I saw Lou Piniella do it in the playoffs once before. It is certainly in the rules. He’s going to manage his team the way he wants to manage it. It worked out for him.”Jose Altuve had three hits, including an RBI double, and Jarred Cosart pitched six solid innings for the Astros.Cosart (5-5) allowed three runs and five hits with two walks. The 23-year-old right-hander struck out eight, matching his career high set in his previous start against the Los Angeles Angels. He retired the first 10 batters, five by strikeout.The Astros scored their four runs in the first two innings off Josh Collmenter (4-3), who settled down to blank Houston over his final five innings.Goldschmidt doubled in a run for the Diamondbacks, who had won five of six going into the game.Chad Qualls pitched a scoreless ninth for his eighth save in nine opportunities and seventh straight since May 11.The Astros have won four of five and 12 of their last 16. “We’ve all won at some level. That’s kind of what was the motto in spring training,” Cosart said. “Whether it’s college, high school, Little League, whatever, we all know what it’s like to win, so why not get it going up here? And everyone’s just feeding off each other.”Altuve singled and scored in the first, doubled in a run in the second and singled in the fourth. Dexter Fowler had three hits, including a double, and scored twice.Collmenter went seven innings, giving up four runs, three earned, and seven hits.Right fielder Gerardo Parra threw out Altuve trying to score from second on Jon Singleton’s single in the ninth. Porter challenged, arguing that Montero, the catcher, missed the tag, but the call was upheld after a 38-second video review.Fowler and Altuve opened the game with singles, then after an out, Jason Castro was hit by a pitch to load the bases. Matt Dominguez’s sacrifice fly brought one run home. Another scored on second baseman Aaron Hill’s fielding error.In the second, Fowler singled and scored from first on Altuve’s double over the head of Inciarte in center field. Castro doubled Altuve home and Houston led 4-0.Parra was the first Arizona player to reach base, drawing a walk with one out in the fourth. Goldschmidt followed with Arizona’s first hit, a double down the left field line that scored Parra from first. Montero singled to put runners at first and third, but Prado grounded into a double play to end the inning.Arizona got two more runs in the sixth.Didi Gregorius singled, then scored from third when Parra singled and Fowler muffed the ball in center field. Goldschmidt walked, then Montero’s RBI single made it 4-3.

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    After finishing fourth in the Belmont Stakes, jockey Victor Espinoza cools down California Chrome. Mike North says there should be a match race in two months with California Chrome and Tonalist.

    Why horse racing should pay attention to boxing

    After hearing Steve Coburn, the owner of California Chrome, apologize for his post-Belmont Stakes statements, Mike North has some advice for the racing industry: "I don’t know what will be done to change things — my guess is nothing — but I find it puzzling that horse racing is always slow on the uptake. For example, when two boxers fight and bring in spectacular numbers or there is a major controversy, the first thing any good promoter does is talk rematch!" A match race with Tonalist and California Chrome at Arlington International Racecourse, North says, would be a huge draw.

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    Warren’s Maxwell Bongratz reacts to losing game three of the IHSA state final match to Lincoln-Way East on Saturday at Hoffman Estates.

    Images: Daily Herald prep photos of the week
    The Daily Herald Prep Photos of the Week gallery includes the best high school sports images by our photographers featuring softball, volleyball, soccer, and baseball.

Business

  •  
    Honey Hill Orchard employee Jacob Swanson adds another level onto a hive last week at the Waterman orchard. The harsh winter has led to heavy losses among hives of honeybees in northern Illinois and left beekeepers scrambling to replenish their hives.

    Honeybee losses have Illinois farmers scrambling

    The harsh winter led to heavy honeybee losses in northern Illinois, leaving farmers scrambling to replenish hives in time to produce enough pollinators for crops such as apples, pumpkins and raspberries. Keepers of honeybees in DeKalb County lost more than 70 percent of their bees, The (DeKalb) Daily Chronicle reported Tuesday. Producers in the area say they typically lose 40 percent.

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    Associated Press/Dec. 21, 2013 Travelers check in at the United Airlines ticket counter at Terminal 1 in O’Hare International Airport.

    United changing how travelers earn mileage rewards

    United Airlines is about to start rewarding its big-spending customers at a potential cost to bargain-hunting travelers who rack up miles with long-distance getaways. United follows other U.S. airlines that have begun basing awards on money spent, not miles flown. The changes would benefit customers like elite members of United’s loyalty program who fly at least 25,000 miles a year.

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    While East Dundee officials say they won't block medical marijuana enterprises from opening in the village, one trustee says just because medical marijuana is legal doesn't make it right.

    E. Dundee won't block medical pot businesses

    When it comes to housing dispensaries and distribution centers for medical marijuana in East Dundee, a majority of the board won't stand in the way of letting that happen. Trustee Jeff Lynam is the only one expressing moral trepidation. “This is just another unraveling, fraying of the edges of the moral fabric of this country,” Lynam said of medical marijuana. “We need to sew it up and stop it.”

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    A man hand-launches a Puma drone aricraft. The Federal Aviation Administration said Tuesday it has granted the first permission for commercial drone flights over land.

    FAA OKs commercial drone flights over land

    Ben Gielow, general counsel for the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, a trade association for the commercial drone industry, said the first approval of commercial flights over land is “an exciting moment,” but “we believe more can and must be done to allow for limited operations for small (unmanned aircraft) over land.”

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    Amiibo characters for Wii U are on display at the Nintendo booth Tuesday during the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles.

    Nintendo shows off ‘Skylanders’-like toy line at E3

    The first lineup of figures, due out later this year, features 10 characters from well-known Nintendo franchises: the Villager from “Animal Crossing”; the “Wii Fit” trainer; sword-wielding Link from “The Legend of Zelda”; intergalactic solider Samus Aran from “Metroid”; Pikachu from “Pokemon”; iconic gorilla Donkey Kong; pink shape shifter Kirby; and Mario, Princess Peach and Yoshi from “Super Mario Bros.”

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    NYSE Euronext, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott, left, applauds Tuesday during the opening bell ceremony at the New York Stock Exchange in New York.

    S&P 500 slips, ending 4-day run of record highs

    After slumping earlier this year, the stock market has been on a slow and steady climb since April. In recent weeks, a number of encouraging economic reports have helped push the S&P 500 to a series of record highs and left the index up 5.5 percent for the year. Some analysts argue that this success rests on shaky ground.

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    First lady Michelle Obama declares the “keel well and laid” as she participates as ship’s sponsor in a keel-laying ceremony last week for a submarine that will become the USS Illinois.

    White House threatens veto of GOP school meal bill

    Some school nutrition directors have lobbied for a break, saying the rules have proved to be costly and restrictive. The schools pushing for changes say limits on sodium and requirements for more whole grains are particularly challenging, while some school officials say kids are throwing away fruits and vegetables.

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    This is the flooded office of the Des Plaines Chiropractic Center at 444 Lee St. in Des Plaines in 2013.

    Des Plaines chiropractic business ditches flooding for Arlington Heights

    A Des Plaines chiropractic business moved to a new location in Arlington Heights and changed its name to The Wellness Group to escape flooding from the Des Plaines River. “If it weren’t for flooding, we would’t have decided to move,” said Dr. Michael Bagby.

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    Smoke rises from the site of anti-government protests, upper center, in Kiev, Ukraine.

    Google buying satellite maker Skybox for $500 million

    Google Inc. plans to use Skybox’s satellite already in orbit to supplement the material that it licenses from more than 1,000 sources, including other satellite companies such as DigitalGlobe and Astrium.Eventually, though, Skybox could turn into another Google “moonshot” — a term that CEO Larry Page has embraced for describing ambitious projects that could take several years to materialize.

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    The seafood counter in Whole Foods in Hillsboro, Ore.

    FDA now says pregnant women should eat seafood

    For most people, accumulating mercury from eating seafood isn’t a health risk. But for a decade, the FDA has warned that pregnant or breastfeeding women, those who may become pregnant, and young children avoid certain types of high-mercury fish because of concern that too much could harm a developing brain.

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    Firm wants FDA to declare smokless tobacco safer

    Smokeless tobacco maker Swedish Match is asking the Food and Drug Administration to certify its General-branded pouches of tobacco as less harmful than cigarettes.The company with its North American headquarters in Richmond, Virginia, is filing an application with the FDA to approve the snus products as “modified risk."

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    Man bets 400,000 pounds on Scotland voting against independence

    A man gambled 400,000 pounds ($671,000) on Scots voting to stay in the U.K. in a referendum later this year. Bookmaker William Hill Plc said the stake, placed in London today, was the largest ever political bet.The customer, “who does not have a Scottish accent,” got odds on a No vote on Sept. 18 of 1-4, meaning he stands to make 100,000 pounds if the bet is successful. As a result, William Hill shortened the odds to 1-5, while lengthening those on a Yes vote to 10-3 from 11-4, the company said in an emailed statement today.The wager is twice the previous record bet of 200,000 pounds, also on Scots rejecting independence and opting to remain in the 307-year-old union, William Hill said.Opinion polls in recent months showed people warming to independence though they are still outnumbered by those preferring the status quo. All three main U.K. political parties have declared their intention to give Scotland more financial power should they vote against full autonomy as they try to arrest the progress of the nationalist campaign.Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown, a Scot, said yesterday that home rule for Scotland within the U.K. will be a minimum as the country moves away from a unitary state.Ladbrokes Plc, the other of the two largest U.K. bookmakers, offers odds of 1-4 for a No vote and 3-1 for Scotland deciding to go it alone, the company’s website shows.

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    Japan Olympics organizers review Tokyo 2020 plans

    TOKYO — Japan’s Olympics organizers said Tuesday they are reviewing their plans for the venues of Tokyo’s 2020 Summer Games due to concerns about cost.Tokyo Gov. Yoichi Masuzoe told a city assembly meeting that the overall plan for the venues needs to be revised. “We must respond to concerns over rising facilities costs, including rising costs for labor and construction materials,” Masuzoe said. “We will review the plan as soon as possible from that point of view and revise what needs to be revised appropriately and promptly so that there will be no obstacles for the preparations for the games,” he said.Japan has already informed the International Olympic Committee about its intention to review and revise its plans, the broadcaster NHK cited Masuzoe as saying. Yoshiro Mori, a former prime minister and rugby enthusiast who heads Tokyo’s Olympic committee, issued a statement saying that Masuzoe and other members of the committee agree on the need to revise the plan for the venues.The statement did not refer specifically to plans to replace Tokyo’s National Stadium with a colossal, 80,000-seat facility, the centerpiece of the city’s Olympics bid. The proposed new stadium has caused protests over its size, cost and design. The Japan Sports Council has already scaled back its original proposal to spend 300 billion yen ($3 billion) on a 75-meter-tall stadium to a still-hefty 169 billion yen ($1.7 billion). It recently presented its plans for the stadium to the Olympics organizers, saying it did not envision revising the basic design concept but would take other concerns into consideration. Mori said the Tokyo committee was dedicated to creating a “legacy of sports-centered and affluent, healthy living spaces.” Tokyo, the 1964 Summer Olympics host, failed in a bid to host in 2016 but won the right to host the games in 2020 with a plan emphasizing the city’s safety and advanced infrastructure. Of the 33 competition venues, 28 will be within 5 miles (8 kilometers) of the Olympic Village, which will be built on reclaimed land in Tokyo Bay.

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    Facebook’s “Trending World Cup” special feature. Available on the Web as well as mobile devices, the hub will include the latest scores, game highlights as well as a feed with tournament-related posts from friends, players and teams.

    Facebook, Twitter brace for World Cup fever

    This year’s World Cup will play out on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and messaging apps like WhatsApp just as it progresses in stadiums from Sao Paulo to Rio De Janeiro. On Tuesday, Facebook is adding new features to help fans follow the World Cup — the world’s most widely viewed sporting event — which takes place in Brazil from June 12 to July 13.

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    Investors might be surprised to learn that they have a lot riding on something that they pay very little attention to: macro-prudential regulation, or what central banks and other government agencies do to reduce the risk of systemic financial disasters.

    What if the Fed has created a new bubble?

    Investors might be surprised to learn that they have a lot riding on something that they pay very little attention to: macro-prudential regulation, or what central banks and other government agencies do to reduce the risk of systemic financial disasters. The aim of such regulation is to lower both the probability and potential costs of financial accidents.

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    Ukraine’s First Deputy Tax Minister of Revenue and Duties Ihor Bilous says that a massive tax scam overseen by his predecessors squeezed billions of dollars out of his country’s budget.

    AP: Tax cheats took billions from Ukraine

    As Ukraine’s tax chief tells it, the billion-dollar theft was planned at a see-through plastic table in a vault of sound-proof steel. The table and six matching transparent chairs sit in a secret chamber on an upper story of the Tax Ministry in Kiev. It was the epicenter, he and other tax officials say, of a massive fraud suspected of squeezing $11 billion from Kiev’s coffers over the past three years.

  •  
    East Dundee appealed its dismissed lawsuit against Carpentersville and Wal-Mart to the Illinois Supreme Court this week. The retailer has announced plans to close its East Dundee store, above, and build a supercenter in neighboring Carpentersville.

    East Dundee appeals Wal-Mart case to state Supreme Court

    East Dundee didn’t waste time opening another legal salvo against Carpentersville to block Wal-Mart’s planned move to the neighboring village. Wednesday, East Dundee appealed its dismissed case against Carpentersville and the retailer to the Illinois Supreme Court.

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    The Bank of England is testing lenders’ defenses against cyber-attacks by mimicking hackers’ own techniques as online criminals grow more sophisticated.

    Bank of England mimics cybercriminals to test security

    The Bank of England is testing lenders’ defenses against cyber-attacks by mimicking hackers’ own techniques as online criminals grow more sophisticated. The BOE will “bring together the best available threat intelligence from government and elsewhere” to improve information sharing and cyber-attack testing, Andrew Gracie, the central bank’s executive director for bank resolution, said.

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    AT&T Inc., Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Facebook Inc. and other companies are embracing software to run their networks -- a shift that poses a challenge to hardware makers led by Cisco Systems Inc.

    Cisco challenged as Facebook favors software to move data

    AT&T Inc., Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Facebook Inc. and other companies are embracing software to run their networks -- a shift that poses a challenge to hardware makers led by Cisco Systems Inc. Instead of buying expensive new routers and switches that move Internet traffic, they’re opting for networks that rely more on software and inexpensive hardware.

  •  
    RadioShack’s first-quarter loss widened and revenue slumped as the retailer dealt with weakness in its mobile business and consumer electronics.

    Weakness in mobile business hurts RadioShack 1Q

    RadioShack’s first-quarter loss widened and revenue slumped as the retailer dealt with weakness in its mobile business and consumer electronics. Its performance missed Wall Street’s view. The stock dropped more than 18 percent in premarket trading on Tuesday.

  •  
    North Chicago-based AbbVie will participate in the Goldman Sachs 35th Annual Global Healthcare Conference on Wednesday, June 11.

    Abbvie to present at Goldman Sachs healthcare conference

    North Chicago-based AbbVie will participate in the Goldman Sachs 35th Annual Global Healthcare Conference on Wednesday, June 11. Bill Chase, executive vice president and chief financial officer, will take part in a question and answer session at 10:40 a.m. Central time.A live audio webcast of the question and answer session will be accessible through AbbVie’s Investor Relations Web site at www.abbvieinvestor.com.  An archived edition of the session will be available later that day.AbbVie is a global, research-based biopharmaceutical company formed in 2013 following separation from Abbott Laboratories. The company’s mission is develop and market advanced therapies that address serious diseases.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Freeze-dried corn is the star of Stetson Chopped Salad, one of Penny Kazmier’s favorite summer salads.

    Stetson Chopped Salad
    Stetson Chopped Salad is Penny Kazmier's newest summer salad obsession.

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    “Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World’s Most Versatile Ingredient” by Michael Ruhlman

    Lean and lovin’ it: Celebrate eggs and the many ways to cook them

    Don Mauer dives into Michael Ruhlman’s new book “Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World’s Most Versatile Ingredient.” (Little Brown, 2014) He says it's egg-actly the book you need to learn about cooking eggs. While seemingly simple — it’s just a yolk and a white — an egg can be made and used in more ways than you might think.

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    June is the month for wedding dilemmas

    June does this to my inbox. Q. I would like to invite one of my good college friends to be in my wedding party. I’m in the awkward position of inviting someone to be in my wedding when he didn’t even invite me to his. Do I need to broach this, or just invite who I want to invite?

  •  
    Sue Cortesi has learned how to stretch the family meal budget still load the dinner table with bold flavors.

    Mount Prospect mom finds success on recipe contest circuit

    Remember last January? (Here's a hint: cold, snow and ice, repeat.) Well, while we were busy shoveling our driveways for the umpteenth time, Sue Cortesi of Mount Prospect, and her husband, were winging their way to sunny California. Sue's recipe for Moroccan Lamb Bolognese took the grand prize in a recipe contest held by Kenwood Vineyards, garnering an all-expenses paid trip to Napa Valley.

  •  
    FX Networks says that Tracy Morgan’s new series is waiting for him once he’s well. His half-hour comedy was scheduled to start filming in August for a January premiere on the FXX network.

    FX: Morgan’s show waiting for him once he’s well

    FX Networks says that Tracy Morgan’s new series is waiting for him once he’s well, but that his recovery is all that matters now. Tuesday’s statement updates the status of the TV project planned for the comic who was critically injured in a highway crash Saturday in New Jersey.

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    Dietary changes mean friendship may be off the table

    Ever since her good friend changed her dietary habits, the couples haven't been able to go out to dine without a sermon on the benefits of the new diet plan. Carolyn Hax says instead of ending the friendship, be honest.

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    One witness to the aftermath of the fatal New Jersey Turnpike crash that also injured comedian Tracy Morgan described the scene as “terrible.”

    911 calls released in Tracy Morgan limo crash

    One witness to the aftermath of the fatal New Jersey Turnpike crash that also injured comedian Tracy Morgan described the scene as “terrible.” State police released a portion of three 911 calls on Tuesday. One of the callers reports a “terrible accident” with a vehicle flipped over onto its side.

  •  
    Terry Hayes’ “I Am Pilgrim” is a compelling thriller.

    ‘I Am Pilgrim’ may be one of the year’s best

    A man with ties to a top-secret unit of the federal government has to fight his instincts to stop a madman in Terry Hayes’ compelling thriller “I Am Pilgrim.” The man goes by the name of Pilgrim. He’s had so many aliases over the years that he has no memory of his real name or identity. Pilgrim is thrust into a conspiracy that forces the president of the United States to rely on him to save the world.

  •  
    Lil’ Kim is now a mother.

    Rapper Lil Kim gives birth to girl, Royal Reign

    Lil Kim has a lil one of her own: The rapper is now a mother. Lil Kim’s assistant, Noel Perez, confirms that the 38-year-old gave birth to daughter Royal Reign on Monday. It is her first child.

  •  
    Electronic Arts is testing its latest “Battlefield: Hardline” game at E3.

    EA launches ‘Battlefield Hardline’ beta at E3

    Electronic Arts is testing out its latest “Battlefield” game at E3. The video game publisher surprised Electronic Entertainment Expo attendees by announcing it was launching the online beta test for “Battlefield Hardline” on Monday after its presentation at the game industry’s annual trade show. The upcoming first-person shooter trades the franchise’s war-torn locales and military conflicts for an urban assault featuring cops and robbers in the streets of Los Angeles and Miami.

  •  
    Paul McCartney announced Monday tour stops scheduled for mid-June will be postponed to October.

    McCartney postpones some U.S. tour dates to recover

    Paul McCartney is rescheduling U.S. tour dates as he continues to recover from a virus he received treatment for last month. The former Beatles singer announced Monday tour stops scheduled for mid-June will be postponed to October. He was supposed to kick off the U.S. leg of his tour Saturday. Instead his first show will be July 5 in Albany, New York.

  •  

    Frustrating, yes, but better to let a boor expose herself

    Q. What to do, as a full-grown adult, when a classless coward makes a loud, public and derogatory comment about your mother (a FORMER friend of hers) after your unknowing mother walked out of the restaurant, where this person and party were coincidentally seated near us?

  •  
    Sue Cortesi started entering cooking contests because, well, she was cooking anyway. Her miso-marinated grilled chicken and Asian salad pleased her family and the judge.

    Miso-Marinated Chicken Paillards with Asian Salad
    Cook of the Week Sue Cortesi placed in a national cooking contest with her Asian salad and miso-marinated chicken.

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    Lemon Bars
    Cook of the Week Sue Cortesi's Lemon Bars are a famiy favorite. She's often asked for this recipe and she shares it with us today.

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    Warm Lemon Chicken over Panzanella Salad with Basil Aioli
    Cook of the Week Sue Cortesi of Mount Prospect shares her recipe for Warm Lemon Chicken over Panzanella Salad with Basil Aioli. Perfect for summer entertaining.

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    Jack White, “Lazaretto”

    Jack White goes country on second solo CD

    Jack White’s second solo album is steeped in tones of his adopted hometown, Nashville. Lighthearted piano, sprightly fiddle and soulful slide guitar lend a country twang to most of the 11 tracks. White is more open musically on “Lazaretto” than any of his previous works, whether with the White Stripes, Raconteurs, Dead Weather or solo. He shares the vocal spotlight with fiddler-singer Lillie Mae Rische and Ruby Amanfu, who belongs to the Peacocks, an all-female band that backed White while touring for his first solo album, 2012’s “Blunderbuss.”

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    Rihanna attends the CFDA Fashion Awards on Monday, June 2, in New York.

    Fashion awards celebrate modeling diversity

    The Council of Fashion Designers of America is not a governing entity for the fashion industry. But to say the trade organization has sway over the thousands of designers, buyers, publicists and staff members who create and disseminate fashion in the United States would be a gross understatement. “Technically they really can’t tell anyone what to do, that is not what they are,” Bethann Hardison, this year’s recipient of the founder’s award in honor of Eleanor Lambert, says of CFDA. “But they have a natural influence.”

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    Military veterans and meditation/yoga advocates get together last month at Arlington National Cemetery’s Women’s Memorial.

    New Age healing for trauma of war

    The growing popularity of practices such as yoga and meditation is pushing some to demand more from the military. They want more options for the one-third of veterans who say their mental and emotional health is worse than when they were deployed.

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    Rheinhardt Harrison, 10, of Falls Church, Va., ran his first half-marathon in 1:35:02. The time, believed to be a world record for his age, is awaiting certification.

    Running provides a ‘sense of self’ to young athlete

    Rheinhardt Harrison is such a typical, hyperactive 10-year-old suburban boy — loves basketball and Xbox, grossed out by onions and girls — that it’s easy to overlook that he is one of the fastest 10-year-old distance runners in the world, ever.

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    Luke Bryan performs at the iHeartRadio Music Awards at the Shrine Auditorium in May in Los Angeles. When Eric Church first saw the video of Luke Bryan’s nasty fall from a stage in Charlotte, N.C., on May 29, 2014, his first thought was to call his friend and make sure he was OK.

    Luke Bryan’s not the only star to take a tumble

    When Eric Church saw video of Luke Bryan’s nasty fall from the stage last week, his first thought was to reach out to his friend and make sure he was OK. While everybody could chuckle afterward — it was the talk of Nashville during the CMT Awards and CMA Music Fest — Bryan’s fall onto the metal security stanchion underscored the dangers involved with live performances. “Luke’s lucky he didn’t break his neck,” Church said. “... It’s pretty nasty, the way he went into it. When you first see it, you’re like, ‘Oh, no, he might be really hurt there.’ But then he pops up.”

Discuss

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    Editorial: Can Facebook post lead to help for the very poor?
    A Daily Herald editorial says a local mayor's Facebook post about panhandling can be a starting point for a discussion about helping the very poor in our midst.

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    A farewell to friends

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: You know how it goes. You lose track of friends and then one day, someone gets in touch to say the friend has left us to our mortal pursuits.Two such messages came recently within the span of a few days.

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    Marine in Mexico a disgrace for U.S.
    An Elgin letter to the editor: I am so outraged, as every American should be, about Andrew Tahmooressi, a brave Marine being held in a Mexican jail because he made a wrong turn and ended up in Mexico instead of heading home to San Diego, California.

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    Stick to your guns, forest preserve
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: President Dewey Perotti and his DuPage Forest Preserve Board of Commissioners have done a great job over the years denying requests for forest preserve land from government bodies, developers, and special interest groups.

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    Make higher education for all a priority
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: The time has come for the United States to take a bold step forward. We should make a four-year college degree free for all citizens.

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    Wrigley’s 100th year already marred
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: People are talking about the 100th anniversary and the proposed signage at Wrigley Field, but let’s remember that with just under one-third of the season completed, the Cubs are on track to lose 100+ games this year. They have won fewer games than any team in either league.

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    Some superintendents pensions very sweet
    A Barrington letter to the editor: I read an HYPERLINK "http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20140521/news/140529690/"article by Tax Watchdog Jake Griffin in the paper on May 21. I learned that Superintendent Loren May, who leads a small elementary district in Glendale Heights, was earning $357,117 per year.

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