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Daily Archive : Tuesday June 3, 2014

News

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    Friends and business partners Tyrrell Tomlin, right, and Iran Garcia are working on opening Abe Froeman's, a new eatery at 74 S. Grove Ave. in downtown Elgin, in the spot formerly occupied by On the Side Restaurant.

    Childhood friends opening restaurant in downtown Elgin

    Tyrrell Tomlin and Iran Garcia say they know exactly how to make a hit out of their new eatery in downtown Elgin: offer something that's sorely needed. Their Abe Froeman's will be located at 74 S. Grove Ave., in the spot formerly occupied by On the Side Restaurant.

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    Matthew Martinek

    Put former POW on trial, say parents of Bartlett soldier

    The mother and stepfather of a Bartlett High School graduate who they believe died in Afghanistan while searching for a U.S. soldier held prisoner by the Taliban, are urging the U.S. military to put the former POW on trial when he eventually returns.

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    Rolling Meadows accident victim identified

    A Rolling Meadows woman who died in a car accident on Route 53 Tuesday night has been identified. Tiffany Ensalaco, 34, died as a result of multiple injuries from a car accident, according to officials with the Cook County medical examiner's office.

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    Jeff Engelhardt gets hugs from supporters as his mother, Shelly Engelhardt, wipes away tears after D’Andre Howard was convicted of stabbing to death three members of their family in their Hoffman Estates home five years ago.

    D’Andre Howard guilty in Hoffman Estates murders

    Convicted Tuesday of the 2009 stabbing deaths of three members of his ex-fiance Amanda Engelhardt’s family in their Hoffman Estates home, D’Andre Howard faces mandatory life in prison when he is sentenced, possibly as soon as July 9.

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    Republican Robert Dold, left, opposes Democrat Brad Schneider in the 10th Congressional District.

    Pelosi to appear with Schneider

    U.S. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi will visit Chicago Wednesday to appear with Democratic U.S. Rep. Brad Schneider and other Illinois Democrats running for Congress. The visit is the last stop on bus tour called: “When Women Succeed, America Succeeds: Women on a Roll.”

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    The state lawsuit was filed Monday in Cook County circuit court. It alleges the companies' marketing of opioids for long-term use to treat non-cancer pain was false, misleading and unsupported by science.

    City of Chicago sues over painkiller marketing

    The city of Chicago has filed a lawsuit accusing five drugmakers of deceptively marketing a class of prescription painkiller that can be highly addictive. The state lawsuit was filed Monday in Cook County circuit court. It alleges the companies' marketing of opioids for long-term use to treat non-cancer pain was false, misleading and unsupported by science.

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    Palatine wants to change state wage law

    Members of the Palatine village council took their opposition to a state law on paying contractors one step further than other suburbs by voting Monday to establish a legislative initiative to change the rules altogether. The Prevailing Wage Act requires that contractors pay their workers a state-dictated wage for work on publicly funded projects.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn told reporters Tuesday he is not done working on a state budget.

    Governor says budget still needs work

    Gov. Pat Quinn said the nearly $36 billion budget state lawmakers sent him still needs work and vowed Tuesday to comb through it before signing off. The spending plan doesn't include an extension of the state's 2011 temporary income tax increase, which Quinn had said was necessary to avoid massive cuts to education and other areas. When the tax rolls back in January, it'll create roughly a $1.8...

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    A protester attends a 2013 rally after a House committee hearing on “fracking” legislation at the state Capitol in Springfield. A southern Illinois lawmaker believes fracking could produce jobs in his struggling region.

    Power plant rules stoke Illinois fracking debate

    The newly released federal plan to limit carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants triggered a new line of debate Tuesday over whether fracking in coal-rich southern Illinois may be part of the answer. State Rep. John Bradley, a Marion Democrat who represents an area where mining has been a force for more than a century, believes the Obama administration's draft regulations unveiled...

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    Moody's: Lost tax revenue could hurt Illinois' rating

    A bond rating agency has announced that Illinois' financial rating could take a hit if lawmakers don't extend an income tax increase scheduled to roll back in January. Moody's Investors Service released a statement Tuesday that says allowing the tax rate to drop might force more borrowing and continued overdue bills.

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    A car crashed into a house on the 1100 block of Diamond Lake Road in Mundelein after a short police chase Tuesday morning.

    Victim identified in Island Lake death investigation

    A car that crashed into a Mundelein house Tuesday morning was taken from the home of an Island Lake woman who was found dead the night before, authorities said. Authorities have identified the woman as 48-year-old Karen M. Scavelli. “Preliminary findings as to cause suggest that her death was due to injuries sustained from blunt force trauma,” McHenry County Coroner Anne Majewski said...

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    Maine West coach connected to hazing scandal formally fired

    A former Maine West soccer coach connected to a hazing scandal has been formally fired by the Maine Township High School District 207 board. The action comes almost a year and a half after the board voted to fire Emilio Rodriguez the first time — a decision that Rodriguez appealed, but was upheld by an independent hearing officer in April.

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    The Army may still pursue an investigation that could lead to desertion or other charges against Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was freed from five years of Taliban captivity in a prisoner exchange last weekend, Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said Tuesday.

    Top military officer: Bergdahl case not closed

    The nation’s top military officer said Tuesday the Army could still throw the book at Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the young soldier who walked away from his unit in the mountains of eastern Afghanistan and into five years of captivity by the Taliban. Charges are still a possibility, Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told The Associated Press as criticism mounted in...

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    Former South Dakota Gov. Mike Rounds waves to motorists, as he campaigned Tuesday in Sioux Falls, S.D. Rounds won the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate — and instantly became the favorite to pick up a seat for the GOP in its drive to capture a majority this fall.

    Tight race in Mississippi GOP primary

    Six-term Republican Sen. Thad Cochran and tea party-backed challenger Chris McDaniel dueled at close quarters in Mississippi’s primary election Tuesday night, an epic struggle in a party divided along ideological lines. GOP governors in South Dakota and Alabama coasted to renomination. On the busiest night of the primary season, former South Dakota Gov. Mike Rounds won the Republican...

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    Car windows are blown out at a car dealership in Blair, Nebraska, following a severe thunderstorm. Storms packing large hail and heavy rain rolled into Nebraska and Iowa on Tuesday.

    Storms hit Midwest, ‘dangerous evening’ forecast

    Homes and cars in parts of Nebraska and Iowa were pummeled Tuesday by baseball-sized hail and damaging winds as potentially dangerous storms targeted a swath of the Midwest, including the Omaha area, where flooding left dozens of drivers stranded and prompted home evacuations.

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    Carleen Sliwa, right, hugs Emily Rosemann as alumni of Pleviak Elementary School got a chance to say goodbye to the building during an open house Tuesday in Lake Villa.

    Pleviak Elementary hosts open house before closing

    There was not an empty parking spot in the lot as many generations of the Pleviak community filed in and out to say a final goodbye Tuesday to the beloved 100-year-old school in Lake Villa. “I wish that I could take a brick out of the wall,” said Bob Weber, who began at Pleviak in first grade and graduated from eighth grade in 1958.

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    Sen. John McCain and three other GOP senators introduced a bill Tuesday that would give veterans more flexibility to see a private doctor if they are forced to wait too long for an appointment at a VA hospital or clinic.

    Illinois among states with VA unauthorized waiting list

    The problems with delayed care and unauthorized wait lists that caused a furor at a Veterans Affairs health care campus in Arizona existed at several facilities in the Midwest, including Illinois, but in much smaller numbers, VA officials said in letters to two U.S. senators.

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    President Barack Obama and Poland’s President Bronislaw Komorowski make statements and meet with U.S. and Polish troops at an event featuring four F-16 fighter jets, two American and two Polish, as part of multinational military exercises, in Warsaw on Tuesday.

    Obama: U.S. to boost military presence in Europe

    President Barack Obama pledged Tuesday to boost U.S. military deployments and exercises throughout Europe, an effort costing as much as $1 billion to demonstrate American solidarity with a continent rattled by Russia’s intervention in Ukraine. But even as Obama warned that Moscow could face further punishments, leaders of Britain, France and Germany were lining up to meet with Russian...

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    An emotional Jeff Engelhardt and his mother, Shelly, talk about the verdict after D’Andre Howard was found guilty of murdering three members of the Engelhardt family.

    Engelhardt family feels ‘absolute relief’ about guilty verdict

    Jeff Engelhardt paused for a minute when asked what he’d say to D’Andre Howard, his sister’s former fiance convicted Tuesday of killing his other sister, father and grandmother.“I would say, he took away three great people,” said Engelhardt. "I don’t know if he feels regret for us, or who he may feel sorry for, but he should feel sorry for his daughter...

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    Tommy McBurney

    Man accused of setting Elgin Tower Building fire

    A homeless man has been charged with setting a May 11 fire at the Elgin Tower Building.

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    Portions of Route 59 in Naperville to be closed over weekend

    A portion of Route 59 in Naperville will be closed in both directions for three days beginning Friday night near the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad underpass to allow crews to install a box culvert beneath the often-congested state road, city officials said Tuesday. "I don’t like having to shut the whole thing down,” said Bill Novack, director of transportation, engineering...

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    One injured in six-car crash

    A rear-end collision involving six cars ended with one patient being transported.

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    Schaumburg fire fighters tackle a fire Tuesday morning at the Taurus Tool and Engineering Inc. on the 500 block of Estes Avenue in Schaumburg.

    Fire damages industrial building in Schaumburg

    A fire at the Taurus Tool and Engineering company forced the closure of Estes Avenue in Schaumburg between Wright and Mitchell avenues Tuesday morning and the business itself for the near future. Schaumburg Deputy Fire Chief William Spencer said eyewitness accounts helped confirm that the fire started in a machine at the back of the one-story industrial building after it froze up and the motor...

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    The volume of email cloaked in encryption technology is rapidly rising as Google, Yahoo, Facebook and other major Internet companies try to shield their users’ online communications from government spies and other snoops.

    Volume of encrypted email rising amid spying fears

    The volume of email cloaked in encryption technology is rapidly rising as Google, Yahoo, Facebook and other major Internet companies try to shield their users’ online communications from government spies and other snoops. Google and other companies are now automatically encrypting all email, but that doesn’t ensure confidentiality unless the recipients’ email provider also...

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    This July 30, 2008 photo shows Jeffrey Epstein in custody in West Palm Beach, Fla. Epstein was suspected nearly a decade ago of paying for sex with underage girls. The FBI abruptly dropped its investigation. Now, two women who say they were sexually abused as girls by Epstein are hoping a trove of new documents will get the case reopened.

    Rich man’s accusers press to reopen sex abuse case

    Nearly a decade ago, a wealthy financial guru came under FBI investigation, suspected of sexually abusing dozens of underage girls at his Palm Beach mansion. Then, abruptly, the investigation was dropped and Jeffrey Epstein pleaded guilty to a single state charge of soliciting prostitution. He served just over a year in jail. Now, two women who say they were among his victims have won a...

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    Round Lake Area Unit District 116 has approved its end of a lease for Joseph J. Pleviak Elementary School in Lake Villa.

    Round Lake school board approves Pleviak lease

    Round Lake Area Unit District 116 has approved its end of a lease for Joseph J. Pleviak Elementary School in Lake Villa, which was targeted for shutdown. District 116 Superintendent Constance Collins said the tentative 10-year agreement to rent Pleviak is the best option — financially and educationally — for her school system to upgrade kindergarten instruction.

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    Chinese paramilitary policemen watch visitors during the flag lowering ceremony on the eve of the June 4 anniversary at Tiananmen Square in Beijing Tuesday. Beijing put additional police on the streets and detained government critics Tuesday as part of a security crackdown on the eve of the 25th anniversary of the crushing of pro-democracy protests centered on the capital’s Tiananmen Square.

    Security tight on eve of Tiananmen anniversary

    Beijing put additional police on the streets and detained government critics Tuesday as part of a security crackdown on the eve of the 25th anniversary of the crushing of pro-democracy protests centered on the capital’s Tiananmen Square. Police manned checkpoints, and officers and paramilitary troops patrolled pedestrian overpasses and streets surrounding the square.

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    Thailand’s military rulers said Tuesday they are monitoring a new form of silent resistance to the coup — a three-fingered salute borrowed from “The Hunger Games” — and will arrest those in large groups who ignore warnings to lower their arms.

    ’Hunger Games’ salute used as protest in Thailand

    The three-finger salute from the Hollywood movie “The Hunger Games” is being used as a real symbol of resistance in Thailand. Protesters against the military coup are flashing the gesture as a silent act of rebellion, and they’re being threatened with arrest if they ignore warnings to stop.

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    A man votes for Syria’s President Bashar Assad, on a ballot stamped with his blood, during the presidential election in Damascus, Syria, Tuesday. Polls opened in government-held areas in Syria amid very tight security Tuesday for the country’s presidential election, a vote that President Bashar Assad is widely expected to win.

    As civil war rages, Syrians vote for president

    Against a backdrop of civil war, tens of thousands of Syrians voted in government-controlled cities and towns Tuesday to give President Bashar Assad a new seven-year mandate, with some even marking the ballots with their own blood. The carefully choreographed election was ignored and even mocked in opposition-held areas of Syria where fighting persisted, with some rebels derisively dropping their...

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    Naperville police investigating suspicious incident at bank

    The Naperville Police Department is investigating a suspicious incident that occurred at a local bank on May 28.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    A front-door window was broken in the 500 block of Maple Lane in Batavia. It was reported at 10:21 a.m. June 2.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Fox blotter

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    District 200 still struggling with power outage
    All classes resumed Tuesday at Wheaton’s Edison Middle School, one day after 30 students were taken to area hospitals when a gas leak and a burning smell caused them to feel sick. The district is, however, still suffering from the power outage, which created a partial loss of electricity at Edison as well as an outage at District 200’s school service center, causing all phone lines...

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    Barrington bank executive wins Athena award

    The Barrington Area Chamber of Commerce named Ellaine Sambo Reyther, of BMO Harris Bank, as the winner of the 2014 Athena Leadership Award at a luncheon on May 29 at the Biltmore Country Club in North Barrington.

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    Bridge work near Huntley begins Monday

    Renovation of the 53-year-old bridge along Main Street near Huntley will begin this weekend. Main Street, between Harmony Road and Coyne Station Road, will be closed to through traffic starting Monday, June 9, through Aug. 8.

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    Kindergartners Jessica Sadowska, left, and Annie Lock compete in the pizza box relays Tuesday during Field Day at Adler Park School in Libertyville. More than 50 parent volunteers helped out with games, including potato hockey relays, pizza box relays and the three-legged race.

    Field Day was fun day at Adler Park School

    Adler Park School students enjoyed a beautiful spring day competing in a variety of athletic games during Field Day at the Libertyville elementary school. Students rotated among various stations to participate in games including pizza box relays, potato hockey relays, three-legged races and ring warrior.

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    New cement is coming to the tollway’s oases.

    Tollway oases to get new parking lots

    Be prepared for parking lot work at Illinois tollway oases this summer.

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    Schaumburg Garden Club holds sale June 7

    The Schaumburg Community Garden Club will hold its Bargain Bulb and Native Plant Sale from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 7 at Spring Valley Nature Center, 1111 E. Schaumburg Road in Schaumburg.

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    Shredding event Saturday in Maine Township

    Maine Township will be host a free document shredding event Saturday in its town hall parking lot. Residents will be able to bring as many as three small grocery-type bags full of paper to shred.

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    Tony Borcia

    Quinn to sign boating safety legislation

    Gov. Pat Quinn plans to sign a trio of boating safety proposals this summer, maybe closing for now a suburban lawmaker’s efforts on the issue two years after her nephew, Tony Borcia of Libertyville, was hit and killed by a boat.

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    Rochel Melka, left, founder and president of Melk and Cookies, listens to the presentation of Grete Gaigalas, an eighth-grader at Monroe Middle School, as she judges her booth Point Up. Nearly 200 eighth-graders from Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200 showcased and pitched their business plans to area business leaders during the 2014 Spring Entrepreneurship Business Expo at Illinois Institute of Technology in Wheaton.

    Dist. 200 middle school students pitch business ideas

    Nearly 200 eighth-graders from Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200 pitched their business plans to area businesspeople during an entrepreneurship expo at the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Wheaton campus Monday.

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    Golf outing to benefit A Safe Place

    Golfers of all abilities are invited to join A Safe Place at its 12th annual golf outing Thursday, June 19, at The Grove in Long Grove. A Safe Place provides emergency shelter, affordable housing, advocacy, and supportive services to survivors of domestic violence and their children.

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    More downtown Round Lake construction Wednesday

    Commuters may want to reconsider driving through downtown Round Lake on Wednesday, June 4, since traffic on Sunset Drive will be reduced to one lane to allow for paving.

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    Get the latest on Lyme disease

    The Lyme Support Network meeting at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, June 4, will feature presentations by Dr. Elizabeth Maloney, an expert and educator on tick-borne diseases and Mike Adam, senior biologist from the Lake County Health Department.

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    Celebrate Flag Day at the Stevenson Center

    The Adlai Stevenson Center on Democracy in Mettawa will host a storytelling and music festival of Flag Day, June 14, featuring the North Suburban Wind Ensemble.

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    Huntley may help fund downtown facade improvements

    Huntley village officials may start a facade improvement grant program to help businesses and property owners in the core downtown area and along the Route 47 corridor. The village could award up to $10,000 in matching funds for renovation projects, said Charlie Nordman, Huntley development services director.

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    The Batavia Overseas Post 1197, Veterans of Foreign Wars, is asking the city of Batavia to rescind its 2009 ban on video gambling. Post leaders say they are losing customers to other social clubs outside the city limits, where video gambling is permitted.

    Batavia VFW asks city to drop ban on video gambling

    Batavia will reconsider its ban on video gambling, at the request of leaders of a Veterans of Foreign Wars post. Dale Richard, past commander of Overseas Post 1197, told the city council Monday the post is losing business at its bar and weekly bingo night to nearby fraternal organizations in unincorporated Kane County, where video gambling is permitted.

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    Budget spurs state education funding talks in Dist. 203

    Discussion of the budget that’s set to take effect July 1 in Naperville Unit District 203 launched talks not so much about local spending, but about state education funding and potential reforms. Naperville Unit District 203 board member Susan Crotty asked what school board members can do to “stand up for our communities,” in light of proposed changes to state education...

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    Naperville Unit District 203 Superintendent Dan Bridges says he is looking to find a community member to be a co-chairman for the district’s diversity committee as it looks to continue welcoming an increasing population of diverse students and recruiting teachers from various backgrounds.

    Dist. 203 targets an environment ‘good for all kids’

    A committee focused on promoting acceptance of growing diversity in Naperville Unit District 203 hosted a forum on equity, got more involved with the DuPage County branch of the NAACP and created a video to help recruit diverse teachers — all within the past year. “They’re having meaningful conversations about inclusive environments,” Superintendent Dan Bridges said...

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    Dean Argiris

    Wheeling delays tax increment financing districts

    Wheeling postponed re-establishing two tax increment financing districts Monday, which also postponed any lawsuit from school districts and the library and park districts that serve the community. The village board must wait for Cook County’s certified equalized assessed valuation for the areas within the districts, said Village Manager Jon Sfondilis. He said after the meeting that...

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    Trevor Willis, 7, sits under a 9-foot Clifford the Big Red Dog exhibit at the Gail Borden Public Library Tuesday in Elgin as his brother, Jonathan, explores the site. The Elgin boys were with their mother, Clara. The 10-site, interactive exhibit officially opens Saturday as part of the library’s summer reading program called Paws to Read.

    Interactive Clifford exhibit towers inside Elgin library

    If a 9-foot-tall Clifford the Big Red Dog isn’t enough to get the attention of children as they enter the Gail Borden Public Library this summer, the nine other huge exhibits that accompany him should be. As part of the library’s summer reading program, a 10-site interactive exhibit on loan from the Minnesota Children’s Museum and Scholastic Inc. will open for children to...

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    The Antioch Theatre in downtown is closed, but a real estate developer said he plans to renovate the 95-year-old facility.

    Antioch officials approve ticket tax to help pay for theater renovations

    The proposed renovation of the shuttered Antioch Theatre now includes a movie ticket tax that would help fund work at the 95-year-old facility.

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    Ibrahim M. Aqel

    Men arrested near Elgin accused of laundering $78K

    A pair of Minnesota men are facing money laundering charges in connection with their weekend arrests on the Jane Addams Tollway near Elgin. Zuhair Abudaya, 45, and Ibrahim Aqel, 45, both of Shoreview, were found Saturday with a van full of chewing tobacco and smoking tobacco that lacked necessary tax stamps, authorities said.

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    Keith Farnham

    Farnham pleads not guilty on child porn charges

    Former state Rep. Keith Farnham pleaded not guilty in federal court Wednesday to child pornography charges. The Elgin Democrat stepped down from his spot in the Illinois House this year soon after his Elgin office and home were searched by federal authorities.

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    Pavel V. Logvin

    Bloomingdale man sentenced on child porn charges

    Pavel V. Logvin of Bloomingdale first stumbled upon child pornography in 2000 by accident, prosecutors said, and eventually his curiosity got the better of him and it became an addiction.

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    DuPage County Board member Don Puchalski, center, explains why he doesn’t believe countywide elected officials should get annual stipends.

    DuPage holds line on salaries, eliminates stipends

    Stipends for three countywide elected officials in DuPage will be eliminated after November’s general election while the salaries of all county leaders will remain unchanged for another 2½ years.

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    Country legend Kenny Rogers will perform Aug. 24 at the Du Quoin State Fair.

    Foreigner, Kenny Rogers slated for Du Quoin fair

    The iconic rock ‘n’ roll band Foreigner will be playing at the Du Quoin State Fair in August. The lineup also includes Kenny Rogers, Travis Tritt and .38 Special.

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    A University of Illinois student takes a photo of the popular Alma Mater statue in April on campus in Urbana. The statue turns 85 next week.

    U of I plans a party for the Alma Mater

    The Alma Mater statue beloved by University of Illinois students and graduates has been back on campus almost two months but the university plans to officially mark her return and her 85th birthday with a party Friday morning.

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    $7,000 reward for info in teacher’s slaying

    Family members of a Chicago public school teacher who was fatally shot in gang crossfire have increased the reward for information in her slaying.

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    No arrests after shootings at laundry

    Chicago police are still searching for a suspect in a shooting outside a laundry that injured six people. Two boys, ages 14 and 16, were among the wounded. The others ranged in age from 27 to 52.

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    Woman found dead in water tank suffered heart attack

    Lake County officials say an elderly woman found dead in a Lake Villa-area water tank died from a heart attack.

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    Abraham Lincoln

    Springfield’s Lincoln Home wants to build archives

    The Lincoln Home Historic Site Room is running out of storage space for thousands of artifacts and documents and administrators say they want the federal government to build an archives center at the Springfield site.

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    Judge allows tapes at bribery trial to be released

    A federal judge in Chicago has agreed to publicly release secret recordings when they’re entered into evidence at an Illinois lawmaker’s bribery trial.

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    Jorge Torrez

    Lake County prosecutors go after ex-Marine on death row

    Prosecutors in Lake County are determined to bring a former Marine back to his home state to stand trial in the slayings of two young girls in Zion even though he’s already facing the death penalty in a federal case in Virginia.

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    The opening of Mundelein’s new village hall is delayed until June 23, officials said, because some elements of the construction aren’t completed.

    Opening of Mundelein’s new village hall delayed until June 23

    The much-anticipated opening of Mundelein’s new village hall has been postponed two weeks because the building at 300 Plaza Circle isn’t yet ready, officials said. The 32,000-square-foot building, which is on a new road just south of Hawley Street, should open to the public June 23. It was supposed to open at noon on June 9.

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    Barrington gears up for Friday’s Relay for Life

    Eradicating cancer is a big cause, and in Barrington that cause is a big deal. The annual Relay For Life, from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. Friday to Saturday, at the Barrington High School community stadium, is being billed as the largest sleepover ever held in Barrington.

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    Mount Prospect concerts on the village green return this weekend.

    Mt. Prospect free Friday night concerts beginning

    Mount Prospect’s series of free Friday night summer concerts begins this week, with the band Beatolution performing from 6 to 8 p.m. on the village green in at village hall, 50 S. Emerson St.

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    JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.com Yuki Kunishina of Hoffman Estates performs on the Taiko Japanese drum during the 2010 Japan Festival at the Forest View Educational Center.

    Japan Festival this weekend in Arlington Heights

    The 32nd Annual Japan Festival, a celebration and demonstration of Japanese culture, will be held this weekend at Forestview Educational Center, 2121 Goebbert Road in Arlington Heights. It will include demonstrations of traditional arts, a marketplace, a pop culture exhibit and a food court. A pop concert will be held Saturday night.

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    Brian Patrick Noone

    Police: Federal drug investigation leads to Naperville man

    A federal task force investigating drug trafficking led Naperville police to a 20-year-old man who now is accused of having more than 600 Xanax pills and planning to sell them, authorities said Tuesday. Brian Patrick Noone of the 4100 block of Royal Mews Circle in Naperville was arrested about 7:10 p.m. Friday when the Naperville Police Department’s Special Operations Group and the U.S.

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    Man shows gun during Naperville Subway robbery

    A Subway restaurant on 75th Street in Naperville was robbed at gunpoint about 10 p.m. Monday and a search is on for the suspect, authorities said Tuesday. A man described as tall and thin wearing a black hood, a black scarf over his face and dark pants showed a gun inside the sandwich shop at 931 W. 75th St. and demanded money, authorities said.

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    DuPage County to vote on salaries for elected officials

    The DuPage County Board is expected to vote Tuesday morning on a series of proposals that will set the annual salaries of six county board members and five countywide elected officials. Four-year pay schedules must be established for the county board chairman, sheriff, treasurer, clerk, regional superintendent of schools and the county board members.

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    Rescue workers take a stabbing victim to the ambulance in Waukesha, Wis. Two 12-year-old Wisconsin girls accused of stabbing their friend nearly to death in the woods to please a fictional character struggled to decide who should actually do the deed and expressed at least some regret to detectives, according to court documents.

    Police: Wisconsin girls charged in stabbing expressed regret

    Two 12-year-old Wisconsin girls accused of stabbing their friend nearly to death in the woods to please a fictional character struggled to decide who should actually do the deed and expressed at least some regret to detectives, according to court documents.

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    The 15 Annual Ray Bradbury Dandelion Wine Fine Arts Festival will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 7, at Bowen Park in Waukegan.

    Waukegan hosts annual Ray Bradbury festival

    The 15th Annual Ray Bradbury Dandelion Wine Fine Arts Festival will be held in Bowen Park in Waukegan Saturday, June 7.

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    Arlington Heights to work on new bike-pedestrian plan

    Arlington Heights is working with the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning to create an updated Bicycle-Pedestrian Plan for the village over the next year. The agreement — for the two sides to study existing conditions and best practices for the future — was approved by the village board on Monday. The partnership will not come at any cost to the village, but implementing...

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    The new police contract in Des Plaines is retroactive to Jan. 1, 2012 and includes smaller salary increases and changes in health and dental insurance costs.

    Smaller raises in Des Plaines police's 5-year contract

    Des Plaines city officials and its largest police union have agreed to a new five-year labor agreement that comes more than two years after the old contract expired. Negotiating teams for the city and the officers, represented by Metropolitan Alliance of Police Union Local 240, started discussions over a new contract in August 2011, months before the old three-year agreement was due to expire.

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    Website posts disclaimer after Wisconsin stabbing

    An administrator of a horror website says in an online posting that the stories published on the site are fiction and the site does not endorse the actions of two Wisconsin girls accused of trying to kill one of their classmates.

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    U.S. to revive panel on domestic terror threats

    The Justice Department is reviving a task force dedicated to preventing acts of domestic terrorism. Officials say the reconstituted panel will include national security lawyers from the Justice Department and representatives from the FBI, among other agencies.

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    Climbing guide Matthew Hegeman was the lead guide and one of six climbers who likely plummeted to their deaths high on snow-capped Mount Rainier in Washington state.

    Missing climbers traveled far to ascend Rainier

    The climbers who likely died on snow-capped Mount Rainier in Washington state this week traveled from as far as Singapore and Minnesota to ascend the 14,410-foot glaciated peak. The mountain, southeast of Seattle, is popular with climbers of all abilities, but the victims in last week’s climbing accident — two guides and four clients — were experienced climbers who were...

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    Tara Cowan of Euless, Texas, a member of Open Carry Tarrant County, poses for a portrait with a Saiga 556 rifle as she and members of the group Open Carry Tarrant County gathered for a demonstration, Thursday, May 29, 2014, in Haltom City, Texas.

    NRA calls ‘open carry’ rallies ‘downright weird’

    Companies, customers and others critical of Texas gun rights advocates who have brought military-style assault rifles into businesses as part of demonstrations supporting “open carry” gun rights now have a surprising ally: the National Rifle Association. “Using guns merely to draw attention to yourself in public not only defies common sense, it shows a lack of consideration...

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    Caitlyn Faircloth, a worker with Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream, hands out free ice cream next to a tip jar, Monday, June 2, 2014, at a rally celebrating the passage of a $15 minimum wage measure outside Seattle City Hall in Seattle.

    Seattle raises minimum wage; will others follow?

    Seattle activists celebrated a successful campaign to gradually increase the city’s minimum wage to $15 by calling for a national movement to close the income and opportunity gaps between rich and poor. “Seattle may be a hippie city. We may wear socks with our sandals,” but it’s also a city where different progressive groups can work together to bring about change, said...

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    Phased in over the next seven years, Seattle will have the highest minimum wage in America at $15.

    Seattle’s $15 minimum wage: Questions and answers

    The Seattle City Council has approved an ordinance that would raise the city’s minimum wage to $15 an hour, making it the highest in the nation. Here are some questions and answers about the new hourly wage.

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    President Barack Obama brushed aside questions about the circumstances surrounding Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s capture by insurgents in 2009. The United States, he said, has a “sacred” obligation to not leave men and women in uniform behind.

    Obama: Congress consulted on Bergdahl exchange

    President Barack Obama on Tuesday defended his decision to release five Afghan detainees from Guantanamo Bay in exchange for an American soldier’s freedom, saying his administration had consulted with Congress “for some time” about that possibility. Obama also brushed aside questions about the circumstances surrounding Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s capture by insurgents in...

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    Right up until the moment Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was freed, U.S. officials weren’t sure the Taliban would really release the only American soldier held captive in Afghanistan in exchange for high-level militants detained at Guantanamo Bay.

    U.S. worried to very end about Bergdahl’s release

    Right up until the moment Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was freed, U.S. officials weren’t sure the Taliban would really release the only American soldier held captive in Afghanistan in exchange for high-level militants detained at Guantanamo Bay.

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    About one in six teachers in some of the country’s largest public school districts are out of the classroom at least 18 days, or more than 10 percent of the time, for illness, personal reasons and professional development, according to a report out Tuesday that urges districts to make teacher attendance a higher priority.

    Teacher absences cost students, districts

    About one in six teachers in some of the country’s largest public school districts are out of the classroom at least 18 days, or more than 10 percent of the time, for illness, personal reasons and professional development, according to a report out Tuesday that urges districts to make teacher attendance a higher priority.

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    Press material displayed at the Justice Department in Washington before a press conference by U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to announce charges of economic espionage and trade secret theft against five Chinese military officers, all hackers in an international cyber-espionage case.

    Little public action in Chinese cyberspying case
    In the two weeks since the Obama administration, with fanfare, accused five Chinese military officers of hacking into American companies to steal trade secrets, they have yet to be placed on Interpol’s public listing of international fugitives, and there is no evidence that China would even entertain a formal request by the U.S. to extradite them.

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    U.S. home price gains slow in April amid tepid sales

    U.S. home prices rose in April compared with a year earlier, but the increase was the smallest annual gain in 14 months. Price gains have slowed this year as sales have faltered.

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    New York Cardinal Timothy Dolan speaks in Milwaukee following a document release that shed light on the Archdiocese of Milwaukee’s handling of clergy abuse cases during a period that included his leadership. On Monday, June 2, 2014 federal judges in Milwaukee peppered attorneys with questions about how much the bankrupt Archdiocese spends to maintain its cemeteries and whether there is a strong interest in making maintenance funds available to compensate victims of clergy sexual abuse.

    Judges question use of archdiocese trust fund

    Federal appeals court judges on Monday questioned the bankrupt Archdiocese of Milwaukee’s claim that it needs all the money in a $55 million trust fund to maintain its cemeteries and asked whether some could be used to compensate victims of clergy sexual abuse without violating the Catholic faith.

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    Dawn Patrol: Defendant admits ‘wildly slashing’; Cary motorcyclist killed

    Two juveniles blamed for multiple Aurora car burglaries, police say. D'Andre Howard admits to ‘wildly slashing’ family. Cary man dies in motorcycle crash. Arlington Hights Ace welcomes new owner. Wheaton school evacuated after students sickened. Gurnee mayor says don’t encourage panhandlers. Blackhawks ‘shocked’ by overtime loss.

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    U-46 seeks to change law on filling board vacancies

    Elgin Area School District U-46 officials are seeking a change in state law that would allow school districts additional time to fill school board vacancies. The school board approved a resolution Monday night that will be proposed to the Illinois Association of School Boards, which represents local school districts’ interests in Springfield. It seeks to raise the time to fill a school...

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    On the stadium field after their commencement, high school graduates Ross, left, and Ben Constable acquiesce to their parents' request for a photograph. Tradition at their school requires suits instead of caps and gowns.

    Graduations or playoff losses, end signals fresh start

    While we parents talk about graduations being bittersweet moments that surely will make us cry, it seems that few of us actually do. We don't have time to get too sentimental about the past because we are focused so much on the future. For many suburban graduates, commencement is merely the next step toward college, employment, military service or the life lesson that will follow high school.

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    Suncast Corp., a plastic products company in Batavia, is set to receive incentives totaling $7.5 million to stay in the city.

    Batavia OKs incentives to keep Suncast

    Batavia aldermen approved giving incentives that could total more than $7.5 million to Suncast Corp. to keep the plastic-goods manufacturer in town and expanding production. The city will pay for up to $250,000 of work to upgrade electrical service to the plant to accommodate the increased demand from the expansion. "There is no perfect solution," Alderman Lucy Thelin Atac said.

Sports

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    Competitive O’Malley thrives on all-around success for Conant

    Rachel O’Malley calls third base her comfort zone. O’Malley has helped make things quite comfortable for the Conant softball program and its fans the past four years, playing a key part in three Mid-Suburban League championships. She caps off her stellar prep career by being named captain of the Daily Herald’s Northwest softball all-area team.

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    The Brewers’ Mark Reynolds scores as the Cubs’ Wellington Castillo tries to tag him without the ball during the third inning Sunday in Milwaukee.

    Cubs put Castillo on DL, cut Veras

    The Chicago Cubs have put catcher Welington Castillo on the 15-day disabled list because of a rib injury and designated relief pitcher Jose Veras for assignment. The Cubs made the moves before tonight’s game against the Mets.

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    St. Charles East's Sophie Jendrzeczyk (19) and Amanda Hilton (21) scream with teammates as they present their Class 3A girls soccer supersectional plaque after their win over Huntley at Lake Park High School in Roselle on Tuesday.

    St. Charles East headed to state in girls soccer

    According to forward Darcy Cunningham, the word “legacy” was a term the St. Charles East girls soccer team used as far back as two years ago. The Fighting Saints wanted to not only defend the fact they won 8 state cham pionships in the 1990s and their orange and black were the colors of soccer royalty during that time, they want to relive it and assume the throne again. After East's 2-0 shutout over Huntley in the Class 3A Lake Park supersectional Tuesday, the Saints (18-4-2) are heading back to the state finals for the first time since 2007.

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    Harry Caray in 1993

    Harry Caray left behind diary of drinking

    The legendary baseball broadcaster created a record that is a where’s where of Chicago watering holes and who’s who of drinking buddies.

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    White Sox first baseman Jose Abreu hits a 2-run homer against the Dodgers in the first inning Tuesday night, his 17th of the season.

    White Sox feeling much better about themselves

    The White Sox played their 60th game of the season Tuesday night, and Jose Abreu hit another homer. Thanks to the addition of Abreu, the Sox are in much better shape this year than they were in 2013.

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    Girls soccer: Tuesday, June 3 results
    Results of area high school girls soccer games for Tuesday, june 3.

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    Softball: Tuesday, June 3 results
    Results of area high school softball games for Tuesday, June 3.

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    Boys volleyball: Tuesday, June 3 results
    Results of area high school boys volleyball meets for Tuesday, June 3.

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    Baseball: Tuesday, June 3 results
    Results of area high school baseball games for Tuesday, June 3.

  •  
    The Cubs on Tuesday cut relief pitcher Jose Veras, who was 0-1 with an 8.10 ERA and a high WHIP of 1.73.

    Veras out, Cubs’ young relievers in

    The Cubs made a statement Tuesday by designating veteran reliever Jose Veras for assignment, thus ending his short stay with the team. They might have taken an easier path by sending a young pitcher to the minor leagues, but they cut Veras and took the financial hit instead.

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    Warren’s Mitch Maan de Kok (16) celebrates with Zachary Schultz, left, and AJ Ceisel during the Blue Devils’ win over Deerfield in the sectional final Tuesday at Highland Park.

    Warren makes history with state tourney berth

    The Blue Devils’ 19-25, 25-20, 27-25 victory over Deerfield was one for the record books. It sends Warren to the state volleyball finals for the first time in school history.

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    The Cubs’ Nate Schierholtz’s face is coated with shaving cream delivered by Emilio Bonifacio after Schierholtz hit a game-winning single against the New York Mets on Tuesday in Chicago.

    Schierholtz, Cubs beat Mets 2-1 in 9th inning

    Nate Schierholtz hit a two-out game-ending RBI single, after Chris Coghlan homered to tie it in the eighth, and the Chicago Cubs beat the New York Mets 2-1 on Tuesday night. Cubs reliever Hector Rondon (1-1) pitched a scoreless ninth. Curtis Granderson had three hits for the Mets and drove in their run with a sacrifice fly in the first inning.

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    The Blackhawks have every intention of making sure Patrick Kane, left, and Jonathan Toews remain teammates for life in Chicago.

    Toews, Kane are truly Blackhawks mainstays

    Even though he couldn’t be any clearer than saying recently that he wanted Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane to be Blackhawks for life, Hawks’ general manager reiterated that point again Tuesday, saying taking care of his two superstars is job No. 1 this summer.

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    Briggs: Bears’ defense still has long way to go

    Veteran linebacker Lance Briggs says the defense has a long way to go after a 2013 season that was one of the worst in franchise history.

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    White Sox starter Chris Sale shaved his beard, reportedly after a request from manager Robin Ventura, but why was that request required?

    Not exactly a hairy situation for White Sox

    Throwbacks are all the rage in professional sports. That's the only possible explanation for why the White Sox asked Chris Sale to trim his beard, as if this were the 1950s all over again.

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    Blackhawks general manager Stan Bowman

    Blackhawks ready to make changes? Not big ones

    The Blackhawks were a bounce away from winning it all again, so hysterics are unnecessary and, yet, overreactions expected. But the Hawks don’t need a major overhaul.

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    Bears defensive end Lamarr Houston had no trouble showing his emotions as a member of the Oakland Raiders, and he’s already off to a fast start with his new team.

    Houston right in the mix with Bears

    The Bears signed free-agent defensive end Lamarr Houston to a five-year, $35-million contract in March to spark a defense that was horrendous in 2013, and the former Raider is already juicing things up at Halas Hall. During Tuesday's OTA practice, the 6-foot-3, 300-pound Houston tangled with tight end Martellus Bennett.

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    Blackhawks defenseman Nick Leddy remains at a loss for words to describe the final play of the season Sunday, when the puck deflected off his wrist and side into the net as the Kings won 5-4 in overtime.

    Leddy still bemoans season-ending bad bounce

    A couple of days after it happened, Nick Leddy still shakes his head at the way the Blackhawks’ season ended.“Words can’t really describe it — it’s amazing,” the young defenseman said of the Kings’ game-winning goal in overtime Sunday.

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    Boomers’ bats boom big-time

    The Schaumburg Boomers racked up season highs of 9 runs and 13 hits in a 9-6 victory over the Frontier Greys, halting a four game slide in the opener of a six-game homestand Tuesday.

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    Cubs GM talks about draft, Bryant

    The Cubs pick fourth in Thursday's amateur draft, and general manager Jed Hoyer said Tuesday it's likely they'll go pitching heavy throughout but that their pick at No. 4 is a mystery, even to them.

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    Amy Bukovsky (13) of Montini makes it home as Fiona Summers (4) of St. Francis reaches for the ball in the Class 3A Glenbard South sectional semifinals Tuesday.

    Montini even better the 3rd time

    It’s usually difficult to beat a team three times in a season, but Montini is making softball look easy these days. The Broncos defeated Suburban Christian Conference rival St. Francis for a third time this season, winning 11-1 in five innings in Tuesday’s Class 3A Glenbard South sectional semifinal. The Broncos will meet either Lemont or Glenbard South in Saturday’s sectional final.

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    Wedl, Nee powerful for Wauconda

    Kayla Wedl smashed 2 long home runs, while going the distance in the circle, as Wauconda pounded Antioch 11-3 in a Class 3A sectional semifinal at Ridgewood on Tuesday. Lauren Nee also hit a pair of homers to help top-seeded Wauconda (28-8) advance to Saturday’s 11 a.m. final against the winner of Wednesday's game between No. 3 Lakes and No. 2 Grayslake Central.

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    Hot-hitting Glenbard North ousts St. Charles North hard

    Tom Poulin knows a thing or two about the best softball teams in Illinois, and the St. Charles North coach knew he saw one in the opposite dugout Tuesday afternoon in the Class 4A Bartlett sectional semifinals.

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    Warren sketches itself into sectional final scene

    Warren trailed New Trier for much of Tuesday's Stevenson softball sectional semifinal, but the Blue Devils rallied to tie it in the sixth inning and got a run to win it 3-2 in the ninth.

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    Burlington Central head coach Wade Maisto, kneeling at far left, meets with his team in the outfield under the scoreboard that shows their loss to Sterling Tuesday in the Class 3A Marengo sectional semifinal game. Maisto is stepping down as the Rockets’ coach.

    Maisto steps down at Burlington Central

    Wade Maisto might coach softball again, but it won’t be as Burlington Central’s head varsity coach. Just hours before the Rockets lost 8-7 in eight innings to Sterling Tuesday in the Class 3A Marengo sectional semifinals, Maisto submitted his letter of resignation as the program’s head coach.

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    Burlington Central pitcher Brooke Gaylord takes off her face mask after Sterling scored the winning run in the eighth inning Tuesday in the Class 3A Marengo sectional semifinal game. Gaylord hit two home runs in the game, including a two-run homer to tie the score in the seventh inning and send it to extra innings.

    Sterling beats Burlington Central in 8 innings

    Sterling’s softball team sure does know how to come from behind when it plays on Marengo’s field. The last time the Golden Warriors played at Marengo before Tuesday’s Class 3A sectional semifinal against Burlington Central was the 2013 sectional championship game, which they won over host Marengo in walk off fashion. Well, Sterling did it again on Tuesday. Sophomore Abri Hale’s double to the base of the fence with two outs in the bottom of the eighth inning scored Nadia Trujillo with the game-winning run as the Warriors defeated Central 8-7 to move on to Saturday’s sectional title game against the winner of Wednesday’s semifinal between Marengo and Belvidere.

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    Naperville Central moves into sectional final

    The Bolingbrook softball team, seeded ninth in the Class 4A Oswego East sectional, shook that sectional up big-time Saturday with an upset of top-seeded and 30-win Benet. So fourth-seeded Naperville Central had another big challenge in front of it when the Redhawks and Raiders met Tuesday in the first sectional semifinal. But there were no surprises for Naperville Central (27-7), and a 3-run fifth inning helped the Redhawks prevail 6-1 and advance to the 11 a.m. Saturday final against the winner of Wednesday’s second semifinal between second-seeded Downers Grove South and third-seeded Downers Grove North.

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    Fast-starting Lake Park leaves Barrington behind

    Memories of slow starts were haunting Lake Park when the Lancers took to the court in Tuesday’s boys volleyball sectional final against Barrington at Conant. “So many times this year we’ve lost game one of matches, only to come back and win,” said Lancers coach Tim Murphy. “We knew we couldn’t do that tonight." Backed by a large crowd, which was roaring on almost every point, Lake Park reversed recent history by storming out of the gate. The Lancers built up big leads in both sets and hung on for a 25-17, 25-21 sectional title victory.

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    MSL West’s best prepare for sectional tests

    They were the first and second-place teams in a tough Mid-Suburban West softball conference this season. Now Conant and Barrington are the only two Cook County area teams remaining in the IHSA state tournament. The Mid-Suburban champion Cougars, coached by 14-year veteran CathyAnn Smith, head to the Bartlett sectional with the No. 2 seed and 25-5 record while Barrington coach Perry Peterson, a veteran of 22 seasons, takes the Fillies to the Jacobs sectional with a record of 25-11.

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    New Trier’s Kelly Maday, left, tries to direct the ball past Barrington’s Carrie Caplan during the Class 3A supersectional game at Hersey on Tuesday.

    New Trier stops Barrington

    The Hersey girls soccer supersectional between Barrington and New Trier ended as these things usually do: with contrasting joy and sadness. And and at the final whistle, the first player joyfully embraced by her teammates was New Trier’s Kelly Maday. The player of the match for New Trier drove in the game-winner four minutes from time to give the Trevians (29-1-0) a 1-0 victory and a berth in the Class 3A state semifinals Friday night in Naperville at North Central College. New Trier meets Waubonsie Valley in its matchup at 7 p.m.

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    Quinn to be AD at Naperville North

    Literally and figuratively, Bob Quinn is coming home.At Monday’s Naperville Unit District 203 Board Meeting, Quinn was approved to become Naperville North’s new athletic director. He replaces Jim Konrad, who stepped down to work in the deans’ office so he’ll be able to return to coaching soccer.

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    Dan Marino

    Marino says he’s withdrawing from concussion suit

    Dan Marino says he inadvertently became a plaintiff in a concussion lawsuit against the NFL and is withdrawing immediately. The Hall of Fame quarterback said he doesn’t suffer any effects from head injuries. “Within the last year I authorized a claim to be filed on my behalf, just in case I needed future medical coverage to protect me and my family in the event I later suffered from the effects of head trauma,” Marino said in a statement Tuesday. “I did not realize I would be automatically listed as a plaintiff."

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    Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling was banned for life and fined $2.5 million by the NBA for racist remarks.

    Donald Sterling hit with lawsuit

    Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling is being sued by a woman who alleges that while she was employed by him, they had a romantic relationship and that he subjected her to racially and sexually offensive comments.

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    Maria Sharapova celebrates scoring a point during her quarterfinal match against Garbine Muguruza on Tuesday at the French Open in Paris.

    Sharapova, Djokovic advance to French Open semis
    Maria Sharapova will meet Eugenie Bouchard in the semifnals of the French Open. On the men's side, Novak Djokovic advanced to face Ernests Gulbis in the semis at Roland Garros.

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    Chris Froome won the 2013 Tour de France.

    Froome to defend title at Criterium du Dauphine

    Team Sky bitter rivals Chris Froome and Bradley Wiggins will warm up for the Tour de France in different races. Froome, the defending Tour champion, will put the finishing touches to his preparation by competing at the Criterium du Dauphine from June 8-15, while Wiggins, the first British rider to win cycling’s showpiece event two years ago, will use the Tour de Suisse as a tuneup.

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    Bears sign Edwards, Spurlock

    The Chicago Bears have signed kick returners/receivers Armanti Edwards and Micheal Spurlock and reached an injury settlement with receiver Domenik Hixon.

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    Jeff Larentowicz, who played for three seasons with Colorado, returns Wednesday with his Fire teammates to play the Rapids in a Major League Soccer match.

    Fire shoots to snare a couple of wins before World Cup break

    With two games left before Major League Soccer takes a break for the World Cup, the Chicago Fire would love to get a couple of wins and finally get some momentum going.

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    Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo reacts after being selected as the 62nd pick by the New England Patriots in the second round of the 2014 NFL Draft in New York.

    Patriots sign 2nd-round pick QB Garoppolo

    The New England Patriots signed second-round draft choice QB Jimmy Garoppolo to four-year contract. Garoppolo was the top player in FBS last season at Eastern Illinois, winning the Walter Payton Award. He is likely to be New England’s third quarterback behind Tom Brady and Ryan Mallett.

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    While Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford won't get to defend the Stanley Cup he helped to win last season, Jonathan Quick will try to help the L.A. Kings win their second title in three years.

    A difficult loss, but Kings deserve some credit

    The Chicago Blackhawks lost in Game 7 to the Los Angeles Kings and Hawks coach Joel Quenneville said it was the toughest game he ever coached. And the Kings, says Mike North, deserve from credit.

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    Rosary’s Gabriella Wagoner gets to a header before Dekalb’s Kayley Garland Tuesday in the Hampshire sectional.

    Images: Daily Herald prep photos of the week
    The Daily Herald Prep Photos of the Week gallery includes the best high school sports images by our photographers featuring softball, volleyball, soccer, track and baseball.

Business

  •  
    Abt Electronics plans to expand its warehouse to accommodate more merchandise and larger appliances.

    Abt Electronics to expand Glenview warehouse

    Abt Electronics and Appliances in Glenview, a retailer of household appliances and electronics, said Tuesday that it plans to expand its warehouse, but no additional jobs are planned. The warehouse will add about 100,000 square feet, bringing the total square footage to just under 450,000 square feet.

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    Among Chicago-based Hillshire Brands' products and food lines are Tyson Chicken Nuggets, left, Hillshire Farm sausage, center, and Pilgrim's Pride.

    Hillshire to talk with Tyson, Pilgrim's Pride

    Chicago-based Hillshire Brands says it will hold separate talks with Pilgrim's Pride and Tyson Foods, as the two meat processing heavyweights engage in a bidding war for the maker of Jimmy Dean sausages and Ball Park hot dogs.

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    Mary Barra, CEO of General Motors, right, and Mark Reuss, executive vice president of Global Product Development for GM and President of GM America, watch the introduction of new Chevrolet cars at the New York International Auto Show April 15. GM’s corporate structure — as well as what Barra has called a culture that valued cost-savings over safety — will likely be a prime target in a report expected this week from former U.S. Attorney Anton Valukas.

    Before recalls, safety was low in GM hierarchy

    To understand how General Motors allowed a problem with a small part to balloon into a crisis, look at the organization chart. As of early last year, the director of vehicle safety was four rungs down the ladder from the CEO, according to a copy of the chart obtained by The Associated Press. Finance, sales and public relations had a direct path to the top.

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    Arthur J. Gallagher is expected to move its international headquarters into the west tower of the Meadows Corporate Center in Rolling Meadows.

    Gallagher headed back to Rolling Meadows

    Arthur J. Gallagher, the large international insurance company, is putting together tax incentives to help it move its headquarters from Itasca to Rolling Meadows. The state of Illinois has a tentative agreement with Gallagher worth about $20 million, and the company is negotiating with Rolling Meadows to establish a tax increment financing district that might be worth $30 million.

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    A boy cycles past cooling towers of a coal-fired power plant in Dadong, Shanxi province, China. China, the biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, has promised to curb its output but with its economy slowing and leaders under pressure to generate jobs, it has resisted binding limits.

    Obama’s emissions plan could boost climate talks

    President Barack Obama’s move to limit U.S. carbon emissions may prompt an important shift by China in its climate policies, where officials are increasingly worried about the costs of pollution anyway, according to a Chinese expert and activists closely following the international negotiations. The initiative may be a crucial move in pressuring Beijing to accept binding goals to cut greenhouse gases, while also allowing the U.S. to start catching up with the European Union in the fight against climate change.

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    The former Pour House on North River Street in East Dundee is being renovated by the partners behind The Blue’s BBQ & Grill, which they plan to open in the location later this summer.

    BBQ restaurant moving to another spot in E. Dundee

    The Blue’s BBQ & Grill, an eatery that planned on opening at 220 N. River St. in East Dundee, will instead set up a block away inside the former Pour House. The restaurant, now slated for 102 N. River St., is moving because the property requires less work for renovations and, as a result, can open sooner.

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    The stock market fell slightly Tuesday, pulling back from record highs the day before. Hillshire Brands jumped as a bidding war for the company heated up, while Krispy Kreme Doughnuts plunged after issuing a disappointing forecast.

    Stocks edge lower; Hillshire bidding war heats up

    The stock market fell slightly Tuesday, pulling back from record highs the day before. Hillshire Brands jumped as a bidding war for the company heated up, while Krispy Kreme Doughnuts plunged after issuing a disappointing forecast.

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    Wendy Harrison, a waitress at the Grill in Seattle, carries food to a table as she works during lunchtime. An Associated Press comparison of the cost of living at several other major U.S. cities found that a $15 minimum wage, like Seattle adopted this week, will make a difference, but won’t buy a lavish lifestyle.

    $15 minimum wage permits few luxuries in U.S. cities

    A $15 minimum wage like the one adopted in Seattle doesn’t buy many luxuries in most American cities. Lattes, theater tickets and cable television will still be out of reach for most minimum-wage workers. But about $31,000 a year should be enough to pay the average rent for a shared one-bedroom apartment, plus utilities, health insurance, groceries and an inexpensive cellphone plan.

  •  
    The Nielsen company, for the first time this season, is measuring how many people are reading Twitter messages about particular TV programs the night they are on the air. Nielsen said Monday, June 2, 2014, that the drug-dealing drama “Breaking Bad,” starring Bryan Cranston had an average of 6 million people seeing tweets for each episode.

    Nielsen now measuring TV show tweets

    The Nielsen company, for the first time, is measuring how many people are reading tweets about particular TV programs the night they are on the air. “Breaking Bad,” the drug-dealing drama starring Bryan Cranston, is the initial champion, with an average of 6 million people seeing tweets during each episode and the three hours both before and after, Nielsen said Monday.

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    The Obama administration unveiled a plan Monday to cut carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by nearly a third over the next 15 years, in a sweeping initiative to curb pollutants blamed for global warming.

    5 things to know about EPA’s power plant rule

    Five things to know about the Obama administration’s plans to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, the chief greenhouse gas, from power plants. How much does it cut? How does it compare? Why power plants? Will it make a dent? What will it mean for Illinois?

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    Steam escapes from Exelon Corp.’s nuclear plant in Byron.

    Power plant plan further clouds coal’s future

    President Barack Obama’s ambitious plan to reduce the gases blamed for global warming from the nation’s power plants gives many coal-dependent states more lenient restrictions and won’t necessarily be the primary reason coal-fired power plants will be retired. If Kentucky, for example, meets the new limits proposed Monday, it would be allowed to release more heat-trapping carbon dioxide per unit of power in 2030 than plants in 34 states do now.

  •  
    The Federal Aviation Administration is considering giving permission to seven movie and television filming companies to use unmanned aircraft for aerial photography, a potentially significant step that could lead to greater relaxation of the agency's ban on commercial use of drones.

    FAA considers approving drones for filming movies

    The Federal Aviation Administration said Monday it is considering giving permission to seven movie and television filming companies to use unmanned aircraft for aerial photography, a potentially significant step that could lead to greater relaxation of the agency's ban on commercial use of drones.

  •  
    Companies bored with a dot-com or dot-net Web address can now spice things up with a dot-Vegas suffix.

    Companies can start registering dot-Vegas domains

    Companies bored with a dot-com or dot-net Web address can now spice things up with a dot-Vegas suffix. Las Vegas-based firm Dot Vegas Inc. is opening up registration Monday for the new domains, which offer registrants a chance at a shorter, more descriptive URL they might not be able to find in the crowded world of more than 100 million dot-com domains.

  •  
    Quality Egg LLC owner Austin “Jack” DeCoster, left, and its chief operating officer, Peter DeCoster.

    Egg titan, son to plead guilty in food safety case

    A self-made titan in the egg production industry, his son and the Iowa company they ran are expected to plead guilty to federal food safety violations stemming from a 2010 salmonella outbreak that sickened thousands.

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    Citing wireless trends AT&T raises rales outlook

    AT&T is boosting its full-year revenue forecast citing strong wireless trends. The company said Tuesday that it expects a second-quarter net addition of more than 800,000 in “post-paid” plans. Those are high-value customers who have contracts or long-term installment plans.

  •  
    Apple senior vice president of Software Engineering Craig Federighi speaks about the Apple HomeKit app at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco, Monday.

    Apple expands into health, home with new software

    Apple is expanding into home and health management as the company tries to turn its iPhones, iPads and Mac computers into an interchangeable network of devices that serve as a hub of people’s increasingly digital lives. The new tools for tracking health and controlling household appliances are part of updated operating systems that Apple unveiled Monday in San Francisco at its 25th annual conference for application developers.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Farmers markets are the perfect place to pick up your favorite vegetables and try some new varieties.

    Tips for getting comfortable with farmers market bounty

    The proliferation in farmers markets is equally wild growth in the variety of produce sold at them. Heirloom tomatoes and carrots in funky colors? That's just the start. Think rainbow-spectrum radishes, unusual peas, beans and legumes; gooseberries and quince.But trying something new — whether it's an unfamiliar vegetable or an exotic preparation — can be intimidating. The best advice is to start slow.

  •  
    Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez at the 56th annual Drama Desk Awards in New York.

    ‘Frozen’ writers behind new show ‘Up Here’

    Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez — the Oscar-winning husband-and-wife team behind the film “Frozen” — are preparing an original romantic comedy for the stage called “Up Here.”

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    Undated picture shows an ear made of human cells grown from samples provided from a distant relative from Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh, in the center for art and media in Karlsruhe, Germany.

    German museum shows live replica of van Gogh’s ear

    A German museum has put on display a copy of Vincent van Gogh’s ear that was grown using some of the Dutch artist’s genetic material.

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    Miranda Lambert releases her fifth album, “Platinum,” this week.

    Miranda Lambert examines joys, struggles on new album

    Miranda Lambert has learned something about human nature since becoming one of country music's most identifiable stars. “People are very, very mean,” she says of the tabloids that have made sport of her life, her looks and her marriage since her husband, Blake Shelton, joined NBC's “The Voice” as a celebrity coach. Lambert's wild ride over the last two years is all over her ambitious, sprawling new album, “Platinum.”

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    Miranda Lambert, “Platinum”

    Miranda Lambert shines on 'Platinum'

    Country star Miranda Lambert describes her fifth album “Platinum” as transitional: She wanted to show the maturity of an award-winning artist who has turned 30 and settled into marriage. But don't worry, she's still the wildest risk-taking Nashville singer roaring through the back roads. She frontloads the new 16-song collection with a saucily slurred lyric about the power of bleach jobs (“What doesn't kill you only makes you blonder” she cracks in “Platinum”) and another that rips a would-be Romeo with a string of putdowns delivered with punkish glee.

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    This CD cover image released by Capitol Records shows “Animal Ambition: An Untamed Desire to Win,” a new release by 50 Cent. (AP Photo/Capitol Records)

    50 Cent shows rust on ‘Animal Ambition’

    50 Cent made a ginormous splash more than a decade ago with his multiplatinum platinum debut “Get Rich or Die Tryin’,” pushing out early career hits from “In da Club” to “P.I.M.P.” But the rapper has been unable to live up to his first album’s success.

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    Dina Lohan won’t go to jail for speeding and driving drunk on a Long Island highway. A judge Tuesday ordered her to pay over $3,000 in fines and fees. She’ll also perform 100 hours of community service and participate in a drunken driving program.

    Dina Lohan avoids jail for drunken driving

    The mother of actress Lindsay Lohan won’t go to jail for speeding and driving drunk on a New York highway. A judge ordered Dina Lohan on Tuesday to pay more than $3,000 in fines and fees. She will also perform 100 hours of community service and participate in an anti-drunken driving program.

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    Don’t get in the middle of a family argument

    Her parents and brother rarely see each other because of a disagreement. Now, her sister-in-law and nephew will be visiting and want to stay with her and only visit the parents for a few hours. Carolyn Hax says help bridge the gap and don't meddle.

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    Oliver Stone will write and direct a film about Edward Snowden, one of two high-profile films in the works about the National Security Agency leaker.

    Oliver Stone to write, direct Edward Snowden film

    Oliver Stone will write and direct a film about Edward Snowden, one of two high-profile films in the works about the National Security Agency leaker. Stone announced Monday that he plans to adapt “The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World’s Most Wanted Man,” a book by Guardian journalist Luke Harding.

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    Fashion Icon Award honoree Rihanna poses with her award at the 2014 CFDA Fashion Awards at Alice Tully Hall on Monday, June 2, 2014, in New York.

    Rihanna honored for style at annual fashion awards

    Fashion rules are made to be broken, Rihanna told a glittering crowd of fashion industry leaders on Monday, and her outfit dramatically conveyed that message: a sheer fishnet gown, sparkling with thousands of embedded crystals, that left little underneath to the imagination. The singer cemented her role as a fashion luminary by receiving the 2014 Fashion Icon Award from the Council of Fashion Designers of America.

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    Actress Angelina Jolie waves as she arrives at a promotion event for her movie “Maleficent” in Shanghai, China Tuesday, June 3, 2014.

    Jolie: We won’t change our security on red carpet

    Angelina Jolie says she and Brad Pitt won’t tighten their security policies during publicity events after he was accosted on the red carpet in Los Angeles. “People like that are an exception to the rule,” she explained. “Most fans are just wonderful. We’ve had a wonderful experience over the years, and we’re very grateful for their support, and it will not change the way we behave.”

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    A spokeswoman for Marvin Gaye III says he underwent surgery at UCLA Medical Center last week and is recovering at home after a successful kidney transplant.

    Marvin Gaye III recovering after kidney transplant

    The son of singer Marvin Gaye is recovering at home after a successful kidney transplant.

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    Los Angeles Police Lt. Andy Nieman says Miley Cyrus’ 2014 luxury sedan was located Monday in Simi Valley, a city located about 45 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles.

    Miley Cyrus’ stolen Maserati located by police

    Police say they have recovered a luxury car that was stolen from Miley Cyrus’ home last week. Los Angeles police Lt. Andy Nieman says Cyrus’ 2014 Maserati was found Monday afternoon in Simi Valley, a city about 45 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles.

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    Hedgehog breeder and trainer Jennifer Crespo, of Gardner, Mass., holds “Circus,” a one-year-old pet hedgehog. Hedgehogs are steadily growing in popularity across the United States, despite laws in at least six states banning or restricting them as pets.

    What you need to know about pet hedgehogs

    A growing number of American homes are keeping African pygmy hedgehogs as pets. Here are some questions and answers about the small animals whose backs and sides are covered with about 6,000 quills that are considerably shorter, but harder and sharper, than those of a porcupine.

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    The International Rose Test Garden in Washington Park in Portland, Ore., was founded during World War I as a way to preserve plants that European hybridists feared might be wiped out in the bombings. This summer marks 100 years since the start of World War I in Europe in 1914.

    Portland rose garden’s history lies in World War I

    Boasting spectacular views of the city skyline and — on a clear day — snow-covered Mount Hood, Portland’s International Rose Test Garden in Washington Park is a refuge from a hectic world. But during World War I, the rose garden offered a refuge of a different sort: It was a preserve for plants that European hybridists feared might be wiped out in the bombings. This summer marks 100 years since the start of World War I in 1914, and while the rose garden did not become a reality until after the U.S. entered the war in 1917, it was proposed not long after the war began.

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    New York drug kingpin James “Ghost” St. Patrick (Omari Hardwick) opens a new nightclub in Starz's “Power.”

    A drug kingpin branches out in Starz's 'Power'

    When the legitimate business is a Manhattan nightclub, consider what the illegitimate one could be. Starz's latest drama, “Power,” from executive producer Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson, who raps the theme song, premieres Saturday, June 7. In it, James “Ghost” St. Patrick (Omari Hardwick) is a New York drug kingpin looking for legitimacy with his new business, a club.

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    Cook of the Week Kate Kent says weekly menu planning for her family of six keeps her from losing control.

    Cook of the Week: Planning key to healthy family dinners

    Kate Kent keeps meals simple for her husband and four daughters. “I like knowing what’s in my food,” the Arlington Heights woman said. “I like knowing what’s going on the table and where the food came from." Kate said planning meals for her large family requires a weekly menu; she notes what to buy at the beginning of the week and when to defrost meats. “I find that without it (a plan) it is so scattered and hectic."

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    Milk and cheese give dinner a boost of protein and carbohydrates; cauliflower ups the nutritional ante with added vitamins.

    Eat right, live well: Milk’s nutritional benefits too important to ignore

    Wondering where you can get high quality protein, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, vitamin A, essential vitamin B12 and riboflavin along with calcium and added vitamin D? In a word: Milk. Registered dietician Toby Smithson tells us more about this nutritional powerhouse.

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    Milk and cheese give dinner a boost of protein and carbohydrates; cauliflower ups the nutritional ante with added vitamins.

    Cauliflower Macaroni and Cheese
    Cauliflower seamlessly fits into macaroni and cheese, improving the dish's nutrition profile and texture.

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    Bison is the meat of choice in Kate Kent’s stuffed squash.

    Bison-Stuffed Squash
    Cook of the Week Kate Kent opts for ground bison in her Stuffed Zucchini.

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    Hummus Chicken
    Hummus and lemon juice keep Kate Kent's chicken nice and moist.

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    Chocolate Drizzled Banana Bites
    Cook of the Week Kate Kent's Chocolate Drizzled Banana Bites are a fun treat.

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    Lucy Hale’s debut country album, “Road Between,” releases Tuesday. She will be performing at the Grand Ole Opry on June 21.

    ‘Little Liars’ star fulfills big dream with country album, Opry appearance

    Lucy Hale’s fans may be clamoring to know whom she’s singing about in her upbeat “Kiss Me” or her breakup anthem “Goodbye Gone,” but the 24-year-old actress isn’t spilling all her secrets in her debut album. Hale is best known for playing Aria Montgomery on ABC Family’s popular teen drama “Pretty Little Liars.” This week she steps into the music world with her debut album, “Road Between.”

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    Water rises from a five-decade-old, green, multitiered fountain on Lake Eola that is the official icon of the city as the sun sets in Orlando, Fla. Every night, passers-by are treated to a six-minute water show from the fountain featuring multicolored bursts of water timed to music.

    5 free things to do in Orlando (no theme parks!)

    It costs close to $100 a person to enter the gates of the Magic Kingdom or board the Hogwarts Express. But there are plenty of things to do in the Orlando area that are free, and none of them has anything to do with theme parks. Unlike coastal Florida, where tourists and locals often mix it up, Orlando’s tourist district is distinctly segregated from where locals tend to go. Free activities require tourists to venture beyond the hotel-tourist attraction-industrial complex that stretches from Universal Studios to Walt Disney World.

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    Bruce Springsteen is unusually prolific, as examined in “Counting Down Bruce Springsteen: His 100 Finest Songs” by Jim Beviglia.

    Blogger tallies Springsteen’s Top 100

    Music blogger Jim Beviglia is trying to do far more than start arguments with his latest book, “Counting Down Bruce Springsteen: His 100 Finest Songs.” He ranks Springsteen’s officially released studio recordings song by song from No. 100, “The E Street Shuffle,” to the predictably No. 1, “Born to Run.” “Sometimes the obvious choice is obvious for a reason,” Beviglia argues in support of his cliched top pick.

Discuss

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    Daily Herald file photo

    Editorial: The silver lining on electricity hikes
    A Daily Herald editorial bemoans coming electricity-bill increases but takes comfort in changes in the system that will help users better manage those costs.

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    Talking himself into a corner

    Columnist Richard Cohen: Like a pitcher who has lost his fastball, Barack Obama has lost “the speech.” The speech has always been central to the president and his presidency. He established his credentials with the one he delivered to the 2004 Democratic National Convention while still a state senator. He followed that with many others — Berlin, Cairo, Philadelphia on race, etc. — each one greeted with bobby soxer delirium, which Obama fully expected. In 2004, just before he spoke to the convention, he told his friend Marty Nesbitt that the excitement about him was yet to peak. “My speech is pretty good,” he allowed.

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    U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth

    Illinois can lead out on pollution fight

    Guest columnist Tammy Duckworth: Slowing carbon pollution is a national security, economic and health issue — and a moral imperative. The president’s landmark Climate Action Plan will improve our economy and set a global example for other nations to follow. I look forward to seeing Illinois take a leading role in implementing strong, effective carbon pollution standards.

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    Harper’s program for disabled valuable
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: I loved theHYPERLINK "http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20140527/news/140528552/" Herald article about the graduates of Harper College’s new program for adults with mild cognitive disabilities. Harper truly is a place with something for everyone, thanks to Dr. Kenneth Ender’s amazing vision.

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    Public pensions are too good a deal
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: Almost every other day there is an article in the Daily Herald about outrageous salaries or pension payouts. Just yesterday there were nine presidents of universities that make — not earn — $1 million a year. What would their pensions be when they retire?

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    FDA too slow to regulate e-cigs
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: The fact that the FDA “proposed” regulating e-cigs, but hasn’t yet, is beyond belief. That they didn’t immediately ban fruity flavors/names that appeal to children is, in my mind, even worse. What were they thinking?

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    Let’s investigate the bigger issues
    A Prospect Heights letter to the editor: I have a question for all those Republicans who want answers pertaining to the Benghazi attack. True, it was a tragedy, but why are there no calls for investigations about the lies we were told about weapons of mass destruction that have cost us about 6,000 GI’s, tens of thousands more wounded, and over a trillion dollars? Besides leaving Iraq in total chaos.

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