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Daily Archive : Sunday January 12, 2014

News

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    An Israeli woman mourns Sunday as she looks at the coffin of late Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon at the Knesset plaza in Jerusalem.

    Israel's Sharon laid to rest in military funeral

    Ariel Sharon was laid to rest Monday at his ranch in southern Israel as the nation bid a final farewell to one of its most colorful and influential leaders — a man venerated by supporters as a warrior and statesman but reviled in the Arab world as a war criminal.

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    A coyote prowls a snow-covered field in the suburbs.

    Warning: Suburban coyotes view your pets as intruders

    It's coyote season in the suburbs: Young males separate from their families and search for their own place to live in preparation for the beginning of mating season. As a result, coyote attacks on ets are more likely. A Wheaton family had a coyote snatched their dog in the front yard, no more than 10 feet from its owner. “What scares me most is that they just don't seem to have the fear of...

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    Amtrak restores nearly all service in Chicago

    Amtrak officials say the rail line is nearly back on track after frigid, snowy weather caused delays and cancellations last week. Amtrak says it plans to restore nearly all service to and from Chicago on Sunday.

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    Kirk, mayors oppose Asian carp proposal

    The Army Corps of Engineers recently released report suggested that “hydrologic separation” of Lake Michigan and the rivers that feed into it would work to eliminate the threat of the invasive Asian carp. Sen. Mark Kirk says separating the waterways from the lake isn't financially responsible.

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    George LeClaire/gleclaire@dailyherald.com Leaning out a second floor window, Mohammad Mohyuddin uses a stick to knock icicles off of his home’s roof in Rolling Meadows on Wednesday.

    Images: The Week in Pictures
    This edition of The Week in Pictures features cold people trying to start cold cars, cold cars left in ditches, and cold icicles hanging in the cold.

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    There are reports that the Cubby Bear North in Lincolnshire closed recently.

    Cubby Bear reportedly closed in Lincolnshire

    There are reports that the Cubby Bear North in Lincolnshire closed its doors recently. A worker at the Cubby Bear Chicago location confirmed the Lincolnshire location had closed, but provided no further comment. Owner George Loukas could not be immediately reached.

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    Will Kruger and Chris Strong sing John Denver’s “Country Roads” song during WinterFest at Volo Bog Natural Area on Sunday. The festival featured bog tours, a snow sculpture contest, a photo contest, winter crafts and live folk music.

    Volo Bog hosts WinterFest

    Sometimes, getting bogged down can be fun. Just ask those who enjoyed Volo Bog WinterFest on Sunday. The event featured snowshoeing, cross-country skiing and snow sculpting, as well as indoor activities and music.

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    Magician Paul Lee introduces his niece Teagan Sunday onstage at the Arcada Theater in St. Charles. He was hosting the third annual Believe in Magic show, sponsored by the National Association for Down Syndrome. Teagan has Down syndrome.

    Tricks a real treat in St. Charles

    Hundreds of people attended the third annual Believe in Magic event Sunday in St. Charles. The event was a fundraiser for the National Association for Down Syndrome, and it included performances by a number of professional magicians from all over the Midwest. The host for the evening was Carol Stream-based magician Paul Lee, whose niece was born with Down syndrome.

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    A supporter of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi and Al-Azhar University female student holds a banner with Arabic that reads, “Al-Azhar University is against the coup,” during clashes with security forces in front of the university in Cairo Sunday.

    Vote on charter defines Egypt’s post-Morsi future

    With a presidential run by Egypt’s powerful military chief seeming more likely by the day, this week’s constitution referendum, to be held amid a massive security force deployment, is widely seen as a vote of confidence in the regime he installed last summer.

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    Archbishop of Quebec Gerald Cyprien Lacroix, shown walking past Pope Benedict XVI after receiving the pallium, is among the 19 new cardinals that Pope Francis announced Sunday.

    Pope names 19 new cardinals, focusing on the poor

    Pope Francis on Sunday named his first batch of cardinals, choosing 19 men from Asia, Africa, and elsewhere, including Haiti and Burkino Faso, to reflect his attention to the poor.

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    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, with Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, is in Paris for a two-day meeting to rally international support for ending the three-year civil war in Syria.

    Top envoys insist Syria peace talks must proceed

    Syria’s Western-backed opposition came under steely pressure Sunday to attend peace talks in just over a week as envoys from 11 countries converged to help restore, and test, credibility of a rebel coalition sapped by vicious infighting and indecision.

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    Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates siad he doesn’t regret anything he said in his new book entitled: “Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary of War.”

    Gates defends new memoir as `an honest account’

    Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates says he doesn’t regret anything he wrote in his controversial new book and calls the memoir “an honest account.” In “Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary of War,” the former Pentagon chief under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama raises questions about Obama’s war leadership and harshly criticizes Vice President Joe Biden.

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    Five people shot in Elgin

    Elgin police are investigating a shooting that injured five people early Sunday morning on the 300 block of North Street.

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    Charles L. Minard

    Aurora man gets chance to fight conviction, 70-year sentence

    Christopher R. House in still in prison, but he has a chance to challenge his conviction and subsequent 70-year sentence for a 2006 murder in Aurora. An appellate court panel recently ruled that House’s petition of ineffective counsel that he filed on his own was improperly dismissed by a Kane County judge.

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    Zachary Aceves, 10, right, of Chicago, plays a game as his older brother Alex, 16, coaches him Sunday at Dave and Buster’s in Addison. They were there for the Leukemia Research Foundation Kids Party. Zachary is a six-year leukemia survivor.

    Leukemia foundation sponsors kids’ party in Addison

    For many of the roughly 50 kids who partied Sunday afternoon at Dave & Buster’s in Addison, it’s not unusual to spend a lot of time visiting doctors or undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatments. But for a few hours on this day, at least, they just got to be kids, playing video and arcade games, dressing up for a photo booth and maybe tackling an arts and crafts project.

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    Missing Streamwood man returns home

    An 80-year-old Streamwood man who was reported missing Wednesday morning has returned home and is doing well, according to police.

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    Items too close to water heater cause Aurora fire

    Two families have been displaced after items stored too close to a water heater started a fire in Aurora Saturday night, according to a news release.

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    The Supreme Court hears arguments Monday in a clash between President Obama and Senate Republicans over the power granted the president in the Constitution to make temporary appointments to fill high-level positions.

    Court weighs president’s recess appointments power

    The Supreme Court hears a case today that is the first in the nation’s history to consider the meaning of the provision of the Constitution that allows the president to make temporary appointments to positions that otherwise require Senate confirmation, but only when the Senate is in recess.

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    Survey: U.S. policies out of touch with changing families

    Are government policies and business practices out of touch with the changing state of American families? A new survey, which is part of a broader examination of the role of women in society, shows that many Americans believe the answer to that question is yes.

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    Yolanda Madrid of Miami, left, talks with navigator Daniela Campos last week while signing up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. The Spanish version of the federal health care website has been beset with problems, much like the English version.

    Health care website frustrates Spanish speakers

    People around the nation who are trying to navigate the Spanish version of the federal health care website have discovered their own set of difficulties.

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    Public works employees assist local residents in South Charleston, W.V., in obtaining bottled water on Sunday morning. A chemical spill Thursday in the Elk River has contaminated the public water supply in nine counties.

    W.Va. water tests encouraging after chemical spill

    This is the dilemma for many West Virginians: Coal and chemical industries provide thousands of good paying jobs but also pose risks for the communities surrounding them. The current emergency began Thursday after a foaming agent used in coal processing escaped from a plant in Charleston and seeped into the Elk River. Since then, residents have been ordered not to use tap water for anything but...

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    Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani said Sunday he finds it “pretty darn credible” that New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie didn’t know about an apparently politically motivated plan to create traffic jams near the George Washington Bridge. Speaking on ABC’s “This Week,” Giuliani said candidates “miss a lot of things” in the heat of political campaigns.

    Partisans divided over scandal fallout for N.J. gov

    Prominent Republicans leapt to GOP Gov. Chris Christie’s defense on Sunday, insisting that an ongoing traffic scandal wouldn’t ruin any presidential ambitions, while Democrats say it’s difficult to believe such a hands-on manager knew nothing about a plan by a top aide to close lanes at a bridge into New York City.

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    A worker rides a bicycle in front of the reactor building of the Bushehr nuclear power plant, just outside the southern city of Bushehr.

    Iran, world powers reach deal opening nuke program

    Iran has agreed to open the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program to daily inspection by international experts starting from Jan. 20, setting the clock running on a six-month deadline for a final nuclear agreement, officials said Sunday. In exchange, Iran will get a relaxation of the financial sanctions that have been crippling its economy.

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    MHS board to meet Tuesday

    The Mundelein High School board will meet Tuesday to discuss summer school fees, a libary grant, the 2014-15 calendar and other issues.

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    Coffee with Hoffman Estates board Jan. 18

    The Hoffman Estates village board will host its first “Coffee with the Board” of 2014 at 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 18 in the village hall council chambers at 1900 Hassell Road.

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    Teachers to help students study

    Teachers from Libertyville and Vernon Hills high schools will help students prepare for semester exams Monday at the Cook Park Library in Libertyville and the Aspen Drive Library in Vernon Hills.

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    Hawthorn Woods vision workshop on Wednesday

    Hawthorn Woods officials will host a community vision workshop at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 15, at the village barn, 2 Lagoon Drive (off Old McHenry Road east of Quentin Road), officials said.

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    Cold delays 70 mph sign installation

    State transportation officials say last week’s frigid and snowy weather has delayed crews who were putting up signs along interstates increasing the speed limit to 70 mph.

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    Partygoer dies in Philadelphia balcony collapse

    A fourth-floor balcony collapsed during a birthday party at a Philadelphia apartment, killing a young man and injuring two women, police said Sunday.

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    Desegregation aid could end for Arkansas schools

    An agreement awaiting a federal judge’s final approval soon could end one of the nation’s most historic desegregation efforts following decades of court battles and $1 billion of special aid to Little Rock-area schools.

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    A baby sugar glider was stolen last week from Critters Pet Shop in South Elgin.

    Baby sugar glider stolen from S. Elgin pet shop

    A South Elgin pet store is hoping for the return of a baby sugar glider taken from the store last week. The baby has not been weaned and will not survive long separated from its mother. “It still needs her milk. Bottom line, it’s going to die without its mom,” said Critters Pet Shop employee Diana Reed.

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    Nearly 700 dead in Syrian rebel clashes

    Rebel-on-rebel clashes have killed nearly 700 people over the past nine days in northern Syria in the worst bout of infighting among the opponents of President Bashar Assad since the country’s civil war began, activists said Sunday.

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    ‘Score-settling’ in Central African Republic kills 13

    Scattered violence in the capital of Central African Republic, including two consecutive nights of intense gunfire in some neighborhoods, has killed 13 people since Michel Djotodia announced his resignation from the presidency on Friday, the local Red Cross said Sunday.

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    Thai anti-government protesters gather Sunday during a rally at the Democracy Monument in Bangkok.

    Bangkok braces as Thai protesters plan shutdown

    Anti-government demonstrators began to occupy major intersections in Thailand’s capital on Sunday in what they say is an effort to shut down Bangkok, a plan that has raised fears of violence that could trigger a military coup.

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    Iraqi security forces stand guard Sunday at the site of a bomb attack in Baghdad.

    Car bombs, clashes kill 18 civilians in Iraq

    Two car bombs targeted commuters in Baghdad and clashes between security forces and militants killed at least 18 civilians, officials said Sunday, amid an ongoing standoff between Iraqi forces and al-Qaida-linked militants west of the Iraqi capital.

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    An Afghan police officer stands guard at the site of a suicide attack on a road in Kabul on Sunday.

    Taliban bicycle bomber kills 2 in Afghanistan

    A Taliban suicide bomber riding a bicycle attacked a bus Sunday carrying police recruits in eastern Kabul, killing two people and wounding some 20 others, police said.

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    The Cygnus resupply spacecraft approaches the International Space Station early Sunday.

    Christmas finally arrives at space station

    A privately launched supply ship arrived at the International Space Station on Sunday morning. The Cygnus is carrying 3,000 pounds of equipment and experiments, including ants for an educational project. Also on board: eagerly awaited Christmas presents for all six spacemen.

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    Navy Cmdr. Valerie Overstreet wanted to start a family. But her job as a Navy pilot and the fact that she and her husband, also a naval officer, were stationed in different parts of the country made it complicated. So she decided to take advantage of a fledgling Navy program that allowed her to take a year off and return to duty without risking her career or future commands.

    Sabbaticals may help military keep women in ranks

    Across the military services, leaders are experimenting with programs that will give valued officers and enlisted troops the incentive to stay. “We have innovative things we’re trying to retain women in the service,” said Vice Adm. Mark Ferguson, vice chief of naval operations. “It’s about creating the personnel policies that enable someone to say it’s Navy and family, instead of Navy or family.”

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    This image made from the YouTube website shows a still frame of the music video “Die L’z” by Bang Da Hitta posted on Aug. 8, 2013, with a man pointing a weapon at the camera. From the video, police in Chicago police identified two of those in the video as felons who are prohibited from being around guns.

    Gangs find new home on social media

    Social media has exploded among street gangs who exploit it — often brazenly — to brag, conspire and incite violence. They’re turning to Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Instagram to flaunt guns and wads of cash, threaten rivals, intimidate informants and in a small number of cases, sell weapons, drugs — even plot murder.

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    Chicago women die in I-290 crash

    Illinois State Police say two Chicago women are dead after an accident on Interstate 290 in West suburban Maywood.

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    Teased for being a “nerd” during his childhood in Grayslake, Josh Wittenkeller is hoping to be crowned “King of the Nerds,” during the second season of the reality competition TV show that premieres Jan. 23 on the TBS network.

    'King of Nerds' contestant already a pioneer

    A TBS TV reality show competition starting this month will decide if Josh Wittenkeller has what it takes to be crowned "King of the Nerds." But the Graylake native already qualifies as a pioneer in the post-Internet economy with his YouTube business that draws millions of fans who watch him play and talk about video games.

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    Mary Swieca holds a photograph of her husband, Joseph, who was killed when he was struck by a car in December near his home in Elk Grove Township.

    Fatal accidents raise safety questions on Oakton Street

    Two deadly accidents within six months on Oakton Street near Elk Grove Village have caused some people to question whether safety measures couldn’t be installed. The fatal accidents — a 4-year-old boy hit by a semi-truck last July and a 66-year-old man struck by a car two weeks before Christmas — were in an area with a mobile home park on the north side and businesses on the...

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    A group rendition of “We Shall Overcome” marked the end of last year’s Martin Luther King Jr. prayer breakfast at Elgin Community College. This year’s guest speaker is recent ECC graduate Keyairra Calvin.

    Elgin’s MLK celebration kicks off Saturday

    Elgin’s 29th annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebration will have a special focus on youth. Recent Elgin Community College graduate Keyairra Calvin will be the keynoter speaker at a kickoff prayer breakfast on Saturday, Jan. 18. The three-day event includes a free community program on Sunday, Jan. 19 and a day of service for youth on Monday, Jan. 20.

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    Lake County officials are moving forward with a long-planned expansion of the Robert W. Depke Juvenile Justice Complex near Vernon Hills.

    Expansion coming to Lake County juvenile center

    A long-proposed expansion of Lake County’s juvenile courthouse near Vernon Hills finally is moving forward. A $10.5 million addition to the north side of the Robert W. Depke Juvenile Justice Complex is the centerpiece of the project’s proposed first phase. “The current facility operates beyond capacity in virtually all areas,” County Administrator Barry Burton told the...

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    Don’t assume children think, reason like we do

    "We assume our children think like we do," our Ken Potts says, looking at how we communicate with our children. "We believe that they remember what we say, that they learn from past mistakes, that they have complex motives for what they do, that they reason things out logically. And we respond to them as though all this were true. The problem is, it’s not."

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    Governor Terry McAuliffe signs an autograph Saturday for Daisa Bridges, 12, as McAuliffe’s wife Dorothy, center, looks on during an open house at the Executive Mansion in Richmond, Va.

    McAuliffe takes oath as Virginia’s governor

    In an inaugural address on the south portico of the state Capitol designed by Thomas Jefferson, Terry McAuliffe emphasized bipartisanship as he put several years of campaigning behind him to begin the more challenging task of leading a politically divided government. Republicans have firm control of the House of Delegates, while the outcome of two special elections will determine control of the...

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    Sheila Jackson, left, and Liz Smith, both of Carrollton, Texas, hold signs Saturday as they protest outside the Dallas Convention Center where the Dallas Safari Club is holding its weekend show and auction.

    Kill a black rhino to save a black rhino?

    Jim and Lauren Riese traveled with their children from Atlanta to protest the auction of the rare black rhino hunting permit in Dallas. Ries said it was his son Carter, 12, and daughter Olivia, 11, who pushed for them to go and participate.

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    Piper gets a checkup Friday at the Findlay Animal Hospital.

    Cat rescued after 3 cold days in Ohio drainpipe

    The male cat has been named Piper. It has a broken leg and other injuries signaling it’s had a rough time lately. But things are looking up, with a number of people volunteering to adopt if it goes unclaimed.

Sports

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    Bears fire 2 assistants, but Tucker will be back
    Embattled Mel Tucker will be back as the Bears defensive coordinator next season, but two of his assistants will not. Defensive line coach Mike Phair, a holdover from Lovie Smith's staff, and linebackers coach Tim Tibesar were informed they will not be back for the 2014 season.

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    Bears defensive coordinator Mel Tucker talks to players during the Bead 21-19 loss to the Detroit Lions at Soldier Field, Sunday.

    Bears may need to make U-turn

    Could the Bears be trending away from the trend again? Just as they discover offense, the NFC championship game will be contested between two teams that feature punishing defenses like Chicago used to be accustomed to.

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    Brent Seabrook (7), celebrates with teammates after scoring a goal during the third period of an NHL hockey game against the Edmonton Oilers in Chicago, Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014. Chicago won 5-3.

    Hawks win despite Kane’s head-scratching goal

    Patrick Kane could only stand at his locker and shake his head. Not only about the weirdest play of the night during the Blackhawks’ 5-3 win over the Oilers on Sunday, but the fact that it capped back-to-back nights of wackiness with Kane center stage.

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    Blackhawks’ Leddy has a different skating partner every night

    It’s not exactly Thunderdome, but prior to every game, a trio of Blackhawks defensemen enter the locker room knowing full well that only one of them will be hitting the ice that night to partner with Nick Leddy.

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    Northwestern head coach Chris Collins yells after his team beat Illinois 49-43 during an NCAA college basketball game in Evanston, Ill., on Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014.

    Wildcats win at home against Illinois

    A Big Ten classic it was not, but first-year Northwestern coach Chris Collins was thrilled to bag his first conference win - a 49-43 decision over cold-shooting Illinois Sunday night at Welsh-Ryan Arena.

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    Ekaterina Makarova of Russia celebrates her win over Venus Williams of the U.S. during their first round match at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia, Monday, Jan. 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Andrew Brownbill)

    Venus Williams falls at Australian Open

    Just as she was starting to show glimpses of returning to form, Venus Williams was let down by her serve and her concentration at crucial times and lost 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 to Ekaterina Makarova on day one of the Australian Open.

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    Alex Rodriguez

    MLB witness outlines A-Rod’s PED program

    NEW YORK — Major League Baseball’s key witness in its case against Alex Rodriguez said he designed and administered an elaborate doping program for the 14-time All-Star starting in 2010.Anthony Bosch, the owner of the now shuttered Florida anti-aging clinic, Biogenesis, said in a “60 Minutes” interview aired on CBS on Sunday night that Rodriguez paid him $12,000 per month to provide him with an assortment of banned drugs that included testosterone and human growth hormone.Rob Manfred, the chief operating officer of Major League Baseball, said during the program that Bosch chose to cooperate in the investigation because he feared for his life.MLB’s suspension of Rodriguez was reduced on Saturday by an arbitrator from 211 games to 162, plus all playoff games next season.Commissioner Bud Selig, who did not testify during the slugger’s appeal, defended the largest suspension ever handed out under the Joint Drug Agreement.“In my judgment his actions were beyond comprehension,” Selig said on the show. “I think 211 games was a very fair penalty.”Bosch said he began working with Rodriguez five days before the New York Yankees third baseman hit his 600th career home run on Aug. 4, 2010. Bosch said the first words out of Rodriguez’s mouth were: “What did Manny Ramirez take in 2008 and 2009?”Ramirez was suspended 50 games in 2009 while with the Los Angeles Dodgers after testing positive for a banned drug, his first of two offenses.Of the 14 players suspended as a result of MLB’s investigation into Biogenesis, Rodriguez was the only one to appeal the ban. A self-taught practitioner who was once fined $5,000 for practicing medicine without a license, Bosch outlined his relationship with the three-time AL MVP. He said he designed the program to help Rodriguez maximize the effects of the drugs and remain clean in the eyes of baseball. Rodriguez never failed a test during the period in question.Detailing a clandestine operation, Bosch said the duo used code words for the drugs like “gummies” for testosterone lozenges, which Rodriguez sometimes took right before games. Bosch said he once tested A-Rod’s blood in the bathroom stall of a Miami restaurant.Bosch also said he injected A-Rod with banned drugs because the slugger with 654 career homers was afraid of needles.

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    Chicago Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews (19) celebrates with teammates Patrick Sharp (10) and Marian Hossa (81) after scoring a goal during the second period of an NHL hockey game against the Edmonton Oilers in Chicago, Sunday, Jan., 12, 2014.

    Hossa helps Hawks beat Oilers

    Marian Hossa had a power-play goal and an assist on his 35th birthday, and the Chicago Blackhawks beat the Edmonton Oilers 5-3 on Sunday night to end a three-game losing streak.Ben Smith, Andrew Shaw, Jonathan Toews and Brent Seabrook also scored for Chicago, which had 15 goals against Edmonton in a three-game sweep of the season series.Ales Hemsky and Taylor Hall scored for Edmonton. The Oilers’ Boyd Gordon was credited with a fluke short-handed goal in the second period when Chicago’s Patrick Kane inadvertently bounced a pass off the boards and into an empty net during a delayed penalty call.After a slow start, the Blackhawks dominated the action and outshot Edmonton 41-21.Chicago’s Antti Raanta made 18 saves in just his second start since No. 1 goalie Corey Crawford returned from a lower-body injury on Jan. 2.Edmonton’s Devan Dubnyk blocked 36 shots.The Blackhawks grabbed control with a three-goal second that gave them a 4-2 lead. Chicago outshot Edmonton 19-5 in the period.Shaw struck first, converting a high screened shot from the left circle at 2:36 of the second. Shaw’s 12th goal came moments after a turnover by Edmonton’s Nail Yakupov at center ice.After Gordon’s unusual score tied it at 2, the Blackhawks had a 5-on-3 advantage and Hossa scored on a screened shot from 35 feet away in the slot.Toews completed a 2-on-1 break with Patrick Sharp with 2:28 left in the second to extend Chicago’s lead to 4-2. After taking Sharp’s feed, Toews tucked a backhander under Dubnyk’s pad.Hall got one back for Edmonton when he one-timed a pass from Schultz past Raanta at 5:17 of the third, but Seabrook restored Chicago’s two-goal advantage with 5:41 left.Hemsky opened the scoring at 6:08 of the first. He got past Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith on the right wing, cut alone across the top of the crease and slipped a low backhand shot past Raanta.The Blackhawks tied it at 1 on Smith’s deflection with 5:34 left in the period. It was Chicago’s first first-period goal since Dec. 30, a span of six games.The NHL’s most potent offense helped make up for an unlucky break in the second.The Blackhawks already were on a 5-on-4 power play and buzzing in the Oilers’ zone when Dubnyk hacked Shaw and was assessed a delayed penalty for slashing. Raanta vacated his net and headed to the bench as Chicago sent out an extra attacker.From the right corner, Kane bounced a pass off the boards toward the right point. But no Blackhawk was there and the puck slid the length of the ice and into the net.

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    San Diego Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers, left, and Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning greet each other at midfield after the Broncos beat the Chargers 24-17 in an NFL AFC division playoff football game, Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, in Denver.

    Manning, Broncos beat Chargers 24-17

    DENVER — Peyton Manning welcomed Wes Welker back into the lineup with a touchdown toss and the Denver Broncos narrowly avoided a repeat of their playoff slip from last year, advancing to the AFC championship game with a 24-17 win over the San Diego Chargers on Sunday.The Broncos (14-3) controlled the game for 3½ quarters before Philip Rivers capitalized on an injury to cornerback Chris Harris Jr. to stage a comeback reminiscent of Baltimore’s shocking win at Denver exactly a year earlier.This time, however, Manning rescued the Broncos from the brink of another crushing collapse and sent them into the title game for the first time in eight seasons.They’ll host the New England Patriots (13-4) on Sunday. Get ready for Brady vs. Manning once more.

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    Novak Djokovic, who is seeking his fourth straight Australian Open tennis title, hands out chocolate to reporters during a news conference ahead of the championship tournament in Melbourne, Australia.

    Djokovic has sweet thoughts on Aussie Open

    It was a sweet deal. After answering an assortment of questions about his coach and his prospects for winning a fourth consecutive Australian Open title, Novak Djokovic halted his pretournament news conference and walked around the auditorium offering chocolates to the assembled critics. He originally offered chocolates as a sweetener last year at Melbourne Park, as a way of apologizing because he had to skip a scheduled photo shoot for the champion. As he opened the boxes of chocolates Sunday, he explained it as “a little tradition we started last year.” Djokovic is aiming to be the first man in the Open era to win four consecutive Australian titles, and to join Roy Emerson as the only man with five or more.

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    Bulls guard D.J. Augustin has “just been huge” for the team, according to Kirk Hinrich.

    Augustin a big part of Bulls’ push to .500

    It hardly makes sense that guard D.J. Augustin could bomb with three straight teams, then become practically a savior for the Bulls. But not much has made sense with this team recently.

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    Bulls game day
    Bulls vs. Washington Wizards at the United Center, 7 p.m. MondayTV: Comcast SportsNetRadio: ESPN 1000-AMUpdate: The Bulls could push their record to .500 by extending their five-game win streak. Washington (16-19) has been streaky this season, most recently with a two-game skid. Guards John Wall (19.5 points. 8.6 assists) and Bradley Beal (17.6 points) are the top scorers. The Wizards are starting former Phoenix center Marcin Gortat (12.3 points. 8.7 rebounds). This is the first meeting between the teams this season, with a rematch coming Friday in Washington.Next: Orlando Magic at the Amway Center, 6 p.m. Saturday — Mike McGraw

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    The top three men’s skaters, from left, Jason Brown, Jeremy Abbott and Max Aaron, wave their flowers Sunday on the awards stand at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships in Boston.

    Highland Park skater 2nd at nationals

    Jeremy Abbott won his fourth U.S. figure skating title and all but locked up his second Olympic berth. Highland Park teenager Jason Brown was second Sunday. The Americans will send two men to the Sochi Games, and while U.S. Figure Skating officials will look at past performances in picking the team, they are unlikely to deviate from the standings.

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    San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick runs against the Carolina Panthers during the second half of a divisional playoff game Sunday in Charlotte, N.C.

    49ers headed back to NFC Championship Game

    Colin Kaepernick threw one touchdown pass and ran for another score as the San Francisco 49ers defeated the Carolina Panthers 23-10 on Sunday to advance to the NFC championship game for the third straight season. The win set up the third game of the season between Seattle and San Francisco.

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    Iowa’s Roy Devyn Marble, right, shoots over Ohio State’s Lenzelle Smith during the first half of Sunday’s game in Columbus, Ohio.

    Iowa hands Ohio State another loss

    Roy Devin Marble scored 22 points, Aaron White added 19 and No. 20 Iowa ended the game on a 22-9 run to hand No. 3 Ohio State its second loss of the week, 84-74 on Sunday.

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    Winnipeg Jets head coach Claude Noel talks to players during Saturday’s home game against the Columbus Blue Jackets. Noel was fired after the loss.

    Winnipeg fires head coach

    Claude Noel has been fired as coach by the Winnipeg Jets and replaced with Paul Maurice. Noel was fired amid a five-game losing streak.

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    Ashley Wagner face reporters during a news conference Sunday in Boston. The two-time U.S. figure skating champion made the Olympic team Sunday despite finishing a distant fourth at the national championships.

    Wagner makes U.S. figure skating team despite falls

    Ashley Wagner finished a distant fourth at the U.S. Championships, and only three American women make the Olympics. But Saturday's event was only one factor in the decision.

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    Nebraska forward Walter Pitchford, right, gets tied up with Purdue forward Basil Smotherman, left front, and center A.J. Hammons in the second half of Sunday’s game in West Lafayette, Ind.

    Purdue takes down Nebraska 70-64

    A.J. Hammons scored 18 points to lead the Purdue to a 70-64 win over Nebraska on Sunday. Ronnie Johnson added 14 points for the Boilermakers, who picked up their first league win.

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    Gracie Gold reacts after skating in the women's free skate at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships Saturday in Boston. Gold, 18, won her first U.S. title, posting 211.69 points to easily win the competition. The U.S. Olympic team will be announced on Sunday.

    Images: U.S. Figure Skating Championships
    Gracie Gold of Springfield competes in the U.S. Nationals in ladies figure skating. Before moving to California to train with her new coach, Gold lived and trained in Elk Grove Village. Agnes Zawadzki, who also competed, is a native of Des Plaines.

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    Two seconds all Flanigan, Glenbard N. need

    Glenbard North’s Chip Flanigan turned two seconds into an eternity of opportunity. With his team trailing by a point, the senior forward hauled in teammate Justin Jackson’s three-quarter-court pass and calmly went to work. He took a couple dribbles, turned, fired over a defender and banked in a 3-pointer at the buzzer to give the Panthers a 62-61 stunner over host Naperville Central in DuPage Valley Conference action on Saturday.

Business

  •  
    Stan Osnowitz, 67, lost his state unemployment benefits of $430 a week in December. The money put gasoline in his car so he could look for work. An extra three months of benefits - one of the options Congress is debating in an effort to restore the federal program - would enable his job search to continue into the spring, when construction activity usually increases and more electrical jobs become available.

    Loss of jobless aid leaves many with bleak options

    A cutoff of benefits for the long-term unemployed has left more than 1.3 million Americans with a stressful decision: What now? Without their unemployment checks, many will abandon what had been a futile search and will no longer look for a job — an exodus that could dwarf the 347,000 Americans who stopped seeking work in December

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    Bulgarian trade mission to Galesburg area planned

    A Bulgarian agribusiness trade mission looks set to visit western Illinois. The city of Galesburg and the Bulgarian Consulate in Chicago are planning the trip for this spring, The (Galesburg) Register-Mail reported. Fixed dates and the itinerary will be announced later.

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    Juergen Boyny, of Germany, watches a video clip with a personal viewing device at the Sony booth at the International Consumer Electronics Show last week in Las Vegas.

    The hottest gadgets of CES: 3-D printers to 4K TVs

    The biggest gadget trade show in the Americas wrapped up on Friday in Las Vegas after swamping the city with 150,000 attendees. This year, “wearable” computing was big, along with various 3-D technologies, especially 3-D printing.

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    More than 33.5 million people now play fantasy sports in the U.S., according to the trade association, with leagues based on the NFL far outpacing Major League Baseball as the most popular. Fantasy sports are gaining popularity outside the U.S. also, with leagues for soccer and cricket.

    Daily-play fantasy sports luring Wall Street traders

    Drew Dinkmeyer spent seven years as a senior investment analyst in Tampa, Fla., before deciding to pursue fantasy sports professionally. Dinkmeyer, who’s 31 and got married last year, said he earns about as much from competing in daily fantasy sports leagues as he did when he was researching international equities and domestic small- and mid-cap stocks at CapTrust Financial Advisers.

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    AT&T is the first major cellphone company to create a comprehensive service for sponsored wireless access in the U.S. The move is likely to face considerable opposition from public-interest groups that fear the service could discourage consumers from exploring new sites that can’t afford to pay communications carriers for traffic.

    AT&T to sell toll-free service for wireless data

    AT&T Inc., the country’s second-largest wireless carrier, announced this week that it’s setting up a “1-800” service for wireless data. Websites that pay for the service will be toll-free for AT&T’s wireless customers, meaning the traffic won’t count against a surfer’s monthly allotment of data.

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    Caregiver Warren Manchess, 74, left, helps Paul Gregoline, 92, with a meal, in Noblesville Ind. Burgeoning demand for senior services like home health aides is being met by a surprising segment of the workforce: Other seniors. Twenty-nine percent of so-called direct-care workers are projected to be 55 or older by 2018 and in some segments of that population older workers are the single largest age demographic. With high rates of turnover, home care agencies have shown a willingness to hire older people new to the field who have found a tough job market as they try to supplement their retirement income.

    Growing number of seniors caring for other seniors

    As demand for senior services provided by nurses’ aides, home health aides and other such workers grows with the aging of baby boomers, so are those professions’ employment of other seniors. The new face of America’s network of caregivers is increasingly wrinkled. “I think people are surprised that this workforce is as old as it is,” said Abby Marquand, a researcher at PHI.

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    Last year, investors poured a net $137 billion into global stock mutual funds, according to TrimTabs Investment Research. That’s more than seven times the $18 billion that went into U.S. stock funds.

    Need a passport? More investors are looking abroad

    Stocks are back en vogue five years after the financial crisis, but the interest isn’t universal: Investors are piling into mutual funds that own stocks outside the United States, whether it’s from Asia to the west or Europe to the east. Last year, investors poured a net $137 billion into global stock mutual funds, according to TrimTabs Investment Research. That’s more than seven times the $18 billion that went into U.S. stock funds.

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    Career Coach: New year presents an opportunity to get better
    No matter what happened in 2013, it is now behind us, and it is time to look ahead to 2014. Hope is the thing that most of us want to feel with a new year. We want to know that we have another chance to get it right, to make a difference, to have an impact on the lives of others around us. What can we do to get us off to a new start? Here are some tips for individuals as well as for companies and leaders.

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    This undated image provided by Sweetgreen shows from left, Sweetgreen co-founder Jonathan Neman with backer Steve Case, co-founder of AOL and the Revolution fund, and his restaurant chain co-founders Nicolas Jammet and Nathaniel Ru. Case initially invested in Sweetgreen about a year ago and in December his Revolution fund invested $22 million.

    How to get ahead in business with a short resume

    Hey twentysomethings, dreaming of trading in the safety of a regular paycheck to start your own business? There’s no secret sauce. Instead, founders of three companies have obvious tips: Work hard, network and ask for help. Chicago venture capitalist Bruce Barron, who has invested in companies including food ordering service GrubHub and pet products website doggyloot seconds that. He counsels young entrepreneurs to be open to advice.

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    State budgets to aid U.S. growth amid federal cuts

    State and local governments are poised to increase spending this year, adding to the U.S. economic expansion, even as their federal counterpart cuts back. Outlays by state and local authorities will add about 0.2 percentage point to gross domestic product in 2014, according to a forecast by economists at Morgan Stanley in New York.

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    Twitter, Internet increasingly popular for blacks

    Young, college-educated and higher-income African Americans are just as likely as their white counterparts to use the Internet, and Twitter seems to be a favorite place in cyberspace, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center.

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    A production crew member dusts off Toyota’s FCV hydrogen electric concept car during the International Consumer Electronics Show n Las Vegas. Toyota announced the car would be available to consumers in 2015.

    Toyota ups orders for hydrogen-powered car in U.S.

    Toyota said Monday that it expects to sell more hydrogen-powered electric cars in the U.S. than previously planned. The car, which Toyota calls FCV for now, uses hydrogen as fuel for a battery and emits only water vapor as exhaust. Toyota said the car will go on sale in the U.S. in 2015.

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    Pay differentials between the sexes could be erased if more companies offered a flexible work schedule to their employees, according to results of a study by a Harvard economist.

    Study: Gender pay gap would lessen with flexible schedule
    Pay differentials between the sexes could be erased if more companies offered a flexible work schedule to their employees, according to results of a study by a Harvard economist. Gender salary differentials “would be considerably reduced and might vanish altogether if firms did not have an incentive to disproportionately reward individuals who labored long hours and worked particular hours,” according to professor Claudia Goldin.

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    Will surge of older workers take jobs from young?

    It’s an assertion that has been accepted as fact by droves of the unemployed: Older people remaining on the job later in life are stealing jobs from young people. One problem, many economists say: It isn’t supported by a wisp of fact. “We all cannot believe that we have been fighting this theory for more than 150 years,” said April Yanyuan Wu, a research economist at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, who co-authored a paper last year on the subject.

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    4 questions to ask before next health overhaul deadline

    More than 2 million Americans met the health care overhaul’s deadline last month to sign up for insurance coverage that started Jan. 1. But the enrollment window hasn’t slammed shut on the millions more who still need protection in the new year.

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    Mark Kupke, owner of the Covered Wagon Motel in Lusk, Wyo., stands next to one of four Tesla Supercharger units installed in December in the hotel courtyard. A Supercharger can recharge a Tesla’s depleted battery pack to a 90-percent level within 45-50 minutes, several times faster than any other charging option for the electric cars. Lusk is on the route of Tesla’s first network of coast-to-coast Supercharger stations. The quick-charge stations promise to make cross-country travel by Tesla much quicker and easier.

    Tesla station to bring electric cars to Wyoming

    In the least populated county in the least populated state, old Ford and Chevy pickup trucks roam — and rule — the roads. Finding a Tesla, the sleek and pricey all-electric car, around these ranching towns is about as likely as spotting the mythical jackalope. And yet, one day last month, a Model S sedan pulled quietly in at the America’s Best Value Inn Covered Wagon Motel in Lusk, population 1,557.

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    Ron Unz poses inside the Las Families Del Pueblo child care center in Los Angeles. Unz, a Silicon Valley multimillionaire and registered Republican who once ran for governor and, briefly, U.S. Senate, wants state voters to endorse the wage jump that he predicts would nourish the economy.

    GOP Entrepreneur: Boost wages to $12-an-hour

    A push for bigger paychecks for workers at the lower rungs of the economic ladder is typically associated with Democrats — President Barack Obama is supporting a bill in Congress that would elevate the $7.25 federal minimum to over $10 an hour. But entrepreneur Ron Unz, 52, is a former publisher of The American Conservative magazine with a history of against-the-grain political activism that includes pushing a 1998 ballot proposal that dismantled California’s bilingual education system, an idea he later championed in Colorado and other states.

  •  
    The Outlander

    Illinois Mitsubishi plant boosts production, exports

    Bernard Swiecki, an analyst for the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich., said crossover sport utility vehicles are popular exports because of their light weight and fuel economy.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Speaking Dog, a cast-iron bank made in the late 1800s, has a substantive value. However, an identical piece with the girl in a blue dress can sell for more — $1,500 if in original condition.

    Classic collectibles remain hot this year

    It is not unexpected that many of the most popular collectibles have been classics for years and remain so. However, the value of these items is relative. When thinking of value, it's not necessarily what price is being asked, but who is doing the asking and who is doing the buying.

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    Golden Globes hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler make a toast at the end of their emcee gig Sunday night.

    'Hustle,' 'Slave' top Golden Globes

    Shut out all night at the Golden Globes, the historical drama “12 Years a Slave” eked out the night's top honor, best film drama, while the con-artist caper “American Hustle” landed a leading three awards, including best film comedy. David O. Russell's “American Hustle” had the better night overall, winning acting awards for Amy Adams and Jennifer Lawrence. Best picture was the only award for “12 Years a Slave,” which came in with seven nominations, tied for the most with “American Hustle.”

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    Golden Globes hosts Tina Fey, left, and Amy Poehler walk the red carpet Sunday in Beverly Hills, Calif.

    Images: Golden Globes red carpet
    The stars of the big and small screen put their best fashion foot forward Sunday for the Golden Globes.

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    Lena Dunham on stage during the “Girls” panel discussion at the HBO portion of the 2014 Winter Television Critics Association tour at the Langham Hotel on Thursday.

    ’Girls’ producers take on nudity issue

    The nudity that’s a part of HBO’s “The Girls” has raised eyebrows. A question about it raised the ire of the show’s producers. At a Thursday session with the Television Critics Association to promote the comedy’s new season, a reporter asked Lena Dunham, the show’s creator, executive producer and star, why her character was so often naked and for no apparent reason.

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    Betabrand’s gray Dress Pant Yoga Pants: Although they might sound like novelty items, clothes that can go straight from your workout to your work (or vice versa) are going to come in handy in 2014.

    Workout Wear Friday? No sweat, boss!

    There’s dressing for success. There’s dressing for the gym. And then there’s Dress Pant Yoga Pants. The $88 trousers with belt loops, faux pockets and sun-salutation-ready stretch are the creation of Betabrand, a San Francisco apparel company that also produces the similar Dress Pant Sweatpants for men. Although they might sound like novelty items, clothes that can go straight from your workout to your work (or vice versa) are going to come in handy in 2014.

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    Tina Fey, left, and Amy Poehler return to host the Golden Globe Awards.

    Woody or not, Golden Globes drawing plenty of star power

    If Woody Allen attends the Golden Globe Awards, he’d rival Bill Clinton as its biggest surprise guest. Allen will receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award at Sunday’s ceremony. The writer-director famously avoids awards shows, though, and skipped those for his previous 12 Golden Globe nominations. Still, there will be plenty of stars on hand the awards show honoring the best in film and television.

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    “Dilbert” creator Scott Adams writes that studies show that using willpower in one area diminishes how much willpower you have in reserve for other areas. Instead, you can usually replace willpower with knowledge.

    Read this if you want to be happy in 2014

    Dilbert cartoonist Scott Adams gives his tips about how to be healty and happy. He does caution that it’s never a good idea to take health tips from cartoonists, so check with your doctor if anything here sounds iffy. He also says he doesn't know how many people have died after reading health tips from cartoonists, but it probably isn’t zero. Don’t say you weren’t warned.

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    Sandra Mabry, left, helps Bobbie Jones with regularly scheduled physical therapy in December in Washington.

    Elderly care increasingly focused on homes

    The Nursing Home Transition Program in Washington, D.C., reflects a national trend toward providing older and disabled people with in-home care rather than keeping them in nursing homes.

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    Lisa Gardner pulls off surprises while keeping the reader inside the mind of her characters in “Fear Nothing.”

    ‘Fear Nothing’ is vivid psychological narrative

    Nobody writes about the psychological aspects of working in law enforcement better than Lisa Gardner. She can take potentially disturbing scenarios that are frighteningly real and make them compelling, which she does in her latest novel, “Fear Nothing.” An alternative title could be “Pain Management” because the story takes a hard look at what constitutes physical pain — and how a person deals with it.

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    Matthew McConaughey, left, and Woody Harrelson play former Louisiana State Police detectives interrogated in 2012 about a homicide case we see them working, in flashback, in 1995, in the HBO series “True Detective,” premiering at 8 p.m. Sunday.

    HBO’s ‘True Detective’ detects a truly dark tale

    A number of things set “True Detective” apart. For starters, this new HBO drama series, which premieres at 8 p.m. Sunday, stars Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson, a pair of actors known not for TV but for features (Harrelson’s “Cheers” run ended 21 years ago). And they tackle, in effect, not one but two roles apiece: Former Louisiana State Police detectives interrogated in 2012 about a homicide case we see them working, in flashback, in 1995.

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    Artists dressed in folk costumes sing as they welcome guests at a street in Rosa Khutor, east of Sochi, Russia. Sochi has long been a choice destination for Russia’s political elite. Joseph Stalin’s summer residence in Zeleni Mys even features a wax mannequin of the dictator at his desk.

    From palm trees to snow: Winter Olympics’ Sochi

    For visitors to the Winter Olympics, Sochi may feel like a landscape from a dream — familiar and strange at once. Palm trees evoke a tropical seaside resort, but the Black Sea itself is seriously cold; turn away from the palms and the jagged, snow-covered peaks of the Caucasus Mountains rise nearby. Lively and garish modern buildings mix with Stalin Gothic piles, like trophy wives on the arms of elderly men. Billboards are written in an alphabet where some letters sound exactly like you think they do, others mean something else and the rest are flat-out alien. What may seem oddest of all is the city’s cheerful and relaxed aura in a country stereotyped as dour.

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    Comedian Louie Anderson is set to perform at the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg.

    Sunday picks: Louis Anderson plays the Improv

    Louie Anderson cracks wise about his childhood and more at the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg. The Travel and Adventure Show may be winding down, but you can still check out some of the hot travel trends. Elgin Theatre Company presents a matinee performance of "Men Are Dogs" at the Kimball Street Theater.

Discuss

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    My sister’s icicles.

    Suburban weather drama: Fear of floods follows record cold

    A genius idea to poll people on their worst winter weather experience during the recent cold snap falls a little short of the mark, reports Jim Davis, DuPage/Fox Valley news director. Ah, what's the difference; by the time you read this, we're more likely to be worrying about floods.

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    For a new fight against poverty

    Columnist Michael Gerson: Assessing the outcome of the War on Poverty — announced 50 years ago — has always been complicated by the hopes it initially inspired. After his election in 1964, Lyndon Johnson proclaimed that Americans were living in “the most hopeful times since Christ was born in Bethlehem.” Which raised expectations pretty high — and placed LBJ in the manger.

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    Workers heroic during cold snap
    A Hampshire letter to the editor: I would like to take this opportunity to thank the men and women who have cleared our streets, delivered our mail, collected our trash, kept our power and water on and served and protected us — police and fire departments — over the past several days. You have gone above and beyond the call of duty and need to be recognized and thanked for your efforts and hard work.

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    Aren’t pols guilty of deceptive practices?
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: It was announced recently in the news that some company selling weight loss products was found to be misleading and deceptive because their weight loss product did not work.

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