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Daily Archive : Tuesday November 12, 2013

News

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    Rutland Township did not take a vote Tuesday to offer busing to its senior and disabled residents in Sun City. That means Grafton Township, which had been transporting Rutland's Sun City residents for free since 2007, will terminate that service after Nov. 30, due to budgeting issues.

    Rutland's inaction still means it loses bus service

    A pair of proposals Rutland Township Supervisor Margaret Sanders floated to keep bus service intact for its senior and disabled residents died for a lack of a second Tuesday, which means the board did not make a decision on the issue.

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    Wauconda considering medical marijuana delay

    The sale and use of marijuana for medicinal purposes will be allowed in Illinois starting in January, but Wauconda officials are considering delaying permits for businesses that would seek to sell the drug.

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    This image of a green heron at the Brookfield Zoo won Schaumburg resident Randolph Badiola the grand prize in the Chicago Zoological Society’s 2013 Photo Contest.

    Schaumburg man wins Brookfield Zoo photo contest

    A Schaumburg man who captured a stirring image of a green heron at the Brookfield Zoo has won the grand prize in the Chicago Zoological Society’s 2013 Photo Contest. For his win, Randolph Badiola received an American Airlines voucher for round-trip tickets for himself and a companion to any destination within the contiguous 48 states, Canada, the Caribbean, and Mexico served directly by the...

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    Bill Rahn

    Former Westmont Mayor Bill Rahn dies at 71

    Editor’s note: Story was updated Nov. 13 to correct error in location of service.Former Westmont Mayor William Rahn died on Monday from complications of a fall at home, officials said.Rahn, 71, served as mayor of Westmont from 1999 until his retirement earlier this year, but he had spent more than 30 years as an elected official, said Larry McIntyre, village communications director.

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    Man gets 7 years for assaulting Hanover Park girl

    A Chicago man pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting a girl a 9-year-old Hanover Park girl. Jarick Harris, 20, was sentenced Tuesday to seven years in prison and was ordered to register as a sex offender for the rest of his life.

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    Hundreds of students sick at Wheaton middle school

    After more than half the student body was absent on Monday, officials at Edison Middle School in Wheaton have canceled all before- and after-school activities for the rest of the week. According to a note on the school’s website, 465 students were absent on Monday out of a school population of only about 700, a large spike from 28 student absences last Friday.

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    Atorvastatin Calcium tablets, a generic form of Lipitor, is being sold under a deal with Pfizer. The nation's first new guidelines in a decade for preventing heart attacks and strokes call for twice as many Americans — one-third of all adults — to consider taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs.

    U.S. doctors urge wider use of cholesterol drugs

    The nation's first new guidelines in a decade for preventing heart attacks and strokes call for twice as many Americans — one-third of all adults — to consider taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. The guidelines, issued Tuesday by the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology, are a big change.

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    The Chicago Transit Authority has releasd these images of the woman they believe took an alligator on the Blue Line before leaving it at O'Hare International Airport.

    CTA releases images of woman taking alligator to O'Hare

    The Chicago Transit Authority on Tuesday released images of the last person authorities say was seen with an alligator that was later abandoned and found by workers at O'Hare International Airport earlier this month.

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    Passengers board the Johnstown streetcar during Kenosha Streetcar Day in Kenosha, Wis. Long after the streetcar was driven to the edge of extinction in America by the automobile, cities are spending millions putting them back in.

    Once nearly extinct, streetcar gets new life in US

    More than 30 cities around the country are planning to build streetcar systems or have done so recently. Dallas, Portland and Seattle all have new streetcar lines. Most projects involve spending millions of dollars to put back something that used to be there — often in the same stretches of pavement.

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    Long Grove to ask for property tax March 18

    Long Grove residents will have an opportunity March 18 to decide whether a more rigorous road maintenance program is worth paying for after some neighborhood streets have been privatized. With Village President Angie Underwood’s tiebreaking vote, trustee Tuesday narrowly put a referendum on the primary ballot seeking revenue for up to 10 years to make up an annual $1.7 million shortfall for...

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    This year’s Wood Award recipients. Geneva school board member Mary Stith, left, and Geneva chamber executive director Jean Gaines chat, onstage after receiving their awards at the Geneva Country Club on Tuesday.

    Business, school leaders honored for service to Geneva

    Two women were honored Tuesday for their service to Geneva, receiving the Geneva Chamber of Commerce's annual Wood Award. Keeping the announcement secret from one of them, Jean Gaines, was a challenge due to her job: She's the longtime director of the chamber of commerce. The other, Mary Stith, has served for many years on the Geneva school board.

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    The pedestrian portion of the I-90 bridge over the Fox River will be closed during construction starting next spring.

    Tollway details plans for Fox River bridge on I-90

    The lower-level pedestrian portion of the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway bridge spanning the Fox River in Elgin will be closed starting next spring, officials said. That’s when widening and improvements to the 1,600-foot tollway bridge — part of an ongoing $12 billion, 15-year road-building program — will begin.

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    Typhoon survivors hang signs from their necks as they queue up in the hopes of boarding a C-130 military transport plane Tuesday in Tacloban, central Philippines. Thousands of typhoon survivors swarmed the airport on Tuesday seeking a flight out, but only a few hundred made it, leaving behind a shattered, rain-lashed city short of food and water and littered with countless bodies.

    Aid operations pick up pace in Philippines

    Relief operations in this typhoon-devastated region of the Philippines picked up pace Wednesday, but still only minimal amounts of water, food and medical supplies were making it increasingly desperate survivors in the hardest-hit areas.

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    This combination made from file photos shows Willis Tower, formerly known as the Sears Tower, in Chicago, left, and One World Trade Center in New York. An expert committee of architects declared that New York’s new World Trade Center tower is now the tallest building in the U.S., surpassing Chicago’s Willis Tower.

    One World Trade Center named tallest US building

    They set out to build the tallest skyscraper in the world — a giant that would rise a symbolic 1,776 feet from the ashes of ground zero. Those aspirations of global supremacy fell by the wayside long ago, but New York won a consolation prize Tuesday when an international architectural panel said it would recognize One World Trade Center as the tallest skyscraper in the United States.

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    “Three Studies of Lucian Freud,” a triptych by Francis Bacon of his friend and artist Lucian Freud, sold for the most money ever paid for an auctioned painting.

    Francis Bacon artwork sets auction record in NY

    A 1969 painting by Francis Bacon set a world record for most expensive artwork ever sold at auction. “Three Studies of Lucian Freud” was purchased for $142,405,000 at Christie’s postwar and contemporary art sale on Tuesday night. The triptych depicts Bacon’s artist friend.

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    Actor Alec Baldwin leaves criminal court Tuesday in New York.

    Baldwin testifies in stalking case

    She began leaving as many as 30 voicemail messages a night, so many that he eventually disconnected the cellphone number he’d given her. And she sent a raft of emails that grew increasingly ominous in March 2012, when she wrote: “Call the FBI now!” and said she had the address of his Hamptons home, had “easy access” inside his New York apartment building and would insinuate herself into places he...

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    Kim Kardashian arrives at the inaugural Dream for Future Africa Foundation Gala at Spago in Beverly Hills, Calif.

    Kim Kardashian cited for speeding

    The California Highway Patrol says Kim Kardashian has been cited for speeding after an officer spotted the reality star apparently being chased by the paparazzi on a Los Angeles freeway.

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    Stevie Nicks of Fleetwood Mac performs at The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival in New Orleans, La.

    Nicks to guest star on ‘American Horror Story’

    Creator Ryan Murphy revealed the guest spot news Tuesday over his official Twitter account. “Guess who’s visiting the Coven? The legendary Stevie Nicks!”

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    This illustration shows a reconstruction of an extinct big cat, Panthera blytheae, based on a 4.4 million-year-old skull.

    Scientists: Oldest big cat fossil found in Tibet

    Scientists have unearthed the oldest big cat fossil yet, suggesting the predator — similar to a snow leopard — evolved in Asia and spread out. The nearly complete skull dug up in Tibet was estimated at 4.4 million years old — older than the big cat remains recovered from Tanzania dating to about 3.7 million years ago, the team reported.

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    Sen. John F. Kennedy arrives at Barrington High School on Oct. 25, 1960, as seen in a newly found photo that’s part of a collection to be unveiled Thursday, Nov. 21, at the school.

    Found photos of JFK’s Barrington visit to be unveiled

    Barrington history and world history overlapped on Oct. 25, 1960, but a more complete visual record of John F. Kennedy’s pre-election visit to the village is only now being made available for the public to see. Newly discovered photos of the visit will be on public display Nov. 21 then be added to the school's Future Presidents exhibit.

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    CBS says it was misled by a “60 Minutes” source who claimed he was on the scene of a 2012 attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya, when it turns out he was not. Lara Logan, who reported the story, apologized for the network during Sunday’s show.

    CBS, Logan criticized over Benghazi report

    CBS correspondent Lara Logan's mistaken “60 Minutes” report about a supposed eyewitness to the Benghazi consulate attacks has put Logan under pressure. Despite two on-air apologies, including one Sunday night on “60 Minutes,” Logan, 42, has come in for widespread criticism and demands for a more complete explanation of how her Oct. 27 report went so wrong.

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    Adding to growing pressure on the White House, former President Bill Clinton said Tuesday that President Barack Obama should find a way to let people keep their health coverage.

    Clinton: Obama should honor health care pledge

    Adding pressure to fix the administration’s problem-plagued health care program, former President Bill Clinton says President Barack Obama should find a way to let people keep their health coverage, even if it means changing the law.

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    Lake Forest authorities investigating mansion blaze

    Investigators are trying to determine what caused a Lake Forest mansion fire that resulted in about $2 million in damage. Firefighters were summoned to the house in the 1100 block of Keswick Drive on the city's west side.

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    Robert Forrest of Kansas City, Kan., poses with his bride Katie Krueger of East Dundee after getting married at the Kane County Courthouse Tuesday, 11-12-13, in St. Charles. The couple, who met at church, have a busy week planned complete with a big move. Connie and Don Krueger, Katie’s parents, take pictures after the ceremony.

    Kane Co. weddings abound on 11/12/13

    Robert and Vanessa Szumal of Naperville said “I do” and exchanged vows, rings and kisses on their perfect day: 11/12/13. Theirs was one of 12 weddings at the Kane County Judicial Center as officials made special accommodations for couples who wanted to get married on the second-to-last day this century in which the date will have consecutive numbers in it.

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    Business, school leaders honored for service to Geneva

    Two women were honored Tuesday for their service to Geneva, receiving the Geneva Chamber of Commerce's annual Wood Award. Keeping the announcement secret from one of them, Jean Gaines, was a challenge due to her job: she's the longtime director of the chamber of commerce. The other, Mary Stith, has served for many years on the Geneva school board.

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    Carly Rousso

    Constitutionality of charges argued in fatal 2012 Highland Park huffing case

    The trial for a Highland Park motorist accused of huffing computer dust cleaner minutes before striking and killing a 5-year-old girl was delayed Tuesday. Lake County Judge James K. Booras requested more time to allow attorneys to argue the constitutionality of charging Carly Rousso, 19, with aggravated driving under the influence of an intoxicating compound in the September 2012 accident.

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    Hoffman Estates hires contractor to survey roads for 2014 street project

    A contract approved by the village board Monday night allows Hoffman Estates employees to focus on finishing the reconstruction of Hassell Road while an outside firm provides workers to survey areas that will be included in the newly expanded 2014 and 2015 street projects. The board unanimously approved a contract with Marchris Engineering of Schaumburg in an amount not to exceed $24,400. “This...

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    Kirk Dillard

    Dillard picks up DuPage GOP backing

    State Sen. Kirk Dillard Tuesday won the support of the Republican Party in his home of DuPage County, where the candidate for governor has pins a lot of his primary election hopes.

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    Lake County creates new position to focus on green programs

    Changes approved Tuesday by the Lake County Board relaxed zoning standards to allow bee keeping and hen raising on residential lots as a way to encourage local food production. In the bigger picture, the board also approved a $488 million 2014 budget that includes the position of sustainability director. “This will be a person who in essence will be leading our green initiatives,” said County...

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    Larkin High School graduate Greg White, who is awaiting a double-lung transplant, poses with Chicago Blackhawks forward Marian Hossa. White’s family and friends have raised more than $50,000, out of an overall goal of $70,000, for his transplant operation.

    Nearly $50,000 raised for Larkin grad awaiting lung transplant

    More than $50,000 has been raised in the past two years for Greg White, a 2013 Larkin High School graduate awaiting a double-lung transplant because of the cystic fibrosis ravaging his lungs. That includes nearly $3,000 collected during a weekend fundraiser at Old Towne Pub & Eatery in St. Charles.

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    Carol Stream Park District to allow alcohol sales

    Visitors to McCaslin Park and Fountain View Recreation Center in Carol Stream may be allowed to drink beer and wine beginning next year. The park district board this week unanimously agreed to allow alcohol sales at authorized adult softball tournaments and private rentals.

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    A jury found television infomercial pitchman Kevin Trudeau guilty of criminal contempt Tuesday.

    TV pitchman Trudeau jailed after jurors find him guilty

    Jurors deliberated for less than an hour Tuesday before finding Kevin Trudeau guilty of criminal contempt in weeklong trial during which prosecutors accused the TV pitchman of lying in infomercials to boost sales of his diet book. In a rare move, immediately after the verdict Judge Ronald Guzman revoked the 50-year-old's bail and ordered marshals to take him into custody. White-collar defendants...

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    A nonprofit group is planning to restore the Joel Wiant House in West Chicago. But first, the city will have to agree to sell the historic building, which is located at 151 W. Washington St.

    Work on historic West Chicago house delayed

    More than a month after West Chicago City Council members approved a plan to restore the historic Joel Wiant House, work on the project is yet to begin. This week, they learned that the deal will need to be restructered for the project to proceed.

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    North Suburban Symphony:

    The North Suburban Symphony, based in Lake Forest, hosts its 25th anniversary concert at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 17, at Gorton Community Center, 400 E. Illinois Road, Lake Forest.

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    Discovery museum fundraiser:

    Preview the future home of the Lake County Discovery Museum while sipping champagne, enjoying chocolates and shopping for unique gift items at Chocolate, Champagne and Shopping, on Friday, Nov. 15, from 4:30 to 9 p.m. at the Lake County Forest Preserve general offices, 1899 W. Winchester Road, Libertyville.

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    Arlington Heights accepting entries for photo contest

    The village of Arlington Heights Arts Commission is now accepting entries for its 5th annual Village Hall Photography Competition. The winning photo will be framed, matted and prominently displayed in village hall. The theme of the contest is “Arlington Heights,” and the winning image should be a recognizable scene from the village.

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    Warren hosts financial aid night:

    Warren Township High School’s annual financial aid night will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 7 p.m. in the O’Plaine auditorium, 500 N. O’Plaine Road, Gurnee.

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    Edgar Aguilar, of West Chicago.

    W. Chicago men charged with damaging government property

    Two West Chicago men were arrested and charged with felonies after Batavia police say they damaged government property in Batavia last month. Edgar R. Aguilar, 24, and Roberto Gonzalez, 23, both of West Chicago, were each charged with one count of criminal damage to government property, a class 3 felony, and criminal damage to property, a class 4 felony, according to a release from Batavia police.

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    John Edgell

    Former Antioch Rescue Squad treasurer pleads guilty to theft

    The former treasurer of the Antioch Rescue Squad pleaded guilty to misdemeanor theft in Lake County court Tuesday. John Edgell, 55, formerly of Antioch Township, must repay $25,000 to the Antioch Rescue Squad, perform 100 hours of public service, and have no contact with the ARS under the negotiated plea agreement.

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    Chicago man sentenced for Palatine shooting

    A Chicago man pleaded guilty to discharging a firearm during a May 4, 2013 shooting in the 1800 block of Green Lane in Palatine. In exchange for Freddy Robles' guilty plea to the class 1 felony, a Cook County judge sentenced him to 4 years in prison. No one was injured during the incident, which occurred about 1:30 a.m.

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    Center seeks donations, volunteers for holiday sharing

    People's Resource Center is seeking donations and volunteers for its "Share the Spirit" program in early December.

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    ‘Animal House’ cast members coming to Naperville, Woodridge
    Hollywood Cinemas in Naperville and Woodridge will play host this weekend to a 35th Class Reunion for the hit 1978 comedy "Animal House."

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Tri blotter

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    Public invited to chime in Saturday on Elgin budget

    The Elgin City Council will hold a hearing Saturday morning to give the public a chance to comment on the proposed 2014 budget. Elgin Mayor David Kaptain said he hopes residents will show up armed with constructive ideas. “I hope it’s more than just for people to be critical,” he said.

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    Police investigating crash that killed Harvard man

    McHenry County Sheriff’s police are investigating a single vehicle crash that killed one man on Saturday morning. Police said Howard Walker, 83, drove off the roadway for several hundred feet before hitting a utility pole. He later died from his injuries.

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    Kaneland High to stage ‘Almost, Maine’

    Love, life and magical moments are all a part of the thought-provoking drama "Almost, Maine," which will be performed this weekend at Kaneland High School in Maple Park. “I liked that the show is a series of short stories, as opposed to one long show, because it gives me the chance to focus more closely on character development," said first-time director Christina Staker.

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    Illinois health department releases 5-year road map

    The Illinois agency responsible for public health issues ranging from nursing home regulation to infectious disease control has released a five-year strategic plan in an effort to improve its performance.

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    Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan comfort each other after not being allowed to board a C-130 cargo plane because of limited space Tuesday at the airport in Tacloban, central Philippines.

    Comcast offers free access to Filipino News Channel

    To help Filipinos living in the Chicago area access important news and updates about Typhoon Haiyan, Comcast is now providing its Xfinity digital cable customers with free access to TFC, The Filipino Channel. The free access will run from now through Friday. TFC is on Channel 670 in Chicago’s Comcast lineup. TFC has been providing special in-depth coverage of the deadly typhoon’s aftermath.

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    Huskies to honor veterans at game

    Northern Illinois University will honor the nation’s veterans before and during Wednesday’s game with Ball State. There will be numerous activities to commemorate the veterans, active members of the military and emergency first responders.

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    Rutherford trying to reunite veterans with lost medals

    State Treasurer Dan Rutherford is trying to reunite veterans and their families with lost military medals, ribbons, dog tags and paperwork that was left in unclaimed safe-deposit boxes. Rutherford says his office has 110 unclaimed medals collected from boxes, including 16 Purple Hearts.

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    Kankakee County opens special veterans court

    The Kankakee County veterans court program is one of nearly 170 across the country. It offers second chances to veterans and active-duty military members who have addiction or mental-health issues. It’s similar to special courts for drugs or domestic violence.

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    Counterterrorism expert heads FBI Chicago office

    A counterterrorism expert has taken the reins of one of the FBI’s busiest offices. The agency said on Tuesday that Robert J. Holley had officially started his work as the new head of the Chicago office.

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    Paul Vallas, left, speaks after Gov. Pat Quinn, introduced him as his choice for running mate on Tuesday in Chicago.

    Vallas just as surprised as anyone to be runningmate

    Gov. Pat Quinn’s selection of former Chicago schools CEO Paul Vallas to be his 2014 running mate took many people by surprise — including Vallas himself. Vallas said Tuesday he was initially taken aback that Quinn would choose to be lieutenant governor someone who has held as many high-profile and, at times, controversial positions.

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    Contest to decide who makes Palatine’s best pizza

    The Palatine Jaycees will be holding their annual contest Sunday to determine who makes the best pizza in the Palatine area. More than 10 pizza restaurants that deliver to the Palatine area will take part in the cook-off, which runs from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Durty Nellie’s Bar and Grill, 120 N. Smith Street in Palatine.

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    Evan C. Williams

    Police: Carpentersville man caught with LSD, cocaine

    A 23-year-old Carpentersville man is being held on $50,000 bail after his weekend arrest on allegations he possessed 15 doses of LSD, a felony that carries a minimum six-year prison term. Evan C. Williams, of the 200 block of Harrison Street, also was charged with another felony after refusing to give officers the password to his phone even though they had a search warrant for it, police said.

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    If owners of single-family homes like these rent them out, they would face an annual inspection under a proposal that is likely to be adopted by the Hoffman Estates village board.

    Hoffman Estates rental homes to likely face license fee, inspections

    Starting early next year, the owners of single-family rental homes in Hoffman Estates will likely have to pay a $150 annual license fee and have their rental property inspected by the village. During a planning, building and zoning committee meeting Monday, members of the village board reviewed the proposal for a new property registration and inspection program for single-family homes and...

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    Pace’s Bus On Shoulder program gets commuters through gridlock faster at rush hour.

    Des Plaines railroad bridge among projects to get federal funds

    An interchange at Route 62 and Randall Road, a grade separation at the Union Pacific tracks and Touhy Avenue in Des Plaines, and funding for the West Branch Regional Trail in DuPage County are among the winners as CMAP awards $286 million in federal pollution relief grants.

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    Ice cream served from a shed built sociability in Arlington neighborhood

    The Little Free Libraries movement reminds Arlington Heights history columnist Margery Frisbie of when a candy and ice cream store that sprouted in a shed on the sidewalk became a center of neighborhood sociability. While such a structure wouldn't be allowed today, it served a worthwhile purpose in its time, she says.

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    How to start a business geared to teens

    High school students from Palatine Schaumburg District 211, Northwest Suburban District 214 and Barrington Area Unit District 220 will have the opportunity to learn about running and starting a business from experienced and successful entrepreneurs at an event Friday, Nov. 15.

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    Hoffman Estates Harvest Luncheon set for Nov. 21

    The Village of Hoffman Estates Commission for Senior Citizens will hold its largest annual event, the Harvest Luncheon, on Thursday, Nov. 21 at the Stonegate Conference & Banquet Centre, 2401 W. Higgins Road. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. and the event begins at noon. The cost is $18 per person.

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    Arlene Juracek, now the mayor of Mount Prospect, greets visitors to one of the home in the historical society’s 2006 holiday housewalk. The event is the group’s biggest fundraiser of the year

    Mount Prospect holiday housewalk tickets on sale

    Tickets are now on sale for the Mount Prospect Historical Society’s 26th annual Holiday Housewalk, which will highlight Mount Prospect’s historic Prospect Park Country Club subdivision, south of the tracks and east of the Mount Prospect Country Club golf course. The walk will be from 3:30 to 9 p.m. Friday, Dec. 6. The interiors of five private homes will be featured. The exteriors of two other...

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    Kirk says he won't endorse anyone in GOP primary

    Republican Sen. Mark Kirk says he won't endorse any candidate in Illinois' GOP gubernatorial primary. However, Kirk gave some advice. He contends the only way Republicans will take control of the governor's mansion is to be moderate on social issues.

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    Jean and Jerry Gieraltowski of Naperville have put in 2,937 volunteer hours since 2001 at the DuPage County Historical Museum.

    Naperville couple honored for volunteer work with DuPage Historical Museum

    Jean and Jerry Gieraltowski of Naperville recently were named 2013 Volunteers of the Year by the Illinois Association of Museums for the hours they have donated to the DuPage County Historical Museum since 2001.

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    The flood-prone village of Newtok near Alaska’s storm-battered coast is running out of time as coastal erosion creeps ever closer to the Yup’ik Eskimo community.

    Tribal dispute puts Alaska village in limbo

    The flood-prone village of Newtok near Alaska’s storm-battered coast is running out of time as coastal erosion creeps ever closer to the Yup’ik Eskimo community. As residents wait for a new village to be built on higher ground nine miles away, a dispute over who is in charge has led to a rare intervention by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, which ruled that the sitting tribal council no longer...

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    Joanne Bascetta scatters flower petals outside the apartment that was scene of a Monday shooting rampage, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013 in Brooklyn, New York. Police said gunman Ali Akbar Mahammadi Rafie, 29, a musician, killed himself on the roof after shooting to death two members of the Iranian indie rock band Yellow Dogs, a third musician and wounding a fourth person early Monday morning.

    Slain musicians came to NYC for music freedom

    Iranian musicians Soroush and Arash Farazmand came to the United States to pursue their passion — playing music in an indie rock band called the Yellow Dogs. Instead of achieving fame for their songs, they gained notoriety for their horrific deaths. The brothers were among three men shot and killed in their Brooklyn apartment early Monday by a fellow musician who police say was upset over being...

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    District 300 to seek higher property tax levy

    Community Unit School District 300 officials have set the district's preliminary levy at about $200 million, but officials stress that the figure is a placeholder until the county clerks gives them the valuation of the district's property in April. The district lies within Kane, Cook, McHenry and DeKalb Counties.

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    Live reindeer will be part of the annual Lights of Lisle Festival that will take center stage Dec. 7 and 8.

    Lisle makes plans to flip switch on holidays

    Thousands of luminarias, twinkling tree lights and storefront decorations will transform downtown into a magical place Dec. 7 and 8 during the annual Lights of Lisle Festival.

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    Lombard will celebrate the arrival of the holidays with its eighth annual “Jinglebell Jubilee” Dec. 7.

    Lombard ringing in the season with Jinglebell Jubilee

    Several community organizations will usher in the holiday season on Dec. 7 in Lombard’s historic downtown with the annual “Jinglebell Jubilee.”

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    Geneva school board seeks tax hike, but not as much as it could

    The Geneva school district won't ask for quite as much property tax money as it could legally get, the board decided Monday. But taxpayers are still going to pay more, as the debt-repayment portion of their bill will rise to meet escalating bills.

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    Fatal cougar attack similar to Calif. lion mauling

    The mauling death of a longtime employee cleaning a cougar enclosure at a suburban Portland wildcat sanctuary this weekend is eerily similar to that of an intern killed by a lion at a wildcat park in California earlier this year.

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    Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., center, grandson Cole Inhofe, left, and son Perry Inhofe, right. Dr. Perry Inhofe was killed in a weekend plane crash in northeast Oklahoma.

    Okla. Sen. Inhofe’s son, 52, killed in plane crash

    The son of U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe was killed in a weekend plane crash in northeast Oklahoma, the U.S. Secretary of Defense confirmed. Dr. Perry Inhofe, a 52-year-old orthopedic surgeon, died when the small plane he was piloting crashed Sunday.

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    Nuclear talks with Iran have failed to reach agreement, but U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said differences between Tehran and six world powers made “significant progress.”

    Obama faces worry at home, abroad over Iran talks

    President Barack Obama’s hopes for a nuclear deal with Iran now depend in part on his ability to keep a lid on both hard-liners on Capitol Hill and anxious allies abroad, including Israel, the Arab Gulf states and even France.

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    First lady Michelle Obama is joining President Barack Obama’s efforts to get the United States on track to have the highest percentage of college graduates by 2020.

    First lady to delve into education initiative

    Edging into a broader policy role, Michelle Obama is joining President Barack Obama’s efforts to get the United States on track to have the highest percentage of college graduates by 2020.

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    Tom Goldstein, is not just the founder, owner and publisher of SCOTUSblog, named for the acronym for the Supreme Court of the United States. He also argues before the court, comments on and analyzes news on MSNBC and is quoted widely in media accounts. The court’s justices themselves read the award-winning SCOTUSblog, but unlike other media it has no official status in the marble courthouse.

    Legal blog seeks recognition from high court

    One of the most influential news outlets covering the Supreme Court sets up shop on big decision days not in the pressroom with other reporters, but in the court’s cafeteria. The justices themselves read the award-winning SCOTUSblog, but unlike other media it has no official status in the marble courthouse. This curious situation is attributable almost entirely to the unusual, if not unique,...

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    Court won’t overturn Rasta pictures decision

    The Supreme Court won’t hear an appeal from a photographer who said that painter Richard Prince violated his copyrights with paintings and collages based on the photographer’s published works.

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    High court won’t hear Okla. ultrasound case

    The Supreme Court is declining to revive Oklahoma’s strict ultrasound law for women seeking abortions. The justices said Tuesday they will let stand a state Supreme Court ruling that struck down the 2011 law passed by Oklahoma’s legislature.

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    Survivors walk in typhoon ravaged Tacloban city in central Philippines on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013. The Philippines emerged as a rising economic star in Asia but the trail of death and destruction left by Typhoon Haiyan has highlighted a key weakness: fragile infrastructure resulting from decades of neglect and corruption.

    Typhoon highlights weak Philippine infrastructure

    Under a reforming president, the Philippines emerged as a rising economic star in Asia but the trail of death and destruction left by Typhoon Haiyan has highlighted a key weakness: fragile and patchy infrastructure after decades of neglect and corruption.

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    Dan Tsutsumi took a first look at a makeover of his Arlington Heights home on Monday afternoon. Tsutsumi, a veteran who served tours of duty in Iraq, was paralyzed after a swimming accident which occurred after his time of military service.

    Arlington Heights hero gets a new home

    This morning, Dan Tsutsumi will wake up in his own room for the first time in 17 months. The 27-year-old paralyzed Marine Corps veteran has been sleeping in a hospital bed in his parents' dining room for a year, but last night he slept in a new, fully accessible studio built by Designing for Veterans.“It's just wonderful in here,” he said.

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    Dawn Patrol: Icy roads; ‘minor’ Derrick Rose injury?

    Falling temps, snow create icy roads. Moving Wall’s Aurora visit comes to a close. Overdue honors bestowed at Veterans Day ceremony. Mundelein restricts electronic cigarette sales. Kane County prepares for influx of weddings. Hits keep coming for Bears. Derrick Rose injured in Bulls win.

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    A step toward more classrooms in District 41

    Glen Ellyn Elementary District 41’s school board unanimously approved to move forward with phase one of its facilities project on Monday — but not before one board member voiced caution about the next steps.

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    The stereotype would have husbands opting to get married on 11/12/13 or some other easy-to-remember date. But a survey by David’s Bridal says 43 percent of brides are interested in scheduling their weddings on an “iconic date.”

    11/12/13: Count on a lot of weddings today

    Today is 11/12/13, a date that will live in fame for about as long as Oct. 11, 2012. Sure, it makes for an easy-to-remember wedding anniversary, but can't your phone keep track of that for you? “When 7/7/07 happened and all of a sudden we had an estimated 66,000 weddings on one day, it caught our attention,” says Brian Beitler, executive vice president of David’s Bridal.

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    History skits fed Odenkirk’s acting bug at Naperville school

    Mentors? Comedian/actor/writer Bob Odenkirk from LaGrange and Naperville has had a few, most notably Second City fixture Del Close. But reaching, way, way back, Odenkirk credited a social studies teacher at Jefferson Junior High School in Naperville with providing the pivotal moment that changed his life.

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    Naperville Marathon runner Kathy Contreras of Aurora embraces DuPage County Forest Preserve District police officer Lou Addante, who helped guide her to the finish line Sunday after she became lost during her seven-hour run.

    Forest cop gives lost runner spirited escort to Naperville Marathon finish

    Kathy Contreras figured if she could just start the Naperville Marathon, she could finish. But midway through, Contreras got lost and low on supplies. That's when DuPage County Forest Preserve District police officer Lou Addante and a group of strangers came to the rescue, making for one of the most triumphant seven-hour marathon finishes imaginable. “It was like a gift from God,”...

  •  
    Marine Corps veteran Alfred Laseke stands to be recognized during the Veterans Day ceremony Monday at Parkview Elementary in Carpentersville. Laseke, who lives in Rockford, visited Parkview since his grandson, Tommy Schnackel, is a third-grader at the school.

    Paying tribute to veterans in Carpentersville

    The village of Carpentersville celebrated Veterans Day with a ceremony inside Parkview Elementary School including a drum line from Dundee-Crown High School, a song by Parkview students and a rifle salute by American Legion members.

Sports

  •  

    Self, Radtke make big impact on campus

    Rhode Island’s Layne Self and Northern Illinois’ Jenna Radtke, both freshmen, have wasted little time making an impact for their women’s volleyball teams. Each former Lake County volleyball standout recently earned weekly awards from their conferences.

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    Over the last two seasons, no one has more NFL receptions (178) than Brandon Marshall, and his 19 TD catches are second in the league in that same time.

    Sack-minded Ravens to challenge Bears’ O-Line

    With a defense beaten down by injuries, there's even more pressure on the Bears' explosive offense to continue to carry the team. But to do that the Bears offense needs a better effort than it got last week from the O-line.

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    Slezak, Stanek pick up CCIW awards

    North Central had plenty on the line when it took the field against Wheaton College on Saturday.

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    Elgin Community College’s Zach Cooper makes his way around a block by College of DuPage’s Ryan Rader in the first half on Tuesday.

    Elgin CC outlasts College of DuPage

    The Elgin Community College men’s basketball team held off a furious rally in the closing minutes to outlast visiting College of DuPage, 85-81, Tuesday night at the Events Center in Elgin.

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    Harper can’t keep up with Illinois Central

    Suffering through a lopsided loss is a little easier when the foe is so highly regarded.Harper College’s women’s basketball team fell 94-36 to the NJCAA’s second-ranked team, Illinois Central (3-0), in nonconference play Tuesday a the Sports and Wellness Center in Palatine.“We knew we were going to have our hands full tonight,” said first-year Harper coach Jenny Turpel.Harper’s leading scorer last year, Monica Hinderer, had a team-high 16 points.Hinderer and Harper (0-3) had more success in the second half as the Hawks adjusted to Illinois Central’s defensive approach. “I just adjusted to how they were guarding me,” Hinderer said of playing against an assortment of athletic post players. Despite falling short in the Hawks’ home opener, Turpel said there were valuable lessons learned Tuesday that she hopes will pay dividends in time for Thursday’s contest against Moraine Valley.“We have more to work on,” Turpel said. “Having them see the things that they struggle with is enough to get them motivated.”

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    Illinois College finishes fast at Harper

    It was a tale of two halves Tuesday night at the Harper College Sports and Wellness Center as the Hawks men’s basketball dropped a 93-78 decision to visiting Illinois Central College in nonconference play. After the Cougars (3-1) started fast, scoring the game’s first 10 points, the Hawks (0-3) quickly countered and were able to take the lead by the half.

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    Libertyville quarterback Anthony Monken, here delivering a pass to receiver Sean Ferraro, is headed for collegiate quarterbacking at Louisiana-Monroe.

    Libertyville’s Monken pockets Louisiana-Monroe’s offer

    Anthony Monken, a dropback QB, waited. And Louisiana-Monroe made it well worth it, as Monken will attend next season on scholarship.

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    Wisconsin’s Josh Gasser (21) and Nigel Hayes vie for a rebound with Florida’s Patric Young during the first half of Tuesday’s game in Madison, Wis.

    No. 20 Wisconsin defeats No. 11 Florida

    Sam Dekker scored 16 points, Traevon Jackson added 13 and No. 20 Wisconsin overcame a sloppy start Tuesday night to hold off No. 11 Florida in its home opener, 59-53.

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    Elgin Community College’s Porsche Griggs shoots over a block by College of DuPage’s Melissa Niggins in the second half on Tuesday in Elgin.

    Elgin CC hangs on to beat College of DuPage

    The Spartans survived. Elgin Community College’s women’s basketball team built a double-digit lead midway through the second half, then held on for dear life as College of DuPage staged a furious rally. When the dust settled, the Spartans hung on for a 66-64 nonconference victory at the Events Center in Elgin Tuesday night. Jordan Bartelt and Alexa Diaz scored 16 points apiece to lead ECC, which moved to 2-1 on the season. Breanna Venson had 12 points for COD.

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    Chicago State outlasts Jacksonville State

    Quinton Pippen scored 20 points and drained a late 3-pointer to help Chicago State hold off Jacksonville State 79-75 Tuesday night.

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    Missouri’s Earnest Ross, right, is fouled by Southern Illinois’ Bola Olaniyan as he shoots during the first half of Tuesday’s game in Columbia, Mo.

    SIU drops opener to Mizzou, 72-59

    Jordan Clarkson scored a career-high 31 points and Jabari Brown added 17 to lift Missouri past Southern Illinois 72-59 Tuesday night.

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    Tennessee Tech trips up Loyola

    Dennis Ogbe scored 13 points to lead four players in double figures as Tennesee Tech turned back Loyola of Chicago 74-69 Tuesday night.

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    Marquette’s Juan Anderson drives past Grambling State’s Chandler Thomas during the first half of Tuesday’s game in Milwaukee.

    No. 17 Marquette routs Grambling State

    Chris Otule scored 17 points and Steve Taylor added 16 points and 11 rebounds to help No. 17 Marquette roll over Grambling State 114-71 on Tuesday night.

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    Minnesota’s Andre Hollins, center, shoots as Montana’s Andy Martin (41) and Keron DeShields defend during the first half of Tuesday’s game in Minneapolis.

    Minnesota crushes Montana, 84-58

    Andre Hollins scored 24 points, shooting 8 for 14 from the floor, to lead Minnesota to an easy 84-58 victory on Tuesday over Montana, an NCAA tournament team last season.

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    Ohio State’s Sam Thompson goes up for a dunk against Ohio during the first half of Tuesday’s game in Columbus.

    No. 10 OSU downs Ohio, 79-69

    Aaron Craft scored 17 points — including eight free throws down the stretch — to help No. 10 Ohio State hold off neighboring rival Ohio 79-69 on Tuesday night.

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    Michigan State center Adreian Payne (5), Kentucky forward Julius Randle (30) and Michigan State guard Gary Harris, right, struggle for a loose ball during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    No. 2 is No. 1 as Spartans beat Kentucky 78-74<

    With Keith Appling, Gary Harris and Adreian Payne all scoring in double figures for No. 2 Michigan State, Branden Dawson came up with the biggest basket, tipping in a miss with less than six seconds left to give the Spartans a 78-74 victory over top-ranked Kentucky on Tuesday night.

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    San Francisco 49ers wide receiver Kyle Williams lies on the ground after losing a fumble during overtime of the NFC Championship Game against the New York Giants in 2012.

    49ers release Kyle Williams

    The San Francisco 49ers released wide receiver and return man Kyle Williams, son of White Sox executive Kenny Williams, on Tuesday after three-plus seasons, while also waiving cornerback Perrish Cox.

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    Nebraska guard Tai Webster goes for a basket against Western Illinois guard Jordan Foster, right, and Garret Covington in the second half of Tuesday’s game in Lincoln, Neb.

    Nebraska dispatches WIU 62-47

    Walter Pitchford scored all 14 of his points in the first half to lead four Nebraska players in double figures, and the Cornhuskers defeated Western Illinois 62-47 on Tuesday night to give Tim Miles his 300th coaching victory.

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    Goalie Corey Benjoya has overcome adversity to help lead Stevenson's hockey team to an 11-3-2 start.

    Benjoya helping Stevenson step up

    Standing in front of the goal, Corey Benjoya is in his comfort zone. He’s the Stevenson goalie in his fourth varsity season, anchoring the Patriots who look as though skating next March for the state championship at the United Center isn’t just a hope or dream, but rather, a true, legitimate chance. “Benjoya is rock solid in net,” said Bob Melton, coach of defending state champion New Trier Green. “He is a big goalie, but also able to get from post to post. He is capable of shutting down the state’s best offensive teams.” That includes Melton’s Trevians, as well as Loyola Gold, Glenbrook North and, oh, about five others with a strong chance of skating for state at the UC. Stevenson, though, is leading the pack — the No. 1-ranked team. The Patriots are 11-3-2 overall, with their wins including those over Loyola Gold, Prairie Ridge and Benet Academy.

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    Hjalmarsson’s game jelling early

    Already with 9 points in 18 games, Blackhawks defenseman Niklas Hjalmarsson is within 8 of his career high of 17 points set in 2009-10. “Defensively, I think he’s been rock solid over the last couple years,” Hawks coach Joel Quenneville said. “This year, I think we’ve seen him more with the puck.

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    Who’s ready to work for Renteria, Cubs?

    The Cubs seem to be acting quickly to put together a coaching staff under new manager Rick Renteria. Reports out of the general managers meetings in Orlando, Fla., indicated that onetime Cubs third baseman Bill Mueller is a candidate to become the new hitting coach.

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    In this September file photo, Miami Dolphins guard Richie Incognito (68), center left, and tackle Jonathan Martin (71), center right, sit on the bench during a game against the Saints in New Orleans. The Dolphins’ bullying issue between the two players is just one of the NFL’s latest unwanted storylines.

    Even in crisis, NFL players, fans still love their game

    The NFL has a lot of problems and they’re not going away, but the game has never been more popular, and the men who play are resolute in their belief that there will always be young men willing to play football.

  •  
    Mike Dunleavy finished strong Monday, playing ahead of Jimmy Butler as the Bulls pulled away late.

    Dunleavy delivers in friendly surroundings

    Maybe it was because there was so much Duke love at the United Center on Monday, but Mike Dunleavy finally had a breakout game for the Bulls. He scored a season-high 15 points in the win over Cleveland.

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    Rose listed as day-to-day

    The Bulls released an update on Derrick Rose’s hamstring that supports the idea of a minor injury. “Derrick Rose is listed as day-to-day with a sore right hamstring,” it read.

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    South Elgin senior Ryan Nutof has accepted a scholarship offer to play baseball at the University of Michigan.

    South Elgin’s Nutof headed to Michigan

    Official visits to Ann Arbor in the fall have a way of swaying potential recruits, as was the case last weekend with South Elgin pitcher Ryan Nutof. The 6-foot-2, 180-pound right-hander received 23 offers from colleges in the Big Ten, Atlantic Coast, West Coast, Mid-American and Ohio Valley Conferences, but he narrowed the finalists to Michigan and Penn State. Last weekend’s official visit to the University of Michigan sealed his decision to accept a baseball scholarship that will cover 85 percent of his college expenses. Nutof phoned Wolverines second-year coach Erik Bakich on Monday and accepted the offer.

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    (No heading)
    BC-BBA--AL Manager of the Year Voting,0099AL Manager of the Year VotingBy The Associated PressAs selected by the Baseball Writers' Association of America:(Tabulated on a 5-3-1 basis)Manager, Team 1st 2nd 3rd TotTerry Francona, Indians 16 10 2 112John Farrell, Red Sox 12 10 6 96Bob Melvin, Athletics 2 5 11 36Joe Girardi, Yankees - 2 5 11Joe Maddon, Rays - 2 3 9Jim Leyland, Tigers - 1 - 3Buck Showalter, Orioles - - 1 1Ron Washington, Rangers - - 1 1Ned Yost, Royals - - 1 1

  •  
    Giants catcher Buster Posey suffered a broken leg and three torn ankle ligaments in this collision with the Marlins’ Scott Cousins in 2011.

    MLB might take action on plate collisions

    Lou Brock’s shoulder-to-shoulder collision with Bill Freehan during the 1968 World Series and Pete Rose’s bruising hit on Ray Fosse in the 1970 All-Star game could become relics of baseball history, like the dead-ball era. Major League Baseball Executive Vice President Joe Torre said Tuesday momentum is building toward taking action that would help prevent collisions at home plate.

  •  
    Indiana forward Jeremy Hollowell, right, blocks the shot of LIU Brooklyn guard Jason Brickman in the first half of Tuesday’s game in Bloomington, Ind.

    Hoosiers barely hold off LIU-Brooklyn

    Will Sheehey scored 15 of his 19 points in the second half, making the go-ahead 3-pointer with 1:47 left to lead Indiana past pesky LIU-Brooklyn 73-7 and avoid a stunning upset on Tuesday.

  •  
    Pittsburgh manager Clint Hurdle guided the Pirates to the playoffs in their first winning season since 1992.

    Hurdle, Francona named Managers of the Year

    Terry Francona of the Cleveland Indians and Clint Hurdle of the Pittsburgh Pirates won the Manager of the Year awards Tuesday after guiding their small-budget teams to charming turnarounds.

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    Kansas City Chiefs Dwayne Bowe prepares to play against the Buffalo Bills in Orchard Park, N.Y. Bowe was arrested outside Kansas City over the weekend on charges of speeding and possessing marijuana, authorities said Tuesday.

    Chiefs WR Bowe arrested on pot, speeding charges

    Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Dwayne Bowe was arrested outside Kansas City over the weekend on charges of speeding and possessing marijuana, throwing his status for a pivotal AFC West showdown against the Denver Broncos into question.

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    Boys soccer/Top 20
    Wheeling, Naperville Central and Lake Park are the top 3 teams in the final Daily Herald Top 20 of the boys soccer season.

  •  
    Carly Nolan

    Crystal Lake South’s Nolan picks Cincinnati

    Connecting with a potential future college coach is one of the most important parts of the recruiting process for any athlete in any sport. Crystal Lake South junior volleyball standout Carly Nolan found that connection this past weekend at Cincinnati and with Bearcats’ head coach Molly Alvey.

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    Ohio State WR no longer allowed to talk to media

    Ohio State receiver Evan Spencer said on Monday that the Buckeyes would “wipe the field” with Alabama and whoever is No. 2 in the Bowl Championship Series rankings. Speaking on the Big Ten coaches’ teleconference on Tuesday, coach Urban Meyer said it would be “a long, long time” before the junior would be permitted to talk to reporters again.

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    Notre Dame quarterback Tommy Rees talks with head coach Brian Kelly during a timeout in the fourth quarter of last Saturday’s loss to Pittsburgh.

    Not much at stake for Notre Dame now

    Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly isn’t worried about his team having a lack of motivation for the final two regular-season games. There’s not much at stake for the Fighting Irish (7-3), who were eliminated from a possible BCS bowl berth with a 28-21 loss to Pittsburgh last week. The Irish must now wait to see which conferences are unable to fill all their bowl affiliations.

  •  
    Michigan State’s Jeremy Langford runs between Michigan’s Desmond Morgan (48) and Raymon Taylor for a 40-yard touchdown during the Nov. 2 game in East Lansing. The No. 14 Spartans can clinch at least a share of the Legends Division title with a victory at Nebraska on Saturday,

    Spartans hoping for first win over Nebraska

    If Michigan State beats Nebraska, a spot in the Big Ten championship game is all but assured — but the Cornhuskers have won all seven meetings between the schools.

  •  
    Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch looks to pass after faking the handoff to running back Joel Bouagnon (28) during the first half against Eastern Michigan at Huskie Stadium.

    Northern Illinois, Ball State offenses ready for clash

    Two of the nation's most productive offenses clash as No. 20 Northern Illinois seeks to extend the nation's longest current home winning streak Wednesday night. The Huskies (9-0, 5-0 Mid-American West) go for their 25th straight home win against Ball State (9-1, 6-0) at 7 p.m. at Huskie Stadium. “It's going to be a big challenge for us,” Northern Illinois coach Rod Carey said.

  •  
    John Fahey, president of the World Anti-Doping Agency, speaks during a news conference Tuesday in Johannesburg, South Africa. Fahey says he is confident that cycling’s new leadership will set up an independent commission “within weeks” to look at the sport’s drug-stained past.

    5 things to know from world doping conference

    The four-day summit is the biggest anti-doping gathering in six years. It will culminate Friday with a new anti-doping code being adopted and the election of a new president of the World Anti-Doping Agency.

  •  
    Illinois forward Austin Colbert goes up for a dunk over Jacksonville State guard Rico Sanders (5) during the first half of Sunday’s game in Champaign.

    Illinois faces size test against Valparaiso

    Illinois will see something Wednesday that it hasn’t had to face yet in the young basketball season: a big opponent. The Illini (2-0) take on Valparaiso at home Wednesday night. The Crusaders (2-0) have four players who are 6-9 or taller. That includes a 7-footer in 270-pound center Moussa Gueye.

  •  
    Mexico’s Edwin Hernandez, top, fights for the ball with Lobos’ Manuel Mondragon during a friendly soccer match Saturday. Mexico will play New Zealand twice for a spot in next year’s World Cup. Mexico will host the first leg on Nov. 13 and play at New Zealand on Nov. 20.

    Mexico gets last chance to qualify for World Cup

    Mexico has yet another coach — and a last chance to reach next year’s World Cup in Brazil. El Tri, which last missed a World Cup in 1990, opens a two-game playoff Wednesday against New Zealand, with the winner earning a World Cup berth.

  •  
    Wisconsin’s Sojourn Shelton, right, breaks up a pass intended for Brigham Young’s Mitch Mathews during Saturday’s game in Madison. No. 17 Wisconsin (7-2, 4-1) has won its last four games to stay within shouting distance of No. 3 Ohio State.

    Defense keys Big Ten leaders

    In the Big Ten, title contention is still driven by defense. It’s no coincidence that the three best teams — No. 3 Ohio State, No. 14 Michigan State and No. 17 Wisconsin — have the top three defenses in the league and rank in the top 10 nationally in points allowed per game.

  •  
    The Houston Texans released safety Ed Reed on Tuesday. The 35-year-old Reed was signed to a three-year, $15 million contract in the offseason after he spent his entire 11-year career with Baltimore.

    Texans release safety Ed Reed

    The Houston Texans released nine-time Pro Bowl safety Ed Reed and put running back Arian Foster on injured reserve Tuesday, the latest blows in a disaster of a season. Reed missed the first two games after hip surgery and was recently relegated to a backup role. On Sunday, after Houston’s seventh straight loss, he publicly criticized the team

  •  
    Purdue quarterback Danny Etling throws against Iowa Saturday during the first half in West Lafayette, Ind.

    Purdue tries to shore up line to help QB, RBs

    Purdue freshman quarterback Danny Etling needs more time to make plays. And the Boilermakers’ running backs need more help to get going. So first-year coach Darrell Hazell is making adjustments to his offensive line. "The thing that we’re not getting in our offense right now is the big play in the run,” Hazell said.

  •  
    Penn State quarterback Christian Hackenberg hands the ball to running back Bill Belton Saturday during the first quarter against Minnesota in Minneapolis.

    Proud O’Brien keeping Penn State motivated

    Bill O’Brien’s mid-November concern is more about how his Penn State team will play down the stretch — not whether it has something to play for. The second-year coach has been able to motivate his Nittany Lions time and again after facing adversity. And now — as that has happened again — this is just the way he’s going to handle it.

  •  
    Wheaton Academy’s Marshall West reacts after scoring against St. Ignatius in Class 2A state semifinal soccer game in Hoffman Estates.

    Images: Daily Herald prep photos of the week
    The Daily Herald Prep Photos of the Week gallery includes the best high school sports images by our photographers featuring football, soccer, volleyball and cross country.

  •  

    Judson lacks experience but has depth

    Things are looking up for the Judson University men’s basketball team. The Eagles, who went 6-24 last year (5-15 in conference play), have already notched a third of that win total through their first five games this season. And Judson has done so with a roster lacking in collegiate experience.

  •  
    Reed Nosbisch

    Elgin CC has some experience

    The Elgin Community College men’s basketball team started the 2012-2013 season with a 7-5 mark. But injuries and other circumstances played a major role in the derailment of last year’s campaign as the Spartans limped to a 9-22 overall mark and finished 2-12 in the Illinois Skyway Collegiate Conference.

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    Illinois defensive end Whitney Mercilus (85) and linebacker Jonathan Brown (45) combine to sack Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller during the 2011 game. Ohio State attempted just four passes — completing one — in a 17-7 victory.

    Ohio State remembers last win in Champaign

    Ohio State offensive lineman Jack Mewhort vividly recalls the last time the Buckeyes played at Illinois. He remembers the swirling winds. He remembers the conservative game plan. But mostly he remembers that the Buckeyes only completed one pass and won the game. A lot has changed since they only attempted four passes while running the ball 51 times.

  •  
    Blackhawks center Andrew Shaw reacts after scoring the game-winning goal against the Boston Bruins in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup.

    Blackhawks, Shaw agree to two-year contract

    The Blackhawks have agreed to terms with forward Andrew Shaw on a two-year contract extension through the 2015-16 season. The 22-year-old Shaw had nine goals and six assists in 48 games last year, his first full season in the NHL.

  •  
    Streamwood senior Hannah McGlone has verbally committed to accept a scholarship offer from Winona State University.

    Streamwood’s McGlone chooses Winona State

    Combining what she was looking for academically along with a strong basketball program made Hannah McGlone’s college choice a fairly easy one. After a weekend visit McGlone, Streamwood’s 6-foot senior center, gave Winona State coach Scott Ballard her verbal commitment to accept a scholarship at the NCAA Division II school in Minnesota.

  •  
    Chicago Bears head coach Marc Trestman looks out at his team during the second half of an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions, Sunday, Nov. 10, 2013, in Chicago. The Lions won 21-19. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

    Trestman made the wrong call on Cutler

    Head coach Marc Trestman has made some very good moves with the Bears so far this season, but starting a recovering Jay Cutler over Josh McCown at quarterback could prove to be very costly for the Chicago Bears.

Business

  •  
    In this July 26, 2013, photo, Des Moines Water Works lab technician Bill Blubaugh takes a water sample from the Raccoon River in Des Moines. The water works has faced high nitrate levels for many years in the Des Moines and Raccoon Rivers, which supply drinking water to 500,000 people and the mandate to increase ethanol production, with millions of acres of new row crops being planted, is helping to increase nitrate pollution in municipal water supplies like Des Moines.

    Illinois farmers pull land out of conservation

    For all its scenic splendor in a mostly pancake-flat state, southern Illinois can be a hassle for farmers. The soil isn't as fertile as up north, and the hilly terrain lends itself to erosion. That's why so many farmers, like others across the Corn Belt, set aside much of their land years ago to a federal program that paid them to keep it idle in the spirit of conservation.

  •  
    This March 2, 2007, file photo shows a charter bus carrying the Bluffton University baseball team from Ohio after it plunged off a highway ramp in Atlanta and slammed into the I-75 pavement below. Five players, the bus driver and his wife were killed. Twenty-eight others were injured.

    Seat belts on commercial buses delayed 45 years

    After a drunken driver on a California highway slammed into a bus carrying passengers to Las Vegas, killing 19, investigators said a lack of seat belts contributed to the high death toll. But 45 years later, safety advocates are still waiting for the government to act on seat belts and other measures to protect bus passengers.

  •  
    The government’s predictions of ethanol’s benefits have proven so inaccurate that independent scientists question whether it will ever achieve its main environmental goal: reducing greenhouse gases.

    The secret environmental cost of US ethanol policy

    When President George W. Bush signed a law in 2007 requiring oil companies to add billions of gallons of ethanol to their gasoline each year, he predicted it would make the country “stronger, cleaner and more secure.” But the ethanol era has proven far more damaging to the environment than politicians promised and much worse than the government admits today.

  •  
    Specialist Vincent Surace works at the post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange that handles Intercontinental Exchange Tuesday. The ICE and NYSE Euronext tie-up will close Wednesday.

    U.S. stocks fall as earnings disappoint

    Disappointing company earnings and falling oil prices pulled stocks back from record highs on Tuesday. Energy stocks fell after oil dropped to a five-month low.

  •  
    Cheri Sisson

    Hoffman Estates chamber director Sisson retiring Jan. 3

    Cheri Sisson, the executive director of the Hoffman Estates Chamber of Commerce and Industry since 2008 and only the second director in the organization’s history, will retire Jan. 3. Sisson joined the chamber in 2008, when many similar organizations were dissolving amid the economic recession.

  •  
    In this July 26, 2013 photo, the Sturgeon Cemetery near Sewal, Iowa stands as an island among corn plants. Forty-four percent of the nation’s corn crop in 2012 was used for fuel, about twice the rate seen in 2006.

    Prairies vanish in the U.S. push for green energy

    Robert Malsam nearly went broke in the 1980s when corn was cheap. So now that prices are high and he can finally make a profit, he’s not about to apologize for ripping up prairieland to plant corn. Across the Dakotas and Nebraska, more than 1 million acres of the Great Plains are giving way to corn fields as farmers transform the wild expanse that once served as the backdrop for American pioneers.

  •  
    A new Associated Press investigation, which found that ethanol hasn’t lived up to some of the government’s clean-energy promises, is drawing a fierce response from the ethanol industry.

    Industry takes aim at AP ethanol investigation

    A new Associated Press investigation, which found that ethanol hasn’t lived up to some of the government’s clean-energy promises, is drawing a fierce response from the ethanol industry. In an unusual campaign, ethanol producers, corn growers and its lobbying and public relations firms have criticized and sought to alter the story, which was released to some outlets earlier and is being published online and in newspapers Tuesday.

  •  
    The Justice Department says it has reached an agreement to allow the merger of the two airlines. The agreement requires them to scale back the size of the merger at key airports in Washington and other big cities.

    Gov’t to allow American, US Airways merger

    The Justice Department says it has reached an agreement to allow American Airlines and US Airways to merge, creating the world’s biggest airline. The agreement requires the airlines to scale back the size of the merger at Washington’s Reagan National Airport and in other big cities.

  •  
    Daniel N. Mendelson, CEO of data analysis firm Avalere Health. Medicaid has signed up 444,000 people in 10 states in the six weeks since open enrollment began, according to Avalere Health, a market analysis firm that compiled data from those states.

    Medicaid is health overhaul’s early success story

    The underdog of government health care programs is emerging as the rare early success story of President Barack Obama’s technologically challenged health overhaul. Often dismissed, Medicaid has signed up 444,000 people in 10 states in the six weeks since open enrollment began, according to Avalere Health, a market analysis firm that compiled data from those states.

  •  
    This photo taken April 4, 2012, Brent Zettl President and CEO of Prairie Plant Systems Inc. and SubTerra LLC looks at some of their plants in a former copper mine in White Pine, Mich. The company grows a legume and a tuber used to manufacture pharmaceuticals including one that is going into pre clinical trial to be used to treat Severe Combined Immunodeficiency also known as Bubble Boy Syndrome.

    Health overhaul debate snags Senate pharmacy bill

    A year after a meningitis outbreak from contaminated pain injections killed at least 64 people and sickened hundreds, Congress is ready to increase federal oversight over compounding pharmacies that custom-mix medications. Before the bill gets to President Barack Obama for his signature, it first has to clear a hurdle put in its path by Louisiana Sen. David Vitter in his ongoing campaign to discredit the president's health care overhaul.

  •  
    Holiday shoppers at the Elgin-area Walmart last year.

    Wal-Mart steps up competition for holiday shopping

    As more stores push for Thanksgiving shoppers, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is stepping up its game for the official kickoff to the holiday shopping season. The world's largest retailer said Tuesday that it will start to offer its holiday blockbuster deals at 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving at its stores, two hours earlier than last year.

  •  

    Late-payment rate on mortgages down in third quarter

    Fewer U.S. homeowners are falling behind on their mortgage payments, aided by rising home values, low interest rates and stable job gains. The trend brought down the national late-payment rate on home loans in the third quarter to a five-year low, credit reporting agency TransUnion said Tuesday.

  •  
    Gov. Jay Inslee, center, adjusts his glasses as he prepares to sign legislation to help keep production of Boeing’s new 777X in Washington, Monday.

    Washington governor signs Boeing incentive bills

    Gov. Jay Inslee gave final approval Monday to a package of tax breaks for Boeing Co. in hopes of landing the company’s new 777X, signing legislation at Seattle’s Museum of Flight at Boeing Field. Now attention is focused on a contract vote later this week by the Machinists union.

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    WisconsinJoAnn Crupi, right, arrives at federal court in New York, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013. Prosecutors say fictitious trades and phantom accounts were created with help from Crupi, an account manager. (

    N.Y. ex-Madoff worker kept mouth shut as fraud grew

    In the many years he spent as a trader at Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities LLC, David Kugel learned that investments that Madoff claimed to be making for clients were fiction.Kugel, 68, knew that because he was instrumental in concocting the phony trades. But he always kept his mouth shut. Madoff “was my boss,” he testified at the trial of five former Madoff employees in federal court in Manhattan.

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    The latest legal battle between the world’s two biggest smartphone makers is getting underway in Silicon Valley.

    Many millions at stake at 2nd Apple-Samsung trial
    The latest legal battle between the world’s two biggest smartphone makers is getting underway in Silicon Valley. Lawyers for Apple and Samsung Electronics will begin picking a jury Tuesday that will decide how much Samsung owes Apple for infringing its patents.

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    A Chicago group that promotes improvements in the city’s Loop business district has announced its first strategic action plan, a five-year blueprint for attracting more people and investment to the area.

    Chicago Loop Alliance unveils 1st strategic plan

    A Chicago group that promotes improvements in the city’s Loop business district has announced its first strategic action plan, a five-year blueprint for attracting more people and investment to the area. The Chicago Loop Alliance announced the plan Monday. It includes projects such as transforming Wabash Avenue with lighting, cleanliness and art into a tourist destination that celebrates Chicago’s elevated train.

Life & Entertainment

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    Sometimes in divorce, it’s better to be decent than right

    His ex-wife does not want his girlfriend to attend his daughter's high school graduation and party. How should he handle this situation? He thinks it is childish for his ex-spouse to insist that the woman he will be living with, and dating for over two years by then, not come. Is he being unreasonable?

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    Egg, Green Chilli and Gruyere Strata with Frozen Waffle Bruschetta

    FINAL FOUR: Christine Murphy of Palatine
    FINAL FOUR: Christine Murphy of Palatine

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    Almond Butter and Bacon-Stuffed Celery Boats; Phyllo Bombs (with Twisted Tops) and Beef Wellington with Almond Butter Pate, both served with a Twizzler Port Sauce; and Savory Baklava

    2013 COOK OF THE YEAR: Dan Rich of Elgin
    Dan Rich of Elgin named the 2013 Cook of the Year.

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    Find out about the latest trends in confectionary creations at the America's Baking and Sweets Show this weekend at the Renaissance Schaumburg Hotel and Convention Center.

    Best bets: Sweet treats and antiques aplenty

    Celebrity chefs — and their delicious creations — will be featured stars at America's Baking and Sweets Show, in Schaumburg. Richard Lewis (and his famous paranoia) venture to Rosemont for a set of concerts Friday night. And St. Charles' Pheasant Run Resort plays host to the Chicagoland Antique Advertising, Slot-Machine and Jukebox show, bringing a plethora memorabilia for collectors to see.

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    Writer and illustrator Bruce McCall teamed up with TV host David Letterman for their new book, “This Land Was Made for You and Me (But Mostly Me).”

    Letterman books it with artist-writer Bruce McCall

    Hear David Letterman, who knows something about comedy, pay tribute to the comic artistry of Bruce McCall. “The standard by which comedy should be judged,” says Letterman. No wonder Dave teamed up with McCall for their new book, “This Land Was Made for You and Me (But Mostly Me)” with the sassy subtitle “Billionaires in the Wild.” Their book treats readers to the McCallian charm that Letterman has adored since the 1970s.

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    Angela Lansbury says “it’s a mistake” for NBC to call a new show “Murder, She Wrote.”

    Lansbury: Mistake to recycle ‘Murder, She Wrote’

    Angela Lansbury says “it’s a mistake” for NBC to call a new series “Murder, She Wrote.” The network recently announced plans to reboot the show with Oscar-winner Octavia Spencer as its star. Spencer acknowledged her new TV project on Twitter last month. “I think it’s a mistake to call it ‘Murder, She Wrote,’” Lansbury said.

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    Mark Wahlberg, and his brother Donnie, will star in a new reality show, “Wahlburgers,” set in his family’s Boston restaurant.

    Wahlbergs to star in reality restaurant show

    A&E network is feasting on the Wahlberg brothers, who will star in a new reality show titled, “Wahlburgers,” and set in the family’s Boston restaurant.

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    Christine Gallup’s sauteed kale rice in a nutrient-rich dinner.

    Sauteed Kale Rice
    Sautéed Kale Rice: Christine Gallup

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    Brownie batter cloaks sandwich cookies and chocolate chip cookie dough for a double decadent treat.

    Double Cookie Brownies
    Double Cookie Brownies: Christine Gallup

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    Easy Weeknight Tacos
    Easy Weeknight Tacos: Christine Gallup

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    Christine Gallup builds dinner around nutrient-rich recipes like Sauteed Kale Rice, so her family can enjoy treats like her Double Cookie Brownies.

    Cook of the Week: Dietitian knows how to treat her family

    While baking is Christine Gallup's passion, her day job as a registered dietitian helps her keep treats in perspective. “We do have healthy food in the house, but I'm more focused on balance,” the Hoffman Estates mom says. “I'll suggest a piece of fruit to my kids if they're low on their fruit quotient. It doesn't work to be overly restrictive.”

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    Parents want to know how much input they can have in daughter’s marriage

    Parents want to know if they should help their daughter escape marriage to the guy they originally warned her about in the first place. Carolyn Hax says offer help with a lawyer or a counselor first.

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    Boston Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz laughs after being named MVP after Game 6 of baseball’s World Series in Boston. MTV Networks and Major League Baseball on Monday said they are collaborating on a weekly 30-episode series that melds pop culture and baseball. Ortiz and Pittsburgh Pirates All-Star outfielder Andrew McCutchen are both executive producers of the series, set to begin next spring.

    MTV and Major League Baseball announce partnership

    As if winning the World Series MVP wasn’t enough, Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz is becoming a producer of his own MTV television show. MTV Networks and Major League Baseball said Monday they are collaborating on a weekly 30-episode series that melds pop culture and baseball. Ortiz and Pittsburgh Pirates All-Star outfielder Andrew McCutchen are both executive producers of the series, set to begin next spring around the start of the new season.

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    Ecology professor Ricardo Freitas weighs a broad-snouted caiman before releasing it back in the water channel in the affluent Recreio dos Bandeirantes suburb of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. While local caimans average about 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) long and weigh about 10 kilograms (22 pounds), older males can be up to twice as long and much heavier. Still, Freitas has been known to dive into the water to catch some with his bare hands.

    Thousands of caimans thrive in Rio’s urban sprawl

    Some 5,000 to 6,000 broad-snouted caimans live in fetid lagoon systems of western Rio de Janeiro, conservationists say, and there’s a chance that visitors could have an encounter with one, though experts hasten to add that the caimans, smaller and less aggressive than alligators or crocodiles, are not considered a threat to humans.

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    Lady Gaga, “Artpop”

    Lady Gaga’s ‘Artpop’ suffers as art and pop

    The mission of some art, particularly the modern kind, is to provoke — to present outlandish concepts, explore untraditional ideas, challenge traditional norms — and leave you with many questions, searching for answers. If that is the goal of Lady Gaga’s fourth album, “Artpop,” then she’s already got a success on her hands. If the goal, however, is to entertain, then she fails, though at least she does it in her typical spectacular fashion.

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    Michael Angelakos of the electro-pop band Passion Pit performs at the Lollapalooza music festival in Chicago’s Grant Park on Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. This year, Passion Pit sold out Madison Square Garden.

    Newer, budding music acts sell out top venues

    In just two years, English singer Ed Sheeran has gone from the small stage to the big league. Sheeran is part of a breed of newer and lesser known acts who are able to sell out top venues, even if they aren’t pushing millions and millions of albums and singles like Eminem and Justin Timberlake, or dominating with chart-topping tracks and radio airplay like Katy Perry or Rihanna.

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    Cannellini Bean and Herb Dip
    Cannelli Bean and Herb Dip: Lean and Lovin' it

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    Cannelli beans stand in for chickpeas in a hummus-like dip for chips for vegetables.

    Lean and lovin’ it: Grading our nation’s changing diet

    Earlier this year, Bonnie Liebman, director of nutrition at Nutrition Action Healthletter, created a nutritional report card covering 1970 to 2010. Using USDA statistics she looked at the changing American diet and noted, “This isn’t a report card you’d want to post on the fridge.”

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    Annie Overboe

    From the Food Editor: Welcoming baking season with brownies

    Deborah Pankey welcomes you to baking season with a brownie demonstration at America's Baking and Sweets Show Nov. 15 to 17 in Schaumburg. Also learn about online cake decorating classes and a baking stuff organizer.

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    Alex O’Loughlin says he’s signed up for two more seasons of “Hawaii Five-0” but is also looking forward to a career beyond the hit TV series.

    Alex O’Loughlin ponders future on ‘Hawaii Five-0’

    Alex O’Loughlin says he’s signed up for two more seasons of “Hawaii Five-0” but is looking forward to a career beyond the hit TV series. The 38-year-old actor plays policeman Steve McGarrett on the CBS series, now in its fourth season. He said the intense workload and shooting schedule had kept him out of other potential projects.

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    Naperville native Bob Odenkirk played Saul Goodman in “Breaking Bad.” Now a spinoff series “Better Call Saul” is on the way.

    ‘Breaking Bad’ star called Naperville ‘Nowheresville’

    Bob Odenkirk said that when he was a teen, Naperville "felt like a dead end, like Nowheresville. I couldn’t wait to move into a city and be around people who were doing exciting things.” He went on to find plenty of excitment as a co-star of the hit TV series “Breaking Bad.” We contacted Odenkirk to talk about his childhood, his upcoming "Breaking Bad" spinoff, and his role in "Nebraska," a film out Nov. 22.

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    Amaryllis flowers are lovely living holiday decorations.

    Art in the garden: Amaryllis make great flowers for the holidays

    Amaryllis bulbs are easy to grow and make beautiful holiday gifts and decorations. They perform admirably in containers and can be coaxed to re-bloom year after year if you follow these simple steps.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Election commission ruling not just an issue of semantics
    A Daily Herald editorial says a judge was correct to rule against the creation of a Lake County Election Commission, but the issue went beyond a question of constitutional technicalities.

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    Obama’s apology a start, but we deserve better

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: When President Obama said he was sorry for the health care mess-up, he performed the mea culpa as well as anyone in recent history. But is he sorry that he intentionally misled people? I must have missed that part.

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    Can’t pin slavery on all Americans
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor:In response to Richard Cohen’s Nov. 6 column about the “12 Years a Slave,” I saw the movie last week and also found it a very compelling presentation. But I take offense at Mr. Cohen’s use of the imperial “we” crediting all of us with slavery.

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    Obama taking credit for what he didn’t do
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: President Obama recently stated that our oil production has increased to record levels, implying that he is responsible for that. The reality is that oil production on federal land, which is the only one he controls, is down substantially because he refuses to allow new drilling. But again he takes credit for something he actually is hurting.

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    President not following through
    A Barrington letter to the editor: Did you hear? This is great. President Obama promised to have the Unaffordable Care Act website fixed soon. Wow! Let’s see how some of his other promises worked

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    Let’s reinforce good, positive behavior
    A South Elgin letter to the editor: There is a big storm brewing in our state and in our nation between “conservatives” and “liberals” and I appreciate the coverage by which the Daily Herald alerts us to the issues. The Nov. 2 and 3 editions reported on Tea Party organizations on the national level, and the Restore Illinois Summit convention at Rosemont. I hope voters are paying attention to the negative attitudes being expressed by many so-called conservatives.

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    Citizens initiative needs your support
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Illinois lawmakers are about to take away our right to initiate petitions for a ballot vote. Last summer, 14 petitioners collected signatures from Kane County voters for an advisory question for the 2012 November ballot. The question asked if voters thought the Constitution should be amended to limit all this secret, unlimited and unregulated money that is being used to buy our elections and politicians.

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    Gay marriage means Abe can rest easy
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: Every once in awhile a good thing happens in the body politic. One of those occasional events happened when the Illinois House, by a slim 61 to 54 margin, voted to make Illinois the 15th state to legalize gay marriage.

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