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Daily Archive : Wednesday October 30, 2013

News

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    Keith Matune

    School board member may challenge Sandack in primary

    Teacher Keith Matune says is preparing for a Republican primary challenge to state Rep. Ron Sandack of Downers Grove and could receive backing from a top conservative group. Matune, a member of the Downers Grove based High School District 99 school board, says he’s gathering petition signatures and will run if he gets enough.

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    8 Antioch students hospitalized for taking pills return to class

    Eight of 10 students hospitalized Tuesday for coming into contact with prescription medication at Antioch Upper Grade School were back in class Wednesday. An ninth student remains hospitalized Wednesday, but not for injesting the hydrocodone, authorities said. The 10th student, who brought the drugs to school, was advised to not return until the investigation is completed.

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    Taking your little pumpkin out trick-or-treating? Almost every town has set hours when you can go door-to-door.

    Trick-or-treat! Check for your town's hours
    If you are heading out to trick-or-treat on Halloween, or waiting to hand out candy at your own house, make sure you take a look our list to see what your town's set times are.

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    Dan Rich of Elgin hugs Daily Herald Food Editor Deb Pankey after being announced the winner of the Daily Herald Cook of the Week Challenge finals, held Wednesday at the Hyatt Regency in Schaumburg.

    Elgin man wins our Cook of the Week Challenge

    Dan Rich is Elgin's superintendent of public works during the day, but when he's off the clock, he can sure cook up a mean dish. His Halloween-inspired “Goblin Delight” was the winning dish Wednesday night at the third annual Daily Herald Cook of the Week Challenge.

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    Dan Rich of Elgin kisses the spoon he was awarded after being announced the winner of the Daily Herald Cook of the Week Cookoff finals, held at the Hyatt Regency Schaumburg Wednesday. Lori Motyka of West Chicago, middle, and Christine Murphy of Palatine are two of his three fellow contestants in the competition.

    Images: Daily Herald Cook of the Week Finale
    Images of the Cook of the Week Cookoff finals at the Hyatt Regency in Schaumburg. Dan Rich of Elgin was named the winner of the annual competition.

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    Aurelio Montano

    Aurora man found guilty of wife’s 1990 murder

    Aurelio Montano, an Aurora man who had been accused of strangling his wife in July 1990, burying her body in a rolled up rug at a Naperville farm and then moving it, was found guilty of first-degree murder by a Kane County jury Wednesday. The 55-year-old is already serving a life sentence for ordering the murders of two people in 1996 over a drug deal.

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    Jim Oberweis

    Oberweis edging closer to U.S. Senate run

    State Sen. Jim Oberweis, a Sugar Grove Republican and veteran of statewide campaigns in Illinois, says he’s nearing the minimum number of petition signatures he needs to run for U.S. Senate. And he said if he reaches his goal number of signatures, he’ll get into his third Republican primary for Senate for good.

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    Five video gambling terminals could be coming to the Fox Run Golf Links clubhouse in Elk Grove Village if approved by the Illinois Gaming Board. If the licenses are granted, Fox Run would be the first publicly-owned course to allow video gambling.

    Video gambling at Elk Grove golf course edges closer

    Fox Run Golf Links in Elk Grove Village could become one of the first publicly owned golf courses in the state to have video gambling machines if approved by the Illinois Gaming Board. Officials with the Elk Grove Park District, which has operated the golf course at 333 Plum Grove Road since 1983, have been looking into that possibility for more than a year as a way to raise additional revenue.

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    Billy Varner

    Police mum on investigation of ‘suspicious deaths’ in Antioch

    The search continues for a 54-year-old man wanted for questioning in connection with two “suspicious” deaths near downtown Antioch, authorities said Wednesday.

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    FILE - In this July 2, 2011, file photo, Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, center, and Kristin Cavallari watch the Chicago Cubs play the Chicago White Sox during an interleague baseball game in Chicago. Cutler and Cavallari are engaged again. The reality TV star announced the engagement Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011, on her Twitter feed, saying: ìThis time its official..Jay and I are engaged again :).î (AP Photo/Brian Kersey, File)

    Kristin Cavallari, Jay Cutler expecting 2nd baby

    Kristin Cavallari and her Bears QB husband Jay Cutler are one step closer to having their own football team.Cavallari is pregnant with their second baby. The 26-year-old former star of MTV’s “Laguna Beach” and “The Hills” confirmed the news Wednesday on Twitter. She wrote: “We are so excited for Camden to be a big brother!”

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    This is a Google data center in Hamina, Finland. The Washington Post reported Wednesday the National Security Agency secretly broke into the main communications links that connect Yahoo and Google data centers around the world.

    Report: NSA broke into Yahoo, Google data centers

    The National Security Agency has secretly broken into the main communications links that connect Yahoo and Google data centers around the world, The Washington Post reported Wednesday, citing documents obtained from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

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    Jarrett Payton speaks to students at Schaumburg High School about bullying on Wednesday. Payton, whose foundation supports anti-bullying efforts, appeared as part of the school’s “SHS Unites Day.”

    Schaumburg HS students hear Payton’s anti-bullying message

    Students at Schaumburg High School heard Jarrett Payton’s “No Bull” anti-bullying message Wednesday during three assemblies for “SHS Unites Day.” Payton — the son of the late Bears great Walter Payton — has a foundation that supports anti-bullying and promotes creating and maintaining a safe environment for students.

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    St. Mark’s Episcopal Church preschooler Elliot Dupuy plays in a pumpkin patch Wednesday on the church grounds in Glen Ellyn. The annual pumpkin sale raises money to fight homelessness and the patch also serves as an extension of indoor classrooms. “When we come out here, sometimes we bring our journals and draw what we see in the pumpkin patch,” preschool teacher Beth Figler said. “Then we go back inside to write and talk about our experiences.”

    Pumpkins for PADS
    Standalone pic

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    Randy Hultgren

    Hultgren wins approval for banking bill

    The U.S. House Wednesday approved legislation from Rep. Randy Hultgren that would allow banks to offer certain complex financial tools that reforms following the 2008 financial crisis sought to strip from them. Hultgren argues the particular investment instruments shouldn’t have been targeted by sweeping reforms that followed bank bailouts because local businesses can use them to manage risk.

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    Jaime Aguirre

    Man gets 22 years for Villa Park home invasion

    A Highland Park man was sentenced Wednesday to 22 years in prison for his role in a Villa Park home invasion in which three people were tied up and robbed. Jaime Aguirre, 23, was one of four men charged in the Feb. 12 crime that unfolded after one of the victims arranged to meet a prostitute at his home.

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    Youth baseball registration:

    Registration for Lake Villa Township Baseball’s 2014 season begins Friday, Nov. 1. Parents are urged to register their child at lvtb.org.

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    MainStreet Libertyville seeks directors:

    MainStreet Libertyville, a volunteer-driven organization dedicated to maintaining the vitality and heritage of the downtown area, is seeking nominees for its 2014 board of directors.

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    CLC open house:

    High school students and adults can learn about attending the College of Lake County at an open house set for 6 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 12, at the Grayslake campus, 19351 W. Washington St.

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    Belgian man charged in possible nuclear scheme

    A Belgian man is accused of attempting to illegally export aluminum tubes from a Schaumburg company to Malaysia, possibly for use by Iran's upstart nuclear program. Nicholas Kaiga, 36, is charged with violating an international trading act and making false statements. He was arrested in June in New York City and will be arraigned Thursday in Chicago.

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    A proposal would try to encourage states to require schools to carry epinephrine pens to fight off allergic reactions.

    Kirk, Durbin want schools to carry epinephrine pens

    Under a plan from U.S. Sens. Mark Kirk and Dick Durbin of Illinois, states go toward the front of the line for certain federal grants if they require schools to carry epinephrine pens that fight off allergic attacks. Food allergies are common among children, and quick use of epinephrine against a reaction can help when someone suffers an attack.

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    Beata Candre

    “Beata, please come home,” father of missing Schaumburg woman says

    The parents of missing Schaumburg woman Beata Candre made a direct appeal Wednesday for their daughter to return home to her husband and children. “Beata, please come home,” her father, Tony Dzierzak, said Wednesday during a news conference at the Schaumburg police station. “We love you. The kids love you."

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Tri blotter

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    Don Darby, a 14-year veteran of the Glendale Heights Police Department who died in August from brain cancer, will be remembered with the Don Darby Charity Basketball Game Saturday at The Sports Hub.

    Charity game in memory of Glendale Heights officer

    The Glendale Heights Police department is going head-to-head against the Glenside Fire Protection District Saturday in the Don Darby Charity Basketball Game, with all proceeds going toward the family of the former police offer and to cancer research.

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    Round Lake Middle School Principal Jeff Prickett says students and teachers are now on the same page when it comes to English language arts materials.

    District 116 provides restructuring update for Round Lake Middle School

    Round Lake Area Unit District 116 has produced a video updating the community about the middle school's academic restructuring.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Sandy Kinsey, 21, of Carpentersville, has been charged with four counts of manufacture/delivery of a controlled substance, which police said involved several grams of heroin she sold to an undercover officer, according to a police report. Police arrested her Oct. 24, Cmdr. Timothy Bosshart said.

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    Skokie police officer charged with battery

    A Skokie police officer from Gurnee faces charges that he shoved a female inmate into a jail cell earlier this year causing facial fractures that required surgery, prosecutors said Wednesday. Authorities say Michael Hart, 43, "became irate" with the female detainee when she reportedly refused to look at a specific location on a camera lens during her arrest and booking photo.

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    Shoppers at the Lake Zurich farmers market pick out fresh vegetables in Paulus Park.

    Lake Zurich Area Farmers Market volunteers praised

    Lake Zurich Mayor Thomas Poynton credited the work of volunteers on what he says was an "uber successful" new, village-sponsored weekly farmers market.

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    Michael Kelley portrays Teddy Brewster, who thinks he’s Teddy Roosevelt, in Elgin High School’s production of “Arsenic and Old Lace.”

    ‘Arsenic and Old Lace’ at Elgin High School
    Comedy and mystery come together in Elgin High School’s production of “Arsenic and Old Lace,” which takes the stage this weekend. Shows are 7 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 and 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, at 1200 Maroon Drive.

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    Curves of BG celebrates 10 years

    Curves of Buffalo Grove will celebrate its 10th anniversary by hosting a free Zumba-Thon from 6-9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1 and an open house from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, featuring free fitness assessments, refreshments and raffles.

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    A real thriller
    The Wauconda Academy of Ballet danced to Michael Jackson's classic song "Thriller" during the village's recent Trick or Treat on Main Street event. This video of the performance was shot by Stephen Neilson. Happy Halloween!

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Thieves stole a man’s wallet valued at $115 around noon Oct. 15 after he left it on a counter in the Social Security Office, 705 N. Wheeling Road, Mount Prospect. Someone used a credit card in the wallet to make purchases at two McDonald’s restaurants in Mount Prospect and Palatine, at a Mobil gas station in Arlington Heights, and at a Wendys restaurant in Arlington Heights between 12:26 and...

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    Mike Hopkins, a 1991 engineering graduate of the University of Illinois, greets an audience at his alma mater in Urbana through a live video chat from the International Space Station. Hopkins had 10 minutes to answer questions from Illini aerospace engineering students at the University of Illinois National Center for Supercomputing Applications.

    Illini grad talks to students from space station

    University of Illinois graduate Mike Hopkins earned cheers from an audience at his alma mater when he spoke via NASA video hookup from the International Space Station. “University of Illinois, Fighting Illini, I hear you loud and clear, and I’m ready to answer some questions,” Hopkins said, standing in front of an Illini flag in the space station on Tuesday.

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    It’s not just football. A new report says too little is known about concussion risks for young athletes, and it’s not clear whether better headgear is an answer. The panel stresses wearing proper safety equipment. But it finds little evidence that current helmet designs, face masks and other gear really prevent concussions, as ads often claim.

    More study urged on concussions in young athletes

    No one knows how often the youngest athletes suffer concussions. It’s not clear if better headgear is the answer, and it’s not just a risk in football. A new report reveals big gaps in what is known about the risk of concussion in youth sports, especially for athletes who suit up before high school.

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    U.S. Army Sgt. Robert Schroeder of Lake Barrington received a hero’s welcome Wednesday at St. Anne Parish School in Barrington. Schroeder had planned to surprise his son William, a pre-Kindergarten student at the school, with his return for a two-week leave, but instead students and staff surprised him with their greeting. “It’s been shocking and an honor,” he said.

    Soldier receives surprise hero’s welcome at son’s Barrington school

    U.S. Army Sgt. Robert Schroeder of Lake Barrington received a hero’s welcome Wednesday at St. Anne Parish School in Barrington. Schroeder had planned to surprise his son William, a pre-Kindergarten student at the school, with his return for a two-week leave, but instead students and staff surprised him with their greeting. “It’s been shocking and an honor,” he said.

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    Batavia considers expanding rental-housing monitoring program

    Batavia's committee of the whole favors adding smaller buildings to its crime-free rental housing program, and adding inspections of the exteriors and interior common elements as a requirment for getting a license.

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    Complimentary words work wonders on the soul

    In our modern culture, words are oftentimes offensive, harsh, or arrogant, yielding results that are contrary and counterproductive, rather than kindhearted compliments which build our well-being and foster productivity, says columnist Annettee Budzban.

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    Would-be iPad thief caught on video at Chicago pizzeria

    A man who tried to steal an iPad from a Chicago pizza restaurant was caught on video failing miserably. Apparently, when the would-be thief saw the iPad in the window at the Pie Hole Pizza joint on North Broadway, he failed to realize the tablet was attached to a cable.

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    Andrew Thies says “This Book Will Pay for Itself” shares common sense ways to save and manage money that he's learned over 47 years of living.

    Can you afford that? Bensenville author says maybe not

    Bensenville resident Andrew Thies, a commercial artist who makes a salary of less than $30,000 a year, has gone to Europe several times in the last five years, owns a condo, put himself through school and still has money in the bank. He tells others how to budget their money and find great bargains and sales in his book, "This Book Will Pay for Itself."

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    Easton Area School District students Brianna Hawk, left, and Kayla Martinez, display their “I (heart) Boobies!” bracelets for photographers outside the U.S. Courthouse in Philadelphia. The Easton Area School District says it will take its fight against “I (heart) Boobies!” bracelets to the U.S. Supreme Court. The board voted 7-1 Tuesday night, Oct. 29, 2013 to appeal a decision rejecting its claim the bracelets are lewd and should be banned from school. The bracelets are designed to promote breast cancer awareness among young people.

    ‘Boobies’ bracelet fight could go to Supreme Court

    The court battle between two girls and their Pennsylvania school over “I (heart) Boobies!” bracelets could be settled by the U.S. Supreme Court. The Easton Area School District board voted 7-1 Tuesday night to appeal a federal appeals court’s decision that rejected its claim the bracelets are lewd and should be banned from school.

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    Arizona Department of Public Safety officers investigate a multiple fatality accident involving six semi tractor-trailers and 19 other vehicles in the eastbound lanes of Interstate 10 south of Casa Grande, Ariz., on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Authorities say three people are dead and at least 12 others injured after a dust storm led to chain-reaction collisions.

    3 killed in dust storm crashes on I-10 in Arizona

    A stream of thick, blowing dust crossing an Arizona highway led to a chain-reaction crash that killed three people in an area where gusting winds often stir up towering clouds of dirt that can reduce visibility to zero. At least 12 other people were injured Tuesday in the 19-vehicle pileup on Interstate 10 between Phoenix and Tucson.

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    The federal government has issued its first guidelines to schools on how to protect children with food allergies. The voluntary guidelines call on schools to take such steps as restricting nuts, shellfish or other foods that can cause allergic reactions, and make sure emergency allergy medicine — like EpiPens — are available.

    Feds post food allergy guidelines for schools

    The federal government is issuing its first guidelines to schools on how to protect children with food allergies. The voluntary guidelines call on schools to take such steps as restricting nuts, shellfish or other foods that can cause allergic reactions, and make sure emergency allergy medicine — like EpiPens — are available.

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    Law enforcement officials stand near a home on Callison Highway where six people were found dead, Tuesday evening, Oct. 29, 2013, in Greenwood, S.C. Authorities found the bodies Tuesday of four adults and two children, including the body of the man they believe called police, Greenwood County Sheriff’s Office spokesman John Long told The Associated Press.

    6 people dead in S.C. in apparent domestic dispute

    Six people were found dead in a home by SWAT team members who came after a man called authorities and said he was thinking about hurting himself. Authorities found the bodies Tuesday of four adults and two children, including the body of the man they believe called police, Greenwood County Sheriff’s Office spokesman John Long said. The ages of the dead ranged from 9 years old to early 50s.

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    In this 2010 photo, whooping cranes follow an ultralight aircraft from Wisconsin to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Florida.

    Wisconsin whooping cranes released to fly south

    Two groups of Wisconsin-raised whooping cranes have been released to fly toward warmer climates for the winter. Nine were released last Thursday from the Horicon National Wildlife Refuge in Dodge County near some older whooping cranes from which they will learn the migration route south.

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    Residents walk by a mural depicting China’s ethnic minorities including Uighurs in Beijing, China.

    Uighurs facing new police scrutiny in Beijing

    In a dusty outdoor curio market in China’s capital, traders from the minority Uighur community gathered Wednesday to swap stories about the omnipresent harassment they say they suffer at the hands of the police. That scrutiny has only intensified after this week’s deadly vehicle attack at Tiananmen Square in which Uighurs are the prime suspects.

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    Reports based on leaks from former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden suggest the U.S. has monitored the telephone communications of 35 foreign leaders. The fact that Merkel was among them has been particularly troubling to many in Europe and on Capitol Hill, given her status as a senior stateswoman, the leader of Europe’s strongest economy, and a key American ally on global economics, Iranian nuclear negotiations and the Afghanistan war.

    Spying tests trust between Obama, Merkel

    Revelations that the National Security Agency was monitoring the communications of German Chancellor Angela Merkel threatens to damage the close relationship between her and Obama, which, until now, has been defined by candor and trust. “We are very sensitive to the fact that she comes from the East, and that brings with it a historical perspective on surveillance that is quite powerful,” said...

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    This image posted on Egypt’s Interior Ministry Facebook page on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013 purports to show Essam el-Erian, the deputy leader of the Muslim Brotherhood’s political arm, after his arrest in Cairo. Egyptian security forces raided an apartment in eastern Cairo early Wednesday, arresting the key Muslim Brotherhood figure who had been on the run since the July coup that ousted the country’s Islamist president, the Interior Ministry said.

    Senior Muslim Brotherhood leader arrested in Egypt

    Egyptian security forces arrested a key Muslim Brotherhood figure on the run since the July coup that toppled the country’s Islamist president in a raid on his hideout early Wednesday, the Interior Ministry said. The arrest of Essam el-Erian, the deputy leader of the Brotherhood’s political arm, the Freedom and Justice party, was the latest in a wide-ranging crackdown.

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    Egypt: Police storm university after student siege

    Egyptian security forces have stormed the main building of an Islamic university in Cairo after students who support the country’s ousted president besieged and attacked the offices of the university’s chief administrator.

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    Two policewomen, right, a traffic police, in yellow vest, and members of a SWAT team guard a street corner, where, on Monday, a sport utility vehicle veered into a crowd near Tiananmen Gate, where the car crashed and caught fire, in Beijing, China, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013. Police announced Wednesday the arrests of five people in connection with this week’s suicide car crash in the heart of China’s capital, calling it a planned terror attack — Beijing’s first in recent history — and identifying the attackers as members of a Muslim minority.

    Police say 5 arrested in Tiananmen Gate attack

    Police announced Wednesday the arrests of five people in connection with this week’s suicide car crash in the heart of China’s capital, calling it a planned terror attack — Beijing’s first in recent history — and identifying the attackers as members of a Muslim minority.

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    The Larkin Center in Elgin closed Oct. 18, and the Kane County Board gave the organization a $20,000 grant Tuesday so the center can make its payroll.

    Larkin Center gets $20,000 emergency grant from Kane County

    The Kane County Board authorized an emergency $20,000 grant to the Larkin Center Tuesday evening, money that will help the center, which closed Oct. 18, make the last two weeks of its payroll. The grant came from the county's Grand Victoria Riverboat Fund, money that's supposed to be used for projects that improve the county's education, environment and economic development.

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    Taylor Swift is the top nominee for the $START_URL$American Country Awards;http://theacas.com$STOP_URL$.

    American Country Awards hands Swift eight nominations

    Taylor Swift is the top nominee for the American Country Awards. Swift received eight nominations, including top honor artist of the year. Blake Shelton and Florida Georgia Line are next with seven apiece.

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    Stevie Wonder plans to release two albums next year.

    Stevie Wonder plans two albums next year

    Stevie Wonder plans to release two albums next year, including some newly written songs, and he’s working on a third. The 63-year-old performer said in an interview Tuesday that his first albums in eight years would be “When the World Began” and “Ten Billion Hearts.”

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    Solange Sior

    Dabble in the arts as Elgin’s FallBack Arts Festival returns, expands

    Fighting onstage at the Hemmens. Building a dragon sculpture from clay. Improving your writing, photography or art techniques. These are among the skills you can learn this weekend at Elgin’s FallBack Arts Festival.

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    Randy Cohen, vice president of Research and Policy at Americans for the Arts in Washington, D.C., will speak at Elgin’s FallBack Arts Festival

    Expert to speak on ‘Why Art Matters’

    The Elgin Cultural Arts Commission, in cooperation with the Gail Borden Public Library, will host a town hall discussion on “Why Art Matters” with Randy Cohen at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, in the Elgin Room as part of this year’s FallBack Arts Festival.

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    Dawn Patrol: Oak Brook bank robbed; big sports night

    Metra train strikes, kills pedestrian. Naperville stabbing survivor settles with club. Wheeling hearing resumes about flood-damaged homes. Mundelein raising money for statue. Work begins on Elgin-O’Hare western access. South Elgin DUI guilty plea stands. Busy Tuesday in Chicago sports.

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    Larry and Liz Hunka have set up a haunted garage in their Wheaton home for the past 13 years. This is the last year of the Halloween tradition since their son will be going off to college next year.

    Wheaton Halloween tradition hanging up the haunts

    Hunka’s Hideous House of Halloween Horrors is taking a hiatus. Say that 10 times fast. Wheaton resident “Scary” Larry Hunka and his family have realized a haunted garage minus the ghouls quickly becomes just another garage. So after Thursday night, the annual haunted house they have created in their garage for the last 13 years, will come to an end.

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    Elk Grove Village Mayor Craig Johnson, left, chats with Jim Carr, president of Carr Machine & Tool Inc., during the Elk Grove Village business expo Tuesday.

    Elk Grove hosts inaugural business expo

    Elk Grove Village — home to the country’s largest industrial park — is ramping up efforts to market itself as a community that’s “beyond business friendly,” as its new marketing slogan suggests. Take, for example, the inaugural village-sponsored “Made in Elk Grove Manufacturing Expo” held Tuesday — a networking event for business owners in town and for prospective industrial park tenants that Elk...

Sports

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    Titus Booker

    Football: Week 9 MVPs

    Grayslake North junior running back Titus Booker and Naperville Central senior linebacker Jack Wooldridge have earned Daily Herald MVP honors for the performances in Week 9 of the high school football season.

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    Harper rolls past Triton in regional opener

    On paper, Wednesday night’s NJCAA Division III, Region IV tournament women’s volleyball quarterfinal between Harper College and Triton figured to be a mismatch. And this time, the paper prediction turned out to be pretty accurate. The third-seeded Hawks (30-20) came away with a 25-7, 25-9, 25-12 win over Triton.

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    Boston Red Sox relief pitcher Koji Uehara (19) and catcher David Ross celebrate after Boston defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 6 of baseball's World Series Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013, in Boston. The Red Sox won 6-1 to win the series. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

    Red Sox win World Series, beat Cards 6-1 in Game 6

    David Ortiz and the Boston Red Sox, baseball's bearded wonders, capped their remarkable turnaround by beating the St. Louis Cardinals 6-1 in Game 6 on Wednesday night to win their third World Series championship in 10 seasons.

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    Ohio State’s Lenzelle Smith Jr. is part of a veteran crew that includes two seniors and seven juniors from a 29-win squad that came within a whisper of a second straight trip to the Final Four.

    Buckeyes return 4 starters in Matta’s 10th season

    Lenzelle Smith Jr. doesn’t need a calendar to know when Ohio State’s basketball season is drawing near. After being around him for going on four years, Smith can just look at coach Thad Matta.

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    Antioch’s Eric Pedersen, left, and RJ Ruano celebrate with Danny Brito (3) after his second goal on a throw-in during their Class 3A sectional semifinal against Grayslake Central on Wednesday.

    Brito, Antioch find the mark

    Danny Brito earned credit for a goal earlier this season when his throw-in found the back of the net against Lakes. The Antioch sophomore did the trick again Wednesday night against Grayslake Central. And not once, but twice in less than three minutes early in the second half. Brito fired the ball toward the goal each time, and each time it glanced off a defender and rolled into the net. The pair of fluke goals helped Antioch build an early lead and the Sequoits hung on for a 3-2 win in a semifinal of the Class 2A Grayslake North sectional.

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    Vernon Hills breaks more new ground

    History was made again for Vernon Hills’ boys soccer team, as its ride in the postseason continued. The Cougars won their first sectional semifinal in school history with a 1-0 shutout of Marian Central at Grayslake North on Wednesday. Ilya Kravtsev scored the lone goal, his ninth of the season, in the eighth minute off an assist from Caleb Shaw.

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    Bulls pick up Teague, Butler’s options

    The Bulls still have more point guards than they need, but chose to pick up next year's contract option on second-year guard Marquis Teague. The Bulls also exercised the fourth year of Jimmy Butler's rookie scale contract.

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    Lake Park players celebrates their win over Elk Grove during the Class 3A Schaumburg sectional semifinals Wednesday.

    Lake Park’s second-half surge sinks Elk Grove

    Second-half goals from Riker Tithof-Steere and Oliver Horgan guided No. 2 seed Lake Park to a hard-fought 2-0 victory Wednesday night over No. 3 Elk Grove in Class 3A sectional semifinal play in the rain at Schaumburg. The Lancers (19-2-3) earn a rematch with top seed St. Charles East (20-1-4) in Saturday’s 3 p.m. sectional final at Schaumburg.

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    Week-4- Photos from the St. Francis at Montini football game on Friday, September 20.

    Montini focused on getting fifth straight state title

    Montini’s drive for five begins Friday in Lombard. The Broncos, four-time defending state champions in Class 5A, aim to become the second high school football team in Illinois to win a fifth consecutive crown. Driscoll won seven straight between 2001 and 2007, all in Class 4A except for the 2004 title in 3A.

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    Hampshire football coach Dan Cavanaugh will retire at the end of the season after 25 years leading the Whip-Purs. Cavanaugh, who won a state title at Hampshire in 1995, has the Whips back in the playoffs, where they will face Kaneland on Friday night in a Class 5A opener.

    District 300 football teams take different paths to same destination

    The three football teams from District 300 have most definitely taken three different paths to the IHSA playoffs, the first time all three schools from the Carpentersville-based district have made the 10th week of the football season in the same year. Oh, there have been years where two of them made it to the postseason, and one of them owns three state championships, but never until Friday night have Dundee-Crown, Jacobs and Hampshire all been playing football beyond the regular season.

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    Chicago Fire coach Frank Klopas directs his team against the Real Salt Lake during the second half of an MLS soccer match in Salt Lake City, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011. Chicago won 3-0.

    Klopas, Leon lose jobs with Chicago Fire
    Chicago Fire officials confirmed Wednesday that coach Frank Klopas and Javier Leon, the club's president of soccer operations, will not return for the 2014 season.

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    Brian Hill/bhill@dailyherald.com St. Charles North's Ashley England on her way to third during girls cross country at LeRoy Oakes in St. Charles Saturday.

    Scouting Tri-Cities boys and girls cross country sectionals

    While the location of their biggest meet of the year might not be the first choice for cross country coaches and runners, it won’t take away from the excitement Saturday when the area Class 3A teams gather at Waubonsie Valley High School for the sectional meet.

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    Larkin’s Hector Mendoza (13) is congratulated by teammates Gonsalo Garcia, left, and Fredy Jungo after scoring the first goal for the Royals in the first half as Hononegah goalie Henry Reynolds stands in the net at the Huntley sectional semifinals on Wednesday.

    Larkin gets another chance at sectional title

    The Larkin boys soccer team may have been wetter than a surfer riding a Tsunami Wednesday night due to the heavy rains falling in Huntley, but the benefit for the Royals scoring early this time around was that they didn’t have to stay out any longer than regulation, contrary to last week. Finally getting things done in 80 minutes instead of going to penalty kicks for the third-straight game, the rain-soaked Royals received a goal each from Hector Mendoza and Pancho Garcia in the first half to move past Hononegah 2-0 in a Class 3A Huntley sectional semifinal.

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    The Bulls’ Luol Deng protests a foul call to official Sean Corbin during Tuesday’s season-opening loss at Miami. Deng was on the bench with 3 fouls during a 17-0 Heat run in the second quarter.

    Foul way to tip off season for Bulls

    For a variety of reasons, the Bulls can never seem to get their full lineup on the court against the Miami Heat. On Tuesday, the problem was foul trouble and the Bulls are hoping for a better response in Thursday's home opener agianst New York.

  •  
    The Blackhawks’ Jonathan Toews, here scoring his third goal Tuesday night against Ottawa, had a “pretty amazing performance,” according to coach Joel Quenneville.

    Toews’ special night one to remember

    Marian Hossa has played with Jonathan Toews long enough to know when to get him the puck and stay out of his way. “He’s so good around the net,” Hossa said of Toews after watching him score three goals and an assist in the 6-5 win against Ottawa. “He was jumping for the loose pucks and going to the net hard.”

  •  
    Yes, the Green Bay Packers do have a running game, especially with rookie Eddie Lacy churning up some big yardage.

    At least Packers won’t run away and hide vs. Bears

    The Bears' defense is fortunate that Green Bay has developed a running game. Otherwise, Packers' quarterback Aaron Rodgers might pass often enough to score 100 points when the teams meet Monday night.

  •  
    New Minnesota men’s basketball coach Richard Pitino enjoys a laugh along with, from left, Maverick Ahanmisi, Austin Hollins and Andre Hollins during the setup for the formal team portrait Monday in Minneapolis.

    Leaner, quicker Gophers try to keep up in Big Ten

    Minnesota has a new coach in Richard Pitino, a fresh outlook fueled by a younger man in charge, and a faster style of play. The question is whether the combination will be enough for the Gophers to keep up in the tough, deep Big Ten.

  •  
    Ottawa Senators right wing Erik Condra (22) is sandwiched between Blackhawks defenseman Sheldon Brookbank (17) and goalie Nikolai Khabibulin during the first period of an NHL hockey game Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, in Chicago.

    How many more chances for Khabibulin?

    While fans are clamoring for Antti Raanta to be recalled from Rockford, Hawks coach Joel Quenneville likely will give veteran Nikolai Khabibulin a chance to redeem himself. The 40-year-old goalie had a second straight poor outing and was pulled midway through Tuesday’s 6-5 win over Ottawa after allowing 4 goals on 22 shots. Tim Sassone has more in today's Blackhawks notebook.

  •  
    Former Philadelphia 76er Allen Iverson speaks during a news conference Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013, in Philadelphia. Iverson officially retired from the NBA, ending a 15-year career during which he won the 2001 MVP award and four scoring titles. Iverson retired in Philadelphia where he had his greatest successes and led the franchise to the 2001 NBA finals. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

    Saying goodbye: Allen Iverson retires from NBA

    Allen Iverson’s highlights played one more time on the big screen, diehard Philadelphia 76ers fans and Julius Erving all part of the crowd catching one more glimpse of No. 3 in his prime. This was time for A.I to say goodbye.Iverson officially called it quits — though, in truth, it was the NBA that gave up on him — nearly four years after he played his final game.

  •  

    Missouri Valley Conference welcomes Loyola

    The MVC lost Creighton to the reconfigured Big East but added Loyola, bringing the Chicago market into the conference mix for the first time. The Ramblers are delighted to be aboard.

  •  
    Lance Armstrong, foreground, was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles.

    Armstrong loses key ruling in bonus money fight

    A Texas company is closer to forcing Lance Armstrong to return about $12 million in bonuses he was paid for winning the Tour de France while secretly using performance-enhancing drugs.

  •  
    Soccer legend David Beckham promotes his new photography book during an interview Wednesday in London.

    Beckham hopes son could play on team

    David Beckham is finalizing plans to start a Major League Soccer franchise, and he’s hoping son Brooklyn could one day take the field for the team. While wary about putting pressure on his children to follow in his famous footsteps, the former England captain tells The Associated Press he hopes Brooklyn could be good enough to play on his team one day.

  •  
    Marquette forward Davante Gardner was the Big East’s top sixth man last season.

    Marquette is new league favorite

    The new era of Big East basketball begins with high expectations for one of the old favorites. Marquette, one of the three co-champions last season, was picked by league coaches to win the conference in a preseason poll.

  •  
    Penn State guard Tim Frazier missed all but four games last season due to injury.

    Chambers, Frazier ready to lead optimistic PSU

    Penn State coach Patrick Chambers has a two-year record of 22-41 that includes a 6-30 mark in the Big Ten, yet he shows no trepidation about saying that he want this year’s squad to finish in the top half of the conference. His optimism stems from the return of point guard Tim Frazier.

  •  
    Penn State cornerback Jordan Lucas tackles Ohio State wide receiver Evan Spencer during the second quarter of Saturday’s game in Columbus, Ohio.

    Penn State defense ready for a rebound

    Linebacker Mike Hull says Penn State’s defensive players not only have to get on the same page, they have to turn it as well. “I don’t think we need to simplify anything, we just need to get better as a defense,” Hull said about last week’s 63-14 loss at Ohio State.

  •  
    Wisconsin’s Josh Gasser, right, drives on Penn State’s Nick Colella during the second half of a game in 2012.

    Gasser’s return adds to solid Wisconsin backcourt

    Josh Gasser’s legs are gradually coming back on the court, though the Wisconsin guard’s upper body is probably as strong as ever. The Badgers are easing Gasser back from a left knee injury that knocked him out for all of the 2012-13 campaign.

  •  
    Purdue center A.J. Hammons shoots over Indiana forward Cody Zeller in the first half of a game last season in Bloomington, Ind.

    Painter looks to carve out new niche for Purdue

    Matt Painter is turning Purdue into his kind of team. Purdue’s coach sees more versatility and more scorers. Practices are more competitive, and there’s a renewed emphasis on rebounding and defense.

  •  
    Iowa forward Jarrod Uthoff grabs a rebound while shooting with teammates during the school’s annual basketball media day Oct. 9 in Iowa City.

    Expectations high for experienced Hawkeyes

    It’s easy to forget that Iowa used to be viewed as a perennial Big Ten contender and a team to watch in the NCAA tournament. Those lofty expectations are back.

  •  
    Indiana forward Jeremy Hollowell tries to dunk over Southern Indiana’s Austin Davis during an exhibition game Saturday at Assembly Hall in Bloomington, Ind.

    New-look Hoosiers after better results

    Indiana has a new blueprint for basketball success. Instead of relying on all those familiar names and faces that helped turn the Hoosiers from a beleaguered basketball program into a national power, this year’s players are focused on extending the legacy.

  •  
    DePaul’s Cleveland Melvin, right, looks to pass against Louisville’s Luke Hancock during a game last season in Rosemont.

    DePaul still looking for breakthrough

    Cleveland Melvin realizes he’s running out of time. He’s not losing hope, though. As he enters his senior season at DePaul, the 6-foot-8 forward remains confident the Blue Demons can turn things around and end this losing cycle before he moves on. “We’ve got a better team now, and now is the time to show everybody,” Melvin said. “We can definitely make a statement with the team we’ve got and go far in the Big East and make the tournament.”

  •  
    Illinois guard Rayvonte Rice drives to the basket during an exhibition game last week against McKendree at the State Farm Center in Champaign, Ill. Rice, a transfer who spent two years at Drake, is one of the players head coach John Groce will be looking to when Illinois opens its season Nov. 8 against Alabama State.

    Young, thin roster creates questions at Illinois

    No one expected what John Groce pulled off in his first season at Illinois. A 23-13 record from a team fresh off a monumental collapse the season before. An appearance in the NCAA tournament. No one, including Groce, knows just what to expect this time around. The team that will open the season Nov. 8 against Alabama State won’t look anything like Groce’s first Illini team.

  •  
    FILE- In this Sept. 14, 2013, file photo, Florida Atlantic head coach Carl Pelini watches during the fourth quarter of an NCAA college football game against South Florida in Tampa, Fla. Florida Atlantic says Pelini resigned on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013, after acknowledging to school officials that he used illegal drugs. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)

    FAU’s Carl Pelini resigns after drug allegation

    Florida Atlantic coach Carl Pelini and defensive coordinator Pete Rekstis both resigned Wednesday after university officials said they acknowledged using illegal drugs.

  •  
    New men’s basketball coach Chris Collins watches over Northwestern’s practice Monday in Evanston.

    Collins’ hiring adds to buzz at Northwestern

    Northwestern made a sweeping change by hiring Chris Collins in the offseason and sent out a loud message in the process. Close calls are no longer enough. The Wildcats are looking for more. That means establishing themselves as contenders in the Big Ten and shooing away that NCAA tournament albatross hovering above them.

  •  
    Michigan guard Derrick Walton Jr. makes a layup in the second half of an exhibition game Tuesday against Concordia at Crisler Center in Ann Arbor, Mich. Michigan won 117-44.

    Wolverines hoping for another banner season

    John Beilein hopes his team has learned the right lessons from last season’s NCAA tournament run, when Michigan came within a few points of a national title.

  •  
    Michigan State’s Branden Dawson shoots over Grand Valley State’s Chaz Rollins during the second half of an exhibition game\ Tuesday in East Lansing, Mich. Michigan State won 101-52.

    Michigan State faces top competition as usual

    Michigan State’s basketball team will find out how good it is, early and often. The Spartans will play Kentucky on Nov. 12 in Chicago. After that, coach Tom Izzo has set up a schedule — as usual — to show his players, the public and himself just how Michigan State matches up.

  •  
    Nebraska’s Ray Gallegos drives past Minnesota’s Andre Ingram, right, in a game last season.

    Huskers’ Miles continues building job in new arena

    Nebraska will have one of the nation’s best college basketball venues with the opening of the Pinnacle Bank Arena. Whether the product on the court is better in coach Tim Miles’ second season is the question.

  •  

    Football Focus: Week 10 Preview

    In this preview video for Week 10 of Football Focus, host Joe Aguilar visits Antioch and the playoff-bound Sequoits. Antioch enters Saturday's round one game at Sycamore on a three-game winning streak.

  •  
    Rosary’s Madison Ronzone and Wheaton Academy freshman Gretchen Pearson battle to the finish line in the Class 2A cross country regional on Saturday, October 26. Pearson took ninth place, Ronzone took tenth.

    Spivey, Felinski making progress with Wheaton Academy

    A common notion is great athletes don’t necessarily make the best coaches. Wheaton Academy is testing the notion with positive results.

  •  
    Chicago Fire Press conference at Naperville Holiday Inn Select. Head Coach Bob Bradley and Dema Kovalenko , player, chat with the news media.

    Images: Chicago Fire Soccer Club Head Coaches Through the Years
    Images of head coaches of the Chicago Fire Soccer Club through the years. Latest head coach Frank Klopas was dismissed from the position on Wednesday.

  •  
    Ahead of the St. Louis Cardinals 3-2, the Red Sox have two chances to win the World Series title on the celebrated green grass at Fenway Park for the first time since 1918.

    Red Sox aim to win title at Fenway, 1st since 1918

    Ted Williams never did it. Not Carl Yastrzemski. Not Carlton Fisk. Not even Pedro Martinez and Curt Schilling, who ended The Curse nearly a decade ago but did it on the road. Practically no one alive can remember seeing such an event unfold: The Boston Red Sox could win a World Series title on the celebrated green grass at Fenway Park. Ahead of the St. Louis Cardinals 3-2, this year’s Red Sox have two chances to reward their faithful.

  •  

    Mike North video: Blackhawks will be fine
    The two time championship Blackhawks team will just be fine.  There's no need to panic.   The players came into the season in good shape, so Mike North says  don't worry,  they'll be fine. 

  •  

    Game video: Lake Park vs. Elk Grove
    Lake Park takes on Elk Grove in the Class 3A Schaumburg boys soccer semifinals Wednesday. Follow the game here with video from High School Cube, then come back later for the replay and highlights.

  •  

    Game video: Larkin vs. Hononegah boys soccer
    Larkin takes on Hononegah in the Class 3A Huntley boys soccer semifinals. Follow the game here with video from High School Cube, then come back later for the replay and highlights.

  •  

    Wheaton Academy has a Hardy time in victory

    Wheaton Academy doesn’t do it the hard way.The Warriors do it the Hardy way.

Business

  •  
    Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, testifying on Capitol Hill Wednesday, apologized to consumers who have wasted so much time dealing with technical problems on the Obama administration’s health insurance website.

    New security issues surface for health website

    President Barack Obama claimed “full responsibility” Wednesday for fixing his administration’s much-maligned health insurance website, while on Capitol Hill, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius apologized to frustrated people trying to sign up, declaring that she is accountable for the failures.

  •  
    The Gogo logo.

    Gogo to move headquarters from Itasca to Chicago

    Gogo, which offers in-flight wireless services to airline passengers, will move its headquarters from Itasca to Chicago. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Gogo President and CEO Michael Small said Wednesday that Gogo will move to 111 N. Canal St., Chicago, with 460 employees and might add 50 jobs within the next two years.

  •  
    Facebook’s third-quarter sales and profit topped analysts’ estimates as advertisers boosted spending on promotions targeting smartphone and tablet users, sending shares up as much as 18 percent.

    Facebook 3Q results fly past expectations

    Facebook’s stock is soaring after the company reported a 60 percent revenue increase in the third quarter thanks to mobile advertising growth. The numbers beat Wall Street’s expectations for the second quarter in a row.

  •  
    U.S. stocks fell Wednesday, with the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index halting a four-day winning streak, after the Federal Reserve fueled bets it will begin to cut stimulus even as it maintained the pace of monthly bond buying as expected.

    Stocks fall after Fed says U.S. still needs support

    The stock market retreated from all-time highs Wednesday after the Federal Reserve said the U.S. economy still needed help from its stimulus program. In its latest policy statement, the nation’s central bank said it will continue buying $85 billion in bonds every month and keep its benchmark short-term interest rate near zero.

  •  
    ASSOCIATED PRESS This undated handout image provided by the Social Security Administration shows a prepaid MasterCard debit card that Social Security and Supplemental Security Income recipients who do not have bank accounts have the option of getting with their benefits instead of a paper check.

    Social Security benefits to go up by 1.5 percent

    Social Security benefits will rise 1.5 percent in January, giving millions of retired and disabled workers an average raise of $19 a month to keep up with the cost of living. The increase is among the smallest since automatic adjustments were adopted in 1975, and reflects the fact that consumer prices haven’t gone up much in the past year.

  •  
    The Rev. Al Sharpton, standing with Mark Lee, left, CEO of Barneys New York, addresses member of the media, at the National Action Headquarters in New York, after they and other community leaders discussed allegations of racial profiling. Two black customers recently claimed they were detained by police on suspicion of credit card fraud after lawfully purchasing expensive items.

    Celebrity-store partnership runs risks

    When big-name celebrities pair up with big businesses, customers often believe the adage: You are the company you keep. Rap artist Jay-Z is learning that firsthand. He has complained this week that he’s been unfairly “demonized” because he hasn’t backed out of his collaboration with Barneys New York after the luxury retailer was accused of racially profiling two black customers.

  •  
    The decision of the Federal Reserve appears on a television screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Wednesday. The Fed said in a statement after a two-day policy meeting that it will keep buying $85 billion a month in bonds to keep long-term interest rates low and encourage more borrowing and spending.

    Fed leaves low interest-rate policies unchanged

    The Federal Reserve says the U.S. economy still needs support from the Fed’s low interest-rate policies because it is growing only moderately. In a statement released Wednesday after a two-day policy meeting, the Fed says it will keep buying $85 billion a month in bonds to keep long-term interest rates low and encourage more borrowing and spending.

  •  
    House Energy and Commerce Committee member Rep. Pete Olson, a Texas Republican, holds up a quote from Apple founder Steve Jobs as he questions Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Capitol Hill in Washington Wednesday, during the committee’s hearing on the difficulties plaguing the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

    Concerns raised about security of health website

    Defending President Barack Obama’s much-maligned health care overhaul in Congress, his top health official was confronted Wednesday with a government memo raising new security concerns about the trouble-prone website that consumers are using to enroll.

  •  
    U.S. consumer prices increased only slightly in September, as higher energy costs offset flat food prices. The figures are the latest evidence that slow economic growth is keeping inflation tame.

    U.S. consumer prices rise just 0.2 pct. in September

    U.S. consumer prices increased only slightly in September, as higher energy costs offset flat food prices. The figures are the latest evidence that slow economic growth is keeping inflation tame.

  •  
    Cutting operator Tyler Andrews downs a loblolly pine at a logging operation site in Hofmann Forest Trustees of N.C. State University’s Endowment Fund have agreed to sell the 79,000-acre research forest to an Illinois-based agribusiness company for $150 million, the university announced Tuesday morning.

    Illinois company buys North Carolina forest for $150M

    Trustees of N.C. State University’s Endowment Fund have agreed to sell the 79,000-acre Hofmann Forest near Jacksonville to an Illinois-based agribusiness company for $150 million. The News & Observer of Raleigh reports Wednesday that the money will be placed in endowment fund

  •  

    3 Ill. residents allegedly used Schaumburg home for fraud

    The U.S. Justice Department has charged three people for their roles in an alleged Illinois health care fraud scheme operating out of a home in Schaumburg. The indictment unsealed Tuesday alleges the three participated in a scheme operating out of a home visiting physician practice, Medicall Physicians Group Ltd.

  •  
    Chicago's bike-sharing program will remain open for business during the winter months. Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced Tuesday the blue Divvy bikes will be available at 300 stations, though the fleet will be reduced because the city expects fewer riders.

    No winter break for Chicago bike-sharing program

    Chicago's bike-sharing program will remain open for business during the winter months. Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced Tuesday the blue Divvy bikes will be available at 300 stations, though the fleet will be reduced because the city expects fewer riders.

  •  
    The contract approved Tuesday covers roughly 28,000 workers who came from both United as well as Continental before they merged in 2010.

    Ground workers at United approve new contract

    A new labor deal for 28,000 baggage handlers and other ground workers at United Airlines gives raises to the workers and gets the airline closer to fully absorbing Continental. The contract approved Tuesday covers roughly 28,000 workers who came from both United as well as Continental before they merged in 2010.

  •  

    Ex-Melrose Park chemical firm exec sentenced to prison in theft

    The former general manager of a Melrose Park chemical company has been sentenced to six years in prison for stealing more than $2 million from the business. The Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office says 56-year-old Kathleen Barth of Chicago pleaded guilty on Tuesday to stealing from Kraft Chemical Corp. while serving as general manager.

  •  
    Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport was the first airport in the country to get the technology this summer. Aviation officials say the system has reduced peak wait times at O’Hare by 16 minutes.

    Self-service kiosks to speed customs at Midway

    Chicago aviation officials say a system to help travelers move through customs more quickly is coming to Chicago’s Midway International Airport. The Chicago Department of Aviation said Tuesday that Midway should get the Automated Passport Control program in the first three months of next year.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Singer/songwriter Richard Marx performs at North Central College's Wentz Concert Hall in Naperville on Friday, Nov. 1.

    Weekend picks: Richard Marx brings 'Endless Summer Nights' back

    Singer/songwriter Richard Marx celebrates his catalog at North Central College's Wentz Concert Hall in Naperville Friday. Our culture's obsession with celebrity comes to a head in The New Colony's premiere of "Kate and Sam are not Breaking Up." And Medieval Times offers its own take on the craft beer festival, with local and national brewers, all weekend in Schaumburg.

  •  
    Clotilde Hesme plays Adele and Pierre Perrier is Simon, her former fiance who returns from the dead, in the new Sundance Channel series “The Returned,” premiering at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 31.

    ‘The Returned’: A quiet undead drama from Sundance

    One exception to the mysteries of death is a certain cold comfort in its finality. But “The Returned” imagines an unsettling alternative: Loved ones back from the grave, stirring things up as they re-enter a community that has moved on without them — or tried to. Though it inevitably will be branded as another zombie drama, “The Returned” couldn’t be further from that The eight-hour Sundance Channel series, premiering at 8 p.m. on Halloween, is set in a seemingly idyllic French mountain town where a succession of past residents, long dead and buried, begin showing up, as bewildered by what has befallen them as are the locals they want to rejoin.

  •  

    Actor D.B. Sweeney to lead Q&A in Rosemont Friday

    Actor D.B. Sweeney will come to the Muvico 18 Rosemont Theaters Friday, Nov. 1, to conduct a Q&A with fans following the screening of his new movie “Underdogs.” The sports drama is based on the true story of a high school football team no one expected to succeed. Sweeney plays DeAntonio, coach who sees great potential in a losing team. “Broadway” Joe Namath also appears in the film.

  •  
    Putting money in piggy bank

    Money matters evolve based on family’s needs

    To give or not to give your child an allowance — that is the question! Actually, that is the first of many questions related to giving an allowance: How much money do you give, and how frequently? At what age do you begin? And if you have multiple children, do you give each child the same amount?

  •  

    Avoid my mistake: Put your children to work now

    My wife Janice and I did a decent job raising our four children. But we made one clear mistake. Our kids do not see any need to get a job. This is our fault. We paid for everything. We tried giving them an allowance, but we didn’t tie it to any kind of performance around the home.

  •  
    Barrington resident Madison Olszewski poses with other cast members in a preproduction photo of Marriot Theatre’s “Mary Poppins.”

    ‘Poppins’ role practically perfect for Barrington teen

    No matter how many productions Madison Gloria Olszewski is in, she’s always a little nervous at first. Who wouldn’t be when working major theaters at the age of 14? “Of course I get nervous, but it’s a good kind of nerves. They help me to show the audience I perform to the best of my ability,” said the Barrington teen, who stars as Jane Banks in Marriott Theatre's "Mary Poppins."

  •  
    A representative for the R&B singer Chris Brown announced Tuesday that Brown has decided to go to rehab to “gain focus and insight into his past and recent behavior, enabling him to continue the pursuit of his life and his career from a healthier vantage point.”

    Chris Brown heading to rehab after assault charge

    Troubled singer Chris Brown is heading to rehab. A representative for the R&B star announced Tuesday that Brown has decided to go to rehab a day after he was released from jail following his arrest for allegedly punching another man in Washington, D.C. Brown remains on probation after his 2009 attack on then-girlfriend Rihanna and could face jail time as a result of the arrest.

  •  
    Chicken Pad Thai comes to the table beautifully presented at Lovely Thai in Grayslake.

    Grayslake's Lovely Thai pleases with delicious cuisine

    The authentic Thai cuisine is as vibrant as the setting at Lovely Thai in Grayslake. The restaurant, just across from the College of Lake County, is the destination in Grayslake for delicious Thai cuisine. I'm not afraid to say it — this place cooks up the best Thai food I've eaten. Ever. Another plus for Lovely Thai is the waitstaff. They seem to have service perfectly timed.

  •  
    Lori Motyka, from West Chicago, created a flatbread pizza with sardines, chick peas, fennel and golden raisins.

    Cook of the Week Challenge: Final four count down to cook-off

    Nail biting and Food Network marathons ... that's how the four finalists in the Daily Herald Cook of the Week Challenge are preparing for the Wednesday, Oct. 30, mystery basket cook-off. Whatever the ingredients turn out to be, our four cooks — Lori Motyka of West Chicago, Christine Murphy of Palatine, Dan Rich of Elgin and Lori Wiktorek of Aurora — will have just one hour to create and plate a dish and present it to a panel of five judges at the Hyatt Regency Schaumburg.

  •  
    Lime gelatin and tequila flavor a marinade for flank steak. Serve it with a refreshing cucumber salsa.

    Margarita Flank Steak with Cucumber Salsa
    Margarita Flanksteak and Cucumber Salsa: Mario Portanova

  •  
    Not one to shy away from a challenge, Michael Pennisi gave cod a Moroccan flare and served it with oaty crostini.

    Oat Cake ‘Crostini’ with Portobello Topping
    Oat Crostini and Portobello Topping Michael Pennisi

  •  
    Not one to shy away from a challenge, Michael Pennisi gave cod a Moroccan flare and served it with oaty crostini.

    Moroccan-Style Baked Cod and Oat Cake “Crostini” with Portobello Topping
    Moroccan Baked Cod: Michael Pennisi

  •  
    2011 Cook of the Year Penny Kazmier wasn’t afraid to put her competitive cooking skills to the test. How do you think her Salmon Quesadillas with Grape Salsa and Spanish Farro stack up against the 2013 contestants?

    Spanish Farro
    Spanish Farro: Penny Kazmier

  •  
    2011 Cook of the Year Penny Kazmier wasn’t afraid to put her competitive cooking skills to the test. How do you think her Salmon Quesadillas with Grape Salsa and Spanish Farro stack up against the 2013 contestants?

    Salmon Quesadillas with Grape Salsa and Spanish Farro
    Salmon Quesadillas with Grape Salsa and Spanish Farro: Penny Kazmier

  •  
    As CEO of King Oscar, John Engle is no stranger to sardines. Still, he gleefully (yes, gleefully) accepted the challenge to create a dish using his sardines plus chick peas, fennel and golden raisins. So, does his entree-sized potato salad sink or swim?

    Tangy Potato Salad with Sardines
    Tangy Potato Salad with Sardines: John Engle

  •  
    Michael Pennisi

    Cook of the Week Challenge: Judges pick up the pan

    Cook of the Week Challenge judges get their chance to open the mystery basket and create a recipe. How do their dishes compare with those from our contestants?

  •  
    Feeding a baby is a messy business, but high chairs have come a long way, with designs that go beyond ponies and giraffes to fit seamlessly into your home.

    High design in high chairs

    Feeding a baby is a messy business. Once your child discovers how to blow raspberries with her tongue, you are likely to be sprayed, repeatedly, with carrots, followed promptly with a huge grin. A high chair isn’t going to make your child a more civilized diner. It can, however, safely contain her during mealtime.

  •  
    A vegetable garden for autumn can include endive, turnips, lettuce and Brussels sprouts. Just because summer’s gone and there’s frost in the air doesn’t mean your garden has to be a scene of tawny colors and limp leaves.

    Some vegetables come into their own in autumn

    How green is your vegetable garden? Just because summer’s long gone and frost is in the air doesn’t mean your garden has to be a scene of tawny colors, limp leaves and withered stems. My garden remains very green, and the first step was staying ahead of the weeds.

  •  
    Kanye West headlines the Chicago's United Center next week.

    Music notes: Kanye, Lamar play United Center next week

    Make a trip to the United Center in Chicago next week to see the innovative (and temperamental) Kanye West live. His opener is Kendrick Lamar, a rising star in the hip-hop world. If you prefer rock, see tributes to Neil Young and Bob Dylan this weekend in Arlington Heights.

  •  
    “Last Night at the Viper Room: River Phoenix and the Hollywood He Left Behind” by Gavin Edwards revisits the tragic life of actor River Phoenix.

    Book revisits tragic life of actor River Phoenix

    “Last Night at the Viper Room,” by rock journalist Gavin Edwards, presents River Phoenix's vibrant if short life in the context of the culture that overwhelmed him. He comes across as wholly unprepared for adolescence and young adulthood in the U.S., not just Hollywood. He swung between extremes: leader of a small rock band one day and actor in a major movie the next, an advocate for natural foods and clean living who was often drunk and high.

  •  
    A glazed doughnut forms the spider’s body while a cake doughnut and doughnut holes form its head, eyes and legs. A delicious way to start Halloween, don’t you think?

    From the Food Editor: Last-minute Halloween treat

    Need a last minute Halloween treat? Doughnuts morph into a creepy, easy and budget-friendly breakfast. Deborah Pankey also tells you about two suburban women headed to the World Food Championships and how you can be in the audience at the Daily Herald's Home Baking Challenge.

  •  
    Hayden Panettiere plays Juliette Barnes in the episode “Don’t Open That Door” from ABC’s “Nashville.”

    A good time for Panettiere as ‘Nashville’ bad girl

    Hayden Panettiere's enjoying her life in Music City and her starring role in ABC’s tuneful melodrama “Nashville” (now in its second season, airing at 9 p.m. Wednesdays). She plays scheming breakout country sensation Juliette Barnes, who’s locked in a love-hate rivalry with country music queen Rayna Jaymes (co-star Connie Britton), whose long reign is threatened by Juliette’s rise. Panettiere nails her role, displaying a deft blend of rapaciousness and vulnerability, not to mention impressive pipes.

  •  
    Chad Priest, the chief operating officer for City Corridor, demonstrates a touch-screen interactive visitor kiosk in the company’s offices in North Charleston, S.C. The interactive kiosk allows visitors to click and print out everything from maps to menus and buy tickets for attractions.

    Kiosks may replace tourist brochures from S.C. to N.Y.

    In tourist towns worldwide, visitors are greeted with racks of brochures promoting everything from tours and museums to restaurants and hotels. But in the world of computers, smartphones and tablets, a new interactive visitor kiosk developed in South Carolina might make such brochures obsolete. City Corridor has developed flat-faced kiosks with a large touch screen for visitors to see ads for attractions, make reservations and print out maps, menus and more.

Discuss

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    The Hill Correctional Center in Galesburg, Ill. (AP Photo)

    Editorial: Don’t rush into mandatory sentences

    A Daily Herald editorial says the evidence points against a proposed law requiring minimum sentences for violators of Illinois gun laws.

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    The Rev. Clyde Brooks

    Putting aside race to focus on character

    Guest columnist the Rev. Clyde Brooks: Months after the Trayvon Martin/George Zimmerman controversy has faded from the front pages and the TV cameras have moved on to other spectacles, I remain concerned that the conversations that this tragedy aroused show our country still is focused on the wrong things when we talk about race.

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    The White House Comedy Club

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: It was a very bad week in governance. The reasons combined suggest an uncomfortable conclusion to the world we purport to lead: The lights are flickering in the city on the hill and our ship of state is foundering.

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    We must do something about gun violence
    A Lindenhurst letter to the editor: It seems like it’s become commonplace to hear on the news about men, women and children being killed by guns.

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    Only let constituents contribute to politicians
    A Round Lake Beach letter to the editor: Concerning money and politics, I have a novel idea: “people” can only give money and lobby a person that they could actually vote for.

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    Seat at infamous Cubs game could’ve been anyone’s
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: I suppose there is a third type, which represents roughly 100 percent of us: those with 20-20 hindsight who say “he should have known the situation and not interfered.” Sorry, this doesn’t apply — it’s too easy to say, and we all should be glad that we weren’t sitting in that seat and it wasn’t the anniversary of the (insert your name here) game.

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    Use money for Obama travel elsewhere
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Think what that money would have paid for. Extra police to work to catch and control the gangs. There is need for that kind of money everywhere.

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    Health insurance just got more expensive
    A North Aurora letter to the editor: I just received my notice of renewal for health insurance to comply with “Obamacare.” I am 63 years old and work part time for a dermatologist. My husband is retired and is on Medicare. I received my new options for health insurance for over $840 per month for Blue Cross Blue Shield with a $1,750 deductible. That is a 100 percent increase.

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    Where are priorities on giving aid?
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Isn’t it amazing that the government shutdown put government employees out of work and we closed national parks and monuments and cut payments to servicemen’s families?

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    There truly is reason to be scared
    An Elmhurst letter to the editor: Recently, I read a letter from a reader who claimed to be scared for America’s future because of the Tea Party. Really? Fast & Furious, Bengahzi, the Obamacare rollout, IRS investigations, record deficits, Solyndra and NSA monitoring of our allies don’t scare you?

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    (No heading)
    Religions must be free to OK gay marriage Bonnie Quirke makes the claim that “government policy must respect those who stand for marriage as a union of a man and a woman” and that “here are a growing number of incidents in which the government has ruled that the First Amendment does not protect those beliefs.”But the government cannot show preference to select moral or religious beliefs, or to any specific individual or group which holds them. It can and must however uphold the right to have specific beliefs. The government is beholden under that amendment to protect not specific beliefs themselves, or even those who maintain singular beliefs, but the right to have those beliefs as opposed to others.Ms. Quirke asks, “If there really is total religious freedom in gay marriage, then why do we have two bills pending in Congress to protect religious freedom?” The point is that there is not. When citizens, gay and straight, of faiths such as Buddhism which allow gay marriage are forced to follow the “one man, one woman” definition of marriage as found in other faiths such as Christianity in order to access the right to marry at all, then everyone’s religious freedom is at stake. There is no religious freedom when any citizens are forced by law to follow faiths other than their own in order to access any civil right. And, there is the legal access to a right or no, but, as it is written into civil law, marriage is still a civil right, for gay as well as for straight citizens.And as civil rights, including religious freedom, are bestowed on individual citizens first before the existence or creation of any political or religious group, the religious freedom of organizations to object does not by law trump the religious freedom of individuals, gay or straight, to be civilly married in the first place.John F. Page Libertyville Lawmakers not representing people Our representatives have voted to “kick the can” down the road, run up more debt and do nothing to reduce spending. Every poll that was taken over the past several months, indicated the majority of those polled, wanted the debt reduced, Obamacare delayed so that people would have a better understanding of the plan and reduce spending. Evidently the people we send to Washington do not represent the people that send them there. Those representatives that voted against the bill were mostly associated with the “Tea Party” and highly criticized in the press but at least they represented the voters that sent them there. It will be interesting to see how many more times the “can” is kicked down the road before a budget is signed into law. As far as Obamacare which has turned into one of the most divisive programs in my life time, actually has some good benefits, such as, people with preconditions cannot be refused insurance and children can stay on their parents plan until age 27. On the other hand it does infringe on religious freedom which has led to many lawsuits and will continue to be challenged. It is amazing how a program to provide insurance for 1 percent of the population has turned into such a train wreck. I just received my insurance information for 2014 and my cost is going to increase by $2,000 if I want to continue with the same program. People have no idea how insurance cost will continue to rise and the effect on selection of doctors, hospitals and services. God bless America. Howard Huber Mundelein

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