Daily Archive : Sunday October 13, 2013

News

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    Access restored for food stamp users

    Shoppers in Illinois and 16 other states should be able to use their debit-style food stamp cards after vendor Xerox Corp. restored service following a system outage.

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    Nyhla Lee is surrounded by some of the medical staff at Advent Christ Hospital in Oak Lawn that have taken care of her.

    Hanover Park rallies around ill seventh-grader

    Teachers at Spring Wood Middle School in Hanover Park organized a fundraiser last week for the family of Nyhla Lee, a seventh-grader who has been hospitalized for the past four months. Nyhla is recovering from a rare blood disorder called idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura that led her to have three strokes in June. According to her mother, Kiona Jordan, Nyhla was in a coma for two weeks, and...

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    In this TOct. 10 photo, a pedestrian walks past the U.S. Treasury Building in Washington on a rainy day. The national debt actually reached the limit in May 2013. Since then, Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew has made accounting moves to continue financing the government without further borrowing. But Lew says those measures will be exhausted by Thursday, Oct. 17. The government will then have to pay its bills from its cash on hand an estimated $30 billion and tax revenue.

    Q&A: What happens if US breaks borrowing limit?

    Negotiations in Congress to raise the nation's borrowing limit are up against a deadline of Thursday. If the limit isn't raised by then, the government will no longer have authority to borrow to pay its bills. So what happens if Thursday comes and goes and the limit isn't raised?

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    Shutdown driving debate over role of government

    With landmarks closed, paychecks delayed and workers furloughed, Americans are drawing dueling lessons from the rippling effects of the partial shutdown: The disruptions show that the feds are way too involved in people’s lives or that the government does a lot of vital things that people take for granted.

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    President Barack Obama, left, and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada, look to photographers as they meet with Sen. Patty Murray, a Washington Democrat, Sen. Dick Durbin, a Democrat, and Sen. Charles Schumer, a New York Democrat, in the Oval Office of the White House Saturday in Washington. The federal government remains partially shut down and faces a first-ever default between Oct. 17 and the end of the month.

    Reid: Soft-spoken, combative Obama partner vs GOP

    Harry Reid, the soft-spoken but pugilistic Senate majority leader, didn’t wait for White House officials to declare their view of high-stakes talks over the government shutdown and debt. Standing just outside the West Wing, the 73-year-old Nevadan gave reporters his assessment of a key House Republican offer last week: “Not going to happen.” White House aides say Obama talks more frequently with...

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    Army Reserve Staff Sgt. Catherine Threat watches students as they arrive at Courtenay Elementary Language Arts Center in Chicago in this Oct. 7, 2013 file photo taken in Chicago. The Wisconsin veteran hasnít let the federal shutdown shut Her down. Threat returned from active duty in Afghanistan in July. Since then, she’s been in the Army Reserve and working as a civilian at Fort McCoy in central Wisconsin — until last week when she was furloughed. Rather than sitting around, Threat decided to volunteer for a veteran patrol for the Chicago Public Schools ‘safe passage’ program. As part of the effort to keep students safe while traveling to school, the veteran branch of the program is coordinated by the group No Veteran Left Behind.

    Furloughed workers pinching pennies, volunteering

    They’re experienced research engineers and park rangers still in college, attorneys who enforce environmental regulations and former soldiers who took civilian jobs with the military after coming home from war.And all of them have one thing in common: They were sent home on unpaid furlough last week after a political standoff between the president and Congress forced a partial shutdown of the...

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    Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada, left, comments to journalists as he takes the elevator after a rare Senate session Sunday on Capitol Hill in Washington Senate Republicans and Democrats hit an impasse Sunday over spending in their last-ditch struggle to avoid an economy-jarring default in just four days and end a partial government shutdown that’s entering its third week.

    Spending limits latest obstacle to budget deal

    Senate Republicans and Democrats hit an impasse Sunday over spending in their last-ditch struggle to avoid an economy-jarring default in just four days and end a partial government shutdown that’s entering its third week. Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, the No. 2 Democrat in the Senate, told reporters the two sides are roughly $70 billion apart, the difference between the $1.058 trillion Senate...

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    7 Red Cross workers kidnapped in northern Syria

    Gunmen kidnapped a team of seven workers from the International Committee of the Red Cross after stopping their convoy early Sunday along a roadside in northern Syria, a spokesman said.

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    Boat capsizes near Miami; 32 people rescued

    An official says a 45-foot boat capsized in waters near Miami, tossing 32 into the water. Florida Fish and Wildlife spokesman Jorge Pino says all of those believed to be on board have been rescued and it does not appear anyone was injured.

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    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, left, leaves after a bi-lateral meeting Sunday with the financial delegation from India at the International Monetary Fund in Washington. Finance ministers and central bank officials from the Group of 20 nations are in Washington for weekend meetings of the 188-nation International Monetary Fund and its sister lending organization, the World Bank.

    Hope remains for global recovery beyond US impasse

    Worries about a possible U.S. debt default cast a pall over weekend meetings of global financial leaders in Washington. But they ended with some hope over signs that the U.S. and European economies are pulling out of long slumps. U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew has warned that he will exhaust his borrowing authority Thursday and the government will face the prospect of defaulting on its debt...

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    Libertyville-area fire under investigation

    Officials are investigating a house fire that took place Saturday night in an unincorporated area near Libertyville and resulted in injuries to one firefighter.

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    This photo released by the Tulsa County Jail shows Meng Lee, 19, one of two shooters accused of a shooting at a traditional Hmong New Year’s festival Saturday that left five people injured in Tulsa, Okla.

    2 in custody in shooting of 5 at Tulsa event

    Gunfire that erupted and left five people injured at a traditional Hmong New Year’s festival followed by the prompt arrest of two men suspected in the shooting have rattled this peaceful, tight-knit community of about 4,000 in east Tulsa, and some feared Sunday the rampage could deter other Hmong from attending upcoming cultural celebrations, including one set later this month.

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    In this Sept. 18, 2013, photo, Buddhist statues decorate the entrance to the Lu Mountain Temple in Rosemead, Calif. The temple has become a repository for the colorful crystals and a tooth and a hair that are believed to have come from the body of the Buddha himself.

    Relics transform small California Buddhist temple

    Dharma Master YongHua's modest Lu Mountain Temple became a repository for the thousands of colorful crystals, two teeth and a single hair that are believed to have come from the body of the Buddha himself. A congregant offered up the collection that he’d painstakingly gathered for years. Since the shariras’ arrival, there have been quite a few people around. Hundreds from around the country...

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    New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, left, former U.S. Rep Gabrielle Giffords, center, and her husband, Mark Kelly, arrive for a tour of the New EastCoast Arms Collectors Associates arms fair in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. on Sunday.

    Ex-US Rep. Gabby Giffords attends NY gun show

    A smiling Gabrielle Giffords toured rows of tables loaded with rifles and handguns Sunday in her first visit to a gun show since surviving a 2011 shooting, and pleaded afterward for people to come together to stop gun violence. The former Arizona congresswoman visited the Saratoga Springs Arms Fair with her astronaut husband, Mark Kelly and New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman to highlight...

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    In this Feb. 11, 2005 file photo, trays of printed Social Security checks wait to be mailed from the U.S. Treasury’s Financial Management services facility in Philadelphia. For the second straight year, millions of Social Security recipients can expect an historically small increase in benefits come January 2014.

    Social Security raise to be among lowest in years

    For the second straight year, millions of Social Security recipients, disabled veterans and federal retirees can expect historically small increases in their benefits come January. Preliminary figures suggest a benefit increase of roughly 1.5 percent, which would be among the smallest since automatic increases were adopted in 1975, according to an analysis by The Associated Press.

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    In this Oct. 2, 2013 photo, Rabbi Lynne Goldsmith and her husband Rob Goldsmith remove the Torah from the Ark inside Temple Emanu-El in Dothan, Ala. Faced with a dwindling, aging congregation, members of a south Alabama synagogue five years ago began recruiting Jews to move to Dothan with the promise of $50,000 in relocation assistance.

    Ala. synagogue revitalized by $1M recruitment plan

    Five years ago, a Jewish businessman who was worried that his synagogue was dying put up $1 million to fund a program to recruit fellow Jews to move to a corner of the Deep South best known for peanuts. Alabama might not be the promised land, but the plan worked. Six new Jewish families with 18 people who used to live in New York, Florida and other states call Dothan their home.

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    This combination of file photos provided by the Nassau County Police Department shows Leatrice Brewer in 2003, and two of her children, Jewell Ward, and Michael Demesyeux, right. Legal experts say the case of Brewer, who drowned her three children in a bathtub and is now seeking to cash in, could succeed because of a loophole. Since Leatrice Brewer was never convicted — instead found not guilty by reason of mental disease — legal experts say she could make a plausible case to receive some of her children’s $350,000 estate.

    Son of Sam loophole may help killer get kids’ cash

    It’s the hallmark of New York’s Son of Sam law and others like it across the nation — convicted criminals should not be able to profit from their crimes. But legal experts say the case of a Long Island mother who drowned her three children in a bathtub and is now seeking to cash in could succeed because of a loophole. Since Leatrice Brewer was never convicted — instead found not guilty by reason...

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    Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle addresses the audience during the Schaumburg Area Democrats’ Meet the Candidates Breakfast Sunday at Chandler’s Chop House and Grill in Schaumburg. Residents and supporters were given a chance to listen to Democratic candidates discuss their upcoming elections at the breakfast.

    Quinn, Democrats drum up support in suburbs

    Gov. Pat Quinn and other Democrats in both county and state government gathered in Schaumburg on Sunday to raise money and drum up support for election campaigns coming up in 2014. The event was organized by Schaumburg Area Democrats.

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    Nicole Carolton, 4, timidly inspects a large, dark scarecrow Sunday at the 28th annual St. Charles Scarecrow Festival as she is held by grandfather Steve Kraft of Aurora.

    Scarecrows quite a draw in St. Charles

    If Saturday’s gloomy skies kept anyone away from the 28th annual St. Charles Scarecrow Festival, Sunday’s idyllic autumn weather brought them downtown. The event has grown from a concentrated few scarecrows to more than 150 on display around town in six categories that visitors can vote on: children’s, mechanical, business, traditional, whimsical and family.

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    Rick Vlahos of the MidWest Renegade Equestrian Drill Team leads the team during the singing of the national anthem to kick off the Danada Fall Festival on Sunday in Wheaton.

    Visitors get a taste of ‘Mild West’ at Danada

    The public was treated to a tamer version of the Wild West at the Danada Fall Festival on Sunday at the Danada Equestrian Center in Wheaton. In the arena, cowboys on horseback were shooting, but the targets were balloons filled with water. And they were using black powder, not live rounds.

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    Naperville Mayor George Pradel speaks during Sunday’s “Spirit of the American Navy” unveiling ceremony in Burlington Square Park in Naperville.

    Navy statue dedicated in Naperville

    "Spirit of the American Navy," a 1920s-era sailor sculpture, will be dedicated at 2 p.m. Sunday in Burlington Square Park, adjacent a 1920s-era sculpture of an Army soldier called "Spirit of the American Doughboy." The sculpture is the 44th piece of public art Century Walk Corp. has brought to Naperville since the nonprofit organization was founded in 1996.

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    Survivor Mahmoudou Ibrahim points out the graves of his three children Sunday in the village of Bouri, Mali. The children were killed when the boat they were traveling on Friday broke apart and sank into the Niger River.

    43 dead, dozens missing after boat sinks in Mali

    Mahmoudou Ibrahim combed the waters frantically for his family after they and hundreds of other passengers were catapulted into the Niger River when their boat capsized. Amid the cries for help in the darkness of night, he listened in vain for the sound of their voices.

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    McHenry courthouse a bad place for fistfight

    A 20-year-old Harvard man apparently picked a bad place to start a fight — the McHenry County Courthouse. Authorities arrested and charged Daniel Stott with felony aggravated battery shortly after 9:15 a.m. Oct. 7 after an altercation on the third floor of the Woodstock courthouse.

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    Noreen Grimm stands next to her husband David Grimm, both from Pittsburgh, holding a portrait of President George Washington during a rally Sunday at the World War II Memorial in Washington. The rally was organized to protest the closure of the Memorial, subsequent to the shutdown, and lack of access to it by World War II veterans, who traveled there on Honor Flight visits. Leaders in the Senate have taken the helm in the search for a deal to end the partial government shutdown and avert a federal default.

    Crowd pushes through barriers to WWII memorial

    A crowd converged on the World War II Memorial on the National Mall on Sunday, pushing through barriers to protest the memorial’s closing under the government shutdown. Republican Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas and Mike Lee of Utah, along were former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, were among those gathered Sunday morning. Cruz said President Barack Obama is using veterans as pawns in closing the memorial.

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    Lake Barrington retail center groundbreaking

    KVM Development will break ground Wednesday, Oct. 16, to mark the start of construction on phase I of Pepper Park of Lake Barrington. Located at 22000 N. Pepper Road, the 14,900-square-foot retail shopping center will feature Pepper Park Coffee, a specialty coffee shop and cafe.

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    Streamwood chamber holds ADA seminar

    The Streamwood Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring an educational seminar on the Americans with Disabilities Act 8 to 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, at the Streamwood Police Department Training Room, 401 E. Irving Park Road.

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    Input sought on Hawthorn Woods plan

    The village of Hawthorn Woods is seeking community input on a revised comprehensive plan from 7 to 8:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 16 at village hall, 2 Lagoon Drive.

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    Fall festival in Island Lake

    The Island Lake Chamber of Commerce will hold a fall festival on Saturday, Oct. 19, at Converse Park, 551 E. State Road.

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    District 103 parent night Oct. 22

    Lincolnshire-Prairieview Elementary District 103 will host a special Parent Information Night on Tuesday, Oct. 22, from 7 to 9 p.m. at Daniel Wright Junior High School, 1370 N. Riverwoods Road in Lincolnshire.

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    Antioch’s Fall Fest set for Saturday

    Antioch’s Fall Fest starts at noon Saturday, Oct. 19, at 902 Skidmore Drive.

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    Florida set to execute man who killed northern Illinois native

    More than 27 years after raping and killing Angie Crowley, William Happ is scheduled to be executed on Tuesday at Florida State Prison in Starke.

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    Kwame Raoul

    Where pension committee members stand

    With the Illinois legislature’s fall veto session a week away, an Associated Press survey of a special 10-member committee tasked with finding a solution to the state’s enormous public pension shortfall found that half the members, all Democrats, support a recently proposed plan estimated to save about $138 billion. The other half — a key Democrat and all four Republicans — say they still have...

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    Lytle Smith, center left, of Evanston and David Zeisler, center right, of Gurnee are assisted at the finish line during the Chicago Marathon on Sunday.

    Chicago Marathon keeps Boston in mind

    Chicago Marathon runners hit the streets Sunday morning, nearly six months after the Boston Marathon bombings, with more police officers lining race routes and spectator areas. Runners from more than 120 countries and all 50 states observed a moment of silence for the victims and families before the race kicked off. Three people died and more than 260 were injured in the April 15 bombings.

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    Among social conservatives, a pocketbook message

    Seeking a new generation of leaders, social conservatives are looking for a lot more than opposition to gay marriage and abortion. An annual summit of faith leaders and conservative activists gave a platform to a new wave of Republican leaders, who derided President Barack Obama’s health care law, his steering of the economy and foreign policy along with a more traditional litany of social issues.

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    Mourners grieve for a man killed in a double bomb attack on a Shiite mosque in northern Baghdad, Iraq. Al-Qaida sees each attack as a way to maintain an atmosphere of chaos that weakens the Shiite-led government’s authority.

    Al-Qaida surges back in Iraq, reviving old fears

    Al-Qaida has come roaring back in Iraq since U.S. troops left in late 2011 and now looks stronger than it has in years. The terror group has shown it is capable of carrying out mass-casualty attacks several times a month.

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    Iraqi security forces inspect the site of a car-bomb attack in Basra on Sunday.

    Attacks across Iraq kill at least 36

    A string of bombings in mostly Shiite-majority cities across Iraq on Sunday killed at least 36 people and wounded dozens, officials said, a grim reminder of the government’s failure to stem the uptick in violence that is feeding sectarian tensions in the country.

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    Kashvi Sarkar, 9, center, recounts what happened to her during the Westgate Mall attack as her mother Nafisa, left, listens at the family’s home in Nairobi, Kenya.

    After Kenya mall attack, children’s trauma lingers

    When the shooting began at the Nairobi mall, Cynthia Carpino and her husband hid in the parking lot. But their 1-year-old daughter wouldn’t stop crying. To muffle her cries, her father placed his hand over her mouth so hard she almost suffocated. Little Azzurra fainted in his arms, and three weeks later she’s still not right.

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    Moscow stabbing death sets off street riots

    The stabbing death of an ethnic Russian man has ignited anger in Moscow against people from the Caucasus, with demonstrators breaking into a shopping center and storming a vegetable warehouse Sunday evening. Police detained hundreds of people.

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    Dennis Kimetto of Kenya crosses the finish line to win the Chicago Marathon on Sunday, Oct. 13, 2013, in Chicago.

    Images: Chicago Marathon
    Runners from area suburbs and around the world participate in the Chiacgo Marathon on Sunday.

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    Indian villagers gather after a deadly stampede on a bridge across the Sindh River in Datia district in Madhya Pradesh state.

    Stampede near Indian temple kills 89 people

    A stampede by masses of Hindu worshippers crossing a bridge to a temple in central India left at least 89 people dead Sunday, police said. The chaos broke out as rumors spread that the bridge was collapsing over the Sindh River.

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    A rescue worker searches the remains of a building that collapsed late Saturday in Medellin, Colombia. Eleven people were missing Sunday.

    Building collapses in Colombia

    Searchers hunted through the wreckage of a collapsed high-rise in Medellin, Colombia, on Sunday, trying to locate 11 people missing. No deaths had yet been confirmed, and many lives may have been saved because the 54-unit apartment building was evacuated after cracks appeared on Friday.

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    Tourists pass by the Statue of Liberty in a boat that circles landmarks in New York harbor on Saturday.

    Statue of Liberty reopens amid federal shutdown

    Lady Liberty was once again welcoming visitors to her shores Sunday in New York after the state agreed to shoulder the costs of running the famed statue during the federal government shutdown. Eager sightseers stood in line in Manhattan’s Battery Park, waiting for the ferry trips to the Statue of Liberty, which had been shut since Oct. 1.

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    Indian villagers collect their belongings Sunday after the cyclone hit Arjipalli on the Bay of Bengal coast.

    Indian officials say few were killed in massive cyclone

    Mass evacuations spared India the widespread deaths many had feared from a powerful cyclone that roared ashore over the weekend, officials said Sunday, as the country sorted through the wreckage of flooded towns, tangled power lines and tens of thousands of destroyed thatch homes.

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    Egypt: Detained American found dead in cell

    A U.S. citizen detained in Egypt for violating curfew in August was found dead Sunday in his jail cell, the second foreigner to die in detention in recent weeks. Security officials identified the man as James Henry, 66, a retired U.S. Army officer.

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    Aurora death under investigation

    Aurora police are investigating the death of a 40-year-old woman whose body was found Saturday morning at a Motel 6.

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    Bartlett parents Laceé and Michael Hudec and their daughter, Laura, almost 7, are active members of Mensa, the club for people with high IQs. Elias, who turns 2 in December, is too young to be tested, but his first word was owl, which is the Mensa mascot.

    Bartlett family finds Mensa unstuffy fun

    Do you have what it takes to figure out the costume puns at the Mensa club's annual Halloween bash for smart folks? The Hudec family of Bartlett has three members. “There’s this strange perception of what Mensa is and what it isn’t,” Laceé Hudec says. “We are a little bit of everything.”

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    Beth Coleman, of Zion, an inmate at Lake County jail in Waukegan uses Skype to speak with her parents Ann and Mark Van Sickle of Zion.

    Lake County jail boosts visits with video conferencing

    Beth Coleman smiled as she chatted with her parents on the video conference screen. Seeing people talking on Skype or other video conferencing isn’t out of the ordinary, but the location for this interaction was: it took place while Coleman was an inmate at the Lake County jail. “It’s definitely different, doing it like this,” Coleman said. “But this way, I get to...

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    Visitors to the Big Ten Conference's free museum in Rosemont will have a “highly interactive” experience when it opens early next year, officials said.

    Big Ten Conference moves into Rosemont headquarters

    A three-story, $20 million Big Ten Conference headquarters is the newest addition to Rosemont's burgeoning entertainment district following a recent move from Park Ridge. “We're in a much different neighborhood,” said Big Ten Deputy Commissioner Brad Traviolia. “We're in a much more high pedestrian area."

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    Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords

    Giffords to attend gun show

    Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and husband Mark Kelly, a former combat pilot and astronaut, are scheduled to be with New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman at the Saratoga Springs Arms Fair today to highlight a voluntary agreement to monitor gun show sales and stricter state gun control law.

Sports

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    Boston Red Sox's David Ortiz celebrates with Dustin Pedroia after hitting a grand slam home run in the eighth inning during Game 2 of the American League baseball championship series against the Detroit Tigers Sunday, Oct. 13, 2013, in Boston.

    Walk-off single caps Red Sox comeback

    BOSTON — David Ortiz's line drive sailed just beyond Torii Hunter's reach and into the Boston bullpen, sending the Tigers right fielder flopping headfirst over the wall after it. With one swing, the Red Sox slugger turned everything upside-down.Ortiz's grand slam erased an eighth-inning deficit and ended Detroit's unprecedented run of pitching dominance, and Jonny Gomes scampered around the bases with the game-winning run in the ninth Sunday night to give Boston a 6-5 victory over Detroit and knot the AL championship series at one game apiece."That's what he does. He's an amazing hitter," said Max Scherzer, who took a no-hitter and a 5-0 lead into the sixth inning but could only watch as the Detroit relievers blew it. "He's an amazing postseason hitter. He's clutch. Any given moment, a swing of the bat he can always take you deep."One night after Anibal Sanchez and four relievers came within two outs of the first combined postseason no-hitter in baseball history, Scherzer struck out 13 and held Boston hitless for 5 2-3 innings. But the Red Sox loaded the bases against three relievers in the eighth and then closer Joaquin Benoit came in to face Ortiz.The Red Sox designated hitter lined the first pitch into the glove of the Red Sox bullpen catcher. Hunter went down hard and came out only after his teammates had waved for the Detroit medical staff to come out and help him."I jumped up. I thought I had a beat on it," said Hunter, who came up in the Minnesota Twins organization with Ortiz and remains friends with the Red Sox slugger. "Next thing, I know I'm falling over the fence."The fans waited until the trainers verified that Hunter was OK to start chanting, "Papi!" and call Ortiz out of the dugout for a curtain call. It was the first career postseason grand slam for a star of the 2004 playoff run that ended in Boston's first World Series title in 86 years. "The guy's an actor at work," Red Sox outfielder Shane Victorino said. "It's fun to watch. It's great to see. He's always upbeat and always positive. He always likes to go up and swing the bat. That's what he always wants to do."Koji Uehara pitched a perfect ninth for the win. Rick Porcello gave up a leadoff infield single that left Gomes at second when shortstop Jose Iglesias threw the ball into the Boston dugout. Jarrod Saltalamacchia hit a foul popup that glanced off first baseman Prince Fielder's glove when he got tangled up with a fan. Gomes moved to third on a wild pitch, and then Saltalamacchia hit one through the drawn-in infield to drive in the game-winner."It's playoff baseball," Tigers manager Jim Leyland said. "Looked like we had one in hand and we let one get away, there's no question about that. But there have been two great games."Boston's comeback came a few hours after Tom Brady threw a touchdown pass with 5 seconds left to complete the New England Patriots' comeback over the New Orleans Saints. The score was greeted with cheers by Red Sox fans waiting for the baseball game to start.Game 3 of the ALCS is in Detroit 3 on Tuesday, when Justin Verlander will face Boston's John Lackey."We need it, man. We need start some momentum going on," Ortiz said. "The whole regular season, you haven't seen a team shutting us down for 14, 15 straight innings like they have the past couple of days. If you look at the way they've been pitching, (it's) unbelievable. It's up to us make an adjustment." Miguel Cabrera and Alex Avila homered off Clay Buchholz as Detroit scored four in the sixth inning to open a 5-0 lead. The Red Sox got one in the bottom half but were four outs from falling behind 0-2 in the series when Ortiz tied it. Scherzer, who led the majors with 21 wins, did not allow a hit until Victorino singled to left with two outs in the sixth.

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    Dennis Kimetto of Kenya crosses the finish line to win the Chicago Marathon on Sunday in record time.

    Kenyans win Chicago Marathon

    Just a few years ago, Dennis Kimetto was a farmer in Kenya. Now, he's shattering marathon records. Kimetto broke the course mark Sunday in capturing the Chicago Marathon, and compatriot Rita Jeptoo was the women's winner in the first major marathon in the United States since the Boston bombings. Kimetto finished in 2 hours, 3 minutes, 45 seconds, leading a 1-2-3 finish for Kenyan men.

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    Defense carries Cowboys past Washington

    ARLINGTON, Texas — Dwayne Harris and the Dallas defense were so good that Tony Romo didn’t have to do it all for the Cowboys.Harris returned a punt 86 yards for a touchdown and set up another score with a 90-yard kickoff return, helping the Cowboys hand Robert Griffin III his first loss in his home state with a 31-16 victory against the Washington Redskins on Sunday night.Romo had just 170 yards passing a week after getting 506 in a wild 51-48 loss to Denver.That’s because Harris had 222 total return yards and Kyle Wilber forced and recovered a fumble on a sack of Griffin that left the Cowboys needing just 3 yards for a clinching score in the fourth quarter.The Cowboys (3-3) gave owner Jerry Jones a win on his 71st birthday. Dallas kept the defending NFC East champion Redskins (1-4) from building any momentum after a win and a bye following an 0-3 start.Joseph Randle, playing because running back DeMarco Murray was out with a sprained left knee, got his first career touchdown after Wilber’s big play. He scored from the 1 when he stayed on his feet with a defender draped over him and was pushed into the end zone by center and fellow rookie Travis Frederick for a 31-16 lead.Harris’ punt return gave Dallas a 14-3 lead in the second quarter, and the big kickoff return came after Kai Forbath’s third field goal pulled Washington to 14-9 in the third.Romo finished the job after Harris’ long kick return. He stepped out of a potential sack and threw off balance into the corner of the end zone, where Terrance Williams got two feet down just as he made the catch and was pushed out of bounds by E.J. Biggers for a 15-yard score and a 21-9 lead.Griffin, who was brilliant in a Thanksgiving win at the Cowboys as a rookie last year, said he was rejuvenated after a bye following the Redskins’ first win of the season against Oakland. And he looked it.The 2011 Heisman Trophy winner from Baylor had 246 yards passing and another 77 rushing as the Redskins outgained Dallas 416 to 213.Alfred Morris, who had a career-high 200 yards rushing when the Redskins beat the Cowboys in a playoffs-or-bust finale last year, was held in check before a 45-yard touchdown run trimmed Dallas’ lead to 21-16 in the third quarter. Morris finished with 81 yards.Morris’ touchdown came a play after safety Barry Church was penalized for unnecessary roughness when he hit Griffin as the quarterback scrambled out of bounds. That was the second time in the third quarter that Church was penalized 15 yards for a hit on Griffin along the sideline. Murray ran 4 yards for a touchdown on Dallas’ opening drive, but left early in the second quarter with a sprained left knee. The Cowboys also lost defensive end DeMarcus Ware before halftime because of a right quad injury. Redskins linebacker Bryan Kehl left with a sprained left knee, and cornerback David Amerson was ruled out after sustaining a concussion.There were flags along the Redskins sideline after Harris’ punt return with 2:26 left in the first half. But the penalty was for someone not in uniform on the Redskins bench inadvertently bumping into an official during the play. The score stood and the unsportsmanlike conduct penalty was enforced on the kickoff.Another Washington penalty had provided Harris with a second chance at a return. The Redskins were flagged for illegal motion, and Dallas accepted the penalty that forced them to kick again, setting up the fifth-longest punt return in Cowboys history.

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    Joakim Nordstrom has been gaining momentum since winning a spot on the Blackhawks’ roster during training camp.

    Nordstrom latest from Sweden to impress Blackhawks

    You can add rookie winger Joakim Nordstrom to the Blackhawks' list of impressive players who hail from Sweden. The 21-year-old Nordstrom made the team out of nowhere in training camp and scored his first NHL goal in Friday’s win over the Islanders. He is plus-2 in five games and has found chemistry with fellow Swede Marcus Kruger as a penalty killer.

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    Even Kane’s friends are fans of Chicago now

    There was a time when Patrick Kane dreamed of playing in his hometown of Buffalo for the Sabres. That was before his life changed in 2007 when the Blackhawks made him the first pick in the draft. Now after winning two Stanley Cups here, the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP in 2013 and rookie of the year in 2008, Kane says even his buddies back in Buffalo would prefer him staying in Chicago when his contract expires after next season.

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    Champaign’s Tatyana McFadden wins the woman’s wheelchair division of the Chicago Marathon on Sunday.

    McFadden will go for No. 4 in New York

    By capturing a victory at Sunday’s Bank of America Chicago Marathon with a women’s course record (1:42:35), Tatyana McFadden became the first elite wheelchair athlete to win three major marathons in a season. Now the University of Illinois alum has her sights set on the New York City Marathon in three weeks.

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    Dennis Kimetto of Kenya crosses the finish line to win the Chicago Marathon on Sunday.

    Kimetto sets record in Chicago Marathon win

    On a near perfect weather day, Kenya's Dennis Kimetto shattered the Chicago Marathon course record by 37 seconds, cruising the 26.2 miles in 2:03:45. The previous mark had been set last year by Tsegaye Kebedel.

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    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler laughs with Jermon Bushrod as they leave the field following Thursday’s victory over the New York Giants at Soldier Field.

    Much rests on Bears’ offense

    Through six games the Bears appear to be a team that needs to score a lot of points to be successful. Fortunately, with Jay Cutler off to the best start of his career and a defense that still scores with takeaways, they look as if they'll be able to keep lighting up the scoreboard.

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    Green Bay Packers wide receiver Randall Cobb is help by the team trainers after an injury during Sunday’s game at Baltimore.

    No denying that watching NFL can be chilling

    Watching Sunday's collection of NFL games on TV should have been a little less comfortable than normal for anyone who saw last week's "Frontline" documentary "League of Denial," which was more chilling than Bear weather.

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    Wolves fall 4-2 to Rampage

    The Chicago Wolves closed out their home-opening weekend doubleheader with a loss as they were defeated by the San Antonio Rampage 4-2 Sunday at the Allstate Arena.

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    Big day by Davis lifts 49ers past Cardinals

    SAN FRANCISCO — Vernon Davis caught touchdown passes of 61 and 35 yards and finished with a career-best 180 yards receiving, leading the San Francisco 49ers past the Arizona Cardinals 32-20 on Sunday for their third straight victory.Colin Kaepernick threw for 252 yards and Frank Gore ran for 101 yards on 25 carries.Kendall Hunter ran for a 6-yard touchdown that sealed it for the 49ers (4-2) with 6:35 remaining. Rookie safety Eric Reid made his team-leading third interception and also recovered a fumble to stop an Arizona drive deep in 49ers territory in the third quarter. San Francisco forced four turnovers for the second straight game.Arizona (3-3) lost star defensive end Calais Campbell to an apparent right leg injury late in the game.

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    New England Patriots wide receiver Kenbrell Thompkins (85) catches the winning touchdown pass against New Orleans Saints cornerback Jabari Greer (33) in the fourth quarter of an NFL football game Sunday, Oct.13, 2013, in Foxborough, Mass. The Patriots won 30-27.

    Pats stun Saints on TD with 5 seconds left

    FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Tom Brady’s 17-yard touchdown pass to Kenbrell Thompkins with 5 seconds left gave the New England Patriots a wild 30-27 win and knocked the New Orleans Saints from the ranks of the unbeaten Sunday.It capped a 70-yard drive in which the Patriots marched downfield with no timeouts after getting the ball with 1:08 to go.The Saints (5-1) had taken a 24-23 lead with 3:29 remaining on Drew Brees’ 34-yard touchdown pass to Kenny Stills, but couldn’t put away New England.The Patriots (5-1) survived an interception by Keenan Lewis on their first snap after Garrett Hartley’s 39-yard field goal made it 27-23.

  •  
    Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman (25) intercepts a pass intended for wide receiver Nate Washington, right, in the second half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Oct. 13, 2013, in Seattle.

    Seattle overcomes mistakes to beat Titans 20-13

    SEATTLE — Marshawn Lynch ran for two touchdowns and had 155 all-purpose yards, Richard Sherman came up with his third interception of the season, and the Seattle Seahawks finally shook the Tennessee Titans in the fourth quarter for a 20-13 victory. Seattle (5-1) won its 11th straight at home despite a long list of mistakes that allowed the Titans (3-3) to hang around into the fourth quarter. There was a careless turnover, missed defensive assignments and a comical muffed field goal attempt that led to the Titans’ only touchdown on the final play of the first half. But the Seahawks made enough plays thanks to Lynch, quarterback Russell Wilson and Sherman’s interception to remain on top of the NFC West. Lynch had TD runs of 3 yards and 1 yard.

  •  
    Denver Broncos defensive end Shaun Phillips (90) raises up his arms after a defensive play against the Jacksonville Jaguars in the fourth quarter of an NFL football game, Sunday, Oct. 13, 2013, in Denver.

    Broncos lurch to 35-19 win over Jaguars

    DENVER — Peyton Manning threw for two scores and Knowshon Moreno ran for three to lead the Denver Broncos to a tougher-than-expected 35-19 victory Sunday over the winless Jacksonville Jaguars. The Broncos (6-0) came in as 27-point favorites, and much of the pregame hype centered on whether they’d cover the spread and when Manning would come out of the game. Neither happened. Manning finished 28 for 42 for 295 yards, but lost two fumbles and threw a pick-6 — a 59-yard interception return by Paul Posluszny that pulled the Jaguars (0-6) within 14-12 at halftime. It was a two-point game late in the third quarter, before Moreno scored his last touchdown, an 8-yard run, for a 28-19 lead. Moreno finished with 42 yards. Justin Blackmon had 14 catches for 190 yards for Jacksonville.

  •  
    Cincinnati Bengals running back Gio Bernard (25) is greeted by quarterback Andy Dalton (14) after scoring against the Buffalo Bills in the third quarter of Sunday’s game in Orchard Park, N.Y.

    Bengals down Bills 27-24 in OT

    Mike Nugent hit a 43-yard field goal with 6:44 left in overtime to lift the Cincinnati Bengals to a 27-24 win over the Buffalo Bills on Sunday. Brandon Tate’s 29-yard punt return to the Bills 33 set up the decisive score.

  •  
    Wisconsin tight end Jacob Pedersen runs in for a 1-yard touchdown against Northwestern safety Jimmy Hall during the second half of Saturday’s game in Madison. Wisconsin upset Northwestern 35-6.

    Wisconsin gets big-game win it craved

    After a two-week hiatus, Wisconsin (4-2, 2-1 Big Ten) climbed back into the AP Top 25 on Sunday at No. 25. It returned after the defense compiled quite a few milestones against Northwestern (4-2, 0-2): seven sacks by seven Badgers, most since 2001; 44 rushing yards for Northwestern, the fewest since 2007; and no touchdowns for Northwestern for the first time since 2006.

  •  
    Michigan State’s Jeremy Langford runs past Indiana’s Mark Murphy for a 32-yard touchdown during the third quarter of Saturday’s game in East Lansing, Mich. The Spartans won 42-28.

    Spartans finally defend home turf

    Michigan State has already improved in one respect since last season — the Spartans finally won a conference game at home. That’s more than they could say in 2012.

  •  
    Penn State tight end Jesse James celebrates his touchdown during Saturday’s game against Michigan in State College, Pa. Penn State won 43-40 in four overtimes.

    Penn State motivated after huge win over Michigan

    Just after Penn State scored the winning touchdown to beat Michigan, coach Bill O’Brien sprinted down the field, arms raised, toward the sea of white in the south end zone. There, his team assembled in front of the adoring, screaming fans as the Blue Band prepared to play the alma mater so players and fans alike could sing along.

  •  
    Nebraska’s Randy Gregory celebrates with fans as he leaves the field after a big win over Purdue on Saturday in West Lafayette, Ind.

    Nebraska enters bye week with rest in mind

    Nebraska is entering its second bye week in a month, and no one in the Cornhuskers’ camp is complaining about the extra time off. The Huskers did what they were supposed to do Saturday against the Big Ten’s weakest team, winning 44-7 at Purdue. If nothing else, the game showed they really could use injured quarterback Taylor Martinez healthy for the challenging November stretch that will determine whether they return to the Big Ten championship game.

  •  
    Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford passes against the Cleveland Browns in the third quarter Sunday in Cleveland. Stafford was 15 of 21 for 165 yards and three TDs in the final 30 minutes.

    Stafford jump-starts Lions in 31-17 win over Browns

    The Lions were lifeless and listless at halftime. Matthew Stafford snapped his teammates out of its strange funk just in time. Stafford threw three of his four touchdown passes in the second half, rallying Detroit to a 31-17 win over the Cleveland Browns on Sunday.

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    Packers wide receiver Jordy Nelson carries the ball into the end zone for a touchdown as Ravens cornerback Lardarius Webb chases him during the second half of Sunday’s game in Baltimore.

    Packers squeeze by Ravens 19-17

    Aaron Rodgers came up with the big plays at just the right time, and Green Bay’s depleted defense shoved around the defending Super Bowl champions. It all added up to the Packers’ first road win of the season, a gritty 19-17 decision over the Baltimore Ravens on Sunday.

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    Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders runs for a touchdown during the second half of Sunday’s win over the New York Jets in East Rutherford, N.J.

    Steelers beat Jets 19-6 for first win

    Ben Roethlisberger threw a 55-yard touchdown pass to Emmanuel Sanders, Shaun Suisham kicked four field goals, and the Steelers won their first game, a 19-6 victory over the New York Jets on Sunday.

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    Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles crosses the goal line for a touchdown as Oakland free safety Usama Young defends during the first half of Sunday’s game in Kansas City, Mo.

    Chiefs defeat Raiders 24-7 to remain unbeaten

    Jamaal Charles ran for two touchdowns, the Kansas City defense harassed Oakland quarterback Terrelle Pryor into throwing three second-half interceptions and the Chiefs remained unbeaten with a 24-7 victory over the Raiders on Sunday.

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    Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Riley Cooper pulls in a 47-yard touchdown reception in front of Tampa Bay Buccaneers cornerback Johnthan Banks during the third quarter Sunday in Tampa, Fla.

    Foles throws 3 TDs to lead Eagles past Bucs

    Nick Foles threw three touchdown passes and ran for a fourth, leading the Philadelphia Eagles to a 31-20 victory over the winless Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sunday. Foles finished a long first-quarter scoring drive with a 4-run and threw TD passes of 12 and 36 yards to DeSean Jackson.

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    Carolina Panthers fullback Mike Tolbert bowls the football as he celebrates his rushing touchdown against the Minnesota Vikings during the second half Sunday in Minneapolis.

    Panthers cruise past Vikings 35-10

    Adrian Peterson’s tumultuous week ended with a quiet game. The Carolina Panthers made all the noise. Cam Newton threw three touchdown passes and ran for another score, and the Panthers romped past Peterson and the Minnesota Vikings 35-10 on Sunday.

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    Houston Texans quarterback Matt Schaub grabs his leg after being injured on a sack by the St. Louis Rams’ Chris Long during the third quarter of Sunday’s game in Houston.

    Rams hand Texans 4th straight loss

    Sam Bradford threw three touchdown passes, St. Louis added a score on defense and special teams and the Rams stunned the mistake-prone Houston Texans with a 38-13 win on Sunday.

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    Wisconsin safety Nate Hammon sacks Northwestern quarterback Trevor Siemian on Saturday in Madison, Wis. The Badgers won 35-6.

    Northwestern falls out of AP Top 25

    The Southeastern Conference set a record for most schools in The Associated Press college football poll with eight ranked teams. The Top 25 was shaken Sunday after seven ranked teams lost, including Northwestern, which fell out of the poll.

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    Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch (6) said Saturday's close win over Akron has left a "bad taste" in the mounths of NIU offensive players. Despite the win, NIU failed to move up the national polls.

    NIU must win big to think BCS big

    There is a long way to go and a lot will change, but as of this moment NIU has a shot at busting the BCS again, with SB Nation projecting Sunday morning that NIU would play in the Fiesta Bowl against Baylor. For that to happen, the Huskies will have to play much better than they did Saturday.

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    Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson warms up before Sunday's game against the Carolina Panthers in Minneapolis.

    Peterson active for game after son's death

    Adrian Peterson suited up for Minnesota's game against Carolina on Sunday, as he promised. One of the star running back's sons died Friday, a victim of abuse by, police say, the boyfriend of the child's mother.

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    Lexi Thompson lines up a putt during her final round at the Malaysian LGPA event Sunday in Kuala Lumpur.

    American teen wins Malaysia title by 4 shots

    American teenager Lexi Thompson shot a 2-under 69 on Sunday to win the LPGA Malaysia title by four strokes. The 18-year-old, who won her second career LPGA title and first of the season, finished on 19-under 265 to end the South Korean dominance at the Kuala Lumpur Golf and Country Club.

Business

  •  
    The new $100 bill has a 3-D blue motion strip down the center.

    Six details about the new $100 bill

    The new $100 bill is here now, with fancy new security features, such as an image of the Liberty Bell that appears in an inkwell and a 3D blue motion strip down the center. Here are some interesting facts about our favorite greenback.

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    Leaders, keep an eye on 'I'

    Setting the right tone can be difficult. In U.S. culture, we are taught to take credit for our individual work and to stand out in front of people so that they understand our personal contributions. We are taught to be aggressive in promoting our own accomplishments. We think that if we put the spotlight on our selves, that we will get promoted faster. But while it is important to be confident, the reality is that when others, even higher-ups, hear all this “I” language, it is disconcerting to them.

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    A man walks past a Fidelity Investments office in the Financial District of downtown Boston. Global investors still see it as the world's best place to park their money. Even the threat of an unprecedented government default doesn't seem to have dulled the allure of Teflon America.

    Investors keep faith in U.S. in crisis after crisis

    Global investors still see the U.S. as the world's best place to park their money. Even the threat of an unprecedented government default doesn't seem to have dulled the allure of Teflon America. The 10-year Treasury note, the bedrock of the government's debt market, has attracted more money in recent weeks, not less, and the stock market is still close to record highs.

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    Most residents will pay more to heat their homes this winter, according to government forecasts out this week. Staying warm is expected to cost more because fuel prices are rising and the weather is expected to be cooler than the last two relatively warm winters. Natural gas, propane, and electricity prices are expected to rise, affecting 94 percent of U.S. households. Heating oil users will catch a slight price break, but still pay near-record bills to heat their homes.

    How to blunt effect of higher heating bills

    After two years of flat or lower fuel prices, many residents will pay sharply more to heat their homes this winter, according to government forecasts out this week. There are a number of ways residents can blunt the expected rise in heating bills — beyond putting on a turtleneck.

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    There are dozens of glaciers in the area fed by the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, which blankets a wide swath of the Andes between Chile and Argentina. Just how to define a glacier is at the heart of a Chilean congressional battle that could determine the future of mining in the world's largest copper-producing country.

    Chile glacier bill pits mines against water supply

    The revival of legislation to ban mining in glacial areas is spawning debate among miners, farmers and environmentalists about how to protect both vital water supplies and Chile's mining industry. If the bill passes, mining experts fear it could shutter multibillion-dollar mining projects and slow investment. “If it passes as a law with tough conditions, it could harm not only the operation of current projects but also future projects,” said Juan Carlos Guajardo, head of the Chilean mining think tank CESCO.

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    4 tips for buying health insurance without subsidy help

    The health care overhaul is expected to help millions of uninsured obtain coverage, but that assistance has limits. Individuals who do not have the option to obtain insurance from their employer, and who make more than about $46,000 — or a family of four bringing in more than $94,200 — will not be eligible for income-based tax credits under the new health care law.

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    Craig Stowers Jr., president of Ramarc Solutions, LLC, is tapping his company's line of credit because he doesn't know when he'll be paid for work he's done for the government.

    Government shutdown takes toll on small business

    The shutdown of the U.S. government is making it tough for small federal contractors like Craig Stowers to keep their businesses going. “I'm juggling funds now, just to keep afloat,” says Stowers, CEO of Vienna, Va.-based Ramarc Solutions, a provider of technology hardware and services for websites, wireless networking, Internet security and teleconferencing. The company gets about 25 percent of its revenue from the government.

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    Rubber glut shrinking as car sales expand to record

    Monsoon rains that drenched rubber plantations across India and Malaysia are diminishing a glut of supply for the first time in three years, just as record global car sales are boosting demand for tires. The surplus will narrow by at least 12 percent to 284,000 metric tons this year, according to the International Rubber Study Group, a 36-nation body based in Singapore. Futures that fell as much as 62 percent since peaking in 2011 rallied into a bull market in August.

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    Investors hungrier for stock funds, but finicky

    Investors are giving stock mutual funds another shot after getting burned during the financial crisis, but they’re being choosy. From January through August, eight straight months, investors put more money into stock funds than they pulled out, according to the most recent data from the Investment Company Institute.

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    An American flag flies atop the stage at the first day of Hempfest on Aug. 16 in Seattle. Thousands packed the Seattle waterfront park for the opening of a three-day marijuana festival — an event that is part party, part protest and part victory celebration after the legalization of pot in Washington and Colorado last fall.

    Legal-marijuana trend spreading in the West

    Voter support for legal marijuana in Washington and Colorado is spurring similar campaigns in California and three other states that together may bring pot within lawful reach of almost one in five Americans. “Because of Colorado and Washington, it’s created a cannabis tidal wave across the country,” Mike Jolson, 45, a legalization activist in Santa Cruz, California, said.

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    Cough drops get sleep aids with Smith Brothers overhaul

    Smith Brothers Co., known for 1800s-era black-and-white bags featuring its bearded founders, is reinventing the medicated lozenge. Bought out of bankruptcy in 2010 by York Capital Management LP, the 166-year-old company is trying to inject fresh thinking into a $7.23 billion U.S. cold-remedy market dominated by Halls and Procter & Gamble Co.’s Vicks.

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    Work Advice: If you can’t say anything nice about your current job...

    Karla L. Miller writes an advice column on navigating the modern workplace. Each week she will answer one or two questions from readers.

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    Grocery stores try fresh idea: Food pickup service

    Starting last fall, Charlottesville, Va.-based Relay Foods, founded by entrepreneur Zach Buckner, has established 35 pickup locations around Washington, with a goal of hundreds eventually. Safeway, the other dominant Washington grocer, has started a pickup business. New York-based FreshDirect and Seattle-based Amazon Fresh, owned by my new boss, Jeff Bezos, may not be far behind. “This is undoubtedly the future of grocery shopping,” Buckner said.

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    Minorities more likely to file bank grievances, report finds

    People in minority communities are more likely to submit grievances to the government’s consumer watchdog about their banks than those in predominantly white areas, a trend that raises questions about fair lending practices, the National Community Reinvestment Coalition said in a report released Tuesday. “The level of products and services serving communities of color continues to be second-rate,” said John Taylor, president and chief executive of the NCRC.

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    Fewer banks willing to lend curbs U.S. sales

    The net percentage of financial institutions reporting increased willingness to make installment loans, which include credit cards, has averaged 15.4 percent in three surveys of senior loan officers released this year by the Federal Reserve. That compares with 18.9 percent during the same period last year and almost 25.4 percent in 2011.

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    Law shields churches, leaves pensions unprotected

    Pension shortfalls at some religiously affiliated hospitals, businesses and social service agencies are raising new alarms and spotlighting a largely overlooked gap in the law protecting Americans’ retirement benefits.

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    A pedestrian passes the entrance to a re:Store premium Apple Inc. reseller in Moscow.

    As developed countries improve, the BRICs stumble

    The developing countries of Brazil, Russia, India and China recovered quickly from the financial crisis five years ago. Their spending helped keep a global recession from becoming a global depression. Now they’re stumbling. The reasons for the slowdown in the BRICs, as the four biggest developing countries are known, are myriad, from a pullback in bank lending in China to crumbling infrastructure and rampant corruption in India. One constant: The cost of living is rising fast, sapping spending power and the spirits of even those who’ve done well since the crisis.

  •  
    Jason Lauve, executive director of Hemp Cleans, looks at hemp seeds at a farm in Springfield, Colo. during the first known harvest of industrial hemp in the U.S. since the 1950s. Hemp and marijuana are the same species, Cannabis sativa, just cultivated differently to enhance or reduce marijuanaís psychoactive chemical, THC. Clinical marijuana is much stronger in THC.

    L.A. cracking down on pot dispensaries

    The city had struggled for more than five years with how to regulate the budding medical marijuana industry. Voters in May overwhelmingly passed Measure D, which reduced the number of shops sharply, and taxed those that were operating legally under state and local laws.There were nearly 1,000 nonprofit dispensaries in the city a few years ago. The measure allows only the 134 that opened before a moratorium was attempted in 2007.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Paul Guilfoyle, left, has been with “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation” from day one, while Ted Danson is in his third season. Both will help mark the CBS show’s 300th episode on Oct. 23.

    Still on the case: ‘CSI’ marks 300th episode

    A 300th episode is a milestone extremely few series get to celebrate. The globally successful Anthony E. Zuiker-created procedural “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation” — which inspired much of what CBS’ prime-time schedule has looked like for the past decade-plus — marks the event Wednesday, Oct. 23, with a story that acknowledges “CSI” history in a number of ways. The plot revisits a cold case from the Las Vegas forensics team’s early days, and founding co-star Marg Helgenberger returns as Catherine Willows.

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    “Gravity,” starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney, landed the top spot at the box office for the week in a row.

    ‘Gravity’ beats Hanks’ ‘Captain Phillips’ at box office

    The Warner Bros. astronaut adventure "Gravity" directed by Alfonso Cuaron and starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney landed in the top spot at the box office for the second weekend in a row, according to studio estimates Sunday. The film earned $44.3 million, raising its domestic total to $123.4 million.

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    “Sons of Anarchy” star Charlie Hunnam has dropped out of the “Fifty Shades of Grey” film adaptation citing scheduling conflicts.

    Charlie Hunnam quits ‘Fifty Shades’ film

    "Sons of Anarachy" star Charlie Hunnam is dropping out of the highly anticipated big-screen version of “Fifty Shades of Grey” just weeks after being cast as the lead, citing his busy schedule.

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    Is frugality the only way to impart one’s values?

    Q. I was taught by my parents to live frugally, which meant never using more than I needed. I would reuse clothes and keep a car until it practically fell apart. We always lived comfortably as a family but it was definitely a test of limits because our space was only as much as we needed.

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    Lynyrd Skynyrd plays on the same bill with John Kay & Steppenwolf at Festival Park next to the Grand Victoria Casino in Elgin on Sunday, Oct. 13.

    Sunday picks: Lynyrd Skynyrd still rockin'

    The current incarnation of Lynyrd Skynyrd headlines a rock concert that also features John Kay & Steppenwolf Sunday at Festival Park in Elgin. See more than 150 handcrafted scarecrows at the annual St. Charles Scarecrow Festival. Need a laugh? Maybe comedian Tammy Pescatelli can help when she headlines the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg.

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    Tom and Mary Porte of Elk Grove Village spend winters in Florida. Recent years have found them in Fort Meyers, though they’ve also spent time in Naples and Bonita Springs.

    Portes share tips on part-time sunshine living

    When in Florida, Tom and Mary Porte have made the strategic decision to rent a vacation home each winter rather than buy one. “We wouldn’t want to move down there full time because we enjoy the weather in Illinois most of the year and we want to be close to our family and friends,” Tom said. Experienced snowbirds, the Portes share other tips they've learned in the past few years.

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    Daffodils naturalize beautifully and are available in many sizes and bloom times

    Daffodils most adaptable bulb for this area

    If you are planting bulbs for next spring, keep in mind that daffodils are one of the hardiest and most adaptable and pest-resistant bulbs for Chicago-area gardeners. They naturalize beautifully and are available in many sizes and bloom times.

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    Mary Bridget Davis performs in “A Night with Janis Joplin” at the Lyceum Theatre in New York.

    Musicals featuring female singer-songwriters swell

    Mary Bridget Davies is part singer, part actress and part spirit conjurer. She is uncanny at capturing the look and sound of the late Janis Joplin in a new Broadway show highlighting the iconic blues singer. “I feel a responsibility to be as honest and authentic as possible,” says Davies, who has spent years singing Joplin songs in concert and onstage. She is part of a new wave of musicals featuring female singer-songwriters, a list that includes a Carole King musical making its way to Broadway, a Billie Holiday show now off-Broadway, and musicals planned on Diane Warren and Patsy Cline.

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    Kenny Rogers’ latest album, “You Can’t Make Old Friends,” was released on Oct. 8.

    Kenny Rogers, Dolly Parton reunite on new duet

    Three decades after their unforgettable team up on “Islands in the Stream,” Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton have a new duet out on Rogers’ latest album. The title song from “You Can’t Make Old Friends” shows once again the special chemistry he and Parton have. But Rogers says it stops there. “Working with Dolly is a great rush for me because we are good friends and we have been forever,” Rogers said.

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    Popular Humans of New York photoblog now a book

    Brandon Stanton rounds the corner, spots a tiny blur of pink, and runs over to ask if he can take a picture. He crouches in a busy Manhattan bike lane to get the shot: a beautiful little girl with pink leg braces, a walker and a big smile, her dad posed behind her. Stanton posts the picture on his website, HumansofNewYork.com — known to fans as HONY — with a mere two sentences from the father: “We go to four appointments every week, but I don’t mind. She’s my blood.” No names or other details. Within an hour, the image has 22,000 likes.

  •  
    Create a parrot costume with a feathery boa and colored feathers and a yellow paper beak attached to cheap, plastic glasses.

    From elf ears to parrots: DIY costume tips

    If you’re thinking of making this year’s Halloween costume yourself, you can stick with simple or go Hollywood pro. Neither has to take much time or money, and either can create a convincing costume, whether you’re looking to draw guffaws, shrieks or admiring nods.

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    “Storyland: A Trip Through Childhood Favorites” at Kohl Children’s Museum pays tribute to a number of classics like the popular “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom.”

    From ‘Storyland’ to Disney ‘Treasures,’ local museums stir the imagination

    Local museums step up their programming in the fall, appealing to families looking for something to do on rainy and chilly days. Whether your kids are interested in animals, movies or books, or you’re just hoping to stir their imagination, you’ll want to check out new exhibits at the Kohl Childrens Museum, the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum and the Museum of Science and Industry.

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    Book notes: Meet Scott Turow at Naperville’s Two Doors East
    Best-selling author Scott Turow signs copies of his latest legal suspense thriller, "Identical," at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at Anderson's Two Doors East in Naperville.

  •  
    Both nail heads and rivets are having a moment in contemporary decor. On some pieces, they reinforce traditional elegance; and on others, they offer an urban, edgier aesthetic. The Alpine Estates hair-on-hide ottoman puts a modern spin on Old West furniture.

    Furniture makers reach back in time for design inspiration

    Both nailheads and rivets are having a moment in contemporary décor. On some pieces, they reinforce traditional elegance. On others, they offer an urban, edgier aesthetic. “We’re seeing nailhead trim — this 400-year-old detail — in lots of new applications, creating bold looks,” says Seattle interior designer Timothy De Clue.

  •  
    “The Circle” by Dave Eggers

    In ‘The Circle,’ Eggers conjures creepy tech giant

    A tech giant with tentacles deep into the lives of its users is no longer an unusual thing to imagine, but Dave Eggers takes the growing inescapabilty of social media and personal technology to clever and chilling places in his new novel, “The Circle.”

  •  
    With all the new styles available, take your time in choosing the right medicine cabinet for your bathroom.

    New medicine cabinet can cure bathroom blues

    Q. Since ny medicine cabinet is outdated and in a poor state of repair, I’m going to have a new one installed. Can you please give me some of your great tips on choosing a new medicine cabinet?

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    Varying humidity levels will affect laminate flooring

    Q. We had a laminate floor installed in our dining area one year ago. When it is dry outside, it is quiet. But when the weather is humid, the floor crackles when you walk on it.

Discuss

  •  
    Malala Yousafzai

    Editorial: Malala Yousafzai and a celebration of courage
    A Daily Herald editorial reflects on inspirational story of Malala Yousafzai and celebrates the everyday courage that is all around us

  •  

    Effort against a viral killer hits its final stage

    Columnist Michael Gerson: Fortunately, the CDC’s polio eradication effort has been largely exempted from the shutdown. It is part of one of the most ambitious medical enterprises in history — attempting to eliminate a highly contagious virus from the wild. This has been achieved only twice before, with smallpox and rinderpest. The end of polio transmission is a few hundred yearly cases away. Even a brief pause would risk losing ground.

  •  

    Lack of help after fall is outrageous
    A Wheeling letter to the editor: I cannot believe everyone just plain ignored me. What is wrong with people who just walk by a lady on the ground in obvious pain and not inquire if there is anything they could do? What is the world coming to?

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    Hypocrisy rife in GOP, Tea Party
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: These two groups have recorded their moral values on loose-leaf paper and in pencil to maintain maximum situational flexibility. Hypocrisy is of course their major tenant. They are first in line when FEMA calls. Many have FHA loans on their homes. Many have student loans. They never hesitate to call 911 when the need arises.

  •  

    Shutdown will affect how I vote
    A Carpentersville letter to the editor: I think it is nothing short of shameful that those I sent to represent me in the Congress of the United States would act so childish as to shut down the government and deprive those who work for it of pay.

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    Boehner kowtows to Tea Party extremists
    An Elgin letter to the editor: John Boehner, speaker of the House, is more interested in placating the Tea Party extremists in his Republican majority than in passing a budget or avoiding default.

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    Someone else should be in charge
    A Sleepy Hollow letter to the editor: Congress is planning to spend over a trillion dollars in fiscal 2014 even though two years ago they passed a law to cap spend at $967 billion as part of the debt ceiling settlement. The Budget Control Act of August 2011 established sequester spending caps including capping 2014 spending at $967 billion yet they are about to authorize 4 percent more.

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    Peanut Days really makes a difference
    A Lombard letter to the editor: On behalf of the many beneficiaries of Peanut Days and the Kiwanis Club of Lombard, thank you for your support of our Peanut Days and your thoughtful donations. As a result of your generosity and that of other friends like you, this year’s event netted more than $3,400.

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    Conservatives need daily newspaper
    A Warrenville letter to the editor: I found your recent supplement, “The Newspaper Partnership,” worthwhile and provocative. I do agree that print journalism still has much to contribute to the community. However, my opinion reflects my prejudice since I developed my skills as a writer in print journalism.

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    Obama intrudes into all facets of life
    A West Chicago letter to the editor: He voted “present” 123 times as an Illinois state senator, but today Barack Obama is an indefatigable micromanager. Never mind that the bloodbath in Syria continues, overshadowed by the specter of chemical weapons.

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