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Daily Archive : Monday September 16, 2013

News

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    Former professional featherweight boxer Jose Hernandez, right, and his father, also Jose Hernandez, both of Round Lake, plan to open a boxing club and fitness center in Round Lake meant to serve at-risk youths.

    Round Lake OKs downtown boxing gym

    Round Lake trustees have approved plans for a boxing gymnasium and health club in the village's downtown that'll be primarily geared toward at-risk youths in the community.

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    The Chicago Transit Authority has a message for riders: stay off the tracks.

    CTA ads warn passengers to stay off the rails

    The Chicago Transit Authority has a message for riders: stay off the tracks. The rail and bus service is rolling out a series of new public safety ads Monday. The Chicago Sun-Times says the number of people making their way to the tracks is up about 4 percent. In 2012, there were 349 reports of people leaving train platforms to climb onto the rails. Last year, 11 people died on the tracks, up...

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    United Way fundraiser at Great America

    United Way of Lake County has teamed with Six Flags Great America in Gurnee for a special promotion called “Coasters For A Cause” on Oct. 5 and 6.

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    Margaret Judson of Arlington Heights appears in a scene from HBO’s “The Newsroom.” She plays the role of producer Tess Westin.

    Arlington Heights journalist finds place in Aaron Sorkin’s ‘Newsroom’

    It was a longshot, but Margaret Judson got the job as an NBC page in New York. And it was a longshot that, while there, she met Oscar-winning screenwriter Aaron Sorkin. The chance meeting changed her life. Sorkin eventually gave Judson, of Arlington Heights, a role on the hit HBO series, "The Newsroom." A Q&A with Judson.

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    District 203 enrollment mirrors projections

    Five weeks into the new school year, Naperville Unit District 203’s enrollment figures closely mirror projections, Superintendent Dan Bridges said. Administrators projected 17,285 students would be attending school in the district, and as of Friday, 17,254 actually were. Kitty Ryan, assistant superintendent for elementary education, said the accurate projections allowed the district to allocate...

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    Airline: 6 fall ill on overseas flight to Chicago

    Officials are trying to pinpoint why six passengers on a flight to Chicago from Germany fell ill. Lufthansa spokesman Nils Haupt tells the Chicago Sun-Times that Flight 432 originating in Frankfort made an emergency stop Saturday night in London so an ailing passenger could be taken to a hospital there.

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    Concrete on the Western Avenue bridge over the Cal-Sag Channel in Blue Island is chipped. The bridge is in the state's multiyear plan for replacement of its south approach spans

    Some 200 Illinois bridges in need of overhaul

    From major spans over the Mississippi River to overpasses on traffic-choked arteries skirting Chicago, some 200 bridges throughout Illinois are in need of replacement or repair because of their outdated, insufficient design and their advanced deterioration.

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    Illinois hunters prefer lead despite eagle concerns

    Despite pushes by environmentalists to curb the amount of lead ammunition used by hunters, sportsmen in southern Illinois say they'll continue using the lead when trying to get their next deer. WSIL-TV reports many of the region's hunters appreciate concerns that scavengers such as bald eagles that feed on deer remains left by hunters using lead ammunition may become poisoned.

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    Security personnel respond near the Washington Navy Yard where a gunman was reported in Washington, on Monday.

    13 killed in Washington Navy Yard shooting rampage

    A former Navy reservist went on a shooting rampage Monday inside a building at the heavily secured Washington Navy Yard, firing from a balcony onto office workers in the cafeteria below, authorities and witnesses said. Thirteen people were killed, including the gunman.

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    Aaron Alexis, one suspect in the Navy Yard shooting Monday in Washington, went through basic training at the Great Lakes Naval Station near North Chicago from May to June 2007.

    Washington Navy Yard shooter went through Great Lakes in 2007

    The one identified suspect so far in the Washington Navy Yard mass shooting received his military training at Great Lakes Naval Station near North Chicago. Aaron Alexis, 34, enlisted in the Navy on May 5, 2007. He graduated from boot camp July 10, 2007. He ultimately he received the rank of petty officer, 3rd Class, aviation electrician's mate on Dec. 16, 2009.

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    West suburban districts collaborating for online education

    In 2013, many schools already incorporate some form of online learning into everyday instruction, but five West suburban districts are moving forward with plans to offer a more comprehensive online learning program as soon as 2014. Naperville Unit District 203, Indian Prairie Unit District 204, Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200, Batavia Unit District 101 and Kaneland Unit District 302 have...

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    William Daley’s spokesman is confirming that the former White House chief of staff will not seek the Democratic nomination for Illinois governor.

    Daley: I’m not prepared for enormity of governor run

    Former White House chief of staff William Daley has dropped out of the race for Illinois governor. Spokesman Peter Giangreco confirmed Monday that Daley was ending his bid. “There’s nothing that prepares you for getting into these things,” his spokesman said.

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    St. Charles mayor pitches new plan for licensing taverns

    St. Charles Mayor Ray Rogina has a new plan to fix the need for police interventions at downtown taverns.

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    Man arrested at BMW Championship

    A man was arrested Monday morning at the BMW Championship at Conway Farms Golf Club for attempting to bring in a concealed firearm, Lake Forest police said. The man was stopped by security at the main entrance of the event, which was rained out Sunday and finished Monday instead.

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    U-46 proposed budget for 2014 draws criticism

    Three years since a nearly $42 million deficit forced Elgin Area School District U-46 to cut programs, increase class sizes and layoff 399 employees — including 314 teachers and 19 administrators — administrators are now seeking to hire 48 additional teachers in fiscal year 2014. The roughly $527 million proposed budget for expenditures for the state’s second-largest school district also includes...

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    Terry Mee

    East Dundee approves police chief contract

    East Dundee inked an employment agreement with its longtime police chief who had been working the last several years without a new contract. Monday night, the board approved the agreement with Terry Mee, East Dundee’s police chief since 2006. The vote to approve the deal was unanimous.“It’s heartening to have that show of support and that indication of confidence," Mee said.

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    Jeremy T. Mansfield

    Lake in the Hills man charged with solicitation of child

    A Lake in the Hills man faces felony charges after trying to arrange a meeting for sex with what he thought was a teenage boy, but turned out to be a Lake County Sheriff's detective, authorities announced Monday. Jeremy T. Mansfield, 20, of the 400 block of Winslow Way, was arrested Sept. 4 after he posted an ad on Craigslist for a male companion, then unknowingly began communications with the...

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    Pamela Jacobazzi

    New trial sought in DuPage shaken baby case

    Matthew Czapski was 10 months old in August 1994 when he suffered injuries that left him in a vegetative state, then died at age 2. Now the Bartlett woman who was convicted of causing Matthew’s fatal injuries is hoping to get a new trial in a bid to prove she’s innocent.

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    Kane Coroner Russell, Chairman Lauzen clash again on budget

    The budget battle between Kane County Coroner Rob Russell and County Board Chairman Chris Lauzen intensified Monday when a potential compromise died following concerns about how Russell manages his staff.

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    The Costa Concordia ship lies on its side on the Tuscan Island of Giglio, Italy, early Monday morning. An international team of engineers is trying a never-before attempted strategy to set upright the luxury liner, which capsized after striking a reef in 2012 killing 32 people.

    Shipwrecked Concordia wrested off Italian reef

    Using a vast system of steel cables and pulleys, maritime engineers on Monday gingerly winched the massive hull of the Costa Concordia off the reef where the cruise ship capsized near an Italian island in January 2012 and were poised to set it upright in the middle of the night.

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    Professor Ake Sellstrom, head of the chemical weapons team working in Syria, hands over the report on the Al-Ghouta massacre to Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon Sunday.

    UN confirms chemical weapons used in Syria

    Careful not to blame either side for a deadly chemical weapon attack, U.N. inspectors reported Monday that rockets loaded with the nerve agent sarin had been fired from an area where Syria’s military has bases, but said the evidence could have been manipulated in the rebel-controlled stricken neighborhoods.

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    A U.S. Capitol Police officer patrols the steps at the Capitol as the investigation continues at the nearby Washington Navy Yard where at least one gunman opened fire Monday in Washington.

    Senate lifts some restrictions as shooter sought

    Senate officials lifted some restrictions on their side of the U.S. Capitol complex Monday while authorities searched for a potential second suspect in the Navy Yard shootings.

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    An attorney for residents of the Fox Point mobile home complex, seen here Aug. 22 during a protest at Wheeling town hall, is seeking a temporary restraining order preventing Wheeling officials from enforcing the town's building codes while their federal lawsuit is ongoing. The residents' homes were damaged during flooding, and city officials say the damage estimate is more than 50 percent of their value.

    Fox Point owners continue fight against Wheeling

    An attorney for Wheeling residents suing the village in federal court over efforts they say are intended to remove them from the Fox Point mobile home community said Monday she will seek a temporary restraining order preventing officials from enforcing the town's building codes.

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    A statue of a horse guards the main road to Horizon Farms in Barrington Hills in 2009.

    Couple battle forest preserve over Barrington Hills estate

    The owners of Horizon Farms — a 400-acre Barrington Hills estate and horse farm — have filed a federal lawsuit accusing the Forest Preserve District of Cook County of conspiring to pay $14 million for their Barrington Hills horse farm while they were fighting foreclosure.

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    Mike Steinpach moves mud out from the basement of Stan McDonald’s house damaged by flooding in Longmont, Colo., on Sunday.

    Colorado evacuees return to find more heartbreak

    Weary Colorado evacuees have begun returning home after days of rain and flooding, but Monday’s clearing skies and receding waters revealed only more heartbreak: toppled houses, upended vehicles and a stinking layer of muck covering everything.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Matthew A. Galloway, 26, of Plano, was charged with DUI and DUI with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or greater after a traffic stop at 11:29 p.m. Thursday near Ashe and Galena roads near Sugar Grove, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Muslim group sues Des Plaines for denying religious center

    A Bosnian Muslim group is suing the city of Des Plaines and five of its aldermen, claiming the city council’s rejection last month of a proposed religion center in an area zoned for manufacturing violated rights to religious freedom. The group intended to use the property for prayer services, religious education classes and community meetings.

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    Palatine Republicans host candidate, activist training

    The Palatine Township Republican Organization and the Leadership Institute will conduct training Sept. 21 for people interested in becoming involved in politics or running for office.

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    First West Nile death in suburban Cook County reported

    The first death of the year attributed to West Nile virus in suburban Cook County was reported Monday by officials at the Cook County Department of Public Health. A 67-year-old Cicero man who suffered from multiple other health conditions died recently after contracting West Nile, according to the health department.

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    Jose Rebollar-Vergara

    Motion to dismiss murder charges in Round Lake Beach shooting denied

    A Lake County judge has denied a motion to dismiss murder charges against a Round Lake Park gang member in the shooting of a Zion teen, despite the defense attorney’s claims police misled grand jurors in the case. In his ruling Monday, Lake County Judge Daniel Shanes said there was enough evidence against Jose Rebollar-Vergara, 25, to warrant a trial.

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    Andrew Bueno

    Two face attempted murder charges in two Aurora shootings

    Two men have been charged with attempted murder in two shootings late Friday on Aurora's east side. Andrew Bueno, 24, and Armando Delgado, 17, were being held at the Kane County jail on bails of $250,000 and $200,000, respectively.

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    Corps holds public meetings on Des Plaines River report

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will hold a series of public meetings next week to discuss the findings of a report outlining a variety of potential flood risk management and ecosystem restoration projects that could be implemented along the Upper Des Plaines River. The meetings will give the public a chance to review and comment on the report.

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS U.S. stocks rose, sending the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index to a five-week high, after Lawrence Summers withdrew his bid to be Federal Reserve chairman and tensions over dealing with Syria’s chemical weapons eased.

    Stocks rally after Summers exits Fed race

    Wall Street was happy to see Larry Summers go.Stocks rose on Monday after Summers, who had been the leading candidate to replace Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke, withdrew his name from consideration.

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    Man seeks damages from Gilberts bar, bouncer in alleged beating

    A 46-year-old man is seeking damages from a Gilberts bar and its owners, arguing he was beaten without provocation by a bouncer 20 months ago, according to a lawsuit filed in Kane County. William Hemmings seeks unspecified damages from The Point Bar and Grill and bartender/bouncer Eric Bender from an altercation on Jan. 7, 2012, in which Bender continued to strike Hemmings after he was escorted...

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Miguel Angel Ramirez, 36, of Villa Park, was charged with DUI, DUI with a blood alcohol concentration of more than .08, and failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident after deputies responded to a single-vehicle rollover crash at 5:26 a.m. Sunday at Boncosky and Sleepy Hollow roads near West Dundee, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Naperville settles excessive force lawsuit for $435,000

    Naperville has settlement an excessive force civil lawsuit brought by a Lemont woman for nearly half a million dollars. The woman suffered a torn rotator cuff in a scuffle with officers who were arresting her son on drug charges. The woman wasn't charged with anything, which city officials said "may have hurt" the case if it went to trial.

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    Stormwater charge coming to Batavia?

    Batavia is thinking about creating a stormwater utility, and a charge to go with it. The council will discuss the matter at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.

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    Jeremy A. Betancourt

    Antioch-area teen involved in fatal drag racing crash back in jail

    An Antioch-area man accused of killing a teenage girl in a June street racing crash is back behind bars after his bail was increased by a Lake County judge Monday. However, Jeremy Betancourt’s bail could be reduced again on Wednesday if his defense attorney is successful in placing him in another behavioral treatment facility.

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    Cook Memorial Public Library District officials are considering acquiring land for a parking lot expansion at the Aspen Drive Library in Vernon Hills.

    Quirke not sold on Aspen Drive Library parking idea

    Cook Memorial Public Library District officials are eyeing land near their Vernon Hills branch for a possible parking lot expansion, but board President Bonnie Quirke isn’t yet sold on the idea.

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    Miss New York Nina Davuluri waits to be introduced during a news conference following her crowning as Miss America 2014 on Sunday night in Atlantic City, N.J.

    Weekend in Review: Man shot at Elgin hotel; BMW golf tourney resumes today
    What you may have missed this weekend: RTA chief says Metra, Pace, CTA waste money; charity seeks new home for Rob Komosa's wheelchairs; man shot outside Elgin hotel; Menards leaving Mundelein; actress leaves 'Kinky Boots' for 'Evita'; BMW tourney to resume Monday; 'Mr. Fourth Quarter' Cutler ekes out win for Bears; new dynamic for Blackhawks; Cubs lose to Pirates; and Sox drop 12th straight to...

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    Fundraiser Saturday for Schaumburg’s Prairie Center

    The cultural surroundings of Schaumburg’s Prairie Center for the Arts will add a unique and festive flavor to “Celebrate the Arts 2013” — the annual fundraising party hosted by the Prairie Center Arts Foundation from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21 at 201 Schaumburg Court.

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    Run for fun at Stevenson High:

    The Stevenson High School Foundation and the Stevenson cross country teams will host the inaugural 5-kilometer Color Fun(d) Run at 9 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 22.

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    Job fair for vets in Lake Zurich:

    Lake Zurich's American Legion post will host a veterans job fair from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20.

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    Lakes Volley-For-the-Cure:

    Lakes Community High School will participate in its fifth annual Volley-For-the-Cure match on Tuesday, Oct. 1.

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    Wauconda village board to meet:

    The Wauconda village board will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday at village hall, 101 N. Main St., to discuss design guidelines for buildings in town and other issues.

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    Xiubin Mei

    Ex-cook gets probation in meat cleaver attack

    Five months after a jury acquitted him on one count of attempted murder and deadlocked on another, former Elk Grove Village restaurant cook Xiubin Mei pleaded guilty to lesser charges and was sentenced to probation.

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    Rich Meyer of Mount Prospect shows Takahiro Tsutsui how he grouts the tile floor at the Chicago Japanese Mission Church in Arlington Heights. Tsutsui flew in from his native Japan recently to assist with the church’s construction.

    Arlington Heights church effort receives help from Japan

    A three-year effort to build a new church for an Arlington Heights congregation received a big boost recently all the way from Japan. Takahiro Tsutsui, a skilled carpenter who spent a career building traditional Japanese shrines completely free of nails, flew to Chicago for two weeks to lay floor tiles at the Chicago Japanese Mission.

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    Wheaton man killed in I-94 Gurnee crash Sunday

    An 18-year-old Wheaton man was killed following a crash on the Tri-State Tollway near Route 120 in Gurnee, authorities said. Andrew Wilcox was pronounced dead at Advocate Condell Medical Center in Libertyville after the crash Sunday, said Orlando Portillo of the Lake County Coroner’s Office.

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    A view of Elgin’s riverfront today, looking north along the Fox River from downtown.

    Elgin’s riverfront plans, then and now

    The construction of a multimillion dollar riverfront promenade in Elgin’s downtown is transforming the area into a showpiece for the region. But plans for redevelopment of this Fox River community are nothing new. An even grander plan was proposed by an Elgin mayor in the early 1930s.

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    The Naperville Riverwalk Commission has approved a procedure explaining the steps toward approval that must be followed by any person or group looking to add a plaza, fountain, sculpture, memorial or other feature to the popular 1.75-mile path along the West Branch of the DuPage River.

    Riverwalk stewards spell out steps for future projects

    The stewards of Naperville’s Riverwalk have approved a new written procedure explaining the steps — and the five- to seven-month time frame — it will take to add new features to the 1.75-mile path. “I think it’s really thorough and covers the steps that are needed,” Riverwalk Commission Chairman Jeff Havel said about the procedure, approved last week. “It gives a clear understanding of what...

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    District 87 schools working to prepare students for job market

    Glenbard Superintendent David Larson says area schools are proactively structuring an engaging and rigorous learning environment where graduates will be equipped with skills and aptitudes needed for new middle-class jobs.

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    Rotary benefit gets Stephanie thinking about soup

    With the Naperville Rotary Club gearing up for its next fundraiser, our Stephanie Penick can't stop thinking about soup.

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    Des Plaines man faces multiple charges after armed standoff

    A 28-year-old Des Plaines man is facing multiple felony charges stemming from an armed standoff Sunday in which police say he threatened to shoot officers who interfered with his plans to kill himself.

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    Participants of the 2013 Class of Mini Interns talk with Dr. Raghu Thunga in the ICU at Vista Medical Center East.

    Vista’s mini internship program an eye-opening experience

    It was not the typical start of a work week for a Lake County judge, two attorneys, a university business development manager and three insurance company employees.

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    Two Lake County lawmakers to host health fair

    Two state lawmakers from Lake County will host a health and safety fair for children on Saturday, Sept. 21. State Rep. Ed Sullivan and state Sen. Dan Duffy will co-host the event, which will run from 9 a.m. to noon at Lake Zurich Middle School North, 95 Hubbard Lane, Hawthorn Woods.

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    Fifth-graders Sean Huber, right, and Iksun Jeong perform sit-ups on the new Fit-Trail station at Woodland Intermediate School in Gurnee. The new fitness station will be used for students during the school day and available to the community after school hours.

    Getting healthy at Woodland Elementary District 50

    Woodland Intermediate School is beginning the school year with a healthy addition to its grounds. A new fitness station, located on the west side of the school, will be used by students during the day to support healthier living through the school's curriculum while also being available to the community after school hours.

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    Arlington Heights village trustees are expected to approve an Arlington Heights Park District proposal tonight that calls for a $6 million renovation nearly doubling the size of the community recreation facility at Camelot Park.

    Arlington Heights to consider liquor licenses, park renovations

    The Arlington Heights village board will reappoint more than 25 members of village commissions during its meeting Monday night as well as consider giving two new liquor licenses and approve plans for upcoming park district renovations at Camelot Park.

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    Defense attorney against plea deal in Highland Park murder

    A Lake County defense attorney said he is against allowing his client to accept a 25-year plea deal in the murder of a Highland Park man. In exchange for a guilty plea, prosecutors have offered Philip Vatamanivc, 17, of Highland Park, a prison sentence of 20 years for armed robbery and a consecutive term of 5 years for concealment of murder.

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    State's attorney investigates Dist. 207's handling of ex-teacher's case

    The Cook County state's attorney's office is investigating whether Maine Township High School District 207 failed to properly notify the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services about a former teacher accused of inappropriate conduct toward students in 2007. The allegations involved Mark Krockover, a former tenured Maine East High School chemistry teacher and cheerleading coach, who...

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    Sunday Soiree fundraiser at Metropolis turns 10

    Metropolis’ annual ladies only fundraising event, Sunday Soiree, is celebrating its 10th anniversary at Metropolis on Sunday, Sept. 29. The Metropolis Ballroom will be filled with exciting goods including jewelry, clothing, shoes, holiday gifts, and much more. Have a glass of wine and some hors d’oeuvres as you shop, then come down to the theater for an exciting performance from Midwest Dueling...

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    Lake Michigan water drives Buffalo Grove annexations

    Buffalo Grove officials last week approved the annexation of three new properties into the village. The properties' owners said they were motivated by a desire to tap into the village's Lake Michigan water.

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    Wauconda Mayor Frank Bart

    Second Wauconda grassroots group forms on Facebook

    Wauconda's political divide has stretched into cyberspace. Just a few months after one of Mayor Frank Bart's more outspoken critics launched a Facebook group about the goings on at village hall, a second Facebook group has popped up — this time, created by a Bart supporter.

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    Dist. 203 to discuss online learning program

    Naperville Unit District 203 will continue discussions Monday night of a new policy about online and blended learning that would create a remote educational program. The proposed policy says the new remote educational program will align its curriculum with Illinois State Learning Standards, offer experiences consistent with those given to traditional students at the same level and operate anytime...

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    Obama getting updates on Navy Yard shooting

    President Barack Obama is getting frequent briefings on a deadly shooting at the Washington Navy Yard.The White House says the president had several briefings about the unfolding situation by senior aides.

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    Roscoe McCall with his wife, Geri, in Peoria.

    Civil rights sit-in led to love

    The headline read “36 Negroes Arrested for Cilco Sit-In.” But that’s not what grabbed his attention. Roscoe McCall was fresh from the South when he saw the picture in the newspaper. That’s what interested him.

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    New Illinois law limits disabled parking exemption

    A new law will crack down on misuse of disabled parking permits in Illinois. The (Springfield) State Journal-Register reports 683,000 drivers in the state have been exempt from parking meters because they have the special disabled placards. But a new law that goes into effect next year limits the exemptions only to disabled drivers who can’t access or operate the meters.

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    Preservationists watch Illiana Expressway proposal

    Illinois preservationists are working with state officials to make sure historic properties aren’t affected by the proposed Illiana Expressway.

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    French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, left, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, French President Francois Hollande and British Foreign Secretary William Hague in the lobby of the Elysee Palace in Paris, prior to a meeting on Syria, Monday.

    Panel probing 14 suspected Syria chemical attacks

    A U.N. war crimes panel is investigating 14 suspected chemical attacks in Syria, its chairman said Monday, dramatically escalating the stakes after diplomatic breakthroughs that saw the Syrian government agree to dismantle its chemical weapons program. Paulo Sergio Pinheiro said the Geneva-based U.N. panel he heads has not pinpointed the chemical used in the attacks and is awaiting evidence from...

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    Chechen Police officers and investigators work on an area after a bomb blast at the police station in Sernovodsk, Chechnya, southern Russia, on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Russian news reports say three policemen have been killed and four injured by a suicide car bombing.

    Police: Suicide car bomb kills 3 in Chechnya

    Three Russian policemen were killed and six others wounded Monday in a pair of car bombings in the restive Caucasus region. Another attempted attack on a police station was foiled, authorities said. It was not clear if the incidents in the southern republics of Chechnya and Ingushetia were coordinated, but Russian officials said they believe one of the region’s armed groups was responsible for...

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    People run from the scene as smoke engulfs the Russian nuclear submarine Tomsk as it undergoes repairs in the Pacific Coast city of Bolshoi Kamen, Russia, according to Russian news reports Monday.

    Russian nuke sub catches fire; no injuries or leak

    Fire broke out on a Russian nuclear submarine undergoing repairs, but no injuries or radiation leaks have been reported. Russian news reports said the Monday fire on the Tomsk submarine at repair yards in the Pacific Coast city of Bolshoi Kamen was extinguished with foam.

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    Army soldiers work to try to get their vehicle out of a flooded portion of a road caused by Tropical Storm Manuel in the city of Chilpancingo, Mexico, Sunday. In the southern Pacific Coast state of Guerrero, rains unleashed by Manuel resulted in the deaths of six people when their SUV lost control on a highway headed for the tourist resort of Acapulco. Another five people died in landslides in Guerrero and Puebla states, while the collapse of a fence killed another person in Acapulco.

    Big storms hit Mexico on opposite coasts; 21 dead

    The remnants of Tropical Storm Manuel continued to deluge Mexico’s southwestern Pacific shoulder with dangerous rains while Hurricane Ingrid weakened to a tropical storm after making a Monday landfall on the country’s opposite coast in an unusual double onslaught that federal authorities said had caused at least 21 deaths.

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    Firefighters extinguish a mobile home fire Sunday that killed a man and five children in Tiffin, Ohio, according to police.

    Trailer fire in Ohio kills 6 while mom is at work

    A fire that ripped through a mobile home killed a man and five children ages 6 and younger just a few hours after the children’s mother left to work an early morning shift Sunday at a fast-food restaurant. Anna Angel, the children’s mother, lived in the home with the children and her boyfriend, a relative and neighbors said. “She had a whole family and now she has nothing,” said Owanna Ortiz,...

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    Dawn Patrol: Elgin gang shooting; Bears win

    Coroner: McHenry County man was stabbed; Lake Villa church debuts 42,000 square foot addition; man shot outside Elgin hotel, police suspect gang ties

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    Kristina Davis, West Chicago Elementary District 33’s assistant superintendent for learning, talks about what steps the district has taken to help low-income students. District 33 saw the largest growth in its low-income population of any district in the Daily Herald circulation area.

    West Chicago Dist. 33 partnerships help low-income students succeed

    Despite a signifigant jump in the number of low-income students attending West Chicago Elementary District 33 schools, officials say the district has been able to respond with more resources. And that was possible because of a collaboration with various local groups that began years ago.

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    The Grand Victoria Casino is partnering with Onesti Entertainment and the city of Elgin to hold a concert series at Festival Park in downtown Elgin. The first on Aug. 24 featured Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, along with Eric Burdon & The Animals.

    Elgin casino starts renovation, branches out into concerts

    Grand Victoria Casino has launched a $4 million renovation and an outdoor concert series hoping to attract more customers to the riverboat. The casino partnered with Onesti Entertainment and the city of Elgin to hold the “Rock ’N Roll Jackpot” concert series at Festival Park, which kicked off Aug. 24 with Joan Jett and the Blackhearts and Eric Burdon & The Animals. Grand Funk Railroad and Night...

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    Metra’s interim Chief Executive Officer Don Orseno, at Chicago Union Station, wants the public to have faith in the agency after a turbulent summer.

    Interim CEO wants public to put its trust in Metra again

    Metra's interim CEO Don Orseno wants the public to have faith in Metra after a scandalous summer. Here are his views on customer service, fare hikes, Ventra, service expansion and what he'd do when politicians come knocking. Plus Transportation Writer Marni Pyke answers reader questions and traffic tips.

Sports

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    Steve Lundy/slundy@dailyherald.com Dillon Fornier, left, and Pat Mullane battle for the puck during the Blackhawks' annual Training Camp Festival Monday at the United Center in Chicago.

    Blackhawks’ fight for jobs gets serious now

    After four days of battling each other in training camp scrimmages, the Blackhawks will open their six-game exhibition schedule Tuesday at the United Center against the Detroit Red Wings.

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    Rough night for Cubs’ Jackson

    Edwin Jackson suffered his National League-leading 16th loss of the season Monday night as the Cubs fell 6-1 to the Brewers in Milwaukee. Jackson lasted only 4 innings and had words with manager Dale Sveum in the dugout after he came out.

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    Cubs tout three for Gold Gloves

    Major-league managers and coaches receive their Gold Glove ballots this week as they vote on the award for defensive excellence. The Cubs' Darwin Barney is the defending winner at second base, and the team believes catcher Welington Castillo and first baseman Anthony Rizzo deserve consideration along with Barney this year.

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    Paul Konerko says he eventually get around to figuring out whether he will play again after this trying season for the White Sox.

    Difficult times for White Sox’ Konerko

    A weary Paul Konerko told the Daily Herald he's just trying to avoid a 100-loss season for the White Sox. As for his future, Konerko's not expected to make a decision whether or not to continue playing until November.

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    Sox’ offense helps Johnson get first win

    Erik Johnson finally got some run support Monday night, and the White Sox' rookie starter made the most of it. Johnson picked up his first major-league win after the Sox beat the Twins 12-1.

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    White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko celebrates with teammates in the dugout after scoring on a Gordon Beckham single during the first inning of a baseball game against the Minnesota Twins in Chicago, Monday, Sept. 16, 2013.

    Sox score 7 in 1st, beat Twins

    Erik Johnson pitched six scoreless innings to earn his first major league victory, and the White Sox scored seven runs in the first and coasted to a 12-1 win over the Minnesota Twins on Monday night at U.S. Cellular Field. The White Sox, who had lost six straight and 15 of 17, broke out of their offensive funk against Liam Hendriks and the Twins. Chicago scored a season high in runs and posted its biggest margin of victory this year.

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    Milwaukee Brewers’ Caleb Gindl slides safely past Chicago Cubs catcher Welington Castillo during the sixth inning of a baseball game, Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, in Milwaukee. Gindl scored from second on a hit by Yuniesky Betancourt.

    Cubs drop 6-1 tilt to Brewers

    Caleb Gindl had three hits, including a two-run home run, and Wily Peralta pitched six strong innings to lead the Milwaukee Brewers to a 6-1 win over the Cubs on Monday night. The Brewers’ fourth win in five games moved them 3½ games above Chicago at the bottom of the NL Central. Peralta (10-15) gave up an unearned run on five hits. He struck out seven while walking two.

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    Monday’s boys cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's boys cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls swimming scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls swimming meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Monday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Blackhawks’ Teravainen gets quite an endorsement

    When Blackhawks senior adviser Scotty Bowman tweeted Sunday that rookie Teuvo Teravainen reminded him of Detroit Red Wings Hall of Famer Igor Larionov, it raised eyebrows.

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    Jennifer Marten of Montini goes up to spike the ball in action against Walther Christian during girls volleyball on Monday in Lombard.

    Benet going back ‘home’ for Wheaton Classic

    Wheaton has been a home away from home for the Benet volleyball team in recent years. Will it continue this weekend? The No. 2-ranked Redwings are the top seed at the Wheaton Classic this week, which concludes on Saturday at Wheaton Warrenville South High School.

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    Conway Farms good bet to host BMW again

    After a year's hiatus while the BMW Championship heads to Cherry Hills in Denver, all signs are pointing to the tournament returning to Conway Farms in 2015 after a solid week-long run in Lake Forest .

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    St. Francis lives up to top billing at Rosary

    St. Francis might lose so few volleyball matches that there’s no such thing as a good loss, but the No. 1 Spartans have managed to find a positive from their one setback this season. St. Francis opened the year with a defeat against Mother McAuley — and the Spartans haven’t lost since. They made it 13 wins in a row Monday with a 25-14, 25-12 victory at Rosary.

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    Ten-year-old Ben Scruton of Grayslake poses with a cutout of the Stanley Cup.

    Images: Blackhawks Training Camp Festival
    Images as the Chicago Blackhawks host a Training Camp Festival at the United Center.The event offered fans a chance to celebrate the open of a new season and watch the team scrimmage.

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    Menich, Prospect shoot to MSL victory

    Five-time defending MId-Suburban League girls golf champion Prospect (6-0) shot a 173 to defeat Rolling Meadows (224) on Monday.Medalist Emma Menich fired a 41 for the Knights, followed by Kacie O’Donnell (42), Ally Scaccia (44) and Isabella Flack (46). Rolling Meadows was led by Samantha Olson (53), Jenna Anderson (53), Lauren Hattory (54) and Megan Fallon (64).

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    Walding, Lake Zurich home in on victory at Fremd

    If the Lake Zurich girls volleyball team looked right at home Monday night at Fremd High School, there might be a reason. The Bears’ ninth win of the season, a 25-13, 25-14 over the host Vikings, was their sixth match at Fremd.

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    Barrington’s Connor Hennelly, right, races Palatine’s Gavin Falotico for control of the ball at Barrington on Monday night.

    Barrington sets up win over Palatine

    Barrington beat division rival Palatine at its own game Monday night, and in doing so, captured 3 important points to climb atop the Mid-Suburban West boys soccer standings. Giles Phillips’ header off a superb corner from Connor Hennelly was all the Broncos needed to secure a 1-0 victory as they turned away a spirited late challenge from the Pirates on Monday at Barrington Community Stadium.

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    Bears defensive end Julius Peppers has been slowed by both injury and illness.

    Bears’ defensive line in no real rush so far

    The pass rush from the Bears' defense has been inconsistent at best through two weeks, as Pro Bowlers Julius Peppers and Henry Melton struggle to get back to full strength after injuries and illness.

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    Trestman’s teachings already paying off for Bears

    After two narrow, come-from-behind victories, Bears coach Marc Trestman says there's a fine line between being 2-0 and 0-2 in the NFL.

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    Fremd’s Drost delivers in Ivanhoe Classic

    Fremd’s Jamie Drost earned medalist honors at Monday’s Ivanhoe Classic, shooting 75 on the par-72 layout to beat his nearest competitors by 3 strokes. Stevenson took top honors in the team competition by shooting 321.

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    Massé gives Alverno a big assist

    Alverno College extended its women’s volleyball school-record winning streak to five matches with victories over Finlandia University and North Central University (Minn.) on the opening day of its volley tournament. An individual school record was also set during the streak, and it belongs to former Antioch setter Meranda Massé. She broke the single-match record with 44 assists when the Inferno defeated Finlandia University 3-2.

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    Jim Furyk hits out of the sand on the third hole during the final round of the BMW Championship golf tournament at Conway Farms Golf Club in Lake Forest, Ill., Monday.

    Putter betrays Furyk again as Johnson takes BMW

    Jim Furyk’s problems with the putter cost him yet another tournament as Zach Johnson came from behind on Monday to steal the BMW Championship at Conway Farms in Lake Forest.

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    St. Charles North’s Gianna Furrie watches her long putt on No. 8 Monday at the Elgin Country Club girls golf invitational. Furrie won the individual title with a 3-over par 38.

    St. Charles North wins title at Elgin Country Club

    While some girls golf programs around the Fox Valley continue to struggle for participation numbers, St. Charles North coach Chris Patrick and Geneva coach Eric Hatczel have a different problem, one of those good problems to have: choosing which of their girls will play each day. The depth and consistency of the North Stars and Vikings was evident Monday at the 9-hole Elgin Country Club Invitational. St. Charles North, fueled by a 3-over par medalist round of 38 from freshman Gianna Furrie, won the event with a 168 while Geneva came in second at 183 despite not having an individual in the top five. Huntley, led by a 41 from junior Gillian Young, was a surprising third with a 186.

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    Boys soccer/Top 20
    Hinsdale Central, Barrington and Benet have earned the top three spots in the Daily Herald's most recent ranking of area boys soccer teams.

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    Clint Bowyer greets fans Sunday during driver introductions before the NASCAR Sprint Cup series auto race at Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet, Ill. His crew chief decided Bowyer should help MArtin Truex Jr. stave off elimination and so Bowyer spun out. That one move has had a ripple effect bringing with it penalties and questions about what’s legal and what’s not.

    NASCAR’s SpinGate spun out of control early

    Everything could have been handled better from the moment Clint Bowyer spun at Richmond to trigger the biggest credibility crisis in NASCAR history. That spin started as the well-intentioned desire to help a teammate earn a valuable spot in NASCAR’s version of the playoffs, and with a little honesty, a few deep breaths and some clear thinking, it might have ended there. The situation snowballed, and NASCAR quickly had a full-blown scandal on its hands.

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    While rivalries like Michigan and Notre Dame may stay alive, it’s the idea that college athletes are not “professionals” that’s being challenged on multiple fronts. Despite an anti-trust lawsuit from former players seeking millions of dollars in compensation, the head of the NCAA Mark Emmert, says it won’t change the way things are. “there’s enormous tension right now that’s growing between the collegiate model and the commercial model,” Emmert says.

    NCAA won’t budge on paying college athletes

    The structure of the NCAA could look very different by this time next year as members try to resolve the growing disparity between big-money schools and smaller institutions. What won’t change, however, is the amateur status of the players who make college athletics a billion-dollar business.“(There’s) enormous tension right now that’s growing between the collegiate model and the commercial model,” says NCAA President MArk Emmert.

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    Zach Johnson kisses the J.K. Wadley Trophy after winning the BMW Championship at Conway Farms Golf Club in Lake Forest on Monday.

    Zach Johnson rallies to win BMW Championship

    Zach Johnson won the rain-delayed BMW Championship on Monday and now has a chance to win something bigger. Johnson rolled in two birdie putts over the closing holes at soggy Conway Farms and closed with a 6-under 65 for a two-shot victory over Nick Watney, giving him one of the top five seeds for the Tour Championship next week and a clear shot at the FedEx Cup and its $10 million prize.

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    Zach Johnson holds the J.K. Wadley Trophy after winning the BMW Championship at Conway Farms Golf Club in Lake Forest on Monday.

    Images: Monday at the BMW Championship
    Images from Monday and the finale of the BMW Championship at Conway Farms in Lake Forest. Zach Johnson won the tournament Monday after play had been suspended over the weekend with steady rain that made the course unplayable.

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    @Capton credit:George LeClaire/gleclaire@dailyherald.com Luke Donald acknowledges the crowd after putting on the 16th hole in the BMW Championship at Conway Farms Golf Club in Lake Forest on Monday. Donald closed with two more birdies and finished tied for fourth with a final round of 66.

    Donald’s strong finish boosts his confidence

    After a difficult season, Luke Donald rediscovered his game this week on Conway Farms, his home course, and now the 35-year-old former No. 1 golfer is headed to Atlanta for the Tour Championship. His 67-66 finish at Conway Farms boosted him into a four-way tie for fourth place in the BMW Championship and elevated him from 54th to 29th in the FedEx Cup rankings.

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    Former Bears players Mike Pyle (50) and Ed O'Bradovich share a moment during halftime of Sunday's Bears game. Their 1963 Bears team was honored for winning the NFL Championship over the New York Giants 50 years ago.

    Nothing quite like that ’63 Bears team

    For a weekend at least, the 1963 Bears could enjoy being remembered for bringing an NFL championship to Chicago.

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    Roger Warren

    Former Dundee-Crown coach Warren makes golf a way of life

    Golf has always been part of Roger Warren’s life. The former Crown and Dundee-Crown high school teacher and coach played the sport growing up and worked summers from 1973-186 at The Village Links of Glen Ellyn. “I played soccer in college and played semipro soccer after I got out of college,” he said. “I always had played golf. I took it up as a game I wanted to get better at.” Warren, who will be inducted into the D-C Athletic Hall of Fame next weekend, started teaching at Crown in 1978 and left Dundee-Crown in 1986 to pursue a career in the golf industry.

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    Dundee-Crown, Jacobs set hall of fame inductions

    The athletic halls of fame at Dundee-Crown and Jacobs high schools will hold their 2013 induction festivities the next two weekends.

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    Girls volleyball / Top 20
    Effinghgam tournament champ St. Francis remains the No. 1 team in this week's Daily Herald Top 20 girls volleyball rankings. Benet is No. 2 and undefeated St. Charles North No. 3.

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    Mike North video: Bear Win Again, Late
    Coach "Marc" North recaps the Bears victory and is pleased with Jay Cutler, Devin Hester and Matt Forte and is looking forward to playing the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Business

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    Illinois Republican gubernatorial hopeful Bruce Rauner speaks to a gathering Republicans and business leaders at a stop on his Bring Back Illinois Tour in Quincy.

    Wealthy business executives eye political races

    He has never been elected to anything, not even “student council in high school,” as he boasts. He has little patience for schmoozing. In dealing with people, he admits to being “pretty blunt” - more suited to running a large private equity firm, which Bruce Rauner did successfully for 30 years, than seeking votes for governor, which he intends to do in Illinois next year.

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    Joe Bero of Joe Bero and Son Plumbing & Piping in Elgin works on the interior of Alexander's restaurant last week. The eatery is renovating the interior and exterior, and the owners hope to be opened by December.

    Alexander's restaurant undergoes major renovation

    Alexander's restaurant on Route 31 in Elgin is undergoing an $800,000 renovation to modernize the interior and exterior of the eatery, its owner said. The Elgin City Council's committee of the whole last week gave the OK to award the project a $24,446 neighborhood business improvement grant.

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    Hoffman Estates-based Sears Holdings Corp. is seeking a term loan of as much as $1 billion to pay down borrowings under a revolving credit line.

    Sears plans to get $1B senior secured term loan

    Hoffman Estates-based Sears plans to get a $1 billion senior secured term loan to help lower borrowings under its revolving credit facility. The department store operator said Monday that the term loan would be issued under its existing credit agreement, which provides for a $3.28 billion revolving credit facility.

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    Microsoft Corp. co-founder Bill Gates remains America’s richest man, taking the top spot on the list for the 20th straight year, with a net worth of $72 billion, up from $66 billion a year ago.

    Combined net worth of America’s richest rises

    Life is good for America’s super wealthy. Forbes on Monday released its annual list of the top 400 richest Americans. While most of the top names and rankings didn’t change from a year ago, the majority of the elite club’s members saw their fortunes grow over the past year, helped by strong stock and real estate markets.

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    Annette Guerra, 33, of San Antonio has been looking for a full-time job for more than a year after finishing nursing school. An analysis of government data conducted for The Associated Press lays bare a grim reality for middle class and lower-income families: middle-income workers in the persistently weak economy have increasingly been pushed into lower-wage jobs.

    Employment gap between rich, poor widest on record

    The gap in employment rates between America’s highest- and lowest-income families has stretched to its widest levels since officials began tracking the data a decade ago, according to an analysis of government data conducted for The Associated Press.

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    Scott Garberding, senior vice president of manufacturing for Chrysler Group LLC stands between a 1992 Grand Cherokee, right, and the automaker’s 5,000,000th vehicle produced at the Jefferson North Assembly Plant, in Detroit. U.S. factories increased output in August by the most in eight months, helped by a robust month at auto plants. The gains are a hopeful sign that manufacturing could help boost economic growth in the second half of the year.

    U.S. factory output up 0.7 pct. led by strong autos

    U.S. factories increased output in August by the most in eight months, helped by a robust month at auto plants. The gains are a hopeful sign that manufacturing could help boost economic growth in the second half of the year. Manufacturing production rose 0.7 percent last month from July, the Federal Reserve said Monday.

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    The Butterball's Turkey Talk has grown from six operators to about 60 since it launched in 1981. It has never hired men. But starting Monday, Sept. 16, 2013, Butterball will begin offering an online application for men age 25 and up to apply to be the spokesman for the line or one of the operators.

    Turkey Talk Line to have 1st male spokesman

    This year if you call Butterball's Turkey Talk Line for some turkey advice, you might get a male voice on the line. For the first time, Butterball enlisting the help of men as well as women for its Turkey Talk cooking-advice line during the holidays. And the turkey seller is seeking the first male talk-line spokesman this year as well.

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    Carolyn Gable

    Lake Zurich transportation owner honored for work in field, with kids

    Carolyn Gable didn't realize that waitressing would one day lead to owning her own transportation industry company called New Age Transportation, Distribution & Warehousing Inc. in Lake Zurich. And fitting in comfortably in the male-dominated field has turned into a blessing for her as well as thousands of youngsters, who now benefit from a foundation her company has created.

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    Lake Forest firm buying Boise company for $1.27 billion

    Lake Forest-based Packaging Corp. of America is buying Boise for about $1.27 billion, acquiring additional containerboard needed to support its growth. Shareholders of Boise Inc., a maker of packaging and paper products, are being offered a 26 percent premium to their stock price on Friday. Shares of the Boise, Idaho-based company jumped in premarket trading on Monday.

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    Websites need attention, updates to be useful

    Website visitors don’t hang around. If they can’t find the information they seek within two clicks, the third click most often goes elsewhere. Small business owners have to pay attention to their Web site says small business columnist Jim Kendall.

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    Fed likely to slow bond buys despite tepid economy

    Hiring is soft. Pay is barely up. Consumers are cautious. Economic growth has yet to pick up. And yet on Wednesday, the Federal Reserve is expected to take its first step toward reducing the extraordinary stimulus it’s supplied to help the U.S. economy rebound from its deepest crisis since the Great Depression.

Life & Entertainment

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    Chemicals in foods may worsen fibromyalgia symptoms

    Is there a relationship between poor bowel function and the symptoms of fibromyalgia? According to one medical study, some chemicals found in everyday foods may exacerbate fibromyalgia symptoms. This suggests that there is a strong link between bowel function and the pain associated with fibromyalgia. An interesting point is that fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome share several risk factors including stress and being female.

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    Brady Williams with his wives, from left, Robyn and Rosemary, outside their home in a polygamous community near Salt Lake City. Brady Williams has five wives, 24 children but no organized religion.

    A new Utah polygamous family on reality TV

    Brady Williams has five wives, 24 children but no organized religion. The newest polygamous family from Utah on reality TV considers itself progressive and independent. Williams and his wives slowly withdrew from the fundamentalist Mormon Church in their rural community outside of Salt Lake City during the mid-2000s after re-evaluating their core beliefs.

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    Nancee Ariagno creates original punch needle embroidery designs that are a hit in needlework stores across the country.

    Country Folk Art Festival attacts area's top artists
    The 31st annual Autumn Country Folk Art Festival will be Friday, Sept. 20, through Sunday, Sept. 22 at Kane County Fairgrounds.

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    Liam Hemsworth and Miley Cyrus have called off their engagement, according to their representatives.

    Miley Cyrus, Liam Hemsworth call off engagement

    A wrecking ball has hit Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth’s relationship. Representatives for both celebrities confirmed Monday that the couple have called off their engagement.

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    When cooked correctly, fried calamari should be

    Fried Calamari
    Fried Calamari

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    After years of teaching cooking classes for Viking and Sub Zero, chef Pete Trusiak now tapes video cooking lessons for a global audience.

    Chef du Jour: Chef turns his skill toward teaching from his ‘man cave’

    After working as a corporate chef for Sub-Zero Corp and then the Viking Cooking School, chef Pete Trusiak realized what he loves is teaching others how to cook great food in their own kitchens. So, with help of his wife, Marcy, Pete does just that from the comfort of his own “man cave” in his Wheaton home.

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    Edie Falco will honor the late James Gandolfini, her co-star on “The Sopranos,” at Sunday’s Emmy ceremony, the TV academy said Monday.

    Emmys to honor Gandolfini, Monteith, 3 others

    The Emmy Awards will feature five special memorial tributes, including one to honor James Gandolfini by Edie Falco, who co-starred with him on “The Sopranos.” Gandolfini died of a heart attack in June at age 51. There will also be one for “Glee” star Cory Monteith, organizers said. Monteith died in July at age 31 of a heroin and alcohol overdose. He will be remembered by Jane Lynch.

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    Stand up to family bully to end the cycle

    Q. At family gatherings, my brother’s wife puts my brother down with negative comments and is, in general, denigrating to other relatives. My mother has started to speak up.

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    Art in the garden: Shrubs offer parade of fall color

    Fall is the season to revel in the magnificent colors of changing leaves. Maples and oaks lead the parade but there are some shrubs with outstanding fall color, and their smaller stature makes them easy to fit into most landscapes. Many also offer spring or summer flowers and late summer fruit. Consider planting some of these specimens in your landscape.

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    Elisabeth Hasselbeck appears with co-hosts Steve Doocy, left, and Brian Kilmeade in her debut on the “Fox & Friends” television program Monday. The former cast member of “The View” replaced Gretchen Carlson.

    Hasselbeck: Fox News feels like home

    To Elisabeth Hasselbeck, the “Fox & Friends” morning show felt like home long before she actually got to work there. It was regular viewing at home for Hasselbeck, whose 10 years on “The View” ended in July. She debuted as Steve Doocy and Brian Kilmeade’s new partner on “Fox & Friends” Monday, after the departing Gretchen Carlson offered farewells Friday.

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    Rockstar Games' obsessive attention to detail makes “Grand Theft Auto V” really come alive.

    Four-star 'GTA V' triples the intensity

    I had such a fun weekend. After seeing a movie, I went down to the beach to ride the roller coaster on the pier and go jet skiing in the ocean. It all happened over the past 48 hours while visiting Los Santos, the virtual seaside metropolis depicted in the four-star “Grand Theft Auto V.” Oh, did I mention I also committed dozens of felonies? For the most part, it's illegal business as usual in the latest edition of “Grand Theft Auto.”

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    Abrams trekked ‘Into Darkness’ with much success

    Jeff tuckman reviews the latest in home video, including the sequel "Star Trek Into Darkness" as well as many classic television shows now available on DVDs and other media outlets.

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    “Signs of Life,” which opens Wednesday at Biograph Theater's Zacek McVay Theater, tells the story of a fictional Czech artist named Lorelei as a prisoner in the Terezin concentration camp during World War II.

    Art in Trying Times: 'Signs of Life' a musical Holocaust story

    "Signs of Life," a musical drama about the concentration camp Terezin, has its Chicago premiere at the Biograph Theater's Zacek McVay Theater between Wednesday, Sept. 18, through Sunday, Oct. 27. Its producer, who has suburban roots, discusses how the musical came to be.

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    Bob Newhart poses with his award for outstanding guest actor in a comedy series for “The Big Bang Theory” at the Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards at the Nokia Theatre on Sunday in Los Angeles.

    Bob Newhart finally gets his Emmy Award

    Bob Newhart, among TV’s most enduring stars with shows stretching back more than five decades, wept as he finally captured his first Emmy Award. Newhart, 84, was honored at Sunday’s creative arts Emmy ceremony for his guest role last season on “The Big Bang Theory” as Professor Proton, a down-on-his-luck former host of a children’s science show. “This is my seventh shot at this. ... I just love this very much,” he said.

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    Billboard has named Pink its woman of the year.

    Billboard names Pink woman of the year

    Billboard has named Pink its woman of the year. Billboard announced Monday that the pop singer will receive the honor at its annual Women in Music event Dec. 10 in New York City.

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    Actor Daniel Radcliffe listens to a question during the press conference for “The F Word” at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival.

    Daniel Radcliffe evolves with bold new roles

    Not long ago, Daniel Radcliffe traded in his black-rimmed Harry Potter glasses for a bold acting choice. And he has never looked back. Now the 24-year-old actor’s at the Toronto International Film Festival with three new films, each unique in its own way, and far more mature than the saga of the boy wizard. While they cover some adult themes like murder and homosexuality, the actor claims his current role selections are not part of some strategy to abandon his past, rather they’re about doing what actors do best: “Take chances.”

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    Changing your grip can keep exercise routine fresh

    Changing your exercise routine is a great way to keep workouts fresh and challenge the body. Not allowing yourself to get comfortable helps you find “new” muscles to work or provides new mental and balance challenges. One change that’s easy to make — but often overlooked — is the grip you use when lifting.

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    Will Smith serves as executive producer on Queen Latifah’s new daytime talk show, “The Queen Latifah Show,” which debuts Monday.

    Queen Latifah plans to make noise with new show

    Queen Latifah knows a reliable stress reliever to cope with the pressures of launching a daytime show. “I have a drum set in my dressing room and I go in there and play for a few minutes to relax. They can forget about it being quiet around here — I’m going to bang my drums,” said the singer-songwriter and actress, who’s adding the job of host to her resume. With Monday’s debut of the syndicated “The Queen Latifah Show,” she intends to make noise in the competitive realm of daytime TV.

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    The short form for the new federal Affordable Care Act application. Getting covered through President Barack Obama’s health care law might feel like a combination of doing taxes and making a big purchase that requires some research.

    Applying for health insurance? Get ready to do homework

    Getting covered through President Barack Obama’s health care law might feel like a combination of doing your taxes and making a big purchase that requires research. You’ll need accurate income information for your household, plus some understanding of how health insurance works, so you can get the financial assistance you qualify for and pick a health plan that’s right for your needs. The process involves federal agencies verifying your identity, citizenship and income, and you have to sign that you are providing truthful information, subject to perjury laws.

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    When you move your body in a squat position, make sure your posture is perfect to get the most out of the exercise.

    Improve your workouts by fixing common mistakes

    Exercise is essential for optimal health, but too often many movements are performed incorrectly due to an improper load or just simply being unaware of poor body mechanics. Improve your workouts by avoiding these common mistakes in the gym.

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    Ruth Myers, 99, makes a point to exercise nearly every day.

    99-year-old woman inspires others with her health, outlook on life

    Ruth Myers, 99, got up early on a recent Wednesday, fixed herself breakfast and put on a pot of coffee. She ran the American flag up the pole in front of her Bayonet Point, Fla., home, just like every other morning. Then she cranked up her 2002 Buick Century and headed for the gym. First up: 35 minutes on the stationary bike, just to work up a sweat and get loose. Next, some light weights before heading into an hourlong exercise class with about 50 other seniors in the SilverSneakers program, most of them youngsters by comparison. “She’s a celebrity,” said Laurie Stidham, who leads 18 classes at the Family Fitness Center. “She’s an inspiration.”

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    A new book sheds some light on the do’s and don’ts of pregnancy.

    Your health: Taking a look at pregnancy advice
    There's a new book out about pregancy do's and don'ts and learn about a new website to help answer questions about your health.

  •  
    Daniel Woodrell, author of “The Maid’s Version.” The book recounts the deaths of 42 people in an explosion at a dance in 1929 as told through the eyes of a young boy’s grandmother, an angry, aging maid who’s known little but poverty and disappointment.

    Author Daniel Woodrell changes literary directions

    Daniel Woodrell awoke from colon cancer surgery a few years ago a changed man. Or at least a changed writer. At the time, Woodrell was finally getting widespread — and far too long-awaited — attention because of the Academy Award-nominated adaptation of his hard-as-nails novel “Winter’s Bone.” It was an elemental book, mean and raw, hewn from the poor, rocky dirt of the Ozark Mountains.

  •  

    Mucus in back of throat may be allergic reaction
    I often feel like I have a lump of mucus in my throat. What can I do about it?

  •  
    Dr. Patricia Ganz of the University of California, Los Angeles, chaired an Institute of Medicine panel that found the U.S. is facing a crisis in how to deliver cancer care, as the population ages and treatment becomes increasingly complex.

    Aging U.S. facing a cancer care crisis, report finds

    The U.S. is facing a crisis in how to deliver cancer care, as the baby boomers reach their tumor-prone years and doctors have a hard time keeping up with complex new treatments, government advisers reported. The caution comes even as scientists are learning more than ever about better ways to battle cancer, and developing innovative therapies to target tumors.

  •  

    Study suggests early signs of MS in spinal fluid

    New research suggests it might be possible to spot early signs of multiple sclerosis in patients’ spinal fluid, findings that offer a new clue about how this mysterious disease forms. The new study was small and must be verified by additional research. But if it pans out, the finding suggests scientists should take a closer look at a different part of the brain than is usually linked to MS.

  •  

    Hormone therapies don’t harm brain of menopausal women

    Hormone therapy doesn’t appear to have a harmful effect on cognitive function in younger postmenopausal women, according to a study that also showed the treatment didn’t benefit the brain. Women 50 to 55 years old who were given estrogen or estrogen plus progestin had similar scores on tests of memory and other mental processes as those taking a placebo, according to research published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Discuss

  •  

    Support president for doing what’s right
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: Hand-wringing sentimentalist liberal pacficists need to support their elected president in his departure from that platform which put him in the White House, if for no other reason than he is finally acting from moral conviction as the leader of the free world.

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    Metra’s ‘business as usual’ is not fine
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: Arlene “no ill-intent” Mulder will leave the Metra board when her term expires next June. That’s accountability for you.

  •  

    Stop violence against forest preserve deer
    A Carpentersville letter to the editor: Hard to believe but, according to Kane County Forest Preserve staffer Bill Graser, preserves where bow hunting will take place will remain open to the public. Also, the reason they are allowing this cruel method of eliminating deer is their concern for public safety. Apparently he can say this with a straight face.

  •  

    Find way to streamline fracking permits
    A letter to the editor: Gov. Pat Quinn says that the new law on hydraulic fracturing and directional drilling “enacts the nation’s strongest environmental protections for hydraulic fracturing and has the potential to create thousands of jobs across Illinois.”

  •  

    Fly the flag for Constitution Day
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: While almost everyone knows that our nation’s birthday is July 4 when it declared is independence, far fewer know that Sept. 17 is the birthday of our government. Since 1997, Sept. 17 has by federal law been a day intended to celebrate not only the birthday of our government, but the ideas that make us Americans.

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    All workers deserve at least a living wage
    ARolling Meadows letter to the editor: Poverty is caused by a lack of money. Those who work should be paid a living wage. They should not be expected to work at poverty wages so that their employers reap huge profits while expecting the government to make up the difference.

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    Activist group informs the public well
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: I read an opinion piece last week complimenting the Herald on writing an article about the “rain tax” in DuPage County. While I commend the article, thanks should be given to Carol Davis and her group West Suburban Patriots. They work tirelessly to inform the public about what is happening in our towns and in our country.

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    Look closely at value of Dist. 203 lawsuit
    A Warrenville letter to the editor: As mayor of Warrenville, a city with no debt, I believe in spending taxpayers’ money responsibly. Therefore, I must ask Naperville Unit District 203 taxpayers if the school board is using your money responsibly by pursuing a lawsuit against Warrenville — a lawsuit that as of midsummer has cost your district more than $718,000. Nearly 38 percent of this — $270,000 — has been paid out in the past eight months alone.

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    A fun ending to a very soggy night
    Letter to the editor: Carol Nanna of Schaumburg says the rain thatprompted an early close to Septemberfest on Sept. 1 was too bad, but thanks to a local restaurant the evening wasn't a total washout.

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    Library could go a little darker at night
    Letter to the editor: Joane Jester of Schaumburg congratulations the library for getting an energy efficiency grant, and suggests one efficiency would be to turn the lights out at night.

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    D211 needs junior ROTC program, too
    Letter to the editor: Roman Golash reiterates his call for a junior ROTC program in District 211, calling it "an excellent opportunity to develop leadership skills and develop an understanding about our country."

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    Sente internship a valuable experience
    Letter to the editor: Josh Weisberg of Buffalo Grove thanks state Rep. Carol Sente for his summer internship. "This experience was important for me to see how my skills from school could finally translate into the real world," he writes. "I urge students to apply for Rep. Sente’s internship program next summer."

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