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Daily Archive : Saturday August 17, 2013

News

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    Ed Wolowiec, right, owner of Port Edward in Algonquin, dines with Elliott Bambrough, host of “Chicago’s Best.” Port Edward will be featured on the show Sunday for its Alaskan King crab legs and unique back story.

    Port Edward gets another TV appearance

    While "Chicago's Best" bills itself as a television show “on a mission to find Chicago’s best food” it discovered the tastiest king crab legs in Algonquin. Port Edward, a 49-year-old seafood restaurant on the banks of the Fox River, will be featured this weekend during a four-minute segment airing 10 p.m. Sunday on WGN TV.

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    Vice President Joe Biden speaks in Washington last July.

    2016 campaign checklist: Who’s doing what

    Here’s a look at the hoops that people interested in the presidency must generally jump through to prepare for a campaign — whether they end up running or not — and who’s doing what.

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    American Eagle may receive competition on the wooden roller coaster front at Six Flags Great America in Gurnee. The village’s advisory planning and zoning board is expected to hear a proposal for a wooden coaster at a meeting Wednesday evening.

    Great America to pitch new wooden coaster to Gurnee

    Six Flags Great America in Gurnee plans to seek village permission to construct what may be the fastest-ever wooden roller coaster, officials said. If built, the ride would be in the theme park’s County Fair area where the Iron Wolf roller coaster once stood. Mayor Kristina Kovarik said the proposed ride would be a big deal to the village.

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    America's Best Racing Ambassador Vanessa Ceron of Elgin hands out gifts to, from left, Mark Lennon, Jill Hackmaster and Scott Youngren, all of Chicago, at the Arlington International Festival of Racing at Arlington International Racecourse on Saturday.

    Racing group uses Million to draw Millennials to the track

    On hand at Saturday's Arlngton Million was America's Best Racing, a group hoping to turn Millenials — 21- to 33-year-olds — into horse racing fans. John F. Cox commanded a crew passing out T-shirts and can cozies and explained the ABCs of reading a program and placing a wager. “We don't want people to be intimidated by looking at the program,” Cox said, citing a recent...

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    Army Sgt. Tim Johannsen and his battle buddy, Leonidas, in Afghanistan in 2011. The Puppy Rescue Mission helped bring Leonidas home to live in Downers Grove with Johannsen’s wife, Kaydee, and her family while he finished his combat tour. They were reunited in 2012 and now live in Hawaii.

    Troops need help sending battle buddies home

    An avid hunter and dog lover, Army Sgt. Tim Johannsen always imagined his post-military life would include hunting trips with a trained pointer at his side. Never did he imagine life settling in with “some stray Afghan mutt” named Leonidas who won’t leave his side. “He made my deployment a lot easier by knowing that as soon as I came off mission and whistled for him, he...

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    Real Solution, in red and white, is interfered with in the stretch by The Apache, in yellow and blue, who was disqualified giving the victory to Real Solution in the Arlington Million during the Arlington International Festival of Racing at Arlington International Racecourse.

    Images: Arlington International Festival of Racing
    Real Solution won the 31st Arlington Million during the Arlington International Festival of Racing at Saturday afternoon at Arlington International Racecourse which also included the $750,000 Beverly D and the $500,000 Secretariat.

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    Vacant home catches fire near Hawthorn Woods

    No injuries were reported from a fire that broke out Saturday night at a vacant home near Hawthorn Woods, authorities said. Lake Zurich Fire Department Deputy Chief Donald Golubski said crews were summoned about 6:35 p.m. to the home on the 26000 block of Fairfield Road. Firefighters initially were dispatched to investigate what was described as outdoor smoke in the unincorporated area near...

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    Diana, left, with Dodi Al Fayed in the back of a car, on the night that both of them died in a car crash in Paris on Aug. 31, 1997.

    Police checking new information on Diana death

    Scotland Yard declined to provide details about the information, only saying Saturday in a statement that the assessment will be carried out by officers from its specialist crime and operations unit.

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    Egyptian gather Saturday in the ruins of the Evangelical Church of Malawi after it was ransacked, looted and burned on Thursday by an angry mob, in Malawi. In the province south of Cairo, protesters attacked two Christian churches, security officials said.

    Egyptian Islamists hit Christian churches

    Attacks increased after the Islamists rose to power in the wake of the 2011 Arab Spring uprising that drove Hosni Mubarak from power, emboldening extremists. But Christians have come further under fire since President Mohammed Morsi was ousted on July 3, sparking a wave of Islamist anger led by Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood.

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    Florida Sen. Marco Rubio

    SPIN METER: Who’s jumping through which 2016 hoops

    There is so much to do: Polish a record, for those in office; network with central constituencies of the party; take a serious stab at social media; start dealing with pesky baggage; and get going with a shadow campaign, which can mean bringing on national advisers, powering up a political action committee, or both. The little-knowns must get better known. The well-knowns must shape how people...

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    Eric Schweig

    Notable deaths last week

    'That '70s Show' actress actress Lisa Robin Kelly among deaths of note this past week.

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    Rowena Salas, co-owner of the Hotel Baker in St. Charles, is shown in 2010 on the Penthouse deck.

    Ten years of ‘Talk’ means a trip back in time

    Dave Heun looks back on 10 years of "Talk of the Town" with fond memories.

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    Associated Press Burgess-Peterson Elementary School principal Robin Robbins, center, meets with students during an after-school study program in Atlanta, in preparation for state standardized testing, soon to begin. A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds parents of school-age children view standardized tests as a useful way to track student progress and school quality.

    Poll: Parents back high-stakes testing
    Often criticized as too prescriptive and all-consuming, standardized tests have support among parents, who view them as a useful way to measure both students’ and schools’ performances, according to an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll. Most parents also say their own children are given about the right number of standardized tests, according to the AP-NORC poll.

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    Justine Denison poses with fresh produce at Denison Farm on Aug. 12 in Schaghticoke, N.Y. Justine and Brian Denison adhere to all the growing practices required for organic certification, but if they label their beans and tomatoes “organically grown,” they could face federal charges and $20,000 or more in fines. That’s why they and hundreds of other small direct-marketing farms across the country have adopted an alternative label: Certified Naturally Grown. Certified farms pledge to follow organic practices, while avoiding the high fee and extensive paperwork required for the federal organic label.

    Naturally Grown: An alternative label to organic

    A grassroots program started by organic farmers in New York’s Hudson Valley as a backlash against federal takeover of the “certified organic” program in 2002 has expanded to include more than 700 farmers in 47 states. Executive Director Alice Varon says Certified Naturally Grown is an alternative to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s national organic program.

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    Russian regions hit with record flooding

    “We have never seen such a large-scale flood in our country’s history,” Alexander Frolov, chief forecaster at the nartional weather center, said today on state television channel Rossiya 24. “The flood covers territory from Lake Baikal to the Pacific Ocean.”

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    Helicopters battle the 64,000 acre Beaver Creek Fire on Friday.

    Firefighters facing another tough day in Idaho

    The blaze was started by lightning Aug. 7. It expanded significantly Friday, burning through tinder-dry brush and timber in the mountains west of the towns. Efforts Saturday were focused on protecting homes and structures in the gulches and foothills just west of Hailey and Ketchum.

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    A memorial service is set for Sunday for Glendale Heights canine officer Don Darby, shown with his dog, Lucky. Darby died after a yearlong battle with brain cancer.

    Service set for Glendale Heights canine officer

    A “celebration of life” for the Glendale Heights police officer who died after a yearlong battle with brain cancer is set for Sunday. Donald Darby, a 14-year veteran of the force died Tuesday with his family at his side, including his trusted partner — Lucky, the department’s only canine. Darby, 38, is survived by his wife, Amy, children Caden, 8, and Andrew, 5 and parents Leonica and Donald.

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    In this Feb. 19 photo, Indiana State Police Lt. Chuck Cohen poses for a photo in a mobile crime lab in Indianapolis. The lab is used by an Indiana task force that is building a national reputation for aggressive pursuit of child pornographers worldwide.

    Indiana team leads fight against child pornography
    In a cluttered office cubicle in a nondescript building on Indianapolis’ derelict east side, a man with rolled-up shirt sleeves scans email attachments of videos that depict startlingly young children being sexually tormented in ways that can make even federal judges weep.

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    FDNY battles smoky truck fire on Koch Bridge
    Firefighters are finishing up a battle against a blaze on a major New York City bridge that sent huge clouds of black smoke billowing over the city. There were no reports of injuries Friday in the fire on the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge. Traffic delays were reported on the major crossing between Manhattan and Queens.

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    A black tarp covers the field to stabilize mercury-containing soil at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory in Simi Valley, Calif. last July. Founded in 1947 by North American Aviation, Santa Susana quickly became an aerospace hub.

    Crews rush to clean up former California nuke lab

    Environmentalists and homeowners three years ago cheered when the U.S. Energy Department and NASA agreed to clean their parcels to background levels — the most stringent standard — essentially returning the land to its natural state. But Boeing Co., which owns the lion’s share, opted to follow cleanup rules drawn up in a 2007 pact requiring the site to be scrubbed to a lesser standard.

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    A sign prohibiting the sale of alcohol between certain hours hangs in the aisle at the Naval Station Norfolk Main Exchange,

    Navy changes how alcohol is sold on-base

    The changes are the latest addition to a broader, long-standing alcohol education and awareness program that appears to have had some success. Throughout the Navy, the number of alcohol-related criminal offenses dropped from 5,950 in the 2007 fiscal year to 4,216 in the 2012 fiscal year. The number of DUI offenses dropped from 2,025 to 1,218 during that same period, according to Navy Personnel...

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    Associated Press A row of slave cabins sit empty at McLeod Plantation in Charleston, S.C. Joe McGill, who works with the National Trust For Historic Preservation, has slept in old slave dwellings in a dozen states during the past three years as part of the Slave Dwelling Project to draw attention to the need to preserve the structures.

    Slave dwelling project tries to preserve history

    There is no good estimate on how many slave quarters may still stand around the country, and helping to identify them is one of the objectives of the project. The census of 1860, the year before the Civil War broke out, listed almost 4 million people in slavery.

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    In this Sunday, Aug. 11, photo, Micha Drori, his wife, Ora, and their children stand in the garden of their house at the settlement of Barkan in the West Bank. Israel has built dozens of settlements since 1967 that are now home to about 550,000 Israelis. Settlements dot the West Bank, the heartland of a future Palestine, and ring East Jerusalem, the Palestinians’ hoped-for capital, making it ever more difficult to partition the land between two states. Jews now make up 17.5 percent of the population in both areas.

    Israeli settlers defy stereotype amid peace talks
    Micha Drori is living the Israeli dream: a house, a yard, a wife and three kids. The 42-year-old businessman has found an affordable alternative to Israel’s booming real estate market in a quiet community he loves, with a commute of less than half an hour to his job near Tel Aviv. What’s the catch? He’s a West Bank settler.

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    Associated Press Keely Walker Muse, left, sits with her mother Eve Walker in the living room of her home in Atlanta, Saturday, Aug. 17. Mexican drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero was sentenced to 40 years in prison for the 1985 murders of her father, journalist John Clay Walker, his friend Alberto Radelat, and DEA agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena, among other crimes. According to witnesses interviewed by DEA agents hunting for Camarena’s killers, the cartel had mistaken Walker and Radelat for undercover agents. Caro Quintero walked free this month, 12 years early, after a local appeals court overturned his sentence for three of the murders. For the families of the six Americans slain before Camarena, the decision has awakened bitter memories of the brutality that ushered in the modern era of Mexican drug trafficking.

    Drug lord’s release painful for victims’ relatives
    Leader of Mexico's most powerful drug cartel Rafael Caro Quintero walked free this month, 12 years early, after a local appeals court overturned his sentence for three of the murders of two young American couples, an American journalist and DEA agent in 1985.

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    Russia boat crash kills 4, injures 49
    Russian media report that a boat being piloted by a captain suspected of being drunk has crashed into a barge, killing four people and wounding 49. The Interfax news agency, citing regional police and emergency services, says the crash occurred Saturday on the Irtysh river, 10 kilometers from the Siberian city of Omsk.

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    Associated Press Egyptians Army forces stand guard outside the al-Fatah mosque after hundreds of Islamist protesters barricaded themselves inside the mosque overnight, following a day of fierce street battles that left scores of people dead, near Ramses Square in downtown Cairo Saturday, Aug. 17. Authorities say police in Cairo are negotiating with people barricaded in a mosque and promising them safe passage if they leave. Muslim Brotherhood supporters of Egypt's ousted Islamist president are vowing to defy a state of emergency with new protests today, adding to the tension.

    Security forces storm protester-held Egypt mosque

    Egyptian security forces stormed a Cairo mosque Saturday after shooting at armed men firing down from a minaret, rounding up hundreds of supporters of the country's ousted president who hid there overnight after violent clashes killed 173 people. Security officials said officers raided the Ramses Square mosque out of fears the Muslim Brotherhood again planned to set up a sit-in similar to those...

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    Eduardo Mateos

    Hoffman Estates man charged with sex assault

    A Hoffman Estates man was arrested Friday and charged with sexually assaulting a 14-year-old girl he knew, authorities said. Eduardo D. Mateos, 32, of the 700 block of Salem Drive, was charged with two felony counts of criminal sexual assault.

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    Associated Press President Barack Obama arrives to make a statement about the violence in Egypt to media gathered in Chilmark, Mass., where he is vacationing. As Arab Spring democracy uprisings spread across the Middle East, Obama’s philosophy of limited engagement is facing perhaps its toughest test in Egypt after the nation’s first democratically elected president was ousted by military forces with deep, decadeslong ties to the U.S. Obama insists the U.S. stands with Egyptians seeking a democratic government, but says America can not determine Egypt’s future, and would not “take sides with any political party or political figure.”

    Egypt challenges Obama’s Arab Spring philosophy
    As Arab Spring democracy uprisings spread across the Middle East, President Barack Obama’s response to the political unrest has been to voice support for people seeking representative governments but limit the role the United States will play to shape those efforts.The president’s philosophy of limited engagement is facing perhaps its toughest test in Egypt, where the nation’s first...

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    Chicago officer completes swimming’s Triple Crown
    English Channel? Check. Swimming around Manhattan Island? Yep. On Tuesday, Chicago police officer Nial Funchion checked off another grueling swim, traversing the channel between Catalina Island and the Southern California coast. And with that he became one of only about 70 athletes to complete what’s known as the Triple Crown of open water swimming.

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    Quinn signs ‘puppy lemon law’
    Gov. Pat Quinn has signed legislation to protect consumers who buy a dog or cat and then learn the animal is seriously ill. The Chicago Democrat signed the so-called “puppy lemon law” Saturday morning at a popular Chicago dog park called Wiggly Field.

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    Feds shut NYC bus line that stranded 53 in Va.
    A New York City bus line that stranded 53 passengers at a Virginia truck stop for 24 hours has been closed by federal authorities. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration said it shut Staten Island-based All Nations Coach after discovering it was a reincarnation of another company shut down a year earlier for safety violations and for failing to pay fines.

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    Gunmen kill 11 near Syrian Christian villages
    Gunmen shot dead 11 people, mostly Christians, near a town in central Syria on Saturday, state media and activists said, an attack described by a local resident as aimed at members of the religious minority. The resident, citing eyewitnesses, told The Associated Press that the gunmen randomly opened fire on roadside restaurants in a drive-by shooting outside Ein al-Ajouz as Christians were...

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    German leader: Far-right extremists remain threat
    Associated Press BERLIN — German Chancellor Angela Merkel says anti-Semitism and racism remain a threat to democracy in Europe almost 70 years after the end of World War II.

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    Malaysia punishes Singaporean in prayer room row
    Malaysian authorities on Saturday revoked the immigration privileges held by a Singaporean man who offended some Muslims by allegedly letting Buddhists use an Islamic prayer room.The case has provoked debate about whether the government in Muslim-majority Malaysia is increasingly bowing to pressure by religious conservatives who want stern penalties against people accused of insulting Islam.

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    German tourist dies in gondola crash in Venice
    A German tourist has died in Venice after the gondola he was riding in crashed into a larger boat ferrying passengers along the Grand Canal.Venice fire chief of staff Giovanni Carlesso says the crash occurred around noon near the highly trafficked Rialto bridge.

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    Associated Press Vanderbilt wide receiver Chris Boyd celebrates after scoring a touchdown against Kentucky during an NCAA college football game in Nashville. Metro Nashville Police said 21-year-old Boyd gave another defendant advice on how to cover up an alleged rape of an unconscious student on campus. Vanderbilt released a statement Friday, Aug. 16, saying he had been suspended from the team pending further review. Four other players already have been dismissed.

    Indicted Vanderbilt player surrenders to police
    A Vanderbilt football player indicted on charges that he was an accomplice after the rape of an unconscious student on campus has turned himself in to police. Metro Nashville Police say 21-year-old Chris Boyd came to police headquarters Saturday morning after being indicted on Friday. He is accused of giving another defendant advice on how to cover up the crime. His bond was set at $25,000.

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    Crews rush to clean up former California nuke lab

    The sun was barely up at a former Cold War rocket test site when crews in hard hats, neon vests and steel-toe boots collected jars of dirt as part of a massive effort to clean up from a partial nuclear meltdown a half century ago. Parties that inherited the toxic mess face a 2017 deadline to restore the sprawling hilltop complex on the outskirts of Los Angeles to its condition before chemical and...

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    Key events in Egypt’s uprising and unrest

    Egyptian authorities are considering disbanding the Muslim Brotherhood group, a government spokesman said Saturday, as security forces raided a mosque in Cairo where protesters supporting the nation’s ousted president had been barricaded inside. Here are some key events from more than two years of turmoil and transition in Egypt.

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    Associated Press A cluster of life rafts floats near the cargo ship Sulpicio Express Siete Saturday Aug. 17, a day after it collided with a passenger ferry off the waters of Talisay city, Cebu province in central Philippines. Divers combed through a sunken ferry Saturday to retrieve the bodies of more than 200 people still missing from an overnight collision with a cargo vessel near the central Philippine port of Cebu that sent passengers jumping into the ocean and leaving many others trapped. At least 28 were confirmed dead and hundreds rescued. The captain of the ferry MV Thomas Aquinas, which was approaching the port late Friday, ordered the ship abandoned when it began listing and then sank just minutes after collision with the MV Sulpicio Express, coast guard deputy chief Rear Adm. Luis Tuason said.

    Divers search Philippine ferry for dozens missing

    Divers combed through a sunken ferry Saturday in search of dozens of people missing after a collision with a cargo vessel near the central Philippine port of Cebu that sent passengers jumping into the ocean and leaving many others trapped. At least 31 were confirmed dead and hundreds rescued.

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    In this August 5, 2013 photo released by Mark Schneider, a cat named Jasper sits on top of a sinking tuna boat off the Oregon coast about 80 miles from Newport, Ore. Mark and Cynthia Schneider and their two cats, Jasper and Topaz, survived after the boat sank following an engine explosion. Both cats eventually swam through the ocean to safety on the rescue boat.

    Odd news: Cats swim, crazy bar mitzvah entrance

    The week’s odd news column includes cats swimming to safety after a boat explosion, a Pennsylvania man claiming he dressed as a ninja to help police, a four-headed ear of corn and Detroit flubs up the date of elections on billboards. The video of the week is a Dallas teen’s flamboyant bar mitzvah entrance that included being dropped from a white chandelier and performing with professional dancers.

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    Work planned for Hart Road and Sunset Drive in Round Lake

    Round Lake officials will submit final plans on Monday for $8.5 million of road improvements to Hart Road and Sunset Drive, which is expected to be done next year.

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    Naperville Park District police officer Patrick Ryan gives Beth Louthain of Naperville a card, shown below, that reminds people not to feed the wildlife. Louthain was watching — but not feeding — the ducks with daughter Kendall, 4, along the Riverwalk.

    New cards discourage duck-feeding on Naperville Riverwalk

    If a Naperville parks police officer approaches with a business card, he’s not passing out his phone number. He’s distributing a new River Wildlife Card encouraging Riverwalk visitors not to feed ducks or geese. The park district printed 500 of the cards and started handing them out this week to teach people that tossing scraps of bread, popcorn or other human food to ducks and geese can harm...

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    Metra leaders tried to get the train back on the tracks Friday after weeks of controversy.

    Metra embracing Ventra, promising no fare increases

    There's talk about whether Metra will reduce its 10-ride pass but no action as the board met for the first time since its CEO departed with a bang. Directors also talked about Wi-Fi on trains, capital funding and a universal fare card.

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    E. Dundee trustee to ask for vote delay

    East Dundee Trustee Allen Skillicorn will ask that his fellow trustees postpone a vote for $3 million in police station renovations Monday, until after he meets with Elgin to discuss the merits of his alternate plan for the city to take the village's overnight prisoners. “I think it would be appropriate,” Skillicorn said of waiting. “I mean, what if this changed our needs, working with Elgin?”

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    Dist. 211 board of education approves tentative budget

    The Palatine-Schaumburg High School District 211 board of education approved a tentative 2013-14 budget at Thursday night’s meeting. Total direct expenditures amount to $249.1 million, an increase of about 7.3 percent from actual expenditures in 2012-13. Salaries and benefits account for more than 75 percent of the expenditures.

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    During his two-plus years on the job, Fire Chief Kenneth Ellerbe has yet to implement any major reforms, stonewalled by the firefighters’ union and a skeptical D.C. Council that has questioned his competence.

    Washington, D.C., fire dept. strains to provide emergency care

    The D.C. Fire and EMS department has lost more than 40 paramedics since 2011, and just two have been hired. The attrition rate is just one of many problems in a department struggling to keep up with the city’s growing population and a rapidly increasing number of emergency medical calls.

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    A letter lists the valid citizenship documents needed to register to vote in Kansas for the first time. Starting this year, new voters aren’t legally registered in Kansas until they’ve presented a birth certificate, passport or other document demonstrating U.S. citizenship.

    Kansas voters’ limbo shows hitch in citizenship law

    A few weeks after moving to suburban Kansas City from the Seattle area, Aaron Belenky went online to register to vote. But he ended up joining thousands of other Kansas residents whose voting rights are in legal limbo because of the state’s new proof-of-citizenship rule. Starting this year, new voters aren’t legally registered in Kansas until they’ve presented a birth certificate, passport or...

Sports

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    Real Solution, in red and white, gets bumpbed in the stretch by The Apache, in yellow and blue, who was disqualified giving the victory to Real Solution in the Arlington Million during the Arlington International Festival of Racing at Arlington International Racecourse.

    Arlington Million TV viewers left in dark

    It wasn’t quite the level of the “Heidi Game” when fans didn’t get to view the Oakland Raider’s two touchdowns in the final minute to defeat the New York Jets in a 1968 NFL playoff game on NBC.But Saturday’s WGN broadcast of the Arlington Million unfortunately left viewers wondering about the official outcome when they cut away to the White Sox game before the official sign was lit.

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    Jockey Alan Garcia beams aboard Real Solution after a disqualification put them in the Arlington Million winners circle.

    Real Solution the real winner in Million

    Who would be the winner of the 31st running of the Arlington Million? Initially, it was The Apache by head, but then a head-on replay of the race was shown and suddenly the result didn't seem nearly as cut and dry.In the end it was Real Solution.

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    Richard L. Duchossois presents the trophy to Real Solution owner Kenneth L. Ramsey and jockey Alan Garcia on Saturday after the 31st running of the Arlington Million.

    Arlington shines on brilliant Million Day

    At least on this day, Illinois racing shined. The 31st running of the Arlington Million was a race worthy of The Bart and John Henry in the inaugural Million, and should serve as a reminder to Gov. Pat Quinn that Illinois horse racing matters.

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    Chicago White Sox’s Alejandro De Aza drives in a run against the Seattle Mariners in the 16th inning of a baseball game on Wednesday, June 5, 2013, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    De Aza an interesting decision for White Sox

    Alejandro De Aza has been good - and bad - for the White Sox this season. As the Sox restructure their offense over the winter, they'll have to decide if De Aza is deserving of another chance in 2014.

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    Free-agency clock big factor for Cubs

    Shortstop prospect Javier Baez has torn things up in the minor leagues this year at the Class A and Class AAA levels. Could he make the Cubs' opening-day roster in 2014. Probably not, but he may go to spring training looking to force the issue.

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    Beverly D winner Dank has won five of her last 10 races.

    Dank in a runaway in Beverly D

    It was hardly a wet nor dreary day at Arlington International Racecourse for its biggest racing day of the season. But that didn’t stop Dank, a talented 4-year-old English-bred from stealing the show in the 24th edition of $750,000 Beverly D., a 1¼-miles turf showcase for fillies and mares. Dank, traveling near the back of the nine-horse field during the early running, made a brilliant move in the stretch to win going away under jockey Ryan Moore by 4¼ lengths over 11-1 longshot Gifted Girl of Ireland.

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    Four Footed photos Admiral Kitten prevailed in the Secretariat Stakes at Arlington Park on Saturday.

    Ramsey watches three of his horses win at Arlington Million

    After watching his horse Big Blue Kitten win Saratoga’s Grade I Sword Dancer on an in-house television monitor, owner Ken Ramsey turned his attention to the Grade 1 Secretariat Stakes at Arlington International Racecourse late Saturday afternoon. More good fortune struck as Ramsey was on hand to watch Rosie Napravnik steer Admiral Kitten to a convincing 1¼- length victory in 1¼ miles turf showcase for 3-year olds.

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    Castro’s gaffes provide reason to pay attention to Cubs

    Who said there's no reason to go watch the Cubs at Wrigley Field the rest of the season? Just the intrigue over what Starlin Castro might do next is worth the price of admission.

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    Chicago White Sox’s Dayan Viciedo, left, is congratulated by third base coach Joe McEwing (47) after hitting a three-run home run during the fourth inning of an baseball game Saturday against the Minnesota Twins in Minneapolis.

    Viciedo, De Aza homer, lead White Sox past Twins

    Dayan Viciedo hit a three-run homer and Alejandro De Aza added a two-run shot as the Chicago White Sox topped the Minnesota Twins 8-5 Saturday night. Viciedo’s home run gave him five RBIs in his last two games, equaling his total from July 10 through Aug. 14.

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    Bears bring in QB Palmer

    Quarterback Jordan Palmer was signed to take the place of injured No. 3 quarterback Matt Blanchard -- at least temporarily. The Bears have yet to announce how long Blanchard will be out with a fractured knuckle on his left hand.

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    Bears rookie offensive linemen Kyle Long and Jordan Mills relax during the fourth quarter of Thursday’s preseason victory over San Diego.

    Rookie linemen impressing Bears coaches

    It's been a long time since the Bears used two first-year players as starters on the offensive line, but first-round pick Kyle Long is the leader in the fight for the right guard spot, and fifth-round pick Jordan Mills is mounting a strong challenge for the right tackle job.

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    The Cubs have much invested in shortstop Starlin Castro, who was benched by manager Dale Sveum on Saturday after another mental lapse on defense.

    Castro benched, so what’s next for Cubs shortstop?

    Cubs manager Dale Sveum made a bold move Saturday, yanking shortstop Starlin Castro in the fifth inning for a mental error. The Cubs lost the game 4-0 to the Cardinals, and Castro accepted responsbility for the lack of attentiveness.

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    The Apache, in yellow and blue, was disqualified after interfering with the Real Solution, in red and white, giving the victory to Real Solution in the Arlington Million during the Arlington International Festival of Racing at Arlington International Racecourse.

    Real Solution wins Arlington Million after Apache DQ'd

    Real Solution won the Arlington Million on Saturday when first-place finisher The Apache was disqualified to second for bumping Real Solution three times in the final 200 yards.

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    St. Louis Cardinals’ Joe Kelly is hit by a pitch during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Chicago Cubs in Chicago, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013.

    Molina, Kelly team up to lead Cardinals over Cubs

    Yadier Molina hit a two-run homer, Joe Kelly threw six scoreless innings and the St. Louis Cardinals beat the Chicago Cubs 4-0 on Saturday.

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    In this Jan. 8, 2013, file photo, Alabama head coach Nick Saban walks past national championship trophies at a BCS National Championship college football news conference in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Alabama will begin this season the way it ended the last two ó No. 1. Nick Saban and the two-time defending national champion Crimson Tide are top-ranked in The Associated Press preseason college football poll released Saturday as they try to become the first team to win three straight national titles.

    Alabama No. 1 in AP preseason poll

    Alabama will begin this season the way it ended the last two — No. 1. Nick Saban’s two-time defending national champions are top-ranked in The Associated Press preseason college football poll, with the Crimson Tide trying to become the first team to win three straight national titles.

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    Jamaica’s Usain Bolt competes in the men’s 200-meter final at the World Athletics Championships in the Luzhniki stadium in Moscow, Russia, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013.

    Bolt is indisputably golden in 200 at worlds

    With Usain Bolt, the real fun happens after he crosses the finish line.Plenty of preening, lots of dancing and loads of over-the-top showboating. He did his trademark bow-and-arrow pose and kissed his muscles. He picked up a camera and snapped photos of a teammate, who was trailing behind him just like in Saturday’s race. “Happy to really get it done,” Bolt said. “I pushed myself all season to be the best.”

Business

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    GreenTech Automotive’s MyCar electric vehicles currently come from a temporary factory in Horn Lake, Miss. The company has said it plans to build a state-of-the-art plant in nearby Tunica.

    Electric car maker’s aspirations collide with reality

    Just off the legendary Highway 61, where crop-dusters perform acrobatics above billboards for Mississippi Delta casinos, is the place where Virginia gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe pledged to build a $60 million factory for his electric car company. On a recent summer day, a bird was skittering over patches of weedy gravel at the vacant site of what is supposed to be GreenTech Automotive’s future plant.

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    In this January 13, 2013 photo provided by DJI North America is the Phantom drone. The $700 Phantom, made by Chinese company DJI, is at the forefront of bringing drone technology to the masses. The roughly foot-square, four-propeller craft is sold as a complete unit with only minimal assembly required.

    Review: Is this quadcopter a drone for the masses?

    Unmanned aircraft, also known as drones, are revolutionizing warfare. Now, some of that technology is coming home from the war, to amuse us and give us an aerial perspective on our surroundings. It’s easy to see these agile, relatively stable aircraft being put to a number of uses, from aerial photography to package delivery — at least once the dangers can be managed and the legal issues worked through.

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    Glow is the latest fertility-tracking app, but comes with a twist. Glow isn’t a mere ovulation calendar. Instead it’s something more ambitious and, depending on your views about your personal data, it’s creepier.

    Is new fertility app ambitious or creepy?

    Glow is the latest fertility-tracking app and there are lots of apps and sites that do what Glow does, plus several products that are much more precise at predicting fertility than calendar-based tracking. But Glow isn’t a mere ovulation calendar. Instead it’s something more ambitious and, depending on your views about your personal data, it’s creepier.

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    The Planets app lets you explore the sky either by scrolling around with your finger or pointing your phone at sections of the sky you want to explore more deeply. Illustrates TECH-SCAN (category l), by Hayley Tsukayama, (c) 2013, The Washington Post. Moved Thursday, August 15, 2013.

    App reviews: Planets, Hashnote

    Are your eyes to the sky? For astronomy enthusiasts -- or those cultivating a love of the really great outdoors -- there are plenty of apps that let you pursue your cosmic hobby. One option is Planets.

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    A post on the social-media blog Mashable by a 13-year-old HelloGiggles correspondent named Ruby Karp. Her post, headlined “I’m 13 and None of My Friends Use Facebook,” has garnered some 36,000 Facebook shares since it was published. It has, predictably, launched a fresh armada of blog posts heralding the imminent fall of the great social network.

    Have teens really stopped using Facebook?

    A post on the social-media blog Mashable by a 13-year-old HelloGiggles correspondent named Ruby Karp. Her post, headlined “I’m 13 and None of My Friends Use Facebook,” has garnered some 36,000 Facebook shares since it was published. It has, predictably, launched a fresh armada of blog posts heralding the imminent fall of the great social network.

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    From heavy manufacturing to personal services, smartphones are making waves across a wide range of Japanese industries, shaking up long-established business models as well as consumer lifestyles.

    Smartphone boon rocking digital industry

    From heavy manufacturing to personal services, smartphones are making waves across a wide range of Japanese industries, shaking up long-established business models as well as consumer lifestyles. The impact is so far-reaching that companies known for manufacturing cameras, car navigators, portable music players and other products are struggling to find their place in a digital landscape that now seems to revolve around smartphones.

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    Facebook to acquire Mobile Technologies for speech recognition
    Facebook Inc., owner of the world’s most popular social-networking service, agreed to acquire Mobile Technologies, a developer of speech-recognition tools.

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    Modern politics happens when somebody comments on Twitter or links to a campaign through Facebook. In our hyper-networked world, anyone can say anything, and it can be read by millions. This new world will undermine the polling industry.

    How tech is creating new digital democracy

    Digital democracy is here. We no longer passively watch our leaders on television and register our opinions on Election Day. Modern politics happens when somebody comments on Twitter or links to a campaign through Facebook. In our hyper-networked world, anyone can say anything, and it can be read by millions. This new world will undermine the polling industry.

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    The SanDisk Corp. Connect Media Drive is a palm-sized square that’s about 2 1/2 inches on each side and weighs 2 1/2 ounces. It costs $80 for 32 GB and $100 for 64 GB.

    SanDisk fixes problem you don’t know you have

    File these under “solutions to problems you didn’t know you had.” They’re the SanDisk Connect Wireless Flash Drive and Wireless Media Drive, two new gadgets that provide on-the-go solid-state storage for, and access to, movies, music, photos and documents. I’ve been using them for a few weeks now; they’re unobtrusive, modestly priced and ridiculously useful.

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    Get used to data-mining on social media

    Many people love the convenience of the Internet and cellphones and ever-multiplying social-media applications. What many don’t always focus on, however, is how easily outsiders can invade their lives. Get used to it. The gathering of such data, whether by private commercial enterprises, hackers or governments — ours or foreign ones — is part of 21st- century life.

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    Mobile apps will not harm your baby

    The same group that targeted the Baby Einstein company for exaggerating claims that its videos would turn your baby into Albert Einstein has now moved on to Fisher-Price for its Laugh & Learn mobile apps. The group, called the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, filed a complaint to the Federal Trade Commission, saying that Fisher-Price does not have a “single credible scientific study” showing that babies can acquire any skills or information from these apps.

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    Why you shouldn’t trust Internet recommendations

    The “wisdom of crowds” has become a mantra of the Internet age. Need to choose a new vacuum cleaner? Check out the reviews on Amazon. Is that restaurant any good? See what Yelp has to say. But a new study suggests that such online scores don’t always reveal the best choice. A massive controlled experiment of web users finds that such ratings are highly susceptible to irrational “herd behavior” -- and that the herd can be manipulated.

Life & Entertainment

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    Suburban Chicago's Got Talent winner Gabriela Francesca is set to perform with other top 10 finalists before a performance of Maggie Speaks at Randhurst Village in Mount Prospect.

    Best bets
    Best Bets items for Sunday, Aug. 18, 2013.

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    Rock bands’ plane makes emergency landing near Moline

    A private jet carrying rock bands Ratt and Dokken had to make an emergency landing in northwestern Illinois after smoke was detected in the cabin Saturday afternoon.

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    Singer Fergie, of the Black Eyed Peas, has officially changed her name: The singer born Stacy Ann Ferguson is now Fergie Duhamel.

    Singer Fergie officially changes her name

    Fergie has officially changed her name: The singer born Stacy Ann Ferguson is now Fergie Duhamel. The Grammy winner’s representative confirmed the name change Friday.

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    The field passes shortly after the start, with eventual winner Little Mike at right, during last year's edition of the Arlington Million at Arlington Park.

    Weekend picks: Off to the races at Arlington Million

    The Arlington Million was the world's first million-dollar horse race, and the tradition continues Saturday at Arlington International Racecourse. Buddy Guy performs on the same bill with George Thorogood & The Destroyers Saturday at the Ravinia. Chicago singer-songwriter Michael McDermott returns for an intimate show this weekend at the Montrose Room in Rosemont.

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    Executive producer Stephenie Meyer, left, director Jerusha Hess and writer Shannon Hale at the Los Angeles premiere for Sony Pictures Classics’ “Austenland.” Meyer says she enjoyed the collaboration and socialization she experienced while producing the movie.

    Film producing new passion for ‘Twilight’ author

    When Stephenie Meyer’s name is mentioned, most people think of her “Twilight Saga” vampire books and films. But the author wants a new audience as a film producer. Meyer produced “Austenland,” starring Keri Russell and based on the novel by Meyer’s friend Shannon Hale. The film, directed by Jerusha Hess, opened in limited release Friday. This is the first time she’s produced someone else’s work.

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    “Call of Duty: Ghosts” is amping up the new game with interactive maps, canine sidekicks and a new mode called “cranked.”

    ‘Call of Duty: Ghosts’: 5 ways it’s different

    “Call of Duty: Ghosts” is conjuring new ways to play online. Female characters, interactive maps, canine sidekicks and a knuckle-biting intense mode dubbed “cranked” are among the new additions deploying to the multiplayer mode of the popular military first-person shooter franchise when “Ghosts” is released for both current and next-generation consoles Nov. 5.

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    Mub the slug (Aziz Ansar) lets his feelings be known to MK (Amanda Seyfried) in the animated “Epic,” now on DVD.

    DVD previews: ‘Epic’

    The animated "Epic," the Oscar-nominated French drama "Amour" and the spoof "Scary MoVie V" are three varied films making their way to DVD on Tuesday.

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    Homeowners may opt to “deconstruct” a kitchen or bathroom prior to a remodeling job. Building materials often can reused or resold.

    Deconstruction experts salvage what they can

    Instead of simply taking a sledgehammer to their old kitchen and heaping the remnants into a landfill, one couple carefully deconstructed the space in order to reuse the cabinets, the cabinet doors and other features of the kitchen.

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    Crowds enjoy the annual Oktoberfest celebration in Breckenridge.

    Breckenridge much more than a ski town

    Some mountain towns are touted for their luxury accommodations, fine dining or arts scene. Some are known as the place to go for spas, hiking or biking. Others, golf or world-class fishing. Breckenridge may have the best combination of all those attributes.

  •  
    “Speak of the Devil” by Allison Leotta

    Leotta returns with new legal thriller

    Allison Leotta’s latest novel, “Speak of the Devil,” pits prosecutor Anna Curtis against Diablo, a villain believed to be the devil himself. Diablo and his gang attack a brothel, and a doorman ends up missing his head. Curtis soon discovers evidence of a human trafficking ring, with Diablo’s gang at its heart. Witnesses are too terrified to testify, and people who own businesses in the area controlled by the gang refuse to talk.

  •  
    The 25th Annual Long Grove Fine Art and Wine Festival will features the work of 100 juried artists plus great food and wine.

    On the road: Long Grove celebrates art and wine

    More than 100 juried artists will exhibit at the upcoming 25th Annual Long Grove Fine Art and Wine Festival. Browse art created in oil, acrylic, watercolor, jewelry, sculpture, wood, photography, fiber, glass, paper, metal and mixed media. Also, Chicago’s own Festa Italiana attracts more than 50,000 to the Taylor Street stretch of Chicago’s Little Italy neighborhood. Don’t miss the Turano Baking Company and Fontanini Meatball Eating Contest, grape stomping, bocce ball and lots of food.

  •  
    This beautiful vase is signed “Galle.” But is it genuine?

    Galle vase? This lacks glass artist’s mastery

    Q. I am interested in selling this Galle vase. Can you please tell me more about it?

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    The pink daisy-like flowers of asters fill the fall garden with color.

    Art in the garden: Fall-flowering perennials will perk up sagging garden beds

    Is your perennial garden winding down along with the summer? Now is a great time to spark up the border with some late-flowering perennials. Take a stroll through your favorite garden center to see the many hardy perennials that put on their best show of color from late summer into fall.

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    Asbestos should be removed by a professional

    Q. My daughter was trying to sell her home, but when the buyer found out the home had asbestos on the furnace he decided to buy some other home. I have read that boilers have asbestos, but I never heard of asbestos on a furnace. Have you ever seen something like this?

  •  
    Formaldehyde-free plywood is better for the environment, experts say.

    New materials can be eco-friendly
    Besides reusing materials from deconstruction, you can go green with new products as well. Recycled materials and sustainably produced products can provide an eco-friendly touch.

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    With jointly owned property, does majority rule?

    Q. Two of my cousins and I own a house. I want to sell and so does one of my cousins. The other one wants to keep it. So what happens? Does majority rule?

  •  

    Association bylaws determine voting rules

    Q. There are only three candidates for the three open seats on the board, each for a two-year term, that are up for election at the upcoming annual meeting. Do we have to cast ballots, or can we elect this slate by acclamation?

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    Prepare to rescind your mortgage refinance before you close

    Rescinding a contractual agreement is unusual. A major purpose of contracts is to define the rights and obligations of each party, and if provision is made for a rescission, a penalty will almost always be imposed on the rescinding party. For example, when one party to a merger recently decided to rescind, it had to pay a penalty of $150 million.

Discuss

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    JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.com ¬ There's always plenty of excitement at the Arlington Million.

    The Soapbox

    Great accomplishments and good deeds abound in the suburbs. See what Daily Herald editors think.

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    Too much jumping to conclusions
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Every day in this newspaper I read about the scandals that the president has been involved in. I have read that he has called them phony scandals (not true). They are: Fast and Furious, Benghazi, the IRS and the NSA surveillance. The president has supported inquiries into what happened.

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    Appointment politics were shameful
    A Wauconda letter to the editor:

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    Suggestions for cutting federal waste
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: Mr. Teune’s Aug. 10 letter directs his frustration with the “Republican Party created budget cuts — commonly referred to as sequestration.” I can appreciate Mr. Teune’s frustration that some cuts may impact some of his interests such as viewing the National Weather Service Marine Web page which seems not to be available.

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    America won’t forget heroes at Benghazi
    America won’t forget heroes at BenghaziThere are always things that politicians want us to forget and the sooner the better. This is why certain news conferences are held on Friday afternoons. When there is a potential scandal or cover-up or anything that might expose politicians as stupid or inept, they usually admit to it on Friday afternoon knowing people have short memories and there’s nothing like a weekend to distract our attention.There is one tragic example of ineptitude at the highest level we will never forget. Benghazi and the four brave Americans who were forsaken, abandoned by their government and left to die. Chris Stevens, Sean Smith, Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty will never be forgotten. The next time this president tries to slough off his mistakes as some “ginned up scandal by political opponents,” we will know what he is really doing. He is trying to get us to forget his ineptness and how he left those men to die without even trying to help. How he ordered our military to stand down. Not even a millennium of Friday news conferences will ever wash away the desperate shame and humiliation incurred by America that day.Mike SimonGlen Ellyn

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