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Daily Archive : Tuesday August 13, 2013

News

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    IDOT to host meeting Wednesday on Route 59 project in Bartlett

    Some residents are raising concerns about IDOT’s plans to improve Lake Street at the Route 59 interchange near Bartlett and Streamwood. A meeting will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Bartlett Hills County Club, 800 W. Oneida Ave., to continue discussions on the project and present an improvement alternative to the public.

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    American Airlines and US Airways jets prepare for flight at a gate at the Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia. The Justice Department and a number of state attorneys general on Tuesday challenged a proposed $11 billion merger between US Airways Group Inc. and American Airlines' parent company, AMR Corp., in part because of what their executives have said about raising fares and fees.

    Airline execs' own words haunt them in merger case

    In making its case against an American Airlines-US Airways merger, the government relies heavily on an unusual source of evidence: the airlines' own executives. Throughout the 56-page lawsuit filed Tuesday, Department of Justice lawyers quote internal emails, investor presentations and public comments by the two airlines' top executives.

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    Mother, daughter die in Chicago shooting

    Chicago police say a 5-year-old girl and her 28-year-old mother have died after they were shot in the head. Authorities haven't released their names, but police say their bodies were found shortly after midnight Tuesday in a home on the city's Southwest side.

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    A goat grazes on grass at the northeast corner of O'Hare International Airport in Chicago on Tuesday.

    Llamas, goats love the jet-set life at O'Hare

    Who's cutting the grass at O'Hare International Airport? In part it's a new herd of goats, sheep, llamas and burros -- including a newborn lamb named O'Hare. “He's suckling on mom ... planes are flying overhead. He didn't flinch, mom didn't move, everybody's content,” said Pinky Janota of Settler's Pond Animal Shelter in Beecher.

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    Samone Johnson, 19, of Alvin, types a text on her cell phone next to Zion Moses, 20, left, of Danville at the Danville Public Library. Studies show younger children are getting their own cell phones.

    Younger children getting cell phones

    Danville High School student Lanesia Lollar and her mom, Phyllis, are at odds about the 14-year-old having her own cell phone. Cost is the biggest factor right now, mom Phyllis Lollar said. “I can't afford it,” she said. That doesn't stop Lanesia from continuing to bug her mom about getting one. Lanesia said all her friends have one and she wants one to call and text her friends and...

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    Pipeline explodes, leaves 15-foot-deep crater in western Illinois

    A fuel pipeline exploded beneath a western Illinois cornfield, sending flames hundreds of feet into the sky and leaving a 15-foot-deep crater before pipeline crews were able to stem the flow of fuel and bring the fire under control, authorities said. Nobody was injured in the explosion, which was reported around 11:15 p.m. Monday near the town of Erie, 27 miles northeast of Davenport, Iowa.

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    Chef Rick Tramonto has closed Tramonto Steak and Seafood and RT Lounge in Wheeling.

    Tramonto's in Wheeling closes, will be banquet hall

    Tramonto Steak and Seafood and RT Lounge, Chef Rick Tramonto's last establishments in the Westin Chicago North Shore in Wheeling, have closed. Lettuce Entertain You, owner of Saranello's Ristorante Italiano in the hotel, will take over the space as an event hall, John Melaniphy, Wheeling's director of economic development, said Tuesday.

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    Another lawsuit has been filed against former Schaumburg police officers, from left, Matthew Hudak, Terrance O'Brien and John Cichy. This one claims they broke into a Hanover Park home last year to steal a gun and money.

    Hanover Park man claims former Schaumburg cops stole gun, money

    A Hanover Park man is suing three former Schaumburg police officers under indictment on drug conspiracy charges, claiming they broke into his home last year to steal money and a gun before falsely arresting him.

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    Glendale Heights police officer Don Darby, shown with his dog, Lucky, died Tuesday after a yearlong battle with brain cancer.

    Glendale Heights police in mourning for veteran officer

    Whenever Glendale Heights police officer Don Darby went on a drug bust or was helping chase down an assailant, his trusted partner — Lucky, the police department's lone canine — was always by his side. And even when Don was in his final days, there was Lucky again, at his bedside in the hospital. On Tuesday, the 14-year veteran of the Glendale Heights police force succumb to stage...

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    Driver faces DUI charge in Oak Brook crash that injured two teens

    A man accused of driving drunk in an Oak Brook crash that injured two teenagers was jailed Tuesday on $200,000 bail, authorities said. Jamie Delara-Rodriguez, 25, of the 800 block of Ogden Avenue in Downers Grove, was charged with aggravated driving under the influence.

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    Jim Elenz, center, thanks Aurora police sergeants Rick Ahlgren and Daniel Eppard for their rescue efforts.

    Aurora cops, Schaumburg kids honored for rescue efforts

    Two Aurora police sergeants were honored Tuesday for their efforts to rescue five youngsters who had become trapped at a downstate dam. But, it turns out, the kids were heroes, too. “I'm sorry we're going to die this way, Dad,” one boy in trouble said. “We're not going to die,” the father said. “Someone's going to come down the river, eventually.” Someone did.

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    Deerfield issues boil order after bacteria is found in water supply

    Officials in Deerfield have ordered residents to boil any tap water after traces of fecal coliform was discovered in tests Monday.

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    Smoke pours the parking lot in front of Wheeling High School Tuesday afternoon.

    Tar kettle catches fire at Wheeling High School; no damage inside

    Tar in the parking lot of Wheeling High School caught fire this afternoon. The plume of thick black smoke could be seen for miles, and Elmhurst Road between Hintz and Dundee roads was closed. “The inside of the building is fine,” school board President Bill Dussling said. “It’s a matter of finding out what kind of damage there was to the roof.”

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    Donald Layne, left, shown serving as a judge in 2006 for the Daily Herald Academic Team, was active for decades in Addison school and business affairs.

    Don Layne, fixture in Addison schools and business, dies at 83

    Donald J. Layne, a former coach and principal at Addison Trail High School and a local school board member, died Sunday at age 83. A memorial service for Layne, a fixture in the community for decades, is set for 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday at Addison village hall, 1 Friendship Circle.

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    Joel Wittkamp crashed into this tree in Antioch Township in February.

    Cops: Teen likely driving 100 mph-plus in fatal crash

    An inexperienced teenage driver likely was traveling at more than 100 mph when he struck a tree in a fatal crash in February in Antioch Township, according to a Lake County sheriff's office investigation. “Use it as an example to maybe find some greater good to prevent it from happening to someone else,” Deputy Chief Brian Keller said Monday.

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    Research space scientist Oleg Abramov walks outside simulated Martian base at Mauna Loa, Hawaii. Six researchers have spent the past four months living in a small dome on a barren Hawaii lava field at 8,000 feet, trying to figure out what foods astronauts might eat on Mars and during deep-space missions.

    Mars food study researchers emerge from dome

    Six researchers have spent the past four months living in a small dome on a barren Hawaii lava field at 8,000 feet, trying to figure out what foods astronauts might eat on Mars and during deep-space missions. They emerged on Tuesday with their recipes.

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    Dennis Mudd

    The Hundred Club of Lake County wants to raise awareness of its mission

    The Hundred Club of Lake County, which financially supports the families of police and firefighters killed in the line of duty, is looking for new members. The organization hasn't had to address that situation in nearly 30 years but says the risk is always there.

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    Sen. Dick Durbin, pictured at Union Station, engaged the Federal Railroad Administration to conduct more oversight of Metra in its latest crisis.

    Feds increase Metra safety oversight during crisis

    The Federal Railroad Administration is going to check up on Metra to ensure safety is a priority as the agency reels from a scandal. This includes face-to-face meetings and training, although feds praised the agency for coping amid managerial chaos.

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    The Justice Department and a number of state attorneys general on Tuesday challenged a proposed $11 billion merger between US Airways Group Inc. and American Airlines’ parent company, AMR Corp.

    Federal government sues to block airline merger

    American Airlines and US Airways expected to spend this week cruising toward completion of their huge merger, a deal to create the world’s biggest airline worth $14 billion on paper. Instead, they were stunned Tuesday when the federal government and six states sued to block the deal, saying it would hurt competition and cost consumers hundreds of millions of dollars a year in higher fares and...

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    In this combination photo, the 20th century Ecce Homo-style fresco of Christ is seen at left, and the ‘restored’ version is at right.

    Disfigured Spanish fresco is hit for artist, town

    A year ago, a botched restoration of a fresco of Christ by a Spanish retiree drew guffaws. Now, 81-year-old artist Cecilia Gimenez is having the last laugh.

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    Palestinians hold up flags with the picture of popular Fatah leader Marwan Barghouti, jailed in Israel, during celebrations while waiting for arrival of the released prisoners outside Ofer prison near the West Bank town of Ramallah, early Wednesday.

    Even worse odds than in 2008 for Mideast deal

    The same negotiators, the same issues, a familiar venue: The sense of deja vu is overwhelming as Israelis and Palestinians start Wednesday on their third attempt in 13 years to draw a border between them. But they face even longer odds than in the last round, which ended in 2008.

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    Someone has been firing a BB gun at people in Waukegan. Six people have been shot since the start of August.

    Waukegan sees spate of BB gun shootings

    At least six people have been shot with a BB gun at various locations throughout Waukegan since the beginning of August, police say. No serious injuries have been reported, and Waukegan police are asking for the public’s help in the attacks, which have targeted women.

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    Items are displayed at a makeshift memorial at the Fire Station No. 7 memorial for fallen firefighters in Prescott, Ariz., in July. A dispute over the benefits given to families of the 19 elite firefighters who died this summer in the line of duty has caused an angry division in Prescott, just a month after the community came together in the face of tragedy.

    Firefighters’ benefits divide northern Ariz. city

    In the days after a wildfire killed 19 members of an elite firefighting team, the Arizona city where they were based banded together in a series of moving public memorials and tributes, overwhelmingly united in its support of the men and their families. That unity quickly has faded since residents learned Prescott is not paying full-time benefits to all of the families of the firefighters who...

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    Arlington Heights resident wants term limits on 2014 ballot

    An Arlington Heights resident who has battled with the village before isn’t giving up his quest to get a referendum on term limits for elected officials on the ballot. Bill Gnech said he hopes to have the question before voters during either the primary or general election in 2014.

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    Sonal Amin

    District 93 picks new school board member

    A new board member has been appointed in Carol Stream District 93 to fill the vacancy left by a newly elected board member who has resigned. Sonal Amin, who fell short in April’s crowded six-way race for the school board, was selected by the board to replace Christopher Wagoner, who has moved out of the district boundaries and was forced to step down.

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    A Malmstrom Air Force Base missile maintenance team removes the upper section of an ICBM at a Montana missile site. An Air Force unit that operates one-third of the nation’s land-based nuclear missiles at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont., has failed a safety and security inspection.

    Air Force nuclear unit fails key security test

    An Air Force unit that operates one-third of the nation’s land-based nuclear missiles has failed a safety and security inspection, marking the second major setback this year for a force charged with the military’s most sensitive mission, the general in charge of the nuclear air force told The Associated Press on Tuesday.

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    Quinn vetoes fewer free days at museums, aquariums

    Gov. Pat Quinn has vetoed legislation that would have cut the number of free days in half that museums and aquariums are required to offer every year. Quinn said Illinois’ museums and aquariums “are not just for tourists visiting on the weekends.”

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    Once a rising star, Jesse Jackson Jr. spoke at the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver.

    Tracing the fall of Jesse Jackson Jr.

    The sweep of Jackson’s life, from golden boy who could be president to broken politician, will be laid out for a federal judge in Washington, D.C., Wednesday as she sentences him and his wife, Sandra, for misusing $750,000 in campaign money on a gold-plated Rolex watch, mink capes, mounted elk heads and other personal items.

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    Jackson Jr.’s hope for leniency rests with judge

    If Jesse Jackson Jr.’s federal sentencing judge accepts that his performance as a congressman outweighs his crime, she could give him probation for misusing $750,000 in campaign money. Judge Amy Berman Jackson -- no relation to the defendant -- will rule Wednesday.

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    Tish Powell

    Elgin councilwoman participates in Edgar Fellows Program

    These are tough times to be politicians, but elected officials must focus on building consensus, not rifts. That was one of the key messages Elgin Councilwoman Tish Powell said she got from the 2nd annual Edgar Fellows Program last week at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s Institute of Government and Public Affairs.

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    Newly hatched midland painted turtles look to escape their container before they are released Tuesday at a DuPage County forest preserve.

    Rescued baby turtles set free in DuPage preserve

    Seven turtle hatchlings that appeared doomed when a car hit their pregnant mother were given a second chance at life Tuesday morning at a DuPage County forest preserve. “They are the cutest little things you ever did see,” DuPage County Forest Preserve District spokeswoman Bonnie Olszewski said.

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    New trial date for Wauconda firefighter

    The trial date for a former Wauconda firefighter accused of having sex with a a person under the age of 13 has been postponed. Donald Berthiaume, 41, of Lakemoor, is facing 14 years in prison if found guilty of aggravated criminjsal sexual abuse.

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    Kevin Flynn

    Former Rosemont casino bidder killed in Michigan bike crash

    A Chicago businessman who was once a key player in Rosemont's bid to build a casino was killed Monday while riding his bicycle in southwest Michigan. Media reports stated that 46-year-old Kevin Flynn was with family on vacation when he was struck by a car.

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    Stephen L. Brown

    Prison time for Schaumburg teen charged with burglary

    A Cook County judge sentenced a 19-year-old Schaumburg teen to five years in prison Monday in exchange for him pleading guilty to burglarizing a home. Stephen L. Brown had been sentenced to the Cook County sheriff's boot camp in 2012.

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    Palatine banquet hall to reopen under new ownership

    Brandi’s Banquets, located at 1170 E. Dundee Road in Palatine, recently closed but will reopen soon as Rosa Bella Banquets. The Palatine village council on Monday approved transferring a special use that permits the continued operation of the banquet facility.

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    RE/MAX hot air balloon to visit Elk Grove school

    Students at Grove Junior High School in Elk Grove Village will get a special visitor to start off the new school year on Aug. 23 when the RE/MAX Hot Air Balloon visits the school at 777 W. Elk Grove Blvd.

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    Cliff McIlvaine, who was sued by the city of St. Charles in an effort to get him to finish a project that he first pulled a permit for in 1975, stands on a landing between his original home to the left and new, super-insulated addition on the right, which he hopes to turn into a museum for his and his father’s inventions, along with city memorabilia.

    St. Charles, McIlvaine still at odds over roof damage

    St. Charles officials have fired back at Cliff McIlvaine in the long running dispute over his languishing home improvement project on Prairie Street. The city says it's working with McIlvaine to compensate him for damages caused by a water leak in his roof from July, but McIlvaine has refused to specify what was damaged or provide an inventory. The city also disputes McIlvaine's claim that the...

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Donald R. Cinkus, 52, of Maple Park, was charged with misdemeanor disorderly conduct at 12:30 p.m. Aug. 4 after an incident on the 1N800 block of Francis, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Lake Villa Elementary District 41 board President Michael Conway talks about a proposal to realign the grade levels at the elementary schools as Superintendent John Van Pelt listens. The board voted down the proposal.

    Grade levels won’t change at Lake Villa District 41 schools

    Lake Villa Elementary District 41 officials have decided not to shuffle the grade levels of the schools that will remain open next year after J.J. Pleviak Elementary closes. Hooper,Thompson and Martin elementary schools will continue serving kindergartners through sixth-graders from specific neighborhoods, the board decided after a long discussion Monday night. Palombi Middle School will continue...

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    Gov. Pat Quinn appointed Frank Zuccarelli to the CTA board in June.

    Quinn appointee to CTA board withdraws from post

    Thornton Township Supervisor Frank Zuccarelli says he was looking forward to serving Chicago’s South suburbs on the CTA board. But he says he doesn’t want “political grandstanding” to distract from critical issues or stand in the way of South suburban needs.

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    Teacher accused of drinking on job gets $18,000 to resign

    The Janesville school district is paying a teacher suspected of being drunk at a field trip more than $18,000 to resign as part of a separation agreement.

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    Friday’s debt downgrades affect Illinois State University as well as six other public colleges.

    Moody’s downgrades debt of 7 state universities

    SPRINGFIELD — A major bond-rating agency has downgraded debt ratings on seven public universities in Illinois, and it warned that more decreases could take place if the state doesn’t address its pension problem.

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    It’s back to school! Parents, share your advice.

    Parents, share your best back-to-school advice

    Parents: What's your best piece of back-to-school advice for other moms and dads? Share it in our comment section and we'll include the best tips in our back-to-school coverage.

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    Christine Huneke and her daughter Mikayla, 20 months, of Elburn, take a ride on the “Teacups” at Elburn Days.

    Small town and proud of it: Elburn Days

    As volunteers raise tents in Elburn Lions Park, kids stop to watch the action. “There is a certain excitement that builds in small towns,” said Judi Day of Elburn, entertainment chairwoman for Elburn Days. The 84th annual festival is back this year, running Thursday through Sunday, Aug. 15-18.

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    $40,000 settlement for repair man burned at Batavia restaurant

    A 26-year-old fire suppression repair man who sued Batavia's East China Inn after he was set on fire while working atop a stove recently was awarded $40,000 in a settlement. Matthew Rapp, of Oak Forest, suffered second-degree burns on his left leg and sued for negligence.

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    Members of the West Chicago Community Center say the nonprofit group is willing to purchase the Joel Wiant House in downtown West Chicago and restore it. The house, located at 151 W. Washington St., was built around 1869 for local businessman Joel Wiant.

    West Chicago group wants to save historic house

    A West Chicago house that’s been named one of Illinois’ 10 most endangered historic places could be spared from the wrecking ball, thanks to a proposal from a local nonprofit group. “We’re going to go in there and bring it up to code and restore it to a useful purpose,” said David Sabathne, president of the group. “We want it to be a functional building.”

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    Gunman takes 3 hostages at north La. bank

    Authorities say a gunman has taken at least three people hostage at a bank in northeastern Louisiana.

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    Arlington Heights talks liquor law tweaks

    Arlington Heights is discussing a number of changes to its liquor license restrictions to address violations and inconsistencies in the code. So far in 2013, 10 businesses have been caught serving underage patrons. The liquor license hearings for those will be held later this year. “It's become clear to us that there are some issues with some of our employees in our establishments,”...

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    Arlington Heights Fire Dept. offers CPR class

    The Arlington Heights Fire Department is providing CPR instruction from 7 to 10 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10 at the Arlington Heights Fire Department Administration Headquarters, 1150 N. Arlington Heights Road.

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    Logan Wilson, 3, of McHenry, undergoes chemotherapy at the University of Chicago Comer Children’s Hospital for seven benign brain tumors. He’s been in good spirits thus far and has only sustained minor side effects from his treatment, which began in June. When he’s not at the hospital, Logan loves asking questions and playing outside. “He’s very energetic, he loves cars,” said his mother, Amber Wilson.

    Bandito Barney’s raising money for McHenry boy

    An East Dundee pub is holding a benefit Sunday to support Logan Wilson, a 3-year-old battling seven brain tumors. “He’s pretty normal right now,” Dawn Lambert said of her only grandchild. “We’re praying that there’s not going to be severe side effects.”

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Jeremiah D. Butler, 24, of Batavia, was charged with possession of cannabis at 2:06 a.m. Sunday in the 0-99 block of East Wilson Street, according to a police report. He also faces several other charges.

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    Israelis hold a sign which reads, “Red week, the Israeli government releases twenty six murderers,” and an Israeli flag during a protest in Tel Aviv, Israel, Monday, Aug. 12, 2013, as they protest Israel’s decision to release 26 Palestinian prisoners, most of them held for deadly attacks, as part of a U.S.-brokered deal that led to a resumption of Mideast negotiations.

    Israelis begin releasing 26 Palestinian prisoners

    Israel is moving forward with a plan to build nearly 900 new settlement housing units in east Jerusalem, an official said Tuesday, in a move that angered Palestinians a day before the sides were to hold Mideast peace talks for the first time in nearly five years. Israel has begun releasing 26 Palestinian prisoners, most held for deadly attacks, ahead of renewed Mideast negotiations.

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    St. Charles tries to revive First Street project with smaller plan

    The long-awaited First Street project in downtown St. Charles may see progress for the first time in several years via a new, scaled-back version. “We're very excited to finally put together … a project we can accomplish on what is really the most important part of the project,” Bob Rasmussen of First Street LLC said. “It's a similar concept but a little bit smaller.”

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    Anthony Cechini

    Judge tells Fox Lake man to accept deal or go to trial

    A Lake County judge gave a Fox Lake man accused of reckless homicide one more month to accept a plea deal with prosecutors or go to trial. Anthony Cechini, 24, faces reckless homicide and aggravated driving under the influence charges for a crash that killed David Lettinger, 21, in October 2012.

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    Congestion has plagued Route 59 near the interchange with I-88 in Naperville for years. With construction to widen the street to three lanes between Ferry Road and Aurora Avenue/New York Street set to begin Monday, officials say drivers can expect traffic to worsen before it improves.

    Route 59 construction frustration beginning in Naperville next week

    Officials are warning drivers to be prepared for traffic to get worse before it gets better on Route 59 as construction to widen a 3.5-mile stretch of the congested state road is set to begin Monday. “Motorists know when they travel on Route 59 today, it's often a very frustrating experience, and it will continue to be a frustrating experience for the next two years,” a Naperville...

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    Young children had a blast at last year’s Grayslake Summer Days, which returns for another run Friday, Aug. 16.

    Grayslake Summer Days starts Friday

    Grayslake's Summer Days returns for another run Friday and Saturday in the village's downtown.

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    Russia: Surgeon stole heroin found in drug suspect's stomach

    Russian police say they have arrested a surgeon who stole some of the heroin he had been called on to extract from the stomach of a suspected drug mule. Police in the Siberian region of Krasnoyarsk say that after investigators discovered that some of the drugs were missing, they searched the surgeon and found a packet containing 5 grams of heroin hidden in his clothing.

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    Dancers from the Palatine Park District’s dance program in last year’s production of the “Nutcracker All Jazz’d Up.” The program will host an open house Saturday Aug. 17, at Community Center, 250 E. Wood St., in Palatine.

    Palatine Dance Program offers free open house

    Palatine Park District’s Dance Program will offer a free open house event for children ages 5 and older with their parents from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, at Community Center, 250 E. Wood St., Palatine.

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    In this Aug. 8, 2013 file courtroom sketch, Maj. Nidal Hasan, second from right, sits with his standby defense attorneys Maj. Joseph Marcee, left, and Lt. Col. Kris Poppe, second from left, as presiding judge Col. Tara Osborn looks on, during Hasan’s trial, in Fort Hood, Texas.

    Hasan: ‘I would still be a martyr’ if executed

    FORT HOOD, Texas — The Army psychiatrist on trial for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood told mental health experts after the attack that he “would still be a martyr” if convicted and executed by the government, according to a newspaper report Tuesday.

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    Pope Francis receives a gift from Argentine soccer star Lionel Messi during a private audience at the Vatican, Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013. The player, his fellow teammates on the Argentine national soccer squad as well as Italy’s national team players had a private audience Tuesday with the first Latin American-born pontiff.

    Soccer-loving pope meets world-class stars

    Pope Francis cheered fellow Argentine Lionel Messi and other soccer stars Tuesday as he led a morality-focused pep rally of sorts at the Vatican for Argentina and Italy’s national teams ahead of their eagerly awaited friendly match. The avid soccer fan got two more jerseys on Tuesday: an Argentine and an Italian team jersey, each one signed by the players.

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    Deborah Mell

    Former Mell aide selected for legislative seat
    A onetime aide to former Chicago Alderman Dick Mell will replace his daughter in the Illinois Legislature.Jaime Andrade Jr. will take the seat held by Deborah Mell. She left the Illinois House to replace her father on Chicago’s city council when he retired after nearly 40 years representing the ward on the northwest side.

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    San Diego Mayor Bob Filner speaks during a news conference at city hall, in San Diego in this July 26, 2013 file photo. Filner is challenging a recall effort by touting city progress during his term, an indication that he has no intention of resigning.

    San Diego mayor challenges recall effort

    San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, in a statement obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press, made no mention of the reason recall organizers want to boot him from office — allegations by more than a dozen women that he made unwanted advances such as inappropriate statements or groping. Michael Pallamary said the mayor’s rebuttal falls short for residents. “Mayor Bob Filner obviously believes his policy...

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    A supporter of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi chants slogans against Egyptian Army during a protest at the sit-in at Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, which is fortified with multiple walls of bricks, tires, metal barricades and sandbags, where protesters have installed their camp in Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Aug. 12, 2013.

    Egypt’s new leaders name new provincial chiefs

    Egypt’s new leaders named 20 new provincial governors on Tuesday, in a move to enforce their authority by removing all Muslim Brotherhood members previously installed in the posts by the former government. The shake-up came as supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi reinforced their 6-week-old sit-ins in the capital and rallied for more protests across the country to demand his...

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    Aurora police sergeants honored for river rescue

    Two Aurora police sergeants are being honored for their recent rescue of five young rafters who were trapped in the water at a dam on the Vermilion River.The Illinois Conservation Police plans to honor Sgts. Dan Eppard and Rick Ahlgren on Tuesday at the Aurora Police Department.

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    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry waves journalist after a news conference at the headquarters of the Colombian National Police Counter-Narcotics in Bogota, Colombia, Monday, Aug. 12, 2013. Kerry is on his first trip to South America as secretary of state.

    Kerry works to shore up relations with Brazil

    BRASILIA, Brazil — Secretary of State John Kerry will seek to allay the concerns of Brazil’s top leaders about U.S. surveillance in their country while highlighting the expanding relationship the U.S. is nurturing with the economic powerhouse in Latin America.

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    In the Senate, a few lawmakers, including Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., are taking a stronger line in favor of civil liberties. But progress has been slow, with few co-sponsors joining their legislative proposals to limit NSA spying powers.

    Voters mad about NSA spying face uphill battle

    Americans are becoming increasingly concerned about government invasion of privacy while investigating terrorism, and some ordinary citizens are finding ways to push back. They are signing online petitions and threatening lawsuits. The question is whether these anti-surveillance voters will be successful in creating a broader populist movement.

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    In this Aug. 9, 2013, photo is Bryan Brewer, president of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, who opposes the legalization of alcohol on the reservation in Pine Ridge, S.D. A special election is being held Tuesday, Aug. 13, on whether to end prohibition and allow the tribe to sell alcohol and use the profits for education and detoxification and treatment centers, for which there is currently little to no funding.

    Last dry SD reservation voting on alcohol sales

    Members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe are voting all day Tuesday on whether to give up the fight against bootlegging by allowing alcohol to be sold on the reservation — the last place in the state’s American Indian territory where it’s not allowed. “Prohibition is not working," Larry Eagle Bull said. "Alcohol is going to stay. We need to get our people educated about it.”

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    Associated Press New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks during a news conference in New York, Monday, Aug. 12, 2013. A U.S. judge has appointed a monitor to oversee the New York Police Department’s controversial stop-and-search policy, saying it intentionally discriminates based on race and has violated the rights of tens of thousands of people.

    NYC mayor lambastes stop-and-frisk ruling

    A federal judge’s stinging rebuke of the police department’s stop-and-frisk policy as discriminatory could usher in a return to the days of high violent crime rates and end New York’s tenure as “America’s safest big city,” Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned. “This is a dangerous decision made by a judge who I think does not understand how policing works and what is compliant with the U.S.

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    Delegates listen as former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addresses the American Bar Association annual meeting Monday, Aug. 12, 2013, in San Francisco. Clinton spoke about maintaining the Voting Rights Act and received a medal from the association.

    Hillary Clinton calls for election reform

    Potential 2016 presidential candidate Hillary Clinton kicked off a series of speeches on Monday with a call to combat what she called an “assault on voting rights.” She said that more than 80 bills were introduced in 31 states this year to restrict elections rights. She conceded that not all proposed bills were racially motivated. “But anyone who says that racial discrimination is not a problem...

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    Steven Davis, brother of Debra Davis, wipes his eyes while speaking outside federal court where a jury found James “Whitey” Bulger guilty on several counts of murder, racketeering and conspiracy Monday, Aug. 12, 2013 in Boston. Jurors could not agree whether Bulger was involved in Debra Davis’ killing.

    For families, Bulger verdict brings closure, angst

    The guilty verdicts against James “Whitey” Bulger brought catharsis and closure to relatives of the 11 victims in whose killings he was convicted of playing a role, but for the families of the eight people whose deaths couldn’t be definitively linked to the Boston mob boss, peace will be harder to come by.

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    Brett Anderson, wearing a shirt featuring a photo of his daughter, Hannah, makes a statement regarding her kidnapping and rescue at a news conference Monday, Aug. 12, 2013, in San Diego. Anderson is flanked by FBI agent Rob Howe. James Lee DiMaggio, 40, suspected of killing Hannah’s mother and brother before fleeing with her in the Idaho wilderness, was killed in a shootout with law enforcement on Saturday.

    California teen is home after harrowing rescue

    A 16-year-old girl who was rescued during an FBI shootout with her captor in the Idaho wilderness is resting at home with family and friends to begin what her father says will be a slow recovery. “She has been through a tremendous, horrific ordeal,” said Brett Anderson, who declined to answer questions after reading a brief statement Monday. He pleaded for privacy.

  •  
    A general view of the Red Sea resort city of Eilat is seen in southern Israel on the border with Egypt. The Israeli military shot down a rocket launched toward Eilat, Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013, the army said. It was the first time Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system successfully intercepted a rocket attack on Eilat, according to the military. The incident came after days of heightened tension along the Egypt-Israel border.

    Israel army shoots down rocket near Egypt border

    The Israeli military shot down a rocket launched toward a Red Sea resort town near the border with Egypt on Tuesday, the army said. It was the first time Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system successfully intercepted a rocket attack on the resort of Eilat, the military said. The incident came after days of heightened tension along the Egypt-Israel border.

  •  
    The new $100 bill will have its first public showing during the Chicago World’s Fair of Money August 13-17 at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont.

    Dawn Patrol: Money fair in Rosemont; next Wauconda police chief?

    World’s Fair of Money brings rare currency to Rosemont. Wauconda police chief vote today? Waukegan man sentenced 48 years for murdering wife. Man gets 6 years in Elgin pipe beating. Former pastor in Palatine, Wauconda dies. Police seek robber of Beach Park 7-Eleven. Cubs shut out for third straight home game.

  •  
    Dominic Swanson, a sophomore at Huntley High School, is heading to Prague in October to compete in a powerlifting competition. Here he bench presses 225 pounds during a workout at his Union home.

    Huntley High powerlifter to compete in Prague

    Dominic Swanson, a sophomore at Huntley High School, is heading to Prague this fall to compete in a world powerlifting competition. He holds the world record in one of the sport's divisions and says he can't wait to crush the competition. “(It’s) just competing and hopefully doing really good and beating everyone that I can over there and being able to represent Team USA,” he said.

  •  

    Bartlett panel brainstorms on enticing shoppers

    Bartlett’s economic development commission met Monday to discuss, for a third time, ways to get more residents and commuters to regularly visit the village’s downtown business district.

  •  
    Supporters say with two building additions and a ramped-up fundraising drive, a renovated Wheaton Grand Theater could be open in 2015.

    Wheaton Grand owners, architect say they need more space

    Supporters of the long-vacant Wheaton Grand Theater say the “Miracle on Hale,” the eventual renovation and reopening of the historic theater at 123 N. Hale, could be less than two years and $5 million dollars away. But first, they’re going to need some help from city hall.

  •  
    Community Unit District 300 expected to have a deficit in its next budget, but now a new state funding formula could give the district an extra $4.4 million.

    District 300 getting unexpected $4.4 million from the state?

    Community Unit District 300 school board members got some good news before approving a tentative 2013-14 budget. The Carpentersville-based district will get $4.4 million more than expected in state funding, a surprise that could balance a budget. The district hasn't seen the check yet, but “I feel pretty confident,” CFO Susan Harkin said.

  •  

    Men rob Naperville Radio Shack

    Naperville police continue to investigate an armed robbery Monday evening at a Radio Shack on Ogden Avenue. Three men armed with a handgun entered the store about 6 p.m. on the 1200 block of east Odgen Avenue, police said. Police pursued a suspect vehicle - a gray Volvo - into Chicago.

Sports

  •  
    Sophomore Zack Vretenar, left, and junior Corey Denman during defensive drills at Huntley.

    Images: Football Practice First Day in DuPage County and Fox Valley
    Images from the first day of high school football practice for Aurora Christian, Batavia, Elgin, Glenbard West, Huntley, Montini, Neuqua Valley, and St. Charles North.

  •  
    PGA Tour pros Mark Wilson, left, and Luke Donald, center, joined Bulls guard Kirk Hinrich and Northwestern University basketball coach Chris Collins, right, for a BMW Championship exhibition Monday at Conway Farms Golf Club in Lake Forest. The event raised $45,000 for the Evans Scholars Foundation. The BMW Champion will take place Sept. 9-15.

    Donald, Wilson have work ahead to make BMW

    It won't be easy for Luke Donald and Mark Wilson to make the BMW Championship cut in the upcoming FedEx Cup playoffs. Both Chicago-based PGA Tour players and members of the Western Golf Assn. board of directors need to improve their current position to do it. Len Ziehm looks at their position, and the challenge they face, in this week's golf column, which includes a video of their exhibition match Monday at Conway Farms in Lake Forest.

  •  
    Paul Konerko's numbers on offense have shown a natural and considerable drop-off since his best season in 2010.

    Will Konerko's HOF case measure up?

    A few years ago, White Sox star Paul Konerko began making a Hall of Fame case for himself relatively late in his career, but where is he now after a drop off in production the last 2+ years?

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    Fire teammates already impressed with Rios

    Arevalo Rios, acquired on loan last week from Serie A club Palermo, stands just 5-feet-7, but his shaved head and a thin strip of facial hair from his lip to his chin only add to his reputation for toughness on the field.

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    Bears coach Marc Trestman said that it's important to explain to today's players the rationale behind coaching decisions.

    Moore fighting for fourth DE spot

    Minor injuries to starters Julius Peppers and Corey Wootton recently gave defensive end Kyle Moore an opportunity to get playing time with the first team, as he battles for what could be the fourth and final spot on the depth chart.

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    Bears offensive guard Kyle Long (75) during training camp on the campus of Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais.

    As O-line goes, so goes Bears offense

    The installation of the Bears' new offense remains a work in progress and would benefit from consistency on the line. But with offensive linemen still being moved in and out of the starting lineup, that may not happen for a while.

  •  
    White Sox starting pitcher Hector Santiago delivers during the second inning Tuesday night against the Tigers at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Williams likes look of White Sox pitching

    Much like general manager Rick Hahn, executive vice president Kenny Williams is disappointed with the season but thinks the White Sox have enough good young pitching to avoid a prolonged period of losing. “But where there is bad news ..., there's good news in terms of being able to bounce back, because what you look for, and I think it's similar to 2007 with us, does a club have the necessary pitching to compete? And I think we absolutely have that."

  •  
    Ernie Banks waves to the crowd before the Cubs' game against the Cincinnati Reds on Tuesday night. Mr. Cub is among 16 people President Obama will honor later this year with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

    Mr. Cub never short on niceness

    Former Cubs' general manager Dallas Green fired Ernie Banks in 1982. Now Mr. Cub is being honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Both events happened at least in part because of a common character trait.

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    Phelan solid, but Boomers get beaten

    Despite collecting 11 hits and putting the tying runs on base in the ninth inning, the Schaumburg Boomers fell 4-1 to the Rockford Aviators at Boomers Stadium on Tuesday.

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    Cubs starter Jeff Samardzija worked 6 innings Tuesday night against the Reds, giving up 4 runs on 6 hits.

    Cubs not rushing judgment on Samardzija

    Cubs president Theo Epstein said Tuesday he is taking the long view with pitcher Jeff Samardzija, who gutted out 6 innings against the Ciincinnati Reds Tuesday night at Wrigley Field. Samardzija is in his second season as a full-time starting pitcher for the Cubs, and the Cubs are not rushing to any conclusions about him.

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    The Cubs’ Anthony Rizzo tosses his bat after striking out against the Cincinnati Reds during Tuesday’s seventh inning at Wrigley Field.

    Cubs fall short in 11 innings

    Shin-Soo Choo hit a tiebreaking two-run single in the 11th inning and J.J. Hoover provided terrific relief work on his 26th birthday, helping the Cincinnati Reds beat the Cubs 6-4 on Tuesday night at Wrigley Field. With no outs and the bases loaded, Choo jumped on the first pitch he got from Eduardo Sanchez (0-1) and lined it into the gap in right-center. Ryan Ludwick and Devin Mesoraco came around to score.

  •  
    Third-year starter Ryan Sitter will direct the Elgin offense under first-year head coach Kyle Rohde.

    New beginnings — and endings — as football season kicks off

    Much has changed since the high school football season concluded last November in Champaign, including the ultimate destination. The state championships move this season from the University of Illinois to DeKalb’s Huskie Stadium. Northern Illinois University will host the IHSA title games in odd-numbered years through 2021 due to a scheduling conflict at Memorial Stadium in Champaign. The landscape has likewise changed on the local level as fall practices open statewide, particularly in Elgin Area School District U-46 where three of the five football programs enter the season with new head coaches.

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    Veteran coach Mike Donatucci starts a new chapter in his career with today’s first practice at Hoffman Estates.

    New look in MSL West as football practice begins

    As players get their first taste of practice Wednesday in advance of the season openers scheduled for Aug. 30, expect a very different look at Palatine and Hoffman Estates. Former Fremd coach Mike Donatucci runs his first official practice today at Hoffman Estates, where he hopes to right a Hawks program that’s struggled in recent seasons. At Palatine, the resignation of highly successful coach Tyler Donnelly opened the door for Rick Splitt, who takes the lead role in a program that’s been a playoff regular in recent seasons and is the defending champ in the MSL West.

  •  
    Stevenson’s Matt Morrissey, right, headlines a Lake County recruiting class that has made a habit of saying ‘yes’ to universities in Michigan.

    Lake County football? It’s in a great state

    Matt Morrissey, Zach Novoselsky and T.J. Edwards are among the football players from Lake County who've opted for a future in the state of Michigan.

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    Benet’s Fara commits to Northwestern

    For Rachael Fara, potential plus hard work paid off. Fara, a 6-foot-2 junior middle hitter for Benet, verbally committed this week to play at Northwestern.

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    A fan stands on the clubhouse level of Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas, on Tuesday. In 2011, a fan died there in fall from the left-field seats.

    Despite safety measures, no stadium foolproof

    Even with dozens of safety measures in place, experts say there’s no way to foolproof a ballpark or arena against falls like the one that killed a Braves fan at a game in Atlanta. There have been more than two dozen cases of fans falling at stadiums since 2003, according to the Institute for the Study of Sports Incidents.

  •  
    Manny Ramirez poses in his new jersey after signing a short-term contract to play on the EDA Rhinos in Taiwan’s professional baseball league this spring. Ramirez was released from his minor league contract Tuesday by the Texas Rangers.

    Rangers release Manny Ramirez

    Manny Ramirez is a free agent again after the Texas Rangers released him from his minor league contract. “Based on our evaluation, there was not a spot for Manny on the club at this time,” Rangers GM Jon Daniels said.

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    Ken Ramsey, right, is hoping to be headed back to the winner’s circle this weekend.

    Ramsey is the cat’s meow among horse owners

    Ken Ramsey is going to be one busy cat this weekend.From New York to France to right here at Arlington, it will be a festival of Kittens and other Ramsey horses heading to various starting gates for some of the biggest turf races in the world.

  •  
    Jesse Balluff, pictured hurdling a would-be Morris tackler during last year’s Northern Illinois Big XII East Conference-clinching 33-30 win, will be one of the key players on a Kaneland team that enters the season on a 28-game regular season winning streak.

    Kaneland, Batavia bringing back plenty of talent

    It’s getting to the point you can measure the success of Tri-Cities area football by the food on your plate.

  •  
    Montini will try to win a fifth consecutive state championship this season.

    Glenbard West, Montini picking up where they left off

    The last football teams on the field in November are the first teams talked about the following August. This year in DuPage County is no different as Glenbard West and Montini defend their respective state titles. The journey officially starts today as teams throughout the state hit the practice field for the first time leading up to the season opener on August 30.

  •  
    Carolina Panthers defensive back Josh Norman grabs a seat in the stands after his interception return against the Bears on Friday. Mike North wants Chicago fans to pull up a seat on Sunday mornings for his new radio show on AM560 The Answer. The two-hour pregame program debuts on Sept. 8 before the Bears' home opener.

    Why Puig deserves MVP consideration

    Dodgers' phenom Yasiel Puig, according to some critics, didn't have the credentials to make the 2013 NL All-Star team. Now that he's hitting .370 this late in the season, Mike North contends Puig is worthy of consideration in the MVP debate. And speaking of credentials, North is returning to the local sports talk scene with a new Sunday morning gig on AM560 The Answer. Get your NFL questions ready.

  •  
    Angels superstar Mike Trout said that players caught using performance-enhancing drugs should be banned from baseball for life. Mike Imrem counters that the players union should take the lead in designing a drug policy and being responsible for enforcing it.

    Players as PED police: Now there’s a novel idea

    Mike Trout is the latest baseball player to speak out against performance-enhancing drugs. Maybe it's time to let the union assume the responsibility of designing and enforcing the game's drug policy.

Business

  •  
    Illinois' new concealed carry law seems straightforward enough on the surface. But for businesses, the issues aren't quite so simple.

    What new concealed carry law means for Illinois businesses

    Illinois' new concealed carry law seems straightforward enough on the surface. But for businesses, the issues aren't quite so simple. If a suburban business wants, for example, to ban handguns in company-owned buildings, it still in most cases can simply display a sign prohibiting them. But that same business can't prohibit an employee from keeping a gun locked up in a car in the parking lot.

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    A trustee established under the Tribune Co.'s bankruptcy reorganization plan has filed new lawsuits over the 2007 leveraged buyout led by billionaire Sam Zell that left the media conglomerate saddled with insurmountable debt.

    Trustee files revised lawsuits over Tribune buyout

    A trustee established under the Tribune Co.'s bankruptcy reorganization plan has filed new lawsuits over the 2007 leveraged buyout led by billionaire Sam Zell that left the media conglomerate saddled with insurmountable debt.The lawsuits filed earlier this month in federal district court in New York are revisions of complaints originally filed by Tribune's committee of unsecured creditors.

  •  
    Customers sit in the cafe area of Hines Park Lincoln in Plymouth, Mich., After decades of selling hulking Town Cars to grumpy retirees, Ford Motor Co.ís Lincoln brand is trying to appeal to younger, more discerning buyers. It purged under performing dealerships and is prodding the rest to make expensive updates.

    Lincoln brand introducing dealers to luxury buyers

    How to sell a Lincoln in 2013: Make the dealership smell like luxury. And lay out some wine and cheese. After decades of selling hulking Town Cars to retirees, Ford Motor Co. wants the Lincoln brand to appeal to younger, more discerning buyers. Lincoln unveiled the sleek MKZ sedan this spring, and six more models will follow. It purged underperforming dealerships and is prodding the rest to make expensive updates. Now, Lincoln is teaching its dealers in Chicago and elsewhere how to appeal to the $4 latte crowd.

  •  
    The Lake County Board on Tuesday struck a ban on video gambling and approved an ordinance allowing it the unincorporated area. Supporters argued that establishments that couldn't have it were at a competitive disadvantage.

    Lake County Board cites competitive fairness in close vote overturning video gambling ban

    In an 11-9 vote Tuesday, the Lake County Board agreed to revoke its 2009 ban on video gambling and created a new ordinance to allow it in unincorporated areas. "I think it comes down to an issue of fairness for me personally," said board Chairman Aaron Lawlor. "This creates the most level playing field we can possibly make."

  •  
    U.S. stocks rose, with the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index trimming morning losses for a ninth consecutive day, as data on retail sales reinforced signals the economy is expanding moderately.

    Stock market ekes out small gains; Apple climbs

    Major stock indexes eked out small gains Tuesday after an upturn in technology companies outweighed weakness in other parts of the market, including a drop in airlines. The gain in technology stocks was driven by Apple. The technology company surged after billionaire investor Carl Icahn said on Twitter that he held a large position in Apple and that its stock was undervalued.

  •  
    Toyota will not relinquish the Camry’s spot as America’s most popular car in 2013, a top executive told industry analysts on Tuesday.

    Camry to stay as U.S. top-selling car?

    A top Toyota exec says the company will sell more than 400,000 of the midsize Camry cars in 2013, enough to fend off a challenge from the Honda Accord and other models in the most competitive part of the U.S. auto market.

  •  
    Coca-Cola plans to run its first ad defending the safety of artificial sweeteners on Wednesday, a move that comes as the company looks to stem declining sales of diet soda. Diet Coke contains aspartame.

    Coke to defend safety of aspartame in new ad

    Coca-Cola plans to run its first ad defending the safety of artificial sweeteners on Wednesday, a move that comes as the company looks to stem declining sales of diet soda.

  •  
    Brad Karsh of JB Training Solutions speaks to a group of generation X’ers at the Hu-Friedy Manufacturing Co. in Chicago. There’s a new urgency to the quest for workplace harmony, as baby boomers delay retirement and work side-by-side with people young enough to be their children — or grandchildren.

    A push for harmony among workers, young and old

    There’s a sense of urgency to the quest for workplace harmony, as baby boomers delay retirement and work side-by-side with people young enough to be their children — or grandchildren. Put people of widely different ages together — and there are bound to be differences.

  •  
    From left, women CEOs Lauren Young, Kathy Miller, DaVetta Collins, and Jacqueline Camacho-Ruiz shared tips Tuesday on how to become successful entrepreneurs at the Schaumburg Business Association’s Good Morning Schaumburg breakfast.

    Women CEOs share tips on building successful businesses

    Schaumburg area business owners got a dose of entrepreneurial advice with their morning coffee Tuesday from four women CEOS at the Schaumburg Business Association’s monthly Good Morning Schaumburg networking breakfast. The diverse panel of speakers talked about overcoming challenges such as gender, ethnic, and racial stereotypes, balancing work-life priorities, and mentoring future women entrepreneurs and leaders.

  •  
    A Skokie-based private investor has purchased the vacant Hotel Bollero in Palatine for a reported $1.68 million. The purchase comes after a village-approved plan to convert the hotel into seniors housing fell through.

    Investor’s plans unclear for Hotel Bollero in Palatine

    Months after plans fell through to convert the vacant Hotel Bollero in Palatine into a senior living center, a private investor whose portfolio includes both hotels and senior facilities has purchased the property. Exactly what F&F Realty and President David Friedman plan to do with the highly visible building off Route 53 remains unclear, however.

  •  
    Brian M. Conlon

    Retired Inland exec to head up securities arm

    Retired Inland Real Estate Investment Corp. executive Brian M. Conlon will return to the Oak Brook-based company as chief executive officer of Inland Securities Corp. division, it was announced Tuesday.

  •  

    Follett Higher Education Group president to retire

    Tom Christopher, president and chief operating officer of the Follett Corp.’s Higher Education Group, said he will retire, effective Aug. 30.

  •  

    Wheelchair lift company shifting work to northern Indiana

    A company that converts minivans into wheelchair-accessible vehicles plans adding up to 70 jobs at its northern Indiana headquarters by shifting production from a Michigan factory.Officials from The Braun Corp. say it will spend about $7.5 million to modify a production line at its Winamac facility so workers can install rear-entry wheelchair lifts on minivans. The company says that work will be moved from its Kalamazoo, Mich., facility.

  •  
    In this Wednesday, June 13, 2012, photo, JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Dimon has said JPMorgan is undergoing ìextensive changesî to its business practices, and that regulatory compliance is its top priority.

    The many legal millstones weighing down JPMorgan

    The London whale isn’t the only thing weighing on JPMorgan Chase these days. In fact, the nation’s largest bank has a long list of legal challenges beyond the $6 billion trading loss with the memorable nickname. It faces a swirl of investigations and lawsuits, among them accusations that it is too quick to sue credit card customers over late payments and that it should have caught on to Bernie Madoff’s giant Ponzi scheme.

  •  
    William Ackman has resigned from J.C. Penney Co.’s board as part of a deal to resolve an unusually public battle between the activist investor and the struggling department store operator.

    Ackman resigns from JC Penney board

    William Ackman has resigned from J.C. Penney Co.’s board as part of a deal to resolve an unusually public battle between the activist investor and the struggling department store operator.The announcement follows statements Ackman made last week saying he’d lost confidence in Penney’s board and that its chairman should be replaced. Ackman and the retailer’s board also were bickering over how quickly it should replace CEO Mike Ullman.

  •  
    Prospective students tour Georgetown University’s campus in Washington. Despite all the grumbling about tuition increases and student loan costs, other college expenses also are going up.

    Tuition isn’t only bill college students see
    Despite all the grumbling about tuition increases and student loan costs, other college expenses also are going up. The price of housing and food trumps tuition costs for students who attend two- and four-year public universities in their home states, according to a College Board survey. Even with the lower interest rates on student loans that President Barack Obama signed into law, students are eyeing bills that are growing on just about every line. A look at typical college students’ budgets last year and how they’re changing:

  •  
    Americans remain stingy about carrying credit card balances and are making more of an effort to make timely payments, trends that have helped whittle the rate of late payments on credit cards down to the lowest level in nearly 20 years.

    Average credit card debt per borrower dips in 2Q

    Americans remain stingy about carrying credit card balances and are making more of an effort to make timely payments, trends that have helped whittle the rate of late payments on credit cards down to the lowest level in nearly 20 years. The rate of credit card payments at least 90 days overdue fell in the second quarter to 0.57 percent. That’s the lowest level since 1994, credit reporting agency TransUnion said Tuesday.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Finance issue causing a wedge between relatives

    Her husband’s brother and wife sent a family-wide email asking for a loan due to recent financial issues. Her husband is an accountant, so he offered to help them set up a budget in lieu of giving them a loan. This did not go over well and they rejected the offer. What should their next step be?

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    Keep an open mind after hearing one person’s take on another

    Q. From what my daughter’s boyfriend has told me of his childhood, his mom sounds cold, unloving, even borderline abusive. He’s quick to reassure me that she’s changed since then. But I can’t unhear what I’ve heard. I know the default is to be cordial when I meet her and give her the benefit of the doubt, but how do I handle it if she puts him down in my presence?

  •  
    Ramon A. Dominguez, aboard Little Mike, won the Arlington Million horse race last year in Arlington Heights.

    Best bets: Running of Arlington Million returns Saturday

    The Arlington Million was the world's first million-dollar horse race, and the tradition continues Saturday at Arlington International Racecourse in Arlington Heights. Comedian and impressionist Mike Toomey tells tales of how 1960s and '70s television affected his life in the show “TV & Me” at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles. Plus, “The Pink Floyd Experience” plays Saturday at RiverEdge Park in Aurora.

  •  
    Michaelle Catlett says learning to cook has helped her lose weight and maintain a healthy weight. Her pizza rolls made with garden-fresh herbs have become a family favorite.

    Cook of the week: Learning to cook has positive impact on family's waistline

    For Michaelle Catlett of Cary learning to cook has had a positive effect on her waistline. She lost 45 pounds over three years. She said as she learned to count calories and chose real foods over processed, slowly the weight came off. “It feels wonderful to realize that we are not victims of age or metabolism, and that by making better choices; we have more control over the health and strength of our bodies.”

  •  

    Usher’s son released from hospital after accident

    The son of Grammy-winning R&B singer Usher has been released from the hospital after nearly drowning in an Atlanta pool, a lawyer for the boy’s mother said Tuesday. Five-year-old Usher Raymond V was released from Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta-Scottish Rite on Sunday, lawyer Angela Kinley said. She said Tameka Foster Raymond, the singer’s ex-wife, saw her son at school Monday when he attended orientation for the new year.

  •  
    Vaseline’s new spray body lotion line, from left, aloe, cocoa butter and oat extract.

    Beauty now: Spritz, spray and go

    Beauty consumers seem to like the delivery of their products with the touch of a button, and brands are obliging them with more spray-on items. What had been the domain of sunscreen also now belongs to moisturizers, shampoo and cosmetics: It’s spray, spritz and go.

  •  

    Lean and lovin' it: Coming around to virtues of the cool, cool cucumber

    Don Mauer takes a look at summer salads and shares his version of that buffet fave -- carrot and raising salad. And yes, it's low cal.

  •  
    Ashton Kutcher plays Steve Jobs in new film “Jobs,” directed by Joshua Michael Stern.

    Ashton Kutcher talks about ‘Jobs’ role

    It’s clear from Ashton Kutcher’s tone — even though he’s siting 2,500 miles away in New York — that the 35-year-old actor and technology enthusiast holds an unflinching reverence for Steve Jobs, the Apple co-founder he portrays in the film “Jobs,” opening Friday. When he speaks about embodying the notoriously demanding Mac mastermind during a recent video conversation on Skype, in which Kutcher was an early investor, he’s resolute and thoughtful.

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    Food items at Sushi + range from $1.25 to $6.50.

    Dining events: Sushi + now open in Aurora

    A new rotary sushi bar opened recently in Aurora. Sushi + offers a “Kaiten”-style experience with a refrigerated conveyor belt system that delivers food to every table. The traditional Japanese food is priced between $1.25 and $6.50. Learn grilling from the experts at Weber Grill’s school from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 17.

  •  

    Rice-Millet Pilaf
    Rice Millet Pilaf: Michaelle Catlett

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    Camarones a la Diabla
    Camarones a La Diabla: Michaelle Catlett

  •  
    Brian Hill/bhill@dailyherald.com Cook of the week, Michaelle Catlett adds more cheese to her pizza rolls at her Cary home.

    Pizza Rolls
    Pizza Rolls: Michaelle Catlett

  •  
    Donny and Marie Osmond bring the holiday spirit to Rosemont with "The Donny & Marie Christmas Tour 2013" at the Allstate Arena at 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 20.

    Donny and Marie bring Christmas tour to Rosemont

    Donny and Marie Osmond are returning to the Chicago area with their Christmas Show, this time at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont on Friday, Dec. 20. Tickets go on sale to the general public Friday, Aug. 16.

  •  
    Jon Brookes, shown here in 2001 and drummer with British indie rock band The Charlatans, has died. He was 44 and had been treated for brain cancer.

    Charlatans drummer Jon Brookes dies at 44

    Jon Brookes, drummer with British indie rock band The Charlatans, has died. He was 44 and had been treated for brain cancer. The band said on its website that Brooks died in a hospital Tuesday.

  •  
    George Lucas and his wife, Mellody Hobson, have had a baby daughter, born via surrogate.

    Another Skywalker: Lucas, wife have baby daughter

    “Star Wars” creator George Lucas and new wife Mellody Hobson have had a baby daughter. Representatives for the 69-year-old filmmaker announced the birth Monday. Everest Hobson Lucas was born Friday, the first child for Lucas and Hobson, who were married in June. The baby was born via surrogate.

  •  
    Oprah Winfrey arrives at the Los Angeles premiere of “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” at the Regal Cinemas L.A. Live Stadium 14 on Monday.

    Oprah ‘sorry’ for Switzerland flap

    Oprah Winfrey says she’s “sorry” that a media frenzy emerged after saying she experienced racism during a trip to Switzerland. “I think that incident in Switzerland was just an incident in Switzerland. I’m really sorry that it got blown up. I purposefully did not mention the name of the store. I’m sorry that I said it was Switzerland,” Winfrey said Monday night at the Los Angeles premiere of “Lee Daniels’ The Butler.”

  •  
    Host Chris Hardwick discusses episodes of AMC’s “Walking Dead” with guests like Chad Coleman, Yvette Nicole Brown and Norman Reedus in the aftershow “Talking Dead.”

    From ‘Talking Dead’ to ‘Shark After Dark Live,’ cable after-shows keep TV audiences engaged

    The closing credits of a Discovery Channel Shark Week special barely ended before “Shark After Dark Live” filled the screen. Host Josh Wolf sat in the fish tank-themed studio and bantered with guests on a couch about what type of shark is most terrifying. Taryn Southern, the show’s “social media goddess,” scrolled through a laptop and an iPad simultaneously. A casual atmosphere, a slightly goofy tone and a focused discussion of the TV show that aired mere moments ago, tweets flying across the screen — welcome to the modern day after-show.

  •  
    In his new book “Beating the Lunch Box Blues,” J.M. Hirsch shares two ways to use leftover macaroni and cheese in packed lunches - as the “cheese” in a grilled cheese sandwich and as a topping for nachos.

    Bacon Cauliflower Mac and Cheese
    Bacon and Cauliflower Mac and Cheese

  •  
    Robin Williams, left, plays Dwight Eisenhower and Forest Whitaker is Cecil Gaines in “Lee Daniels' The Butler.”

    In 'The Butler,' history told through a black lens

    History in the movies has often been seen through white eyes: civil rights-era tales with white protagonists reacting to a changing world. “I've been in some of those movies,” says David Oyelowo, a star in “Lee Daniels' The Butler.” The viewpoint of “The Butler,” though, is refreshingly colorful. In it, Forest Whitaker plays Cecil Gaines, a man born to sharecroppers who's turned into a domestic servant. After fleeing north, he rises to serve as a butler in the White House for seven successive presidents, spanning from Eisenhower to Reagan, from Jim Crow to Barack Obama.

  •  
    “Beating the Lunch Box Blues” by J.M. Hirsch

    Lunch boxes 101: How to buy them. How to fill them

    Lunch box styles vary from soft-sided cooler bags to Japanese-inspired bento boxes, even Indian tiffin canisters. They can have built-in ice packs. They can be microwaved. They can be made from recycled bisphenol-A-free, lead-free, phthalate-free, PVC-free plastic. They can be forged from 18-gauge stainless steel.

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    “Crash My Party” by Luke Bryan

    Luke Bryan plays it safe on ‘Crash My Party’

    Within the first minute of “That’s My Kind of Night,” the opening track on Luke Bryan’s new album “Crash My Party,” he cites tailgating, beer drinking and a nameless “pretty girl” in suntan oil and cowboy boots — all standard modern-day signifiers for a country song. What Bryan’s fourth album doesn’t offer is many surprises.

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    “A Tap On the Window” by Linwood Barclay

    ‘Tap on the Window’ is worth answering

    Private detective Cal Weaver makes a simple mistake and destroys everything he holds dear in Linwood Barclay’s new thriller, “A Tap on the Window.” Weaver and his wife are estranged after the death of their son, Scott. Evidence shows that he took drugs and jumped off a roof while trying to fly. Weaver wants answers. Then one evening a young woman named Claire knocks on Weaver’s car window and asks for a ride. He’s about to turn her down when she mentions that she knew Scott. He lets her inside the car — and the mystery starts.

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    Libertyville native Chris Ward — better known as MC Chris — has made a name for himself in the “nerdcore” music genre.

    Libertyville artist, rapper becomes voice of 'nerdcore'

    He wasn't a nerd when he was a student at Libertyville High School, but “nerdcore” music is what made Chris Ward famous. Nerdcore is an adult-oriented, subgenre of hip hop performed by Ward, known as “MC Chris,” who raps both serious and funny lyrics with his trademark cartoonish voice. "Nerdcore is hip hop that's sprung up post 9/11, with a lot of seeds that were probably planted before that," he said.

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    In his new book "Beating the Lunch Box Blues" Associated Press food editor J.M. Hirsch shares two ways to use American chop suey in packed lunches - as a stand-in for sloppy joes on a bun and as a filling for Asian-style lettuce wraps.

    American Chop Suey
    American Chop Suey

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    Live to 120? Most say no thanks

    Having a 90th birthday maybe, but not 120. Americans hope to stretch out life expectancy another decade or so, but they're ambivalent, even skeptical, about a fountain of youth. A new poll by the Pew Research Center explores attitudes about a scientific quest: Creating treatments that one day might slow the aging process and let people live decades longer than is normal today. Scientists already can extend the life span of certain laboratory animals, but there's no way to know if there ever will be some type of Methuselah pill for humans.

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    Sunset colors give any space a distinctly Southwestern look.

    Conjure up color to create yard magic

    Color is a great equalizer. It’s a disguise for things not quite beautiful. For some creative souls, color is a sacrament. For those unwilling to think outside the box, it is a necessary evil. When it comes to your backyard, you can make magic with color. Adding accent color to doors, trim, walls, sheds and fences can turn drab to dynamic in a single weekend.

Discuss

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    George LeClaire/gleclaire@dailyherald.com ¬ Images from the Round Lake High School graduation on Saturday, May 19 in Round Lake.

    Editorial: District adds enthusiasm to ‘back-to-school’ plan

    A Daily Herald editorial says the fanfare with which Round Lake area schools are preparing to start the new school year is worthy of both praise and emulation.

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    Summer Celebration another big success
    Letter to the editor: Gloria Meyer says she and her family had another great time at this year's Streamwood Summer Celebration.

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    Village acts like it’s made of money
    Letter to the editor: Rosemary Colbert of Schaumburg complains that Schaumburg is wasting too much money, especially on its managers.

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    Advocates needed to help Autism Speaks
    Letter to the editor: Mike Baker of Autism Speaks says the organization needs suburban volunteers to advocate congressmen and women.

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    Give D15 parents a better seat at table
    Letter to the editor: Sandy Wiles of Palatine says the emotional debate between District 15 teachers and the school board over late start/early release has convinced her that parents need more voice in the proceedings.

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    Appreciates Clegg’s, Solberg’s votes
    Letter to the editor: Jim Ekeberg salutes Palatine councilmen Greg Solberg and Jim Clegg for supporting Catherine Alice Gardens.

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    Signage overkill at Lake Arlington
    Letter to the editor: Robert Griffith appreciates the Arlington Heights Park District's efforts to avoid more collisions at Lake Arlington, but says the cure may be worse than the disease.

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    Palatine council’s reasons nonsensical
    Letter to the editor: Linda Craft writes that the Palatine council's reasons for rejecting Catherine Alice Gardens are absurd. "Wake up, councilmen! Manufacturing as you knew it will not be returning to Palatine any time soon," she writes.

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    A great deal of food collected at parade
    Letter to the editor: "On behalf of the Hanover Township officials, the staff and all of the volunteers of our Welfare Services Department, I would like to thank the community for their outpouring of support in providing donations for the Township Food Pantry at the Bartlett Independence Day Parade," writes Supervisor Brian McGuire.

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    Numbers show fire plan is irresponsible
    Letter to the editor: Char McLear of Barrington says analyzing the numbers shows that Barrington's fears of firefighter pensions running amok is overstated.

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    Editorial misstated position on disabled
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: I am most disturbed that the Daily Herald would inaccurately state in an editorial that I wrote Arlington Heights in May 2010 to oppose a proposed site for housing for the mentally disabled near the town's border with Buffalo Grove.

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    Follow-up needed on latest scandals
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: President Obama has found a new slogan — phony scandals — to distract Americans from the real scandals in his administration. The IRS’s Lois Lerner has already acknowledged and apologized for targeting conservative tax-exempt organizations then took the Fifth during her testimony.

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    Religious liberty linked to aid for many
    A South Barrington letter to the editor: If appeals to constitutional guarantees of religious liberty fail, it would seem that the government, intentionally and out of sheer self-interest, would force this vast and highly-rated religious service network to shutter its doors.

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    Do Democrats really want immigration reform?
    An Inverness letter to the editor: Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, however, has steadfastly refused to send the bill over to the House so that it could be considered there. Why?Could it be that enthusiasm has waned as opposition from elements in both parties has coalesced? Is the bill being reassessed in light of what may realistically be expected to pass in the House?

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    A case for congressional term limits
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: There is no question that our federal government is virtually ineffective in critical ways as a governing body. Everyone, be aware that our federal debt is now $17 trillion dollars, which many taxpayers don’t know how to write, let alone comprehend the cost to themselves and their children for many years to come. There is only one way to correct this: Congress has to spend less money for many years, than the government has coming in.

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    Durbin’s people not answering email
    A Naperville letter to the editor: I have found that whoever responds to an email to Sen. Dick Durbin has not learned how to answer the question posed. I have sent four emails to the senator about the cost of the recent Obama family trip to Africa.

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