Daily Archive : Tuesday July 30, 2013

News

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    Wheeling Police Officer Shamekia Goodwin-Badger

    Death of Wheeling police officer caused by blood clot

    The Wheeling police officer who died Saturday after collapsing during a training exercise died of pulmonary thromboembolism caused by a blood clot in her lung, according to Wheeling Police Chief Bill Benson. "It's under natural causes," said Benson.

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    Illinois Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon, accompanied by her husband Perry Knop, and daughter Brennan Knop, announces her candidacy for Illinois Comptroller.

    Lt. Gov. Simon announces run for state comptroller

    Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon said Wednesday that she's running for Illinois comptroller, ending five months of uncertainty about which statewide office she would seek next year. Simon, a Democrat, formally announced her plan during a campaign stop in downtown Chicago. She's was scheduled to visit Springfield and her hometown of Carbondale later in the day.

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    Round Lake Beach police probe Monday shooting

    Round Lake Beach Police continue to investigate a shooting from Monday night in which a 21-year-old was shot. The shooting occurred near North Fairfield and Mayfield roads. The shooting was not a random act, police said in a statement, and asked people with information to call (847) 546-2127.

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    Marissa Dub

    Streamwood woman attacked by tiger continues recovery

    A benefit fund has been established for Marissa Dub, the 2008 Streamwood High School graduate critically injured June 21 when mauled by a tiger at the Indiana exotic animal care facility where she works. Dub’s physical recovery continues to progress. The 23-year-old was released from inpatient rehabilitation last week, but continues to receive therapy on an outpatient basis, her mother said.

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    Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, right, meets with High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs Catherine Ashton, at the Presidential Palace in Cairo on June 19.

    Morsi gets a visit, but Egypt crisis stalemated

    Egypt's military gave the ousted president his first contact with the outside world since removing him from office, allowing Europe's top diplomat Tuesday to meet with Mohammed Morsi in his secret detention. She emerged from her two-hour talks with him urging all sides to move on toward a peaceful transition.

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    Secretary of State John Kerry stands with Israel's Justice Minister and chief negotiator Tzipi Livni, right, and Palestinian chief negotiator, Saeb Erekat, after they made statements on the resumption of Israeli-Palestinian peace talks Tuesday at the State Department in Washington.

    Israel, Palestinians eye peace deal in 9 months

    Pressing ahead in a new U.S.-backed push for Middle East peace, Israeli and Palestinian negotiators agreed Tuesday to meet again within two weeks to start substantive talks in hopes of reaching a long-elusive settlement within nine months.

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    Former Penn State director of athletics Tim Curley exits the Dauphin County Courthouse Monday in Harrisburg, Pa. Curley faces charges in the child sex abuse scandal involving former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

    Judge: 3 Penn State ex-officials to stand trial

    Penn State's ex-president and two former top school administrators were ordered Tuesday to stand trial on charges accusing them of a cover-up in the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal, a court ruling that promises to prolong the media attention and court battles casting a shadow over the university.

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    Members of the public took self-guided tours of the First Baptist Church building at the intersection of Route 25 and Wilson Street in Batavia on Tuesday.

    Batavia church open house leaves its future uncertain

    More than 100 people toured the former First Baptist Church of Batavia Tuesday, as city officials listened to opinions about what should be done with the property. Many were former church members who would like the sanctuary part saved, but at least one felt less strongly. "God left with us" when the congregation moved, said Sherry Kenneavy.

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    State Rep. Michelle Mussman speaks while standing with Dr. Khalid Sami during the iftar dinner Thursday night at Masjid Al Huda in Schaumburg.

    Interfaith ‘iftar’ held in Schaumburg

    Suburban Muslims welcomed neighbors and religious leaders from the Schaumburg and Hoffman Estates area for an “iftar,” or fast-breaking meal, Tuesday at Masjid Al Huda in Schaumburg.

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    One injured in Arlington Heights crash

    A 69-year-old Arlington Heights woman suffered minor injuries after running a red light about 5 p.m. Tuesday at East Hintz Road and North Windsor Drive in Arlington Heights, hitting another car, destroying an electrical box and damaging a tree, said Arlington Heights police Sgt. Chuck Buczynski.

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    Danny Hutton, left, sings with Three Dog Night on Tuesday as part of the Mid-Summer Classics Concert Series in Elk Grove Village.

    Three Dog Night plays free concert in Elk Grove

    The final band performing as part of the weekly Mid-Summer Classics Concert Series in Elk Grove Village offered a trip down memory lane for baby boomers. The concert Tuesday night featured Three Dog Night, one of the hottest bands of the 1970s.

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    Paul Darley

    Another resignation from embattled Metra Board

    The fallout over ex-Metra CEO Alex Clifford’s resignation continued this week, as the DuPage County appointee to the Metra board of directors resigned Tuesday, effective immediately. Paul Darley told County Board Chairman Dan Cronin in a letter that it was a difficult decision and he supported a “comprehensive investigation” into the resignation and patronage allegations by Clifford.

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    Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, left, is escorted to a security vehicle outside of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, after the third day of deliberations in his court martial. Manning was acquitted of aiding the enemy for giving classified secrets to WikiLeaks.

    Manning guilty of 20 charges, not aiding the enemy

    In a split decision, U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was acquitted Tuesday of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison.

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    Suspects plead not guilty in foiled Richmond bank robbery

    Two men charged with trying to rob a Richmond bank in a foiled heist that left an accomplice dead pleaded not guilty on Tuesday in federal court. Dressed in orange jail clothes, Roberto Favela, 34, of Chicago, and Aaron Russell, 40, of Orland Hills, sat through the short arraignment in Chicago showing little emotion.

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    Brad O’Halloran

    Metra director says it’s time to vote on chairman

    The push to oust Metra Chairman Brad O'Halloran intensified as a local lawmaker called for his immediate resignation amid revelations he double-dipped, contrary to the RTA act. Meanwhile, one Metra director says he'll put the chairman's job to a vote Aug. 16.

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    Hoffman Estates resident Lilia Martinez picks up her “check” for $1,040,000 in a ceremony Tuesday at the Jewel on Roselle Road in Hoffman Estates. In fact, she’s being paid in 20 annual installments. She won the money at that same Jewel in an instant lottery game.

    Hoffman Estates woman wins $1,000 a week for 20 years

    Hoffman Estates resident Lilia Martinez thought she won $1,000 after playing an instant lottery game. Instead, she'd won that money every week for the next 20 years. “At first I thought it was only $1,000,” said Lilia Martinez, laughing.

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    Cook County-led sex trafficking sting yields 359 arrests

    Just one day after the FBI announced widespread arrests saved 105 young people — mostly teenage girls — who were forced into prostitution, the Cook County Sheriff’s Office said a national sex trafficking sting focused on demand yielded the arrests of 323 would-be sex solicitors and 36 pimps.

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    President Barack Obama, at an Amazon distribution center in Chattanooga, Tenn., Sunday, prodded Congress to consider fresh economic proposals after two years of gridlock.

    Obama challenges GOP to accept corporate tax deal

    President Barack Obama on Tuesday offered congressional Republicans a new corporate tax cut and jobs spending package he said might “help break through some of the political logjam in Washington,” only to have GOP lawmakers immediately throw cold water on the idea.

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    Dist. 300 looks for ways to offset taxpayers’ cost of Sears breaks

    A deal state lawmakers approved almost two years ago that extended tax breaks for Sears could mean major tax increases next year for Community Unit District 300 taxpayers if district officials don’t act to cushion the blow. School board members discussed extending debt payments to avoid a big jump on next year’s tax bill. Property owners still should expect a tax increase on those bills, but of...

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    Joseph L. Lopez Jr.

    Mount Prospect man gets probation in domestic attack

    A 34-year-old Mount Prospect man pleaded guilty to aggravated domestic battery early this month, Cook County court records show. Joseph L. Lopez, was sentenced to 24 months' probation and 180 days in jail in exchange for his guilty plea.

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    Lake in the Hills Airport nets $500K federal grant

    The Lake in the Hills Airport, which is maintained by the village, recently was awarded nearly $500,000 in federal grant funding to buy land to complete a future half-mile access road. The grant is part of more than $1.6 million announced by U.S. Senator Dick Durbin. About $1.1 million went to Lewis University Airport.

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    Hanover Park man pleads guilty to sexually abusing teen

    Brian R. Jones, 36, of Hanover Park, was sentenced to 11 years in prison earlier after he pleaded guilty to sexually abusing a teenager. In exchange for his plea, prosecutors dismissed the child pornography charges against him.

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    Media run after a police car carrying arrested train driver Francisco Jose Garzon Amo, unseen, to testify in court in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, Sunday. Amo was provisionally charged Tuesday with multiple counts of negligent homicide.

    Spain investigators: Train driver was on phone

    The driver was on the phone with a colleague and apparently looking at a document as his train barreled ahead at 95 mph — almost twice the speed limit. Suddenly, a notorious curve was upon him. He hit the brakes too late. The train, carrying 218 passengers in eight carriages, hurtled off the tracks and slammed into a concrete wall, killing 79 people.

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    Kane County Board Chairman Chris Lauzen reviewed the first half-year under his rule Tuesday.

    Lauzen outlines half-year accomplishments, lists priorities

    Kane County Board Chris Lauzen outlined what's happened during the first six months of his tenure, what's next, and asked county board members for suggestions, at a committee of the whole meeting Tuesday that almost half didn't attend.

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    LAOE will use money to help people in Kane, Winnebago counties

    The Lao American Organization of Elgin recently received two grants: One to conduct mental health outreach, the other to hire a counselor to advise the community about the Affordable Care Act.

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    Willard Helander

    Lake County seeking injunction to stop election law changes

    Calling the measure illegal and unconstitutional, Lake County officials are seeking an injunction to stop a new state law that strips away the county clerk's election oversight. Lake County Board Chairman Aaron Lawlor filed a lawsuit Tuesday in Waukegan to halt the change, which Gov. Pat Quinn signed into law as part of a wide-reaching piece of election-related legislation.

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    Nicholas Anderson

    One charged in Palatine home invasion, second suspect at-large

    One of the two men suspected of tying up a Palatine woman at gunpoint last fall in her home is in custody, police said. A judge set bail for Nicholas Anderson, 19, of the 1400 block of Lombard Avenue in Berwyn at $400,000.

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    Jeff Fougerousse, of the Vernon Hills Park District, discusses ongoing renovations at the Lakeview Fitness Center, formerly the Central Lake YMCA.

    Former YMCA getting makeover in Vernon Hills

    Extensive improvements under way at the former Central Lake YMCA in Vernon Hills are intended to help the Vernon Hills Park District attract more members, meet a demand for fitness space, stay competitive and improve customer service.

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    A truck burst into flames Tuesday morning in the parking lot of the White Castle restaurant on the corner of North and Gary avenues in Carol Stream. No injuries were reported.

    No injuries in Carol Stream truck fire

    There were no injuries Tuesday morning when the cab of a semitrailer truck burst into flames shortly after pulling into the parking lot of a White Castle restaurant on the corner of North and Gary avenues in Carol Stream, authorities said..

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    Salvation Army chaperon Jessica Ellingsworth helps Amanda Rinehart, 8, left, and Jazmin Farias, 9, decide which back-to-school supplies to buy Tuesday during a shopping spree at Target in Waukegan. Ten students received gift cards through a program to help needy children get ready for the classroom.

    Salvation Army, Target help 10 needy students with back-to-school supplies

    Ten students from Waukegan Unit District 60 went shopping Tuesday for back-to-school supplies through Target’s School Sprees program aimed at helping needy children get ready for the classroom. The youths met at the Waukegan Target at 9:30 a.m. with Salvation Army chaperones to buy backpacks, shoes and calculators.

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    DuPage County in 60 Seconds
    DuPage County in 60 seconds.

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    Dist. 15 holds arbitration hearing Thursday on late start/early release

    An arbitration hearing on the late start/early release issue in Palatine Township Elementary District 15 will take place at 9 a.m. Thursday at the Joseph M. Kiszka Education Center, 580 N. First Bank Drive, Palatine. The meeting is closed but protesters are expected.

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    Boy killed by truck on Oakton Street identified

    The 4-year-old Chicago boy struck and killed by a semi in an unincorporated area near Elk Grove Village on Monday has been identified as Jaden Jacobo, according to the Cook County medical examiner’s office.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Vincent J. Teruel, 36, of Batavia, was arrested at 8:46 a.m. Sunday on a charge of obstructing justice by obstructing identification, according to a police report. At the same time, David P. Ryan, 29, of the same address, was arrested on a Kendall County warrant.

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    Bob Whitehouse

    Hampshire Park District seeks new director

    Bob Whitehouse, Hampshire Park District’s longtime executive director, has announced his retirement and a search is under way for his replacement. Whitehouse, 62, will retire in December after serving nearly eight years as executive director. "I have three beautiful granddaughters that live in the area," Whitehouse said. "I want to be completely free to help out whenever I can, as needed."

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    Chicago police accepting applications

    The Chicago Police Department will start testing applicants in December. It’s the first test since the force lowered the age to apply for jobs and wear a badge. Under the new rules, anyone 18 and older can take the test and 21 and older can become a police officer.

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    House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton explained their lawsuit Tuesday. Earlier this month, Gov. Pat Quinn cut $13.8 million for legislators’ paychecks in the state budget through his veto power.

    Madigan, Cullerton file lawsuit over halted pay

    Leaders of the Illinois House and Senate sued Gov. Pat Quinn on Tuesday over what they called a “purely political and unconstitutional” move to block lawmaker paychecks because of inaction on the state’s nearly $100 billion pension crisis.

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    Commodity Futures Trading Commission Chairman Gary Gensler testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington Tuesday before the Senate Banking Committee, as lawmakers examine how to mitigate systemic risk in financial markets through Wall Street reforms.

    Waiting for Bernanke, stocks plod indecisively

    On the stock market Tuesday, it felt like late-summer inertia had already set in. U.S. stocks wandered between the tiniest of gains and losses before closing mixed.

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    Antioch Rescue Squad auction

    The Antioch Rescue Squad will host its annual fundraiser auction from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 4, at Williams Park, 741 Main St., Antioch.

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    Abdella Ahmad Tounisi

    Terror suspect’s lawyer to seek clarity on government surveillance

    An attorney for an Aurora teenager facing terrorism charges raised the question at a pretrial hearing Tuesday about whether expanded U.S. surveillance methods — the subject of heated national debate — were used in her client’s case.

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    Wear a helmet, get a treat

    Wauconda police officers have been rewarding kids who are spotted riding bicycles with protective helmets this summer.

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    Childhood obesity forum

    YWCA Lake County is conducting their 4th Annual Obesity Forum on “How to Prevent Early Childhood Obesity”, Wednesday, July 31, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Gurnee Convention Center, 6161 West Grand Ave., Gurnee.

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    Exchange Club establishes Honor Flight

    The Exchange Club of North Chicago has become an official Honor Flight Hub that will transport veterans to Washington, D.C. to visit memorials dedicated to honor their service and sacrifices.

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    Sand dune collapse study in Indiana will be expedited

    The National Park Service is preparing an expedited process to seek proposals from contractors to try to determine what caused a section of dune to collapse at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, burying a 6-year-old Illinois boy under 11 feet of sand.

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    Man shot at South suburban golf course

    A Blue Island golf course manager says he believes a shooting that injured a man as he loaded his clubs is a car was an isolated incident.

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    Salad pegged in Iowa, Neb. cyclospora outbreak

    Iowa and Nebraska health officials said Tuesday that a prepackaged salad mix is the source of a cyclospora outbreak that sickened more than 178 people in both states.

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    Northwestern settles cancer research fraud claim

    Federal prosecutors in Chicago have announced Northwestern University has agreed to pay nearly $3 million to settle a whistleblower’s lawsuit involving alleged cancer research fraud.

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    Police say shoplifter tossed baby out window

    A southwestern Illinois woman is accused of tossing her infant through a car window while trying to flee after authorities say she shoplifted from a department store.

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    Spirit Airlines to start Sky Harbor-O’Hare flights

    Spirit Airlines is moving its Arizona service to Sky Harbor International Airport in central Phoenix and will start service between Sky Harbor and both Chicago O’Hare and Denver on Nov. 7.

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    Naperville traffic study proposes improvements for Gartner

    Proposed improvements to a “difficult” intersection, upgrades to pedestrian crossings and efforts to reduce speeding all are part of the first report completed under Naperville’s neighborhood traffic study program. These recommendations will be presented Saturday to the traffic advisory board as the city looks to finalize and begin implementing changes as soon as September.

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    Bikes are locked to a bike rack at the Arlington Heights train station.

    Police: Arlington Heights reporting more bike thefts

    Arlington Heights police are seeing a big increase in bicycle thefts this year, but they aren't sure why. Cmdr. Mike Hernandez said police haven't determined if some of the thefts are related, and no arrests have been made.

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    Kerin Ramirez

    Ex-Harper wrestler guilty of trespass for entering cop’s home

    A former Harper College wrestler who was shot after he drunkenly wandered into a police officer’s house was acquitted of home invasion Tuesday and found guilty of a lesser felony. The ruling means Kerin Ramirez, 21, of Addison, faces a significantly lesser prison sentence of one to three years and is eligible for time served in the county jail.

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    Woman hit by Metra train in Elgin

    A woman was taken to a hospital this morning after being hit by a Metra train in Elgin, officials said. The woman was hit at 7:50 a.m. just west of Elgin’s National Street station by a Metra train bound for Chicago, Metra spokesman Tom Miller said.

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    Mark A. Hoen

    Naperville man gets jail for putting firework at neighbor’s door

    A Naperville man has been sentenced to 60 days in jail and two years of probation for setting off a firework at a neighbor’s front door, authorities said Tuesday. Mark Hoen, 23, also must pay about $4,400 in restitution for the September 2012 blast, which damaged two doors at the home on the 300 block of Prairie Knoll Drive.

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    Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan speaks to lawmakers during a House committee hearing at the state Capitol in Springfield. Madigan’s open invitation on July 19 to have his role in the Metra scandal scrutinized has turned attention once again to the effectiveness of the Illinois Legislatureís 1967 ethics law, deemed “toothless” by its own chief ethics investigator.

    Madigan investigation puts focus on ‘toothless’ ethics law

    The eight-member Legislative Ethics Commission says it will investigate House Speaker Michael Madigan role in the Metra scandal. But it is working under a 1967 law that critics say is too vague on what constitutes a conflict of interest or other ethical violation, lacks sufficient penalties to enforce ethical behavior and in most cases prevents the commission from reporting its findings publicly.

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    Bill Daley

    Daley makes candidacy for governor official

    Former White House chief of staff Bill Daley filed documents on Tuesday declaring himself an official candidate to challenge Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn in next year’s Democratic primary. More than a month after he released a videotaped announcement that he’d opened an exploratory committee, Daley filed the paperwork hours after releasing another video late Monday in which he said “there is no...

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    New U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy delivers a speech at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Mass., Tuesday, July 30, 2013. During her speech, the first as the head of the EPA, McCarthy told an audience that curbing climate-altering pollution will strengthen the economy.

    New EPA chief: Climate controls will help economy

    In her first speech as the head of EPA, Gina McCarthy told an audience gathered at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Mass., that curbing climate-altering pollution will spark business innovation, grow jobs and strengthen the economy. “Can we stop talking about environmental regulations killing jobs? Please, at least for today,” said McCarthy.

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    James N. Trelford

    Libertyville man remains behind bars on bomb threat charge

    A Libertyville man accused of threatening to detonate three bombs at the Vernon Hills Summer Celebration earlier this month will remain held on $25,000 bail, a Lake County Judge ruled Tuesday. James N. Trelford, 48, whose last known address was on the 100 block of Second Street, was appointed a public defender by Lake County Judge Raymond Collins after testifying that he is unemployed and does...

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    Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital recognized for quality heart attack care

    Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital in Barrington has been recognized by the American College of Cardiology Foundation’s NCDR ACTION Registry–GWTG Platinum Performance Achievement Award for 2013 – out of 197 hospitals nationwide.

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    This May 1, 2012, file photo shows Daniel Chong at a news conference where he discussed his detention by the DEA in San Diego. The Justice Department will pay $4.1 million to Chong, who was left in a DEA holding cell for four days without food or water last year, two people familiar with the case told The AP on Tuesday.

    Student left in DEA cell to get $4 million from US

    The Justice Department will pay $4.1 million to a California college student left in a Drug Enforcement Administration holding cell for four days without food or water last year, two people familiar with the case told The Associated Press on Tuesday. Daniel Chong, 23, said he drank his own urine to stay alive and tried to write a farewell message to his mother with his own blood.

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    In this March 12, 2013 file photo, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg looks at a 64oz cup, as Lucky's Cafe owner Greg Anagnostopoulos, left, stands behind him. An appeals court ruled Tuesday, July 30, 2013 that New York City's Board of Health exceeded its legal authority and acted unconstitutionally when it tried to put a size limit on soft drinks served in city restaurants.

    Appeals court strikes down NYC's big-soda ban

    An appeals court ruled Tuesday that New York City's Board of Health exceeded its legal authority and acted unconstitutionally when it tried to put a size limit on soft drinks served in city restaurants. The beverage industry and other opponents say the measure is riddled with exceptions, unfair and ineffective. The city's law department has promised an appeal.

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    At least 17 killed in air, mortar attacks in Syria

    Mortar attacks and air raids in two major cities in Syria killed at least 17 people, activists and government officials said Tuesday, as a Kurdish opposition leader was killed in the north. The deadliest attack struck the central city of Homs, which has been an opposition stronghold since the beginning of the two-year conflict and is now the target of a withering offensive by President Bashar...

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    North Chicago man charged with selling heroin and cannabis

    A North Chicago man was charged with posession of heroin during a July 25 traffic stop in Waukegan. Marcus "Paco" Samuel remains held in Lake County jail in lieu of $100,000 bail.

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    Poland's first face transplant patient, identified only by his first name Grzegorz, speaks at a press conference after he was discharged from the hospital, in Gliwice, Poland, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. The 33-year-old man said he owes his doctor "everything" following a skin-and-bone transplant on May 15, three weeks after losing his nose, upper jaw and cheeks in an accident at the brick factory where he worked.

    Poland's first face transplant patient goes home

    Poland's first face transplant patient was discharged from the hospital Tuesday. The 33-year-old man said he owes his doctors “everything” following a skin-and-bone transplant on May 15, three weeks after losing his nose, upper jaw and cheeks in an accident at the brick factory where he worked. Doctors say it was the world's fastest time frame for such an operation. More than two...

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    A Pakistani lawmaker casts her vote for the presidential election at the Provincial assembly in Peshawar, Pakistan, Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Pakistani lawmakers elected Mamnoon Hussain, a textile businessman, as the country’s next president.

    Pakistani lawmakers elect new president

    Pakistani lawmakers elected a textile businessman who briefly served as the governor of southern Sindh province as the country’s next president Tuesday, the election commission chief said, a result that was widely expected. The election of Mamnoon Hussain, nominated by the ruling Pakistan Muslim League-N party, followed a late night attack by 150 Taliban militants on a prison, illustrating one of...

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    McLean Co. coroner says woman set herself on fire
    The McLean County Coroner says a woman whose burning body was found in a central Illinois field set herself on fire. Beth Kimmerling says the remains found Monday in the rural community of Shirley likely belonged to a missing 26-year-old Bloomington woman.

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    Dennis Farina

    Actor Dennis Farina’s funeral Tuesday in Chicago

    The funeral for actor and onetime police officer Dennis Farina is to take place in Chicago. A funeral Mass is scheduled for Tuesday at Assumption Catholic Church. Burial plans are private. Farina died July 22 in Scottsdale, Ariz., after suffering a blood clot in his lung. He was 69.

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    In this photo taken July 11, 2013, a Clarksville schools faculty member, wearing a protective mask, rear center, carries a practice handgun toward a classroom in the city’s high school in Clarksville, Ark., as students portray victims in a mock school shooting scenario. Twenty Clarksville School District staff members are training to be armed security guards on campus.

    Ark. district arming more than 20 teachers, staff

    More than 20 teachers, administrators and other school employees in Clarksville, Ark., will carry concealed weapons throughout the school day. “The plan we’ve been given in the past is `Well, lock your doors, turn off your lights and hope for the best,”’ Superintendent David Hopkins said. But as deadly incidents continued to happen in schools, he explained, the district decided, “That’s not a...

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    Downtown Naperville Alliance brought 20 painted snowmen sculptures to the city last year, and a similar promotion will display 25 decorated gingerbread men in downtown Naperville this year.

    Naperville holiday art to feature gingerbread men

    Twenty-five larger-than-life gingerbread men will grace downtown Naperville for a full two months this holiday season as Downtown Naperville Alliance brings a decorated statue promotion to town for the second time. "We're just starting to get in example sketches and they're adorable," said Katie Wood, executive director of Downtown Naperville Alliance.

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    Fire crews pour water on a fire after an explosion at a propane gas company Tuesday, July 30, 2013, in Tavares, Fla. John Herrell of the Lake County Sheriff’s Office said early Tuesday that there were no fatalities despite massive blasts that ripped through the Blue Rhino propane plant late Monday night.

    Massive explosions rock central Fla. gas plant

    A series of explosions rocked a central Florida propane gas plant and sent “boom after boom after boom” through the neighborhood around it. Eight people were injured, with at least four in critical condition. Tavares Fire Chief Richard Keith said possible causes of the explosion may be either equipment malfunction or possibly human error. Sabotage was not suspected.

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    Concentrations of mercury in fish in two Illinois waterways

    A new University of Illinois study documents concentrations of mercury in fish in two state waterways between 1900 and 2007. Researchers at the Prairie Research Institute found that mercury concentrations in small fish have declined but still persist, even in rural areas far from mercury sources.

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    Tires pop on jet landing at O’Hare; nobody injured

    Two tires of an American Airlines jet popped when the aircraft landed at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. American spokeswoman Mary Frances Fagan says no one none was injured when the two left main tires blew on a jet that landed in Chicago at 12:30 Monday afternoon. The flight from Reno, Nev., was carrying 137 passengers and five crew members.

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    Cases of unusual stomach bug found in Lake, 3 other Illinois counties

    Illinois public health officials say they’ve recorded four cases of rare food-borne intestinal illness that’s already sickened hundreds of people in other states. The (Springfield) State Journal-Register says the cases of cyclosporiasis have been found in Jo Daviess, Sangamon, Montgomery and Lake counties. The infection causes prolonged watery diarrhea and sometimes explosive bowel movements,...

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    In this Nov. 20, 2003 photo, Jakiw Palij stands out in front of a building in the Queens borough of New York.

    U.S. limbo for Nazi suspects ordered out

    At least 10 suspected Nazi war criminals ordered deported by the United States never left the country, according to an Associated Press review of Justice Department data — and four are living in the United States today. All remained eligible for public benefits such as Social Security until they exhausted appeals, and in one case even beyond. Quiet American legal limbo was the fate of all 10 men...

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    Andria Montgomery, 5, left of Lombard and Hayden Yates, 6, right, of Wheaton dance during a Radio Rock concert in Memorial Park in Wheaton yesterday. The show was part of the Wheaton Park District’s Summer Entertainment Series.

    Dawn Patrol: 4-year-old killed by truck; drowning 911 call probe

    Boy struck and killed by truck near Elk Grove Village and Arlington Heights. Inquiry initiated in 911 call from Arlington Heights sinking SUV. Elgin fire extinguisher trial continues today. Dog bite case draws $1.125 million settlement. Former Cubs pitcher drowns in lake. Documentary on Loyola’s basketball coach to air.

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    Special effects artist J. Anthony Kosar, winner of this year’s “Face Off” competition on the Syfy network, relaxes in his Westmont studio.

    Lisle man’s monster mash is a real smash

    The art in J. Anthony Kosar’s studio is the kind of stuff you see in nightmares. Despite his dark artistic vision, Kosar, 27, of Lisle – winner of this year’s "Face Off" competition on the SyFy network – is just a regular guy: nice, good humored and charitable, especially toward art students. “I’m having fun and making monsters,” he said.

Sports

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    Martin homers in 10th as Rangers beat Angels 14-11

    Leonys Martin hit a three-run homer in the 10th inning and the Texas Rangers, after trailing four times, pulled out a 14-11 victory over the Los Angeles Angels that took nearly five hours Tuesday night.

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    Dodgers beat Yankees 3-2 on Ellis’ RBI single

    Mark Ellis singled in the winning run with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning, giving the Los Angeles Dodgers a 3-2 victory over the New York Yankees on Tuesday night.

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    Chicago White Sox starting pitcher Jake Peavy waves to a cheering crowd as he leaves a baseball game against the Detroit Tigers during the eighth inning on Thursday, July 25, 2013, in Chicago.

    Peavy changes Sox, heads to Boston

    Jake Peavy was traded to the Boston Red Sox late Tuesday in a three-team deal that also includes the Detroit Tigers. The White Sox are getting 22-year-old outfielder Avisail Garcia from Detroit, with Boston sending shortstop Jose Iglesias to the Tigers. The White Sox also get three minor-leaguers from the Red Sox.

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    Chicago Cubs’ Darwin Barney left, avoids the tag of Milwaukee Brewers catcher Jonathan Lucroy to score on an RBI single by Carlos Villanueva during the fifth inning of a baseball game Tuesday in Chicago.

    Bianchi’s single gives Brewers DH sweep of Cubs

    Jeff Bianchi delivered a two-run single off shortstop Starlin Castro’s glove with two out in the ninth to lead the Milwaukee Brewers to a 3-2 victory over the Chicago Cubs and a day-night doubleheader sweep on Tuesday.

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    Moustakas, Santana lift Royals over Twins, 7-2

    Mike Moustakas homered twice and drove in four runs to back another strong start from Ervin Santana, and the surging Kansas City Royals beat the Minnesota Twins 7-2 Tuesday night.

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    Russell struggles in first of doubleheader against Brewers

    James Russell had been sailing along with 12 straight scoreless appearances. But in Game 1 of Tuesday’s doubleheader with the Brewers, it took just one pitch for Russell to have that streak end. The workhorse Cubs lefty came on in relief of starter Carlos Villanueva and gave up a first-pitch 3-run homer to Khris Davis in the seventh inning to turn a 5-2 Cubs lead into a 5-5 tie. Russell gave up another run in the inning.

  •  
    Pittsburgh Pirates’ Andrew McCutchen scores on a double by Pedro Alvarez off St. Louis Cardinals starting pitcher Lance Lynn during the first inning of a baseball game in Pittsburgh on Tuesday.

    Pirates drill Cardinals 6-0 to sweep doubleheader

    Andrew McCutchen clubbed his 15th homer of the season and the Pittsburgh Pirates completed a doubleheader sweep of the St. Louis Cardinals with 6-0 victory on Tuesday night.

  •  

    Cubs’ rebuild could have ripple effect on White Sox

    A frightening thought for the White Sox is that this week's trade deadline could be the most interesting they get for a long time. Just imagine what will happen to them if the Cubs' plan for the future becomes reality.

  •  

    Young, Ruiz help Phils beat Giants to snap skid

    Carlos Ruiz and Michael Young hit two-run homers to back John Lannan, and the Philadelphia Phillies beat the San Francisco Giants 7-3 Tuesday night to snap an eight-game losing streak.

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    Braves stay hot at home, beat Rockies 11-3

    Freddie Freeman hit two home runs, Brian McCann added a three-run shot and the Atlanta Braves won their fifth straight game with an 11-3 victory over the Colorado Rockies on Tuesday night.

  •  

    Hernandez dominates to lift Rays over D’backs 5-2

    Roberto Hernandez came within one out of a complete-game shutout, and Yunel Escobar and Ben Zobrist drove in two runs each as the Tampa Bay Rays opened a five-game homestand with a 5-2 victory over the Arizona Diamondbacks on Tuesday night.

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    Buck’s two-run single in the 10th lifts Mets

    Marlins reliever Chad Qualls took a tumble after escaping late trouble, but Miami stumbled in the 10th inning when John Buck hit a tiebreaking two-run single that lifted the New York Mets to a 4-2 win Tuesday night.

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    Davis hits 38th homer as Orioles beat Astros 4-3

    Chris Davis hit his major league-leading 38th home run, a two-run shot in the sixth inning that gave the Baltimore Orioles their first lead in a 4-3 victory over the Houston Astros on Tuesday night.

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    Avila’s grand slam gives Tigers 5-1 win over Nats

    Alex Avila hit a tiebreaking grand slam in the sixth inning off Stephen Strasburg and the Detroit Tigers beat the Washington Nationals 5-1 Tuesday night.

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    Workman gets first win as Red Sox beat Mariners

    Rookie Brandon Workman struck out nine while picking up his first major league win, allowing one run over six innings as the Boston Red Sox beat the Seattle Mariners 8-2 on Tuesday night.

  •  
    Chicago White Sox’s Dayan Viciedo follows through on a single off Cleveland Indians relief pitcher Matt Albers in the sixth inning of a baseball game Tuesday in Cleveland. Paul Konerko scored.

    Indians rally to beat White Sox 7-4

    Pinch-hitter Ryan Raburn’s two-run single in the eighth inning rallied the Cleveland Indians to their sixth straight win, 7-4 over the freefalling Chicago White Sox on Tuesday night.

  •  
    Former Carmel baseball coach Chuck Gandolfi will take over the program at Lake Zurich.

    Gandolfi gets back in the game at LZ

    Chuck Gandolfi, who captured 554 baseball victories and won at a 72-percent clip in 21 seasons for Carmel Catholic, is getting back into high school coaching at Lake Zurich.

  •  
    After a week’s worth of high drama, second-guessing and radio interviews, it seems Rodriguez is about to be lumped with New York Yankees who sort of just didn’t fit, failed or just faded away.

    MLB drug shame remains a stain

    For the players who didn’t cheat, it’s pretty simple. Those baseball players who sought a competitive and financial advantage by taking drugs both illegal in baseball and the real world, stole dollars and pennants from those who remained clean. How complicated is that?

  •  
    Chicago Bears outside linebacker Lance Briggs (55) celebrates in the background as Tim Jennings returns an interception.

    Bears’ Jennings not short on tenacity

    Bears 5-foot-8 cornerback Tim Jennings makes up for his lack of size with lots of other attributes, including a toughness and aggressiveness that carries over onto the practice field. His approach helped him earn his first Pro Bowl berth last season while leading the NFL with 9 interceptions.

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    Sporting Kansas City’s Graham Zusi, right, will be among the MLS all-stars to take on AS Roma on Wednesday in Kansas City.

    Best in MLS to challenge Italian club AS Roma

    Michael Bradley got his start in professional soccer as an 18-year-old midfielder for what would eventually become the New York Red Bulls of Major League Soccer. Bradley will join Francesco Totti and the rest of Italian club AS Roma in taking on the best that MLS has to offer in the league’s annual All-Star game on Wednesday night. “There’s no question that the league continues to grow,” Bradley said.

  •  
    United States’ Brek Shea, left, celebrates with teammate Landon Donovan after scoring his goal during the second half of the CONCACAF Gold Cup final soccer match against Panama at Soldier Field last Sunday. United States won 1-0.

    Next U.S. World Cup team could look like this

    Soccer writer Orrin Schwarz offers his view of what a U.S. World Cup squad might look like under coach Jurgen Klinsmann next year.

  •  
    Two-time Illinois Women's Open champ Nicole Jeray will be among the contenders for this year's championship at Mistwood.

    Diverse field set for Illinois Women’s Open

    The 19th Phil Kosin Illinois Women’s Open, which tees off Wednesday at Mistwood in Romeoville, has taken a different approach from the men’s 64th Illinois Open, which had one of its most exciting stagings last week at The Glen Club in Glenview. Golf writer Len Ziehm explain that and more in this week's column.

  •  
    Former Chicago Bandits star and Olympic champ Jennie Finch will return to the Ballpark at Rosemont on Aug. 16 to sign autographs and cheer on her former team before the Bandits take on the USSSA Pride.

    Ace pitcher Finch returning to Rosemont

    U.S. Olympic gold medalist and former Bandits pitcher Jennie Finch will join several of her former teammates before the Bandits game on Friday, Aug. 16 as she returned to Rosemont to cheer on her former team and prepare for a softball camp.

  •  
    High-scoring forward Corey Locke, a former MVP in the American Hockey League, has signed with the Chicago Wolves for next season.

    Wolves sign former AHL MVP Locke

    The Chicago Wolves have signed former American Hockey League MVP and two-time Calder Cup champion Corey Locke.

  •  
    Senator Dick Durbin meets with Madeline Goetz of Ottawa and Hayley and Natalie Gray of Barrington, at the U.S. Capitol during the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation’s Teen Advocacy Day, June 27.

    Barrington teens urge Congress to support cystic fibrosis drug research

    On June 27, Barrington High School students Hayley and Natalie Gray joined nearly 60 other teens from across the United States to press elected officials in Washington, D.C., to support cystic fibrosis drug research and development and to protect access to high-quality, specialized care for people with the disease on behalf of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  •  
    Miami Heat shooting guard Mike Miller has accepted a deal with the Memphis Grizzlies, who played in the Western Cnference final last season.

    Grizzlies sign 3-point shooter Miller

    The Memphis Grizzlies have signed Mike Miller in a deal that brings back the best 3-point shooter in franchise history as the Grizzlies try to find a way to improve coming off their first Western Conference final.

  •  
    Frank Castillo, who pitched for the Cubs from 1991-97, drowned Sunday near his home in Arizona. Castillo was 44.

    Castillo the third '97 Cubs pitcher to pass away

    Former Cubs pitcher Frank Castillo died in a drowning accident in Arizona Sunday at the age of 44. He's the third member of the 1997 rotation to die in the last five years. “I'm just numb,” said former Cubs trainer John Fierro, who got the news while in Boise visiting his son Jonathan, a trainer for the Cubs' short-season, Class-A affiliate. “I played golf with Frankie a lot the last few winters.

  •  
    With his comments that he is the best player in the NBA, Bulls point guard Derrick Rose should be a marked man next season as he returns from his knee injury.

    Rose better know his opponents will be ready

    Is Derrick Rose the best player in the NBA? Mike North was intrigued by Rose’s response last week when he was asked by a CNN reporter who the best player in the NBA was. D-Rose said he was. What would you expect or want him to say? He better be ready to answer the bell when it rings this year because his opponents will be ready for him.

Business

  •  
    A poster from the 1931 film “Frankenstein” that was stashed in the closet of an Illinois home for more than 30 years has sold at a Texas auction for a record amount.

    'Frankenstein' poster from Illinois sells for record amount

    A poster from the 1931 film “Frankenstein” that was stashed in the closet of an Illinois home for more than 30 years has sold at a Texas auction for a record amount. Keith Johnson of Ottawa, Ill., says he purchased the poster as a teenager for a few dollars in 1968 or 1969. Dallas-based Heritage Auctions sold it Saturday for $262,900 to an anonymous bidder. Heritage says it's the largest bid ever recorded for an insert poster, which were designed for movie theater display cases.

  •  
    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg looks at a 64-ounce cup, as Lucky’s Cafe owner Greg Anagnostopoulos, left, stands behind him. An appeals court ruled Tuesday that New York City’s Board of Health exceeded its legal authority and acted unconstitutionally when it tried to put a size limit on soft drinks served in city restaurants.

    Appeals court: NYC’s big-soda ban unconstitutional

    New York City’s crackdown on big, sugary sodas is staying on ice. A mid-level state appeals court ruled Tuesday that the city’s Board of Health exceeded its legal authority when it voted last year to put a size limit on soft drinks served in restaurants, theaters, stadiums, sidewalk food carts and many other places.

  •  

    Fast-food workers go on strike

    ST. LOUIS — Fast-food workers in the St. Louis and Kansas City areas are hopeful their participation in brief strikes will lead to better pay and working conditions.The strikes Monday and Tuesday were part of an effort in selected cities, including New York and Chicago, organized by the Fast Food Forward campaign, launched last year. Among the goals is to more than double the minimum wage, currently $7.25 per hour, to $15 per hour.Shannon Garth-Rhodes of the campaign says at least 150 workers walked off the job Tuesday at about 60 restaurants in the St. Louis area, including some in Illinois. She says at least 70 workers in the Kansas City area walked picket lines outside of dozens of restaurants.Workers are expected back at their jobs on Wednesday.

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    Quinn signs bill for new Illinois loan program

    Women- and minority-owned businesses that do state construction projects can now apply for low-interest loans through a new state program.

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    Community Health plans $3.9 billion acquisition

    Community Health Systems Inc. plans to spend $3.9 billion to acquire Health Management Associates Inc. in a deal that would create a giant U.S. hospital chain just as the health care overhaul starts funneling millions of newly insured people into the health care system.

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    River Grove’s Follett to consilidate operations to Westchester

    Follett Corp. in River Grove said it will consolidate several of its facilities in Chicago’s western suburbs to a single property in Westchester as part of its growth plans for the future. Follett recently signed an 11-year lease to occupy Three Westbrook Corporate Center, a 160,000 square-foot tower that represents the largest office lease transaction completed in the Chicago suburbs so far in 2013.

  •  

    Des Plaines’ UOP membrane to improve natural gas processing in Texas

    Des Plaines-based Honeywell’s UOP Separex Flux+ membrane elements have been selected by Kinder Morgan Energy Partners to increase natural gas processing capacity at the Yates Gas Plant in western Texas.

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    Mundelein’s Medline expands awards in dance competition

    Mundelein-based Medline Industries has announced new prizes and awards for its third annual national Pink Glove Dance video competition.Medline will make a $25,000 donation to the breast cancer charity of the overall winner’s choice; second place will receive $10,000 and third place $5,000.

  •  
    FILE - In this Jan. 3, 2011, file photo Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks at an inauguration ceremony at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. Walker tried to take full advantage of Illinois lawmakers passing dramatic tax increases Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2011, saying Wisconsin would welcome any businesses from its neighboring state that care to relocate. (AP Photo/Morry Gash, File)

    Wisconsin governor says his public union philosophy like FDR

    Gov. Scott Walker says Detroit would not be bankrupt and Chicago public schools would be flourishing if those cities were in Wisconsin and operating under the state’s public union laws. Days before he hosts the National Governors Association conference in Wisconsin, Walker previewed his speech to state leaders in an address to a government research conference in Milwaukee Monday.

  •  
    U.S. home prices jumped 12.2 percent in May compared with a year ago, the biggest yearly gain since March 2006. The increase shows the housing recovery is strengthening.

    U.S. home prices rise 12.2 percent, best in 6 years

    U.S. home prices jumped 12.2 percent in May compared with a year ago, the biggest yearly gain since March 2006. The increase shows the housing recovery is strengthening.The Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index also surged 2.4 percent in May from April, nearly matching the previous monthly gain of 2.6 percent — the highest on record. The price increases were widespread with all 20 cities showing gains in May from April and compared with a year ago. Prices in Dallas and Denver reached the highest level on records dating back to 2000.The index covers roughly half of U.S. homes. It measures prices compared with those in January 2000 and creates a three-month moving average. The May figures are the latest available.

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    Chicago insurer CNA Financial posts higher 2Q net income

    CNA Financial said Monday that its net income jumped 17 percent in the second quarter, as the insurer benefited from higher premiums and the impact of an underwriter acquired last summer. The company reported net income of $194 million, or 72 cents per share, for the three months ended June 30. That compares with net income of $166 million, or 62 cents per share, a year earlier.

  •  
    Billionaire Warren Buffett is auctioning off an all-you-can-eat tour of the See’s Candy factory in California to benefit an education nonprofit there.

    Buffett auctions off personal tour of See’s Candy

    Billionaire Warren Buffett is auctioning off an all-you-can-eat tour of the See’s Candy factory in California to benefit an education nonprofit there. Bidding had already reached $30,000 by Monday, but it remains to be seen whether the final price of this auction will rival the annual auction of lunch with Buffett which routinely tops $1 million.

  •  
    Chrysler Group’s sales picked up in the second quarter thanks to strong U.S. demand for trucks and SUVs, but the company still cut its full-year sales and profit targets after a slower than expected start to the year.

    Chrysler’s 2Q net income up 16 percent on U.S. sales

    Chrysler Group’s sales picked up in the second quarter thanks to strong U.S. demand for trucks and SUVs, but the company still cut its full-year sales and profit targets after a slower than expected start to the year. Chrysler said Tuesday that its net income rose 16 percent to $507 million in the April-June period from $436 million a year ago. It was Chrysler’s eighth straight quarterly profit.

  •  
    A computer screen displays Bitcoin currency exchange rates for the British pound on an internet website in London, U.K., on Wednesday, April 10, 2013.

    Virtual currency Bitcoin blocked in Thailand

    A Bitcoin exchange in Thailand says it has suspended trading after officials declared the virtual currency illegal in a setback for efforts to bring it into the financial mainstream. The company overseeing bitcoins in Thailand said on its website that the central bank informed it on Monday that it’s illegal to trade bitcoins, move them in or out of the country, or use them to buy or sell goods or services.

  •  
    Wireless carrier Sprint’s second-quarter losses grew while revenue held steady in its first earnings report under majority owner SoftBank.

    Sprint 2Q loss expands, revenue flat

    Wireless carrier Sprint’s second-quarter losses grew while revenue held steady in its first earnings report under majority owner SoftBank. Third-ranked Sprint Corp. lost more than 2 million wireless customers, primarily due to the shutdown of the Nextel network. But it gained 412,000 subscribers by buying U.S. Cellular’s business in the Midwest in May.

  •  
    Billionaire investor Carl Icahn is renewing his attack on Michael Dell’s leadership and warning that the latest offer from Dell to buy the struggling PC maker he founded bypasses an important shareholder safeguard.

    Icahn contests condition in latest Dell offer

    Billionaire investor Carl Icahn is renewing his attack on Michael Dell’s leadership and warning that the latest offer from Dell to buy the struggling PC maker he founded bypasses an important shareholder safeguard. Icahn and the investment firm Southeastern Asset Management said Monday in a letter to a special committee of Dell Inc. board members that Michael Dell wants to circumvent the voting process behind a deal by preventing stockholders from passively rejecting his offer.

  •  
    Sherri Mason, right, a chemist with State University of New York at Fredonia and one of the project leaders, works aboard a research vessel on Lake Erie with a device that skims the water surface collecting samples in finely meshed netting.

    Masses of plastic particles found in Great Lakes

    Already ravaged by toxic algae, invasive mussels and industrial pollution, the Great Lakes now confront another potential threat that few had even imagined until recently: untold millions of plastic litter bits, some visible only through a microscope. Scientists who have studied gigantic masses of floating plastic in the world’s oceans are now reporting similar discoveries in the lakes that make up nearly one-fifth of the world’s fresh water.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    She bought her dog, but tells people she adopted it

    When people ask if she adopted her dog, she says yes. Although, actually, she got her from a breeder in Pittsburgh. If the truth comes out, she gets an odd stare at best and a preachy and judgmental reaction at worst. When people go on about this, is there anything she can say?

  •  
    Bill Ahern, a conservation specialist for the Miami-Dade County Parks, holds a loggerhead sea turtle egg as he prepares to relocate the nest on Haulover Beach in Miami.

    It’s turtle-nesting season in Florida

    It’s turtle-nesting season in Florida, when sea turtles lay their eggs and hatchlings head for the water. A number of parks, beaches and conservation groups around the state run programs where nature-lovers can learn about the phenomenon and even watch baby turtles — without disturbing them — as they emerge from the nests and make their way to the water.

  •  
    Stephen Amell as Oliver Queen/Arrow in a scene from “Arrow.”

    The Flash to debut on CW’s ‘Arrow’

    The upcoming season of The CW’s “Arrow” is getting some flash, as in the popular DC comic book character, the network announced at Tuesday’s annual Television Critics Association press tour. “We plan to introduce a recurring character and the origin story of Dr. Barry Allen, who you know as The Flash,” said network President Mark Pedowitz. “We do want to expand upon the DC Universe. We think that there are rich characters we can use, and we felt like this was a very organic way to get there.” If all goes as planned, there could be a spinoff.

  •  
    “In a World Like This” by Backstreet Boys

    Backstreet Boys bore on 8th album

    Backstreet’s back, all right! Not all right, actually. The Backstreet Boys managed to bring fifth member Kevin Richardson back into the fold for an eighth album and a world tour to celebrate 20 years of making music. “In a World Like This” lacks the immediate hooks that their earlier hits had. BSB’s album is a grown-up mix of tunes talking about love and commitment, but the songs bleed into each other despite not being similar.

  •  

    If you can’t be yourself around boyfriend, it may be time to say goodbye

    Carolyn Hax gives advice on a variety of problems, including a boyfriend who constantly teases his girlfriend.

  •  
    Bill Ahern, a conservation specialist for the Miami-Dade County Parks, holds a loggerhead sea turtle egg as he prepares to relocate the nest on Haulover Beach in Miami.

    It’s turtle-nesting season in Florida

    It’s turtle-nesting season in Florida, when sea turtles lay their eggs and hatchlings head for the water. A number of parks, beaches and conservation groups around the state run programs where nature-lovers can learn about the phenomenon and even watch baby turtles — without disturbing them — as they emerge from the nests and make their way to the water.

  •  
    Signed players contracts, personal letters and signed checks from baseball greats such as Henry Aaron, Walter Johnson, Lou Gehrig, and Honus Wagner, are displayed at the Green Diamond Gallery in Cincinnati.

    Ohio gallery is mini-Cooperstown for baseball fans

    Shoeless Joe Jackson might have asked if THIS is heaven. Here was one of his thick-handled bats, being gripped lovingly and studied for cleat nicks and baseball smudges from games he played nearly 100 years ago. Newly arrived, it soon will be carefully displayed, near a rare Jackson signature, and in the days and years to come, it will be viewed by dedicated fans who will also be mingling with stars of the game. Jackson, depicted in the movie “Field of Dreams,” was banned from baseball for his role in the 1919 “Black Sox” World Series-fixing scandal, by lore disappointing a young fan who shouted: “Say it ain't so, Joe!” But the ill-fated star has a place amid such greats as Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Mickey Mantle and Hank Aaron in the Green Diamond Gallery in suburban Cincinnati.

  •  
    NBC announced Saturday that actress Diane Lane will star as former first lady and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton in a four-hour miniseries, “Hillary.”

    Hillary Clinton to get documentary treatment

    Hillary Rodham Clinton’s life is getting the documentary treatment. CNN Films said Monday that it plans a feature-length film on the secretary of state and former first lady to premiere next year. It will look at Clinton’s professional and personal lives.

  •  
    “Big Brother,” which features contestants like Aaryn, has included appalling behavior this season, but the network said Monday that it has responded appropriately.

    CBS defends handling of ‘Big Brother’ controversy

    The “social experiment” that is CBS’ “Big Brother” included appalling behavior this season, but the network has responded appropriately, CBS Corp. CEO Les Moonves said Monday. Contestants have been caught on the reality show’s 24-hour-a-day Internet feed making boorish and racially insensitive remarks, and some were aired on one of the show’s TV episodes. “What you see there ... unfortunately is reflective of how certain people feel in America. It’s what our show is. I think we’ve handled it properly,” Moonves told the Television Critics Association.

  •  
    Actress-singer Miley Cyrus’s transformation from a sweet-faced child star into a wild-child sensation has garnered plenty of debate.

    Miley Cyrus says wild-child behavior part of growing up

    Miley Cyrus’ transformation from a sweet-faced child star into a twerking, wild-child sensation has garnered plenty of debate, but she says it’s not really all that deep — she just grew up, y’all. “I think people forget what it feels like to be 20,” she said in a recent interview. “People just evolve and that’s all that’s happened to me. But people think a mad scientist somehow cooked up this potion and turned me in to a different human, which it wasn’t. All I did was get a haircut and buy some clothes and everyone thinks that I am made into a robot that changes with what’s popular every 10 years.”

  •  
    Clark Garlock's love of grilling and gardening merge on the dinner plate.

    Gardening, grilling come together at meal time

    Clark Garlock has two loves: grilling and gardening. When he prepares meals guests can rely on the Grayslake cook to bring both to the table: meats cooked perfectly on the grill along with fresh produce that he proudly harvests.

  •  
    The beer can house, a Houston landmark, sits between newer homes. Former owner John Milkovisch covered the outside on the house with siding made of cut and flatten beer cans and garlands made from the lids.

    Beer by beer, Houston home morphs into landmark

    A child of the Great Depression, John Milkovisch didn't throw anything away — not even the empty cans of beer he enjoyed each afternoon with his wife. So, in the early 1970s when aluminum siding on houses was all the rage, he lugged down the cans he had stored in his attic for years, painstakingly cut open and flattened each one and began to wallpaper his home. “The funny thing is that it wasn't ... to attract attention,” said Ruben Guevara, head of restoration and preservation of the Beer Can House in Houston's Memorial Park area.

  •  
    Maura Duffy, 35, inside her apartment in Chicago. Duffy, who was adopted at birth, is among 8,800 Illinois residents since 2010 who have been able to see their original birth certificates, because of a law that opened documents sealed for decades.

    Unsealed birth records give adoptees peek at past

    Maura Duffy spent a day in Chicago last September with her mother: A walk along Lake Michigan, shared meals, a boat tour highlighting Second City architecture.But this was no typical mother-daughter outing. It was the first time the two women had ever met. Since a handful of states, including Illinois, have unsealed birth certificates, thousands of adoptees have claimed them and learned about their beginnings. The 35-year-old Duffy, adopted at birth, is among 8,800 Illinois residents since 2010 to do so.

  •  

    Irate Penne
    Irate Penne: Clark Garlock

  •  

    Grilled Stuffed Peppers
    Grilled Stuffed Peppers: Clark Garlock

  •  
    Clark Garlock gives his macaroni and cheese the Buffalo treatment by adding hot sauce and blue cheese into the mix.

    Buffalo Macaroni and Cheese
    Buffalo Mac and Cheese: Clark Garlock

  •  
    Singer and Chicago native Jennifer Hudson will be honored at the VH1 Do Something Awards for creating Hatch Day with her sister in honor of her nephew, who was murdered. The organization collects and distributes school supplies and Christmas presents.

    VH1 Do Something Awards honor those who give back

    All too often, we hear millennials are slackers so plugged into their own worlds they're terminally disengaged from everyone else. Yet there are legions of people younger than 25 making a difference. The VH1 Do Something Awards celebrate generally unknown young good Samaritans, in addition to five celebrities making a difference. The show airs live from the Avalon in Hollywood Wednesday, July 31.

  •  
    “See You There” by Glen Campbell

    Glen Campbell re-imagines some of his hits

    At 77 and stricken with Alzheimer’s disease, Glen Campbell looks back at a lifetime of work on “See You There.” He revisits classics such as “Wichita Lineman” and “Galveston” with a contemplative, late-night feel, stripping down to small-combo arrangements based on brushed rhythms, gently sustained organ notes and twangy, single-note, electric guitar.

  •  
    A young driver tests out the horn of a Hemmet Wrecker from the 3625th Maintenance Company of the Illinois National Guard during a previous edition of Big Trucks, sponsored by the Barrington Park District, held at Ron Beese Park.

    Best bets: Kids love the Big Trucks

    Give little kids a chance to get their hands on some heavy machinery at the 14th Annual Big Trucks Event Saturday at Ron Beese Park in Barrington. Fans of the 1990s boy band Backstreet Boys won’t want to miss their “In a World Like This Tour,” which also features Jesse McCartney and DJ Pauly D at FirstMerit Bank Pavilion at Northerly Island on Friday, Aug. 2.

  •  
    “The Highway” by C.J. Box

    C.J. Box returns with ‘The Highway’

    Sixteen-year-old Gracie Sullivan is book-smart and resourceful, but her 18-year-old sister, Danielle, is self-involved and boy-crazy. As C.J. Box's “The Highway” opens, they’re driving cross-country to celebrate Thanksgiving with their dad — until plans change. Danielle detours toward Helena, Mont., to woo her boyfriend, Justin Hoyt. A long-haul trucker and sexual predator who calls himself the Lizard King trails them through Montana in his Peterbilt semi. And things get worse from there.

Discuss

  •  
    Aurora’s city council voted 9-3 earlier this year to give Mayor Tom Weisner a $10,586 raise.

    Editorial: Don’t invite competitive escalation of administrator pay

    A Daily Herald editorial says sizable pay increases given to several municipal administrators are startling considering many suburban residents are still out of work.

  •  

    Zimmerman case result: Be skeptical
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: In order to cultivate a fair and unbiased result, we have devised in America the best system known to man to judge whether someone accused of a crime is innocent or guilty.

  •  

    More government control, less freedom
    A Geneva letter to the editor: Concerning Obamacare, Mr. Minnerick thinks the GOP is looking out for “those lobbyists on K Street and their political donors.” Apparently the Democrats have no lobbyists or political donors. That is just silly.

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