Daily Archive : Friday July 26, 2013

News

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    Tsukasa Taiko performs during the Natsu-Matsuri Festival held Saturday at Mitsuwa Marketplace in Arlington Heights.

    Drums, dancing highlight Japanese festival in Arlington Hts.

    Mitsuwa Marketplace held its free annual Bon-Dancing Festival, or Natsu-Matsuri (Traditional Japanese Summer Festival) Saturday at Algonquin and Arlington Heights roads in Arlington Heights.

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    Public workshop for Fox Lake Metra station

    Fox Lake officials will host a public workshop regarding changes planned at the village’s RTA/Metra Station on Wednesday, July 31, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at the Fox Lake Public Library, 255 E. Grand Ave.

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    Caleb Bustin, 9, of Warrenville watches from the 15th floor of Wilson Hall as the Mugon g-2 superconducting electromagnet ends its journey Friday at Fermilab.

    After tedious trip, giant magnet reaches Fermilab

    It’s 50 feet wide, weighs more than 15 tons and took a month to transport 3,200 miles from New York to Illinois. A gigantic electromagnet ended its tedious journey early Friday at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, where it will be used to study blazing-fast particles.

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    Police say a woman was killed during a domestic disturbance that took place about 3 a.m. Friday on the 900 block of Craig Place in Addison.

    Police: Woman killed in Addison domestic incident

    A woman was killed in a domestic incident early Friday morning in Addison, authorities said. Addison police responded about 3 a.m. to reports of a domestic disturbance at a home on the 900 block of Craig Place. Two additional people were injured in the incident.

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    ‘All-around good guy’ Didier named top Sugar Grove citizen

    What hasn’t Joe Didier been involved with in the 45 years he has lived in Sugar Grove? The man named Sugar Grove Citizen of the Year Friday has done volunteer work for the Corn Boil, the Old-Timers Reunion, the Senior Center,; American Legion Post 1271, Sugar Grove United Methodist Church, and youth baseball.

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    Woman seriously injured in McHenry crash

    A Flight For Life helicopter was brought in to transport a driver whose SUV rolled onto its roof Friday night in McHenry, authorities said. Emergency crews responded at 7:13 p.m. to reports of a motor vehicle crash on River Road near the entrance to McHenry Dam State Park, according to the McHenry Township Fire Protection District.

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    Dan Webb

    Metra considering hiring Dan Webb for investigation

    Metra leaders are still trying to find a Mr. Clean to exorcise the agency. After allegations of corruption rocked the agency, officials now may try to hire respected former U.S. Attorney Dan Webb to clean house.

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    Man struck, killed by train in Naperville

    A man was struck and killed Friday night by a Metra train in Naperville, authorities said. The accident occurred about 6:30 p.m., just east of the Naperville station on the BNSF line near the Columbia Avenue crossing, according to Metra.

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    In this image taken from video, Manuel Diaz Hernandez, a 10-year-old street vendor, weeps Monday as he is forced by a city inspector to throw away his goods that include candy and cigarettes, in Villahermosa, Mexico.

    Mexicans outraged by humiliation of Indian boy

    A 10-year-old Indian street vendor whose humiliation by a city inspector tugged on the heart strings of Mexicans after a video of it appeared on social media was showered Friday with attention and the offer of a scholarship.

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    Architecture graduate students at Judson University studied the former Bowes Retirement Center at 105 Gifford St., which the Save-A-Vet nonprofit wants to turn into a home for veterans. They proposed making the building more eco-friendly with a rain cistern, solar heat panels and a green roof.

    Judson architecture students study 2 Elgin buildings

    Elgin

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    Miss Lake County Fair Queen Meghan Opolka, left, of Antioch, chugs milk as 11-year-old Sara Lincicome of Beach Park, looks on during Friday’s Crazy Cow Relay in the dairy barn at the Lake County Fair in Grayslake.

    Cow madness at Lake County Fair in Grayslake

    Lake County Fair visitors who braved Friday afternoon’s damp weather were treated to some dairy barn craziness. It was the seventh Crazy Cow Relay at the Grayslake fairgrounds. Crazy Cow participants included Miss Lake County Fair Meghan Opolka, 21, of Antioch.

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    Jr. Miss Lake County Charlotte Roberts, 13, of Grayslake and Little Miss Lake County Victoria Weaver, 8, of Mundelein pet a dairy calf Friday at the Lake County Fair in Grayslake.

    Images: Friday’s Lake County Fair
    Photos of the 85th Annual Lake County Fair in Grayslake from Friday, July 26, including fairgoers in the rain, Crazy Cow Relays, and much more.

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    U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam is being investigated by the House Committee on Ethics over a $25,000 university-funded trip he took to Taiwan with his wife.

    Roskam faces House ethics probe over Taiwan trip

    U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam is being investigated by the House Committee on Ethics over a $25,000 university-funded trip he took to Taiwan with his wife, but the Wheaton Republican says the panel approved the trip before he left.

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    Boeing appoints Whittington as engineering chief of Dreamliner

    Boeing Co. chose a new chief engineer for the 787 Dreamliner program as the composite-plastic jet continues to face glitches almost two years after it first entered service.

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    Commander-in-chief, United Nations Command, and U.S. Army Gen. Mark Clark signs the Military Armistice agreement at a base camp at Munsan-ni, Korea.

    Korean divide lives on 60 years after end of war

    Sixty years on, as both Koreas and the United States mark the anniversary Saturday, there is still no peace on the Korean Peninsula.

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    An Egyptian Army helicopter flies over thousands of supporters of Egypt’s top military officer, Gen. Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi during a rally Friday in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt.

    Millions rally behind Egyptian army

    Throngs of people turned out in Cairo’s Tahrir Square and in other cities, answering a call by army chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, who urged them to give him a mandate to stop “potential terrorism” by supporters of Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood.

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    Associated Press Minnesota Republican Rep. Michele Bachmann speaks Monday in Washington.

    Ethics committee extends Bachmann probe

    WASHINGTON — Allegations surrounding Republican Rep. Michele Bachmann and her brief presidential campaign are getting further examination from the House Ethics Committee.

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    Civics for young adults:

    To further boost the engagement of young adults in civics, the office of House District 59 State Rep. Carol Sente of Vernon Hills is coordinating a Legislative Summit for Young Adults on Wednesday, July 31, from 6 to 7:30 p.m., at the Vernon Area Library, 300 Olde Half Day Road in Lincolnshire.

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    Island Lake targets mosquitoes:

    The Island Lake village board on Thursday agreed to pay $1,800 for mosquito-abatement efforts ahead of Saturday’s Island Lakefest event.

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    Affordable housing rehab in Grayslake:

    Tax credits will be used to preserve affordable housing through a state agency's initiative.

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    CLC dance showcase:

    The third Annual Summer Dance Showcase will be presented at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 2 and 3 by the College of Lake County Dance department.

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    A developer who wants to build apartments and townhouses on what is now the Ken-Loch Golf Links near Lombard is turning to DuPage County for help.

    Request for housing on Lombard-area golf course moving to DuPage County

    The developer who wants to build apartments and townhouses on what’s now a golf course near Lombard is seeking permission from DuPage County after the village indicated last month it would reject the plans.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn announces a $900,000 state grant Friday to help Naperville build a $1.18 million environmental collection center that will accept all types of recyclable items.

    Naperville snares $900,000 grant for ‘first of its kind’ recycling center

    One of four regional environmental collection centers in the state will be expanding and getting a new home in Naperville thanks to a $900,000 state grant Gov. Pat Quinn announced Friday. The grant will help the city construct a $1.18 million recycling facility billed as a one-stop drop-off location for anything recyclable.

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    Authorities confirmed Friday that 89-year-old Henry Laseke of Arlington Heights died by accidental drowning and that he'd called 911 himself after his SUV plunged into a retention pond behind his townhouse Thursday.

    Arlington Hts. man who drowned in pond called 911

    One of the 911 calls about 89-year-old Henry Laseke's fatal plunge into an Arlington Heights retention pond while inside his SUV was from Laseke himself. Pat Dollard, assistant director of technical services for the Northwest Central Dispatch System, confirmed that a 911 call from Laseke was one of six his agency received Thursday in just over a minute beginning at 6:58 a.m.

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    Rollins Road Gateway open house:

    The Lake County Division of Transportation hosts an open house to kickoff the start of construction on the Rollins Road Gateway Project on Wednesday, July 31, from 5 to 7 p.m., at the Cultural and Civic Center, 2007 Civic Center Way in Round Lake Beach.

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    Frank Bart

    After threat of cancellation, Wauconda blues fest gets new life

    Intervention from a Wauconda civic group may have saved a popular community event planned for next month. The Lions Club's involvement clears the way for the 4th annual Blues, Brew & Burger Fest to go on as planned Aug. 10 at the municipal parking lot.

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    Willard Helander

    Quinn to OK controversial Lake County voting plan

    Gov. Pat Quinn is planning to sign legislation Saturday that would take elections duties away from the Lake County Clerk, a new law that has created a local political uproar. The sweeping new law also will allow for the first time Illinoisans to register to vote online.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Tri blotter

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    Trader Timothy Nick, right, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Asian stock markets floundered Friday as China pressed ahead with industrial restructuring.

    Stocks eke out tiny gains

    Volume was thin as traders prepared for a deluge of potentially market-moving events next week: a Federal Reserve meeting, the government’s monthly employment report and much more.

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    Lacey Ousley

    Guilty plea in downtown Elgin cellphone store burglary

    A 19-year-old from Elgin pleaded guilty to his role a smash-and-grab burglary of an Elgin cellphone store earlier this year and was sentenced to 90 days in jail and 30 months probation. Lacey Ousley also was fined $1,780 and could be resentenced to up to seven years in prison if he gets in trouble again before January 2016. Another defendant was admitted into the county's Pretrial Diversion...

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    Palatine Opportunity Center wraps up camps for underserved kids

    Despite funding cuts that have been a blow to so many nonprofits, the Palatine Opportunity Center on Friday wrapped up another summer camp for underserved children in the area. “We try to provide a wonderful camping experience to kids who wouldn’t be able to afford it otherwise,” Director Kathy Millin said.

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    Kendale M. Baymon

    Police: Elgin man forced way into apartment, beat man with brick

    A 24-year-old Elgin man is accused of forcing his way into another Elgin home early Thursday morning, beating a man with a broken landscape brick and threatening others with a gun to trying and find a man who is dating his ex-girlfriend. Kendale M. Baymon faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted of home invasion.

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    Associated Press/Nov. 14, 2012 Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    FDA proposes rules for safer imported foods

    FDA officials say the rules show a major shift in thinking in the way the government works to keep food safe. Like rules for domestic farmers and food companies released earlier this year, the idea is to make businesses more responsible for the safety of the food they are selling or importing by proving they are using good food safety practices.

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    Initial public offerings scheduled to debut next week

    NEW YORK — The following is a list of initial public offerings planned for the coming week. Sources include Renaissance Capital, Greenwich, Conn. and SEC filings.Week of July 29

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    Nyasha Mbawa

    Police: Gurnee-area man charged in sex attacks

    Authorities say a 19-year-old Gurnee-area man has been charged with sexually attacking two girls. Lake County sheriff's police said Friday that Nyasha C. Mbawa, of the 36000 block of Grand Oaks Court in unincorporated Warren Township, has been charged with seven counts of predatory criminal sexual assault of a child. Both girls were younger than 13 when they were sexually assaulted, police said.

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    Julia Robleski and Dana Scholtens of Wheaton join Kendall McPartlin of Glen Ellyn as the McNulty Irish Dancers perform Friday in an empty store along Main Street as part of the Glen Ellyn Sidewalk Sale.

    Shoppers get one more shot at Glen Ellyn Sidewalk Sale

    Shoppers will get one more shot at the Glen Ellyn Sidewalk Sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday along Main Street in downtown.

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    Barnaby Jack, seen here as a computer-security researcher for McAfee Inc.

    Hacker who made ATMs spit out cash dies

    A prominent hacker who discovered a way to have ATM machines spit out cash and was set to deliver a talk about hacking pacemakers and other wireless implantable medical devices died in San Francisco, authorities and his employer said.

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    San Diego Mayor Bob Filner speaks Friday during a news conference at city hall.

    San Diego mayor to get therapy amid harassment scandal

    Declaring he “must become a better person,” San Diego Mayor Bob Filner announced Friday he will undergo two weeks of counseling after a series of women came forward and claimed the former Democratic congressman made unwanted sexual advances that included groping, kissing and offensive comments.

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    Learn about upcoming Rollins Road construction project

    With the long-planned reconstruction of Rollins Road through central Lake County about to begin, transportation officials will host an open house for concerned motorists Wednesday in Round Lake Beach.

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    Donny Schmit

    Defunct facade improvement program to return to Fox Lake in 2013

    Fox Lake village officials say they will restart a defunct financial assistance program for local businesses to help spruce up the town. Trustees have approved earmarking $44,000 to the previously dormant facade improvement program, as a way to encourage business and property owners to improve their storefronts.

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    Vegas casino expansion pushes out 9/11 memorial

    MGM says it will relocate the shrine, which has remained a heartfelt marker amid the plastic artifice of the desert playland.

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    A passenger ‘Alvia’ type train pulls Friday into the station in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. The ‘Alvia’ train, the same as the one that crashed Wednesday, is the first to operate on this line after the accident.

    Church: Virginia woman among Spain train crash victims

    A Virginia woman on her way to see her son, who had completed a Catholic pilgrimage, was among the 78 people who died in the wreck of a train in Spain this week, said Catholic Church officials from the diocese where she worked.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A Schaumburg man was arrested and charged with felony burglary to motor vehicle at a Hoffman Estates pawnshop. Police reports said a woman saw him climb into her car, open the trunk and steal a radar detector. Officers said he was at the pawnshop trying to sell it.

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    Jose Mendez

    Man faces charges for damaging tires, then offering to help victims

    A Waukegan man accused of flattening the tires of unsuspecting women in order to assist them later has turned himself into police, authorities said. Jose M. Mendez, 31, of the 2000 block of Sunset Avenue, was charged with two counts of reckless conduct Thursday and remains free on bail, authorities said.

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    Remy Martin

    4 charged in DuPage County methamphetamine bust

    A two-month undercover drug investigation led to the arrest of four men in Villa Park, police said Friday. Police made the arrests after undercover detectives met about 5:30 p.m. Thursday with Arthur Goodman and Remy Martin to purchase methamphetamines, authorities said.

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    Lawrence DuBose takes a closer look at a beehive.

    Moving Picture: Kline Creek beekeeper in 30th year

    Lawrence DuBose still laughs about the time a young visitor to Kline Creek Farm called him Dr. DuBees. It’s a perfect moniker because DuBose has been a beekeeper at the living-history farm near West Chicago since 1984. Now 92, the Carol Stream man still heads to the 1800s-style farm nearly every day to tend to about 20 hives.

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    Raceway Woods Forest Preserve in Dundee Township will be the site of an inaugural charity 5K run/walk sponsored by the Rotary Club of Carpentersville-Morning. The forest preserve used contain Meadowdale International Raceway, which attracted car racing legends from the 1950s and 1960s.

    Carpentersville 5K will use once-famed race track

    The Rotary Club of Carpentersville Morning’s inaugural charity race next month will take runners and walkers through the same twists and turns navigated by auto racing legends of the 1950s and 1960s. “What’s really neat about this course is it follows the old Meadowdale racetrack, which is for the most part preserved,” Rotary Club President.

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    The B-17 bomber coming to the Chicago Executive Airport today is one of only eight still flying in the U.S.

    WWII aircraft arrive today at Wheeling airport

    World War II bombers and a fighter will be on hand at Chicago Executive Airport July 26-28 for the 24th annual Wings of Freedom Tour. "When it comes to honoring World War II, there is no more effective means than to explore a fully restored World War II aircraft," said Hunter Chaney of the Collings Foundation, which hosts the tours. The planes were scheduled to land at the airport at 1:30 p.m.

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    GEMS summer workshop participants watch as Katie Burke of Lisle gets a hovercraft ride from Cari Cesarotti of Naperville North High School during the second annual event for Girl Engineers, Mathematicians and Scientists in 2011. The fourth annual GEMS summer workshop is scheduled for 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 7, at Naperville Central High School.

    Naperville Central workshop invites girls to explore STEM possibilities

    A story about smashing things is what Cassidy Schneider remembers most from the first GEMS summer workshop she attended three years ago. As a freshman at Naperville Central High School attending the event for girls because science was always her favorite subject, Cassidy heard from engineers, biologists and a memorable high-energy physicist. “I remember her saying ‘I get to go into work and I...

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    Mooseheart students, circa 1950, shop for candy at the commissary.

    Mooseheart to celebrate its 100th anniversary

    Bill Harvey was only 5 then, but he remembers the night in 1953 when child-welfare officials in Indiana came to his apartment to warn his widowed mother her kids would be taken from her. Instead she found Mooseheart between Batavia and North Aurora. "We probably would have been split up ... had she not stumbled on to the Moose," he said. Mooseheart celebrates its 100th anniversary this weekend.

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    Ariel Castro standing before a judge in Cleveland.

    Ariel Castro pleads guilty in Ohio kidnapping case

    Prosecutors and attorneys for a man accused of kidnapping three women, holding them captive in his Cleveland home for about a decade and raping them repeatedly said they have entered into plea negotiations. Both sides are in court Friday morning for a final pretrial hearing for Ariel Castro, 53, and to update a Cuyahoga County judge on the talks.

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    David Harris

    OfficeMax tax debate so far not like Sears

    State Sen. Tom Cullerton, a Villa Park Democrat, has come up with a tentative plan to offer tax breaks if the company keeps at least 2,000 employees in the suburbs and makes some building improvements.

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    Suburban men indicted on federal extortion charges

    Federal indictments name a bevy of suburban men who are accused of extorting or attempting to extort business owners from across the country who owed debts to a Carol Stream business. The nine men each face up to 20 years in prison if convicted and a $250,000 fine.

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    Nancy Connors of Bolingbrook started her dream job after beating breast cancer.

    Cancer survivor brings sweet dream to Lake County Fair

    Nancy Connors is living a sweet dream these days selling homemade cinnamon rolls from a truck at fairs and festivals across the Midwest. Sweet because the Bolingbrook residents gets to sell the treat at events like this week's Lake County Fair, and because she's doing it after beating breast cancer. “The care and support that I got from my loved ones is the reason I'm here,” she said.

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    Lake County Chief County Assessment Officer Marty Paulson

    Everything to know about the propety tax assessment process

    Property owners will be receiving their blue assessment notices over the next few weeks. Martin Paulson, chief county assessment officer, shares the ins and outs of the appeals process and how taxpayers are affected.

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    A sign on Butterfield Road in Mundelein alerts motorists to what is expected to be a disruptive Rt. 45 resurfacing project.

    Route 45 resurfacing to begin in Vernon Hills

    Resurfacing a nearly 4-mile stretch of Route 45 between Mundelein and Lincolnshire, scheduled to begin Monday, is expected to create big delays. But motorists may already have caught a break as night work is expected to be allowed for the grinding portion of the project. “It's a high-traffic, high-volume road. Obviously there's not much traffic at night. That helps us out,” a...

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    Attorney General Eric Holder says the U.S. won’t seek death penalty for Edward Snowden.

    U.S. govt says won’t seek death penalty for Snowden

    Attorney General Eric Holder has told the Russian government that the U.S. will not seek the death penalty for former National Security Agency systems analyst Edward Snowden. In a letter dated July 23, the attorney general said the criminal charges Snowden faces do not carry the death penalty and that the U.S. will not seek the death penalty even if Snowden were charged with additional death...

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    Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is helped out of a security vehicle as he arrives at a courthouse at Fort Meade, Md., Friday.

    Defense attorney: Bradley Manning a whistleblower

    U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is a whistleblower who wanted to inform the American public about the troubling things he saw in the war zone, and the soldier is willing to pay the price for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, his defense attorney said Friday.

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    Anthony Weiner, New York mayoral candidate, listens during a news conference, Thursday in New York.

    Disbelief from seniors on Weiner’s new sexting

    Retired tax auditor Jerry Stern was sitting in the front row with reporters the day in June 2011 when then-U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner — reading a short statement and ignoring the shouts from hecklers — announced his retirement from Congress at a senior center after some of his sexually-charged photographs and emails with women became public.

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    Bow hunters will have expanded territory this fall in the Kane County forest preserves, but deer fans are not happy about where the expansion will occur.

    Bow hunting to expand this fall in Kane County

    Bow hunters will benefit from an expanded deer management program in the Kane County forest preserves this fall. But fans of the deer, who have long decried the state's annual culling program, say it's gotten to the point where forest preserve officials care way more about plants than deer. “Four, five years ago there were dozens of deer all the time,” said Bill Siers of the North...

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    The Geneva Arts Fair on Third Street in downtown Geneva typically draws a crowd of more than 20,000 over the weekend, organizers say. About 160 artists are expected at this weekend’s show.

    Geneva Arts Fair features original work, emerging artists

    After 30 years and anywhere from 10 to 24 art shows, May to December, Estelle Serena knows a good show. Serena, a self-taught rug weaver, is one of many artists returning for the 12th annual Geneva Arts Fair, which runs 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, July 27-28.

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    Brian Lynch

    Naperville’s North Central College to stage classic ‘Peter Pan’

    Alaina Wis has been waiting to go to Neverland since she was 4 years old. Beginning Friday, she will finally have her chance. Wis stars in the lead role of North Central College’s Summer Musical Theatre production of “Peter Pan." “(‘Peter Pan’) is my favorite fairy tale,” Wis said. “This story is special to me and has been ever since I was old enough to understand it.”

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    A man was pulled from this car in a pond yesterday in Arlington Heights after neighbors dived in to try to free him from it. They couldn’t get a door or window open.

    Dawn Patrol: Arlington Hts. pond tragedy; goodbye, Soriano

    Dawn Patrol: Neighbors tell how they couldn't save Arlington Heights driver from pond. Soriano is all but gone from the Cubs. Roselle might lift video gambling ban. Accused West Dundee church youth director allowed to travel. Elgin homeowner displaced by fire.

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    Camille Bejar, 28, was in the middle of nursing school when both her parents died from cancer. Today, Bejar says her career as a nurse for cancer patients is dedicated to them.

    Nurse works with cancer patients to honor parents

    The motto at Cancer Treatment Centers of America is to treat each patient like they’re your mother. Buffalo Grove resident Camille Bejar, 28, takes that quite literally. She lost both parents to cancer in 2010 in the middle of nursing school. “My mom was saying how it’s sad that my dad won’t be able to see me walk in graduation. And ironically, she wasn’t able to see me walk either."

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    This picture was taken during sunset while my family was camping at Paul Wolffe Forest Campground in the Burnidge Forest Preserve in Kane County.

    Images: Photo Contest Finalists
    Each week you submit your favorite photo. We pick the best of the bunch and select 12 finlaists. Here are the finalists for the week of July 22nd.

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    Do you think you could install a ceramic tile floor in your house?

    Poll Vault: What’s the biggest home improvement project you’ve tackled?

    In home-store commercials, couples everywhere are working together on their home projects happily. Not Michelle Holdway and her husband. What's the biggest home improvement project you've worked on?

Sports

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    Chicago White Sox’s Conor Gillaspie watches his home run off Kansas City Royals relief pitcher Kelvin Herrera during the eighth inning of a baseball game on Friday, July 26, 2013, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    For Sox, all’s not lost down on the farm

    It's time to look at the future for the White Sox, and minor-league starters Andre Rienzo, Erik Johnson and Scott Snodgress are all worth keeping an eye on. Rienzo pitched a 7-inning no-hitter for Class AAA Charlotte Thursday.

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    Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville, right, talks about the three-year contract extention he received from general manager Stan Bowman, left.

    Blackhawks give Quenneville a 3-year extension

    Joel Quenneville's three-year contract extension will keep him behind the Blackhawks' bench through the 2016-17 season, which is great news for his players. “He certainly earned the extension,” winger Patrick Sharp said following Friday's announcement that kicked off the team's sixth annual convention. “He's right up there at the top of the league as far as what he has done in his career. It's no secret that about a quarter of the players kind of came into their own once Joel took the team over. He was able to tie everything together. He's our leader.”

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    Cubs outfielder Nate Schierholtz, right, is congratulated by teammate Luis Valbuena, left, after scoring a run on a single Starlin Castro against the San Francisco Giants in Friday’s sixth inning.

    Cubs rally past Giants 3-2

    SAN FRANCISCO — Julio Borbon and Junior Lake scored on an error by San Francisco first baseman Brandon Belt in the ninth inning and the Cubs rallied for a 3-2 win over the Giants on Friday night.Borbon singled leading off the inning against Giants closer Sergio Romo (3-5) and moved to second when pinch-hitter Dioner Navarro walked. After David DeJesus struck out looking, Lake reached on a fielder’s choice. Anthony Rizzo then hit a sharp liner that went through Belt’s legs and into the right field corner.The Cubs, who earlier in the day completed a trade sending slugging outfielder Alfonso Soriano to the New York Yankees, rallied for just the fourth time when trailing after eight innings.Jeff Francoeur had two hits for the Giants, who lost for the fifth time in six games.Matt Guerrier (4-4) retired four batters for the win while Kevin Gregg worked the ninth for his 20th save.Chicago’s 14th come-from-behind win came after Francoeur’s two-run single off starter Edwin Jackson in the seventh gave the Giants a 2-1 lead.The wild ending was in stark contrast to the pitching duel between Jackson and San Francisco starter Matt Cain.Jackson faced just one batter over the minimum through four innings and carried a two-hit shutout into the seventh until giving up two walks and a double before Francoeur’s two-run single.Cain allowed six hits, struck out seven and walked one and was in line to win consecutive starts for the first time since early May until Romo’s fourth blown save following the Giants’ NL-leading 74th error.The Cubs won only hours after the club completed the Soriano deal with the Yankees. Earlier this month, the team also traded pitcher Matt Garza to Texas and pitcher Scott Feldman to Baltimore.Cubs manager Dale Sveum said he isn’t sure if the team is done making moves, but doesn’t want it to become a distraction.“I’m not exhaling yet,” Sveum said before the game. “I don’t really see anything else happening but until that 11th hour is here, I don’t think you can relax. We don’t dwell on it anyway.”Nate Schierholtz, batting in the cleanup spot with Soriano gone, doubled and scored Chicago’s first run to continue a strong stretch for the Cubs slugging right fielder. He went 1 for 3 and is batting .428 (9 for 21) on the road trip.Pablo Sandoval and Hunter Pence both doubled and scored for San Francisco, which dropped a season-high 10 games below .500 with the loss.Sandoval walked with one out in the seventh and took third on Pence’s double. After Belt was intentionally walked to load the bases, Francoeur blooped a two-run single that landed in between second baseman Darwin Barney and right fielder Schierholtz to give the Giants a 2-1 lead. Belt was tagged out trying to score.

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    Pena pitches Cougars to win

    Felix Pena matched a season-high with 7 strikeouts over 6 solid innings to pace the Kane County Cougars past the Beloit Snappers with a 4-1 victory on Friday night at Pohlman Field

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    Boomers let 3-0 lead slip away

    The Gateway Grizzlies scored 4 unanswered runs to rally past the Schaumburg Boomers 4-3 before 4,196 on a Fireworks Friday at Boomers Stadium.

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    Bob Chwedyk/bchwedyk@dailyherald.com Patrick Kane being interviewed before the Sixth annual Blackhawks Convention.

    Kane trying to keep out of trouble this summer

    Patrick Kane’s summer has gotten off to a quiet start, which is just how the Blackhawks like it. “It was crazy at first, but it slowed down when I went back to Buffalo, and I’ve kind of been relaxing ever since,” Kane said Friday at the opening of the Hawks’ annual convention.

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    Chicago White Sox's Dayan Viciedo (24) greets teammate Conor Gillaspie outside the dugout after Gillaspie's home run off Kansas City Royals relief pitcher Kelvin Herrera during the eighth inning of a baseball game on Friday, July 26, 2013, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Shields shuts down White Sox, Royals win 5-1

    James Shields tossed seven shutout innings and rookie David Lough homered and drove in another run to lead the Kansas City Royals to a 5-1 victory over the White Sox on Friday night. The Royals (49-51) have won four straight and six of eight since the All-Star break. The White Sox (40-60) have lost four of five.

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    The Cubs completed their deal Friday with the New York Yankees, sending Alfonso Soriano to the Bronx in exchange for 21-year-old Class A pitcher Corey Black.

    Cubs complete Soriano trade for 21-year-old pitcher
    The Cubs made it official Friday as they sent left fielder Alfonso Soriano to the New York Yankees for minor-league right-handed pitcher Corey Black. The Cubs will get some salary relief on Soriano's $136 million contract, which runs through the end of net season.

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    Patrick Kane runs the gauntlet of fans after being introduced at the sixth annual Blackhawks Convention.

    Images: Blackhawks Convention Friday
    Images of Friday at the sixth annual Blackhawks Convention at the Hilton Chicago. Master of Ceremonies and Blackhawks TV Color Analyst Eddie Olczyk hosted the Opening Ceremonies in the International Ballroom

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    FILE - In this June 23, 2013, file photo, Tyson Gay runs to the finish line to win the senior men's 200-meter dash final at the U.S. Championships athletics meet in Des Moines, Iowa. Gay failed more than one drug test this year, recording one of his positives at the U.S. championships, where he won the 100 and 200 meters in June, The Associated Press learned on Friday, July 26, 2013. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

    AP: Gay tested positive at U.S nationals

    Sprinter Tyson Gay failed more than one drug test this year, recording one of his positives at the U.S. championships in June, where he won the 100 and 200 meters, The Associated Press learned on Friday.

  •  
    Bears rookie guard Kyle Long was given a few reps with the first team at Friday's training campus at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais.

    Briggs tackles new responsibilities

    Weakside linebacker Lance Briggs takes over the defensive play-callling duties this year, a chore that was handled for years by Brian Urlacher. Briggs experienced a malfunction during Friday's first training camp practice, but he's looking forward to the added responsibility.

  •  
    Chicago Sky forward Elena Delle Donne will miss the WNBA All-Star game on Saturday while recovering from a concussion.

    Delle Donne to miss all-star contest

    Sky star forward Elena Delle Donne will miss Saturday's WNBA All-Star Game, which is a shame considering she was the top vote-getter. Patricia Babcock McGraw talks with the Sky's Pokey Chatman about the setback for Delle Donne.

  •  
    As the Chicago Bears opened training camp Friday in Bourbonnais, two key members of the team’s defense (linebacker Lance Briggs and cornerback Charles Tillman) say they’ve moved on after Lovie Smith’s firing and are ready to embrace the new regime, led by head coach Marc Trestman, above.

    Tillman, Briggs stand behind Bears’ Trestman

    For the Bears' defense to continue its excellent play, veterans such as Charles Tillman and Lance Briggs, who were loyal to former coach Lovie Smith, must buy into new head coach Marc Trestman and defensive coordinator Mel Tucker. Both Pro Bowlers appear to be on board. "It’s coach Trestman’s team. What he says goes," says Tillman. "I’m here. If I hadn’t bought into the system, I wouldn’t be here."

  •  
    Chicago Bears head coach Marc Trestman, center, watches his team.

    Images: Bears Open Training Camp
    Images of Bears training camp Friday, July 26, 2013, at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais. New head coach Marc Trestman led his team , including quarterback Jay Cutler, through drills.

  •  
    Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, here catching the ball during NFL training camp Friday in Mankato, Minn., says he is eager for the league to approve testing for human growth hormone.

    Vikings’ Peterson declares: I’m all natural

    MANKATO, Minn. — Embracing the challenge has always been a part of Adrian Peterson’s persona. Following his quick comeback from reconstructive knee surgery, surpassing the 2,000-yard mark and the league MVP award last season for the Minnesota Vikings, Peterson said Friday he’d eagerly accept another test: for human growth hormone.

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    Packers Rodgers: Braun lied to me

    Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers says he was “shocked” when his friend Ryan Braun admitted he violated baseball’s rules against using performance-enhancing substances. Rodgers says the Milwaukee Brewers slugger “looked me in the eye” and it “didn’t feel great being lied to like that.” He says he’s disappointed.

  •  
    Chicago Sky’s Elena Delle Donne, right, won’t play in Saturday’s WNBA All-Star Game after suffering a concussion on Wednesday. Delle Donne is the first WNBA rookie to lead the fan voting for the contest.

    Sky’s Delle Donne out of WNBA All-Star Game

    NEW YORK — Atlanta Dream center Erika de Souza will replace injured Eastern Conference All-Star Elena Delle Donne of the Chicago Sky in the WNBA All-Star Game, league officials announced Friday. Delle Donne, the league’s No. 2 overall draft pick in April, is the first WNBA rookie to earn the top spot among vote-getters in all-star fan voting, but she will be unable to attend the game after suffering a concussion on Wednesday during the Sky’s road loss to the Washington Mystics.

  •  
    Loyola Ramblers men's basketball coach Porter Moser, who directed his team to 15 wins last season, has agreed to a contract extension with the university.

    Loyola extends Moser’s basketball contract

    Porter Moser, Loyola University Chicago men’s basketball coach, has received a contract extension that will keep the Naperville native on the Ramblers’ bench through the 2017-18 season, school officials announced Friday.

  •  

    Red Stars’ playoff hopes dimming

    Seattle Reign struck early and often Thursday night against the Chicago Red Stars, earning a 4-1 victory of a Chicago club that faces a challenging uphill battle to keep its NWSL playoff hopes alive.

  •  
    Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany, speaking at the Big Ten football media conference in Chicago, joined the chorus of major conference commissioners calling for a new model when it comes to the governing body of college athletics.

    Burgeoning Big Ten means business

    With the growth and popularity of the Big Ten Conference, Mike North marvels at how it has changed since the days of his favorite college football player, Rex Kern. Kern, a quarterback at Ohio State, played at a time when there really were just 10 teams in the conference.

  •  
    Arizona Diamondbacks’ Gerardo Parra is forced out by Chicago Cubs’ Darwin Barney as he throws out Wil Neives Thursday night in Phoenix. The Cubs lost 3-1.

    Diamondbacks beat Cubs 3-1

    Aaron Hill drove in two runs with a homer and double, helping the Arizona Diamondbacks to a 3-1 victory over the Chicago Cubs on Thursday night and a split of their four-game series. Cole Gillespie got the start in left field for the Cubs after Alfonso Soriano was removed from the lineup, pending completion of a trade to the New York Yankees.

Business

  •  
    Then-Congressman Mark Kirk explains Medicare Part D to seniors at the Arlington Heights Senior Center.

    Feds ban some Medicare providers in Chicago in crackdown

    The number of home health providers in Cook County increased from 301 to 509 between 2008 and 2012. There were 275 ambulance suppliers in Harris County, Texas, in 2012. The ratio of providers to patients in both regions was also several hundred times greater than in other counties, federal health officials said.

  •  
    Japan’s All Nippon Airways has found damage to wiring on two Boeing 787 locator beacons, a device suspected as the cause of a fire on an Ethiopian Airlines 787.

    United, Nippon find damaged 787 beacons

    Two airlines disclosed issues with the wiring on their Boeing 787’s emergency transmitters, the same part of the plane that is getting close scrutiny after a parked jet burned earlier this month.United Airlines said Friday that it found a pinched wire during an inspection of one of its six 787s. Earlier, Japan’s All Nippon Airways found damage to wiring on two Boeing 787 locater beacons. It flies 20 of the jets.

  •  
    Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan asked then Metra CEO Alex Clifford to boost Patrick Ward’s $57,000 salary, the Chicago Sun-Tikmes reports.

    Madigan ally at Metra was getting pension

    The Chicago Sun-Times reports a man who figures prominently in allegations Illinois politicians pressured Metra staff in hiring and contract decisions was collecting a pension from the city of Chicago. The Sun-Times reports former Metra employee Patrick Ward is receiving a city pension of nearly $57,000. Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan asked then Metra CEO Alex Clifford to boost Ward’s $57,000 salary.

  •  

    North Chicago’s AbbVie 2Q earnings continue climb on Humira sales

    North Chicago-based AbbVie Inc. topped Wall Street expectations in its second full quarter as a standalone company due to higher sales of its best-selling drug Humira. In January, Abbott Laboratories completed the spinoff of AbbVie, which markets the company’s branded prescription drugs, including the blockbuster anti-inflammatory drug Humira.

  •  
    The first American sedan in 20 years to earn Consumer Reports' top score is the Chevrolet Impala. Really.

    New Impala tops sedans in Consumer Reports' tests

    The first American sedan in 20 years to earn Consumer Reports' top score is the Chevrolet Impala. Really. The magazine has ranked the completely reworked 2014 version of the full-size car as its top U.S. sedan, based on ride, handling, quality of materials and other factors. It's the first time in two decades that a domestic brand has beaten cars from Germany and Japan.

  •  
    Illinois Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka said Thursday that she has no choice but to withhold lawmakers' paychecks, citing a precedent-setting court case that bars her from paying state employees without a budget appropriation or court order.

    Comptroller says she can't pay Illinois lawmakers

    Illinois Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka said Thursday that she has no choice but to withhold lawmakers' paychecks, citing a precedent-setting court case that bars her from paying state employees without a budget appropriation or court order.

  •  
    Laurie Gilmore feeds the chickens in front of their coop, in back of the Gilmore’s Aroma Park, Ill., home.

    Chicken coop adds more cluck for buck

    Call them “pets with benefits” if you want, but keeping a few chickens in a backyard pen is one of the hottest new trends in small-scale, urban agriculture. In a move toward more civilized communities, the practice of having a cluster of cluckers on the lawn was generally outlawed in local communities more than a half century ago. Bradley, for example, lumps chickens in with pet snakes and bees. None are welcome there.

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    Attorney general acts in ExxonMobil chemical leak

    The Illinois attorney general’s office and Will County prosecutors have filed a complaint against ExxonMobil for a hydrogen sulfide leak at a suburban Chicago oil refinery. The complaint filed Thursday in Will County Circuit Court alleges a March equipment malfunction at the Channahon Township facility caused the release of hydrogen sulfide for more than 9 1/2 hours.

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    U of I hospital in Chicago to get $85M upgrade

    The University of Illinois Medical Center in Chicago is getting an $85 million upgrade. Trustees approved financing for the project Thursday during a meeting in Chicago. The board authorized up to $77 million in bonds. The plan is to upgrade electrical, mechanical and other infrastructure at the 33-year-old medical center.

  •  
    Citymaps bills itself as a social map that helps people discover new places rather than simply giving them directions to a destination.

    Citymaps aims to make maps social

    Maps are where it’s at. Just ask Google, which bought maps app Waze for nearly $1 billion, or Apple, which snapped up two small mapping startups earlier this month. Enter Citymaps, which bills itself as a social map that helps people discover new places rather than simply giving them directions to a destination.

  •  
    Chris Jaffe, Netflix VP of Product Innovation, left, and Bob Heldt, Director of Engineering, look over video displays as they await the debut of “Orange is the new black” in Los Gatos, Calif.

    It takes a ‘war room’ to launch Netflix’s series

    Netflix’s Internet video subscription service works around the clock, but it’s unusual for more than two dozen of the company’s engineers and top managers to be huddled in a conference room at 10:30 on a midsummer Wednesday evening.

  •  

    Zynga drops after abandoning u.S. Online-betting plan

    Zynga Inc., maker of the social- networking game “FarmVille,” plunged as much as 16 percent in extended trading after abandoning plans to enter the online- gambling business in the U.S.“While the company continues to evaluate its real-money gaming products in the U.K. test, Zynga is making a focused choice not to pursue a license for real-money gaming in the U.S.,” the San Francisco-based company said yesterday in a statement. The stock tumbled as low as $2.95.The shares had surged 48 percent this year on optimism that Zynga could use Web betting to revive growth amid a slump in gaming on Facebook Inc.’s network. Zynga took preliminary steps to get a gambling license in Nevada last year, working to enter a U.S. market for online betting that may reach $7.4 billion a year by 2017, according to Manchester, U.K.-based researcher H2 Gambling Capital.“Zynga probably realized they’re not going to get one,” said Michael Pachter, an analyst at Wedbush Securities Inc. in Los Angeles. “There’s a greater sense of urgency on turning the business around.”The company also forecast third-quarter sales and earnings that fell short of analysts’ estimates as fewer users access its titles on Facebook’s website.Top GamesThe third-quarter loss excluding some items will be 2 cents to 5 cents a share on revenue of $175 million to $200 million, Zynga said. Analysts on average had estimated a 2-cent loss on sales of $216.2 million, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.At the end of the second quarter, Zynga had three top-10 titles on Facebook, down from seven a year earlier. Don Mattrick, who replaced founder Mark Pincus as chief executive officer this month, is working to jump-start sales as users shift their attention to mobile devices and more Facebook members shun Zynga’s titles for games from competitors such as King.com, maker of “Candy Crush Saga.”“Zynga doesn’t have the same advantages on mobile as it did on Facebook,” said Arvind Bhatia, an analyst at Sterne Agee & Leach Inc. in Dallas, who has a neutral rating on the shares. “It’s a tough platform.”Mattrick, the former head of Microsoft Corp.’s entertainment division, said Zynga expects two to four quarters of “volatility” as he evaluates the business and product line and develops a new strategy.“We are missing out on the platform growth that Apple, Google and Facebook are seeing,” Mattrick said on a conference call yesterday. “We have the ability to break some bad habits and get back to some good fundamentals.”Facebook LinkBefore yesterday’s report, the shares advanced 6.7 percent to $3.50 at the close in New York, bolstered after Facebook said the number of mobile users on its service expanded 51 percent to 819 million during the June quarter.Zynga generates revenue by selling virtual goods within its games -- for example, poker chips in “Texas HoldEm” or a tractor in “FarmVille 2.”The company said its second-quarter loss excluding some items was 1 cent a share and revenue fell 31 percent to $230.7 million. Analysts on average had estimated a 4-cent loss on sales of $219.2 million, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.The net loss for the quarter narrowed to $15.8 million, or 2 cents a share, from a loss of $22.8 million, or 3 cents, a year earlier.Bookings, or the total value of virtual goods sold in the quarter, fell 38 percent to $187.6 million, within the range of the company’s forecast of $180 million to $190 million. Zynga’s reported revenue includes virtual items sold before the quarter and amortized over their expected life.

  •  
    A new report shows that Apple’s share of the global smartphone market fell during the second quarter to its lowest level in four years.

    Apple’s smartphone market share slips

    A new report shows that Apple’s share of the global smartphone market fell during the second quarter to its lowest level in four years. Apple had 13.1 percent of the worldwide market, ABI Research said Friday, down from 16.6 percent a year ago. That’s the lowest level since the third quarter of 2009, two years after the launch of the first iPhone.

  •  
    Facebook shares soared 30 percent Thursday after the social media giant pushed aggressively into mobile advertising and reported much-improved second-quarter revenue and profit.

    Facebook shares soar 30 percent on big 2Q

    Facebook shares soared 30 percent Thursday after the social media giant pushed aggressively into mobile advertising and reported much-improved second-quarter revenue and profit. The stock is trading at levels not seen since shortly after Facebook’s initial public offering last year.

  •  
    Amazon.com Inc. reported a surprise net loss as the world’s largest online retailer continued to pump money into warehouses and digital content, fueling sales growth at the expense of profits.

    Amazon reports surprise loss on warehouses, content spending

    Amazon.com Inc. reported a surprise net loss as the world’s largest online retailer continued to pump money into warehouses and digital content, fueling sales growth at the expense of profits. The second-quarter net loss was $7 million, or 2 cents a share, compared with profit of $7 million, or 1 cent, a year earlier, the Seattle-based company said in a statement yesterday.

  •  
    Google says that it paid $966 million to buy online mapping service Waze, six weeks after closing the deal.

    Google discloses it paid $966 million for Waze

    Google says that it paid $966 million to buy online mapping service Waze, six weeks after closing the deal. The Internet search leader spelled out the purchase price in regulatory documents filed Thursday. Google Inc. withheld the price last month when it announced the acquisition of the Israel-based startup.

  •  
    The service area at Napleton Chrysler Dodge Jeep RAM has a number of heavy-duty lifts to service cars and trucks quickly for customers.

    Napleton celebrates another grand opening

    Working in the automobile business has always been a way of life for Ed Napleton. As a fourth generation member of the family business that bears his name, Napleton oversees the new Napleton Chrysler Dodge Jeep dealership in Arlington Heights, which opened in May.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Donald Fagen and Walter Becker bring Steely Dan to Ravinia Festival on Aug. 1 and 2 for "Mood Swings Tour 2013: 8 Miles to Pancake Day."

    Catching up with Steely Dan before Ravinia gig

    Steely Dan founders Walter Becker and Donald Fagen riff on Kanye West, Pancake Day and how fishing gets in the way of songwriting. The iconic jazz rockers bring their latest oddly named tour to Ravinia Festival in Highland Park on Aug. 1 and 2.

  •  
    Tyler Hubbard, left, and Brian Kelley, of Florida Georgia Line, appear onstage at the Billboard Music Awards in May. The duo will be performing Halloween night at the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates.

    Country act sells out Sears Centre, breaks record

    Tickets to see one of the biggest acts in country music at the Sears Centre Arena this fall sold out Friday in less than five minutes — the 7-year-old stadium’s fastest sellout ever, officials said. The up-and-coming country duo of Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard will be performing at the arena Oct. 31 as part of a 32-date “Here’s To The Good Times” tour that kicks off Oct. 3 in Brookings, S.D.

  •  

    Top 10 named for Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent

    The Top 10 finalists of the 2013 edition of Suburban Chicago's Got Talent have been named.

  •  
    This July 26, 2013 booking photo, provided by the Santa Fe County Sheriff shows, actor Wes Studi following his arrest on a aggravated drunken driving charge.

    Actor Wes Studi arrested on charges of DWI in N.M.

    Actor Wes Studi, well-known for his roles in “Dances with Wolves” and “The Last of the Mohicans,” was arrested early Friday on charges of aggravated drunken driving in New Mexico, Santa Fe police confirmed. According to a criminal complaint, Studi, 66, was arrested around 1 a.m. Friday while at a stop sign. The actor was in a 2005 black Volvo with two front tires blown out, police said.

  •  
    Live Nation posted on its Facebook page early Friday that Grammy winner Frank Ocean was told by doctors to rest his voice after performing in Melbourne at Festival Hall on Thursday night.

    Ocean cancels Australian shows due to vocal tear

    Frank Ocean is canceling the rest of his Australian live shows because of a tear on his vocal cords. Live Nation posted on its Facebook page early Friday that the Grammy winner was told by doctors to rest his voice after performing in Melbourne’s Festival Hall on Thursday night.

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    Think a little harder before saying no to vacationing with the parents

    As an adult in his 30s, this reader doesn't want to go on a cruise with his parents. But Carolyn Hax asks what's the harm if it will make them happy?

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    IndigoSun will play a Friday night set at Whippersnap Music and Arts Festival, Aug. 8-10.

    Local talent flocking to Whippersnap music festival

    You can find a music festival somewhere in the Chicago area almost any summer weekend. But Whippersnap? Never heard of it? Me neither. But for an event in only its third year, the Whippersnap Music and Arts Festival has certainly put together a weekend stuffed to the brim with musical talent.

  •  

    Can government help mortgage borrowers make better decisions?

    Government-mandated disclosures can help mortgage borrowers make decisions more wisely if properly implemented, but proper implementation cannot be taken for granted.

  •  

    Mortgage interest isn’t pre-paid

    Q.We had a 30-year loan for the mortgage of our house and we paid off the mortgage in full 16 years early. We thought we would receive not only the escrow money back but we would receive the remaining interest money back. This would have been the interest we would have paid for the 16 years remaining of the loan because we had been paying interest each month as part of our payments. But we received only the escrow money. We are wondering why.

  •  
    The cast and crew of “Glee” is saying goodbye to star Cory Monteith, who died earlier this month.

    ‘Glee’ holds Cory Monteith memorial for cast, crew

    LOS ANGELES — The cast and crew of “Glee” is saying goodbye to star Cory Monteith, who died earlier this month.Twentieth Century Fox Television says “Glee” co-star and Monteith’s real-life girlfriend Lea Michele and show creator Ryan Murphy gathered the show’s cast and crew for a memorial on Thursday. They shared memories and music in “an emotional celebration” of Monteith’s life.The 31-year-old actor was found dead in a hotel room in Vancouver, British Columbia, on July 13. An autopsy revealed he died of an overdose of heroin and alcohol. Murphy said recently that the show plans a tribute episode honoring Monteith that will address the death of his character, Finn. “Glee” is set to begin its fifth season on Sept. 26, a week later than originally planned.

  •  
    Fred Armisen will direct a live stream of an upcoming Kings of Leon concert on Aug. 9.

    Fred Armisen to direct Kings of Leon live stream

    Fred Armisen will direct a live stream of an upcoming Kings of Leon concert for the digital series “American Express Unstaged.” The Nashville, Tenn., band’s Aug. 9 concert at London’s Shepherd’s Bush will be webcast globally on Vevo and YouTube, a spokesman for American Express told The Associated Press.

  •  
    Some residents of the Jersey shore town of Berkeley Township, N.J., say they don’t want reality star Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi to benefit from efforts to rebuild from Superstorm Sandy.

    N.J. shore town nixes Snooki taping

    A New Jersey town trying to rebuild from Superstorm Sandy is pulling the plug on taping of the MTV show “Snooki & JWoww.” Berkeley Township officials say taping the “Jersey Shore” spinoff is a commercial enterprise, which would violate zoning ordinances. The town has notified the property’s owner that the home is in an area zoned for residential use.

  •  
    HBO says it’s unimaginable that a drama pilot, “Criminal Justice,” featuring one of James Gandolfini’s final performances will air. “Criminal Justice” was a series being restructured as a miniseries.

    HBO: Unimaginable that Gandolfini pilot will air

    An HBO executive says it’s unimaginable that a drama pilot featuring one of James Gandolfini’s final performances will air. Gandolfini shot a pilot for “Criminal Justice,” an adaptation of the 2008 BBC series. Gandolfini played a low-rent New York City attorney. The 51-year-old star of “The Sopranos” died of a heart attack in June.

  •  
    Ned Van Go, "Lost in the Trouble"

    Ned Van Go is roadhouse-ready on CD

    As their song titles suggest, Kentucky-based Ned Van Go play roadhouse rock like a band that loves the sound of broken glass.

  •  
    Robin Robertson Starr, the chief executive officer of the Richmond Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, said of Niblett: “He is one of the most beloved pets of my whole life, my dog that I adore with all of my heart. I adopted him after he was returned to us.”

    Unhappy returns of shelter pets can satisfy others

    The luckiest day of Niblett’s life had to be when he was returned to the animal shelter in Virginia where he had been adopted. Excessive barking when he was left alone in the yard earned the terrier mix his return trip in 2000. But he was soon readopted by Robin Robertson Starr, the chief executive officer of the Richmond Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, whose family loved him unconditionally and never left him alone again. “He is one of the most beloved pets of my whole life, my dog that I adore with all of my heart,” Starr said of the 16-year-old pooch.

  •  
    Mexican immigrants Jason (Juan Francisco Villa) and Medea (Sandra Delgado) try to make a better life for themselves and their son in Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood in Luis Alfaro's “Mojada,” in its world premiere at Victory Gardens Theater.

    Modern-day 'Medea': Transplanted tragedy set in Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood

    Conflicts between obligation and self-interest, between assimilation and isolation, propel “Mojada,” Luis Alfaro's retelling of Euripides' “Medea” in its world premiere at Victory Gardens Theater. This isn't the first time Alfaro has re-imagined a Greek classic as a contemporary Latino tragedy. Alfaro knows his source material and his subject. His observations about immigration — from the fear of detection to the desire to secure a legacy for oneself and one's family — are as immediate as today's headlines.

  •  
    Dogs and their owners can enjoy Lake Michigan and the Chicago River on the Mercury Skyline Cruiseline's Chicago Canine Cruise.

    Dog Days: Five fun things to do with your four-legged friends

    Suburban dog owners and their four-legged friends can enjoy a number of summertime activities together in these "Dog Days" of summer. Humans and canines can take a cruise on Chicago's Lake Michigan, attend a dog festival, enjoy a movie under the stars or even catch a baseball game.

  •  

    Theater events: First Folio’s ‘Rainmaker’ a family affair

    First Folio revives "The Rainmaker," Silk Road Rising presents the Midwest premiere of "Invasion!" and Jedlicka stages Andrew Lloyd Webber's rarely produced, "Whistle Down the Wind," this week in Chicago-area theater.

  •  
    A handcrafted pipe made at the site by Native Americans who quarry stone at Pipestone National Monument in Minnesota. The pipes are used in ceremonies and are also sold as works of art.

    Native American pipe focus of national monument

    Like his uncles and grandfather before him, Travis Erickson takes great pride in the handmade pipes he creates using red stone he digs from the ground and carves into intricate designs. Used both for works of art and in ceremonies, the pipes are an integral part of the history and culture of Native American tribes in the Plains. It’s at Pipestone National Monument where Erickson, a member of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate tribe, and other Native Americans quarry for the stone used to make the pipes.

  •  
    Sculptures are scattered across the 26-acre grounds of the Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts near Helena, Mont. The foundation offers artist residencies and free self-guided walking tours on the grounds of a former brick factory.

    5 free things in Helena, Mont., from art to trails

    Montana's capital is perfectly positioned as a halfway point between Glacier and Yellowstone national parks, but visitors often decide to extend their stopovers once they get a feel for the city's burgeoning art scene and its accessible hiking, biking and skiing trails. Helena is a city built on gold. It was founded in 1864 when four miners who had been searching unsuccessfully for the precious metal decided this spot on the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains would be their “last chance.”

  •  

    Water heater thermal blankets should not cover labels

    The water heater in my home has no insulation blanket, and the outer casing is not even warm to the touch. Why should I waste my money on a worthless blanket?

  •  

    Fixing your ‘throne’ can be a do-it-yourself task

    Whether you have a low-flow toilet or an old-timey “throne,” if the wax seal fails at the floor flange, you’re going to have to take care of it ASAP. It’s not a fun project, but definitely easy enough for an average do-it-yourselfer to accomplish. Since it means lifting the toilet up off the floor, have a friend there to lend a hand. The rest is fairly easy.

  •  

    Mortgage giants launch streamlined plan to help troubled owners

    Hundreds of thousands of owners who are behind on their mortgage can now qualify for an automatic reduction in their payments — without providing tons of financial information and other paperwork.

  •  
    The Waterford model at the Prairie Park condominiums in Wheeling features a great room with plenty of space for entertaining.

    Waterford at Prairie Park featured in model profile

    Prairie Park’s Waterford model won a gold key award and remains the Wheeling community’s most popular floor plan. The design shows many great features that appeal to a lot of people, said Jamie Smith, vice president of marketing for Smith Family Construction Inc., developer of the community.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: Efforts to remember Korean War veterans long overdue

    The Korean War ended 60 years ago this week, and local veterans finally are getting the long-absent recognition they deserve, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  
    Paul Kersey

    For Illinois’ leaders, a warning from Detroit

    Guest columnist Paul Kersey: Constitutional protections or not, here is the cold truth: Detroit is broke, and Detroit’s pensioners could wind up accepting steep cuts, regardless of what the state constitution says. When the money runs out, the money runs out. And that’s why government workers in Illinois should pay close attention to what happens in Michigan, because what happens in Detroit could be repeated here.

  •  

    Weiner should take care of his issues
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: In my view, this man has issues that need to be addressed by a mental health practitioner, and yet, according to the story in the Daily Herald, his statement regarding the latest disclosure says nothing about having sought professional help. Absent therapy, there is little doubt in my mind that, if elected, Mr. Weiner would continue his reprehensible activities from the mayor’s office.

  •  

    Courses important for boating safety
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: In Wisconsin, a Coast Guard-approved boating safety course certificate is required for all operators of motor boats and personal watercraft. In Illinois, adult operators are not required to have passed such a course; they are merely encouraged.

  •  

    Stop abortion: Use birth control
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: Come on America, it’s time to act on these issues. If you’re against abortion then be for birth control. The Chinese did it years ago, and now they buy our debt.

  •  

    Telling the truth vs. being truthful
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: Congressional hearings continue in Washington in an attempt to discover the who, what, when, where and why of so many scandals. I am fascinated by the rhetoric. No one lied. They misremembered, misspoke, incorrectly claimed, needed to backtrack, were misquoted, repeated incorrect information, and one I had to look up — they obfuscated. What concerns me more is their truthfulness.

  •  

    If the Bible says it, we’d better get on it
    A letter to the editor: A big thank-you to James Dubinski (July 17) for pointing out what God intended regarding the so-called “marriage equality” discussion. The divine knowledge he presented from the Good Book inspired me to look up other things that Gov. Pat Quinn and other Christians might be missing.

  •  

    You’re not a rock star, Mr. Obama
    A West Chicago letter to the editor: Enough already, Mr. Obama. Any one of us could have been Trayvon-but we aren’t. Playing the race card just doesn’t cut it. Mr. Zimmerman was tried by a jury of his peers, and there wasn’t evidence to convict him of any crime. It seems to me that you have a lot more things on your plate to start and/or finish rather getting involved in yet another area that is none of your business.

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    Enough with the blame game
    A South Elgin letter to the editor: My letter came this week: “We reduce Social Security benefits paid to widows if they also receive a government pension based on their own work. We reduce benefits by two-thirds of the amount of the pension.”

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