Football 2

Daily Archive : Saturday July 20, 2013

News

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    Vernon Hills High School students Jake Campbell, left, and Joe Blitstein compete against Stevenson High School students in an eating contest at Real Urban Barbecue in Vernon Hills on Saturday.

    Stevenson High School student team prevails in sandwich-eating contest

    The Stevenson and Vernon Hills high school football teams won’t meet on the field for another few months, but players jump-started the competition Saturday at a sandwich-eating contest sponsored by Real Urban Barbecue in Vernon Hills. At stake was a $500 donation to the athletic department of the school whose players consumed in the shortest amount of time, Real Urban Barbecue’s signature Hungry...

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    Independence Grove Forest Preserve beach was open on Saturday. The preserve near Libertyville reopened after being closed to the public for three days because of a bomb threat.

    Lake County’s Independence Grove Forest Preserve reopens, events and activities resume

    Independence Grove Forest Preserve near Libertyville reopened Saturday after officials determined a bomb threat risk had passed and pronounced the area safe for public use. The beach, marina, picnic areas and trails reopened and regularly scheduled activities resumed at the preserve, which had been closed to the public for more than three days following a credible bomb threat the district...

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    Pine Cove, Calif., resident Mark Dean and his dog Candy are packed and ready Friday if mandatory evacuation is announced.

    Thunderstorm threat a wildcard for California wildfire

    IDYLLWILD, Calif. — Firefighters got little help from Mother Nature on Saturday as much-needed rainfall from expected thunderstorms didn’t materialize for a huge wildfire burning in the Southern California mountains near Palm Springs.

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    Workers remove debris Saturday from the roof of the O’Brien Athletic Center on the campus of Ursuline College in Pepper Pike, Ohio.

    Tornado hits Ohio’s Ursuline College

    A tornado of 110 mph winds hit Ursuline College in northeast Ohio early Saturday morning, collapsing a wall of the school’s athletic center and damaging other buildings but causing no injuries, officials said.

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    A downed tree on the 200 block of West Sigwalt was one of dozens reported Saturday morning in the aftermath of Friday’s storm.

    No power, downed trees remain after Friday’s storm

    Thousands of homes remained without power Saturday afternoon in the Northwest suburbs, and ComEd officials said it could take until about 3 p.m. Sunday to return the area to full power. Hardest hit in the aftermath of Friday night’s storm were Arlington Heights, Mount Prospect and Skokie, said ComEd spokeswoman Liz Keating.

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    We’re quite sure several people would like to see the shuttered Mill Race Inn in Geneva get new life.

    Given one wish, what would you fix in Tri-Cities

    Dave Heun offers a challenge of sorts, asking his readers if they could have one wish to fix or rectify something in their town, what would it be. And remember ... it's only one thing.

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    Associated Press Members of the Putnam family, who were present when a woman died after falling from a roller coaster, are interviewed by reporters at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington, Texas.

    Woman’s Six Flags roller coaster death probed

    ARLINGTON, Texas — Investigators will try to determine if a woman who died while riding a roller coaster at a Six Flags amusement park in North Texas fell from the ride after some witnesses said she wasn’t properly secured.

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    Downers Grove couple died of stab wounds

    A Downers Grove couple found dead in their home Friday died from stab wounds, according to DuPage County Coroner Rich Jorgenson. Police have yet to release any additional details into the investigation other than the deaths of Thomas F. Smith, 41, and Jennifer M. Smith, 39, appear to be a domestic-related incident.

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    Schaumburg man critical after crash

    One man was critically injured in a single-car crash Saturday morning in Schaumburg. The unidentified man had to be extricated from the car by emergency workers.

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    The Air Ethiopian Boeing 787 Dreamliner ‘Queen of Sheba’ plane on the runway near Terminal 3, at Heathrow Airport, London.

    Boeing 787 inspectors focus on pinched wire

    U.K. and U.S. investigators are focused on the crushed wiring in the plane’s emergency locator transmitter while continuing to look into a number of possible causes for the blaze, said a person familiar with the probe.

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    Secretary of State John Kerry arrives to speak Friday at Queen Alia International Airport.

    Palestinians say ’67 borders basis for talks

    U.S. officials have said in the past that Kerry would reiterate standing American positions on the goals for renewed talks, including that a Palestinian state should be negotiated on the basis of Israel’s borders before the 1967 Mideast war, when Israel captured the Gaza Strip, West Bank and east Jerusalem.

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    Kimmo Williams performs at the annual Rockin’ for the Troops concert to benefit Operation Support Our Troops — America at Cantigny Park in Wheaton on Saturday.

    Crowd flocks to annual Wheaton concert for U.S. troops

    For some, the annual “Rockin’ for the Troops” concert in Cantigny Park in Wheaton has a very special, personal meaning. For others, it’s a chance to spend a relaxing day outdoors, with the added bonus of contributing to a good cause. The annual event held by Operation Support Our Troops — America featured lots of musical acts, including headliner country music star Ronnie Dunn of the due Brooks &...

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    A supporter of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi waves his poster during a protest Friday at a park in front of Cairo University, where protesters have installed their camp in Giza.

    Egypt forms committee to amend Islamist constitution

    Moves to amend the constitution are the latest push by the country’s new leadership to move ahead with a military-backed timetable for a return to democratic rule to Egypt. The drafting of Egypt’s constitution was one of the most divisive issues that came to characterize Morsi’s first and only year in office.

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    Lydia Sabanish, 12, of Cortland, hoists up a hay net for a horse named Hondo on Saturday at the Kane County Fair in St. Charles. Sabanish is a member of the Y-Not 4-H group out of Maple Park.

    Perfect weather for the Kane County Fair on Saturday

    Clad in chaps, cowboy hat and boots, 5-year-old Ezequiel “E.J.” Anguiano Jr. rode the mechanical bull with a wide smile on his face, left arm raised high in the air, even flinging his hat off, much to the delight of the crowd on Saturday at the Kane County Fair in St. Charles. EJ and his family were among hundreds of people who came to the fair on Saturday, the largest afternoon crowd since the...

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    Associated Press George P. Bush, 37, poses for a photo during an interview with The Associated Press in Frisco, Texas.

    George P. Bush starts small amid high expectations

    Political observers wonder if the Spanish-speaker who offers a unique blend of Republican royalty and Hispanic heritage can slow what looks like Texas’ inevitable demographic slide toward a Democratic-leaning state. His mother, Columba, is from Mexico.

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    Huma Abedin, an aide to then Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, attends an event with farmers in Mlandizi, Tanzania, as controversy swirled around Abedin’s husband, Anthony Weiner.

    Wives of Spitzer, Weiner scrutinized in NYC races

    Silda Wall Spitzer, who famously stood by husband Eliot Spitzer in 2008 when he stepped down as governor in a prostitution scandal, hasn’t been seen in the early days of his campaign for city comptroller, though Spitzer insists she’s supportive.Huma Abedin, who was notably absent when husband Anthony Weiner resigned his congressional seat in 2011 after he acknowledged sending lewd Twitter photos...

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    Tragically Hip show at RiverEdge canceled
    The Tragically Hip has canceled its performance tonight at Aurora’s RiverEdge Park. The venue’s HYPERLINK "http://riveredgeaurora.com" website cites a “weather related incident” at the band’s Buffalo, N.Y. show Friday as the reason for the cancellation. The 9 p.m. appearance is one of three scheduled tonight as part of the Two Brothers concert series.

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    Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, holds her son Jahvaris Fulton’s hand while on stage during a “Justice for Trayvon” rally Saturday in New York.

    ‘Justice for Trayvon’ rallies held throughout U.S.

    ATLANTA — One week after a jury found George Zimmerman not guilty in the death of unarmed teen Trayvon Martin, people gathered for nationwide rallies to press for changes to self-defense laws and for federal civil rights charges against the former neighborhood watch leader.

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    Police investigate a scene Friday where four individuals reportedly were held captive, in Houston.

    Charges in case of men found held in Texas home

    Walter Renard Jones faces two counts of injury to the elderly. He is being held without bond in the Harris County Jail and set to appear in court Monday.

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    'Justice for Trayvon' rally set for Indianapolis

    A rally is scheduled in Indianapolis one week after a jury found George Zimmerman not guilty in the death of unarmed teen Trayvon Martin. The Rev. Al Sharpton's National Action Network organized the "Justice for Trayvon" rallies Saturday outside federal buildings in 100-plus cities, including Indianapolis. The rallies are intended to press for civil rights charges against Zimmerman.

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    Associated Press In this image released by the Egyptian presidency, Egypt’s President Adly Mansour, center right, meets Jordan’s King Abdullah II, center left, at the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, July 20. Jordan’s King Abdullah II arrived in Egypt’s capital on Saturday for a short visit — the first visit by a head of state to Egypt since the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi on July 3. Jordan’s Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh, from left, Chief of the Jordanian Royal Court Fayez Tarawneh, Vice President Mohammed ElBaradei, Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi and Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi also joined the meeting.

    Jordan’s king meets Egypt’s new leadership
    Jordan’s King Abdullah has met with Egypt’s new leaders in the first visit by a head of state to Cairo since the popularly-backed military coup. A statement Saturday from Egypt’s presidency said the king voiced his support for the “national choices” made by Egyptians.

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    Egypt to reevaluate Syria ties after coup
    Egypt is reevaluating its relationship with Syria following the military’s ouster of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, the country’s foreign minister said Saturday. In his first public comments since becoming Egypt’s top diplomat, Nabil Fahmy said Cairo continues to support the Syrian uprising but that Egypt has no intention of supporting a jihad — or holy war — in Syria.

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    Associated Press Myanmar President Thein Sein, left, arrives at Yangon International Airport in Yangon, Myanmar as he returns from a European tour, Saturday, July 20. Myanmar’s president on Saturday lifted a state of emergency in the central part of the country put in place after Buddhist-led mobs went on a rampage, killing dozens of Muslims and burning down their shops and homes. Many of the victims were teachers and teenage students from an Islamic school.

    Myanmar lifts emergency order in riot-hit areas
    Myanmar’s president on Saturday lifted a state of emergency in the central part of the country put in place after Buddhist-led mobs went on a rampage, killing dozens of Muslims and burning down their shops and homes. Many of the victims were teachers and teenage students from an Islamic school.

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    4th suspected heat-related death in Milwaukee
    Milwaukee authorities are reporting a fourth suspected heat-related death. The Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office says the victim is a 64-year-old woman who died early Saturday.

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    Associated Press Worshippers attend a memorial mass held for supporters and families of those killed in the Aurora movie theater shootings, at St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church, in Aurora, Colo., on Friday July 19. Saturday, July 20, marks one year since the theater killing rampage left 12 dead and 70 wounded.

    A year after shootings, Colorado looks for healing
    Parents, siblings and survivors of those slain in the Aurora theater massacre exactly one year ago have held a ceremony of prayer, song and remembrance. Several hundred people gathered in Aurora on Saturday to honor the victims, the survivors and first responders. The names of the dead were read, a bell ringing once for each victim.

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    Police: 6-year-old shot in chest hit by crossfire
    Police say a 6-year-old girl who was shot in the chest and critically wounded was struck by crossfire as two gunmen shot at each other on Chicago’s Far South Side. A 52-year-old woman was also hit in the leg and wounded during Friday night’s shooting in the Roseland neighborhood.

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    China detains city workers after fruit seller dies
    Police in south-central China detained six urban management officers Saturday on suspicion of intentionally harming others and their supervisors were fired after a watermelon grower died in a conflict with authorities when he tried to sell fruit in their county, state media reported. The death of Deng Zhengjia earlier in the week has infuriated the public, who have long resented the heavy-handed...

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    Associated Press A witness to an explosion is mobbed by journalists at Beijing International Airport’s Terminal 3, in Beijing, China, Saturday, July 20. A man on a wheelchair set off a homemade bomb at the terminal.

    Bomb detonated at Beijing airport; 1 injured
    A man in a wheelchair who was airing grievances set off a homemade bomb in a crowded terminal at Beijing’s main airport on Saturday evening, injuring himself but no one else, Chinese state media and witnesses said.

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    Associated Press Cedar Point police standby as a person is tended to at the Shoot the Rapids ride at the Cedar Point amusement park in Sandusky, Ohio on Friday, July 19. A boat on the ride accidentally rolled backward down a hill and flipped over when the ride malfunctioned, injuring all seven people on it.

    Boat rolls backward at Ohio amusement park; 7 hurt
    A boat on a thrill ride at an amusement park that bills itself as the best in the world accidentally rolled backward down a hill and flipped over in water when the ride malfunctioned Friday, injuring all seven people on it.

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    Associated Press In this Aug. 4, 2009, file photo, veteran White House reporter Helen Thomas, left, celebrates her 89th birthday with President Barack Obama, celebrating his 48th birthday, in the White House Press Briefing Room in Washington. Thomas, a pioneer for women in journalism and an irrepressible White House correspondent, has died Saturday, July 20, 2013. She was 92.

    Pioneering journalist Helen Thomas dies at 92

    Helen Thomas, the irrepressible White House correspondent who used her seat in the front row of history to grill nine presidents and was not shy about sharing her opinions, died Saturday. She was 92. Thomas, who died at her apartment in Washington, had been ill for a long time, and in and out of the hospital before coming home Thursday, according to a friend, Muriel Dobbin.

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    Michelin announces voluntary recall of 100K tires

    Michelin is voluntarily recalling 100,000 tires after a retailer discovered that some had holes and quickly deflated. The recall affects certain sizes of Michelin’s LTX M/S 2, X Radial LT2 and Latitude Tour tires. The tires are typically used on light trucks and SUVs.

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    Advocates gladly would welcome the same outpouring of support that Daily Herald readers have shown to Rosan Acosta, shown here, a homeless Arlington Heights woman whose belongings were destroyed this week by an arsonist. “Her story is not a unique one, unfortunately,” said Joel Williams, executive director of PADS Lake County. “There are a lot of people who are in desperate need of help.”

    Suburban homeless shelters, agencies say need is greater than ever

    Agencies that work with the suburban homeless population would gladly welcome the same outpouring of support that Daily Herald readers have shown to Rosan Acosta, a homeless Arlington Heights woman whose belongings were destroyed this week by an arsonist. “Her story is not a unique one, unfortunately,” said Joel Williams, executive director of PADS Lake County.

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    A 1913 edition of the Lake County Independent showcases the Volo vigilante event.

    ‘Rail party’ for Volo woman 100 years ago brought widespread attention to town

    This past week marked the 100th anniversary of an unusual event that focused the spotlight on the little village of Volo. Minnie Richardson, suspected of cheating on her handicapped husband with her brother-in-law, was ridden on a rail by a group of angry women. "Initially, I was completely doubtful this could ever take place here," said Diana Dretske, a local historian and collections...

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    Spear often turns to prayer to help him get through the marathon-a-day workload.

    St. Charles man running across U.S. making pit stop at home

    St. Charles resident and Willow Creek pastor Steve Spear will return to his community and church this weekend as he completes the Illinois portion of his run across the country. Spear has been running a marathon or more a day since April to get to this point. He's had doubt along the way. “The days had piled up, and there seemed to be endless road," he said. But he's raising money to bring...

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Sports

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    Chicago Cubs starting pitcher Carlos Villanueva works against the Colorado Rockies in the first inning of a baseball game in Denver on Saturday in Denver. Villanueva has lost both of his starts against the Rockies.

    Cubs' Villanueva loses again to Rockies, 9-3

    Chicago Cubs pitcher Carlos Villanueva was on course to reverse his history of struggling against Colorado until he made the mistake of walking his Rockies counterpart. The fourth-inning, two-out walk to Juan Nicasio opened the door to a three-run inning and the Rockies went on to beat Villanueva and the Cubs 9-3 Saturday night. Villanueva (2-6) allowed seven runs on nine hits in four innings in dropping to 0-2 with a 14.00 ERA in losing both of his starts against the Rockies this season.

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    Bulls guard Marquis Teague, who averaged 18.3 points in five summer-league games, is still a work in progress.

    Taking a bit of a look into Bulls’ future

    The Bulls looked good in the Las Vegas summer league, other than a rough playoff loss to a much lower seed. The Bulls used some players that should be on next season’s roster, so here’s a recap and analysis of how they fared.

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    My Option, at right with Eduardo Perez aboard, holds off the late charge from Frivolous to win Saturday’s Arlington Oaks at Arlington Park.

    My Option charges to victory at Arlington

    My Option, coming off a tough defeat to Bold Kitten in the Purple Violet Stakes on June 1, turned the tables on that rival and four others when she gamely prevailed by a neck over Frivolous in the Grade III Arlington Oaks on Saturday.

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    Jake Peavy

    Peavy gets win in return to White Sox’ rotation

    In his first start since June 4, Jake Peavy helped the White Sox beat the Braves Saturday with 6 solid innings. Pitching in front of a flock of scouts at U.S. Cellular Field, Peavy also helped his trade value.

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    Cougars drop Lugnuts 8-4

    The Kane County Cougars defeated the visiting Lansing Lugnuts 8-4 on Saturday night in a rain-shortened 5½-inning game.

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    Boomers handle Wild Things 6-3

    The Schaumburg Boomers built a 6-0 lead and held off the Washington Wild Things 6-3 to win on the road Saturday night, stopping a brief two-game slide.

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    Bandits win 7-1

    Rookie pitchers Michelle Gascoigne and Ivy Renfroe faced off in the circle Saturday night for the first time since they competed against each other in the 2013 Women’s College World Series. Gascoigne and the host Bandits prevailed to win Game 3 of the series 7-1.

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    Sky roll continues with 80-69 victory

    The Chicago Sky has never once qualified for the postseason over its eight-year existence in the WNBA. But the current team is doing everything in its power to put that dubious distinction on ice. An 80-69 victory over New York Liberrty in front of 6,037 at the Allstate Arena moved the Sky to 12-4 and kept the team atop the Eastern Conference standings.

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    Fire has some fun in 4-1 victory

    The Chicago Fire treated D.C. United like the last-place team it is, beating up on the Major League Soccer doormat 4-1 before 17,190 fans Saturday night at Toyota Park.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Chris Sale just has too much on the plus side for a trade to make sense.

    Spiegel: White Sox’ Sale just too valuable to trade away

    Stop letting your friends, or your favorite baseball pundits, tell you it’s a good idea to trade Chris Sale.Weekly baseball column by Matt Spiegel, who co-hosts "The McNeil & Spiegel Show" 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday on WSCR 670-AM, The Score.

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    Chicago White Sox’s Alex Rios watches his grand slam home run during the third inning of an interleague baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Saturday, July 20, 2013, in Chicago.

    Rios, White Sox batter Maholm, Braves in 9-4 win

    Alex Rios hit a grand slam and drove in five runs, and Jake Peavy pitched six solid inning in his return from the disabled list to lead the Chicago White Sox to a 9-4 victory over the Atlanta Braves on Saturday.

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    The White Sox’ Alex Rios watches his grand slam sail to the seats in the third inning Saturday against the Braves.

    Rios back in lineup, slams White Sox to victory

    After disagreeing with manager Robin Ventura's decision to pull him out of Friday night's game for a lack of hustle, Alex Rios hit a grand slam and drove in 5 runs Saturday to lift the White Sox to a 10-6 win over the Braves.

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    The Wolves are as happy to have John Anderson back as head coach as Anderson is to be back in Chicago.

    Wolves happy for Blackhawks, but want own title

    The return of John Anderson to the Chicago Wolves means only one thing to the local AHL team. They expect to win another title, something that hasn’t happened since Anderson left for the NHL.

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    With the Bears finishing at 10-6 last season, Marc Trestman may be smiling now, but he won’t have the usual grace period given to most new NFL coaches.

    For Bears, it’s all about a playoff spot

    Starting with the first training-camp practice Friday morning, new Bears coach Marc Trestman’s squad will begin the more meaningful mission of proving that it can do what last year’s 10-6 team couldn’t: make it to the postseason.

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    Lee Westwood of England plays a shot on the 4th hole during the third round of the British Open Golf Championship at Muirfield, Scotland.

    Westwood leads going to final round

    Tiger Woods fought back and was even with Westwood going to the 17th. But Westwood made a birdie and Woods a sloppy bogey for a two-shot swing.

Business

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    Tanya Coleman is surrounded by moving boxes as she sits in her Vermont Plaza apartment in Atlantic City, N.J.

    Atlantic City redevelopment keeps poor on the move

    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — As Sandra Taliaferro prepares to move out of her apartment to make way for redevelopment efforts near Atlantic City’s newest casino, she recalls the state of the city when she moved there as a teenager more than 50 years ago.“You weren’t allowed to go across Atlantic past a certain time,” said Taliaferro, who is black, explaining that the city remained partly racially segregated.Modern redevelopment efforts are having a similar effect, she said. “Now it’s not race; it’s money. You’ve got your side, and I’ve got my side of town.”At 66, Taliaferro is one of the main critics of the way the state Casino Reinvestment Development Authority has handled plans to overhaul her neighborhood, which sits in the shadows of the year-old Revel Casino-Hotel.The battle is the latest conflict here in which low-income or middle-class residents believe developers and officials are casting aside their homes like the plastic houses in Monopoly, the board game inspired by Atlantic City real estate.Linda Steele, president of the NAACP’s Atlantic City branch, counts more than 500 housing units that have been cleared since the late 1980s to make way for projects including an outlet mall and convention center — a significant number in a city with 40,000 residents.Many of the disputes have been local news, but some of the disputes attracted wide attention. In the 1990s, Donald Trump joined residents in a futile attempt to fight an Expressway expansion to serve a casino planned by his rival, Steve Wynn. The road was built, and so was a casino, though not by Wynn; the swanky Borgata is now the most profitable casino in the city. And then there’s the case of Vera Coking, a widow who refused to sell her house to Penthouse owner Bob Guccione, prompting him to build the steel skeleton of a building right around it. Trump later tore down that frame to put up his own casino but never prevailed in getting Coking to sell.The marriage of the casino industry and its host city has been complicated since gambling arrived in 1978. After decades of growth, casino revenue has fallen precipitously since 2007. And the city remains a place where signs of poverty co-exist with symbols of excess — limousines zipping past pawn shops and homeless people. The poverty rate is 29 percent, even higher than in 1980.The opening of Revel has inspired plans for the surrounding South Inlet area.A group that includes former NBA star Shaquille O’Neal has approval to build a $75 million entertainment complex, and the CRDA is trying to assemble and clear other land to sell to developers. The first step is obtaining about 70 units of housing, mostly in the two-story Vermont Plaza and Metropolitan Plaza apartment complexes. About a third of the families have moved out. CRDA’s executive director, John Palmieri, said there aren’t specific plans for how that area might be transformed. “We want to create a neighborhood here,” he said. “It’s no mystery. It’s a beautiful location.”As Revel opened last year, CRDA planned to use its revenue share — 1.25 percent of gambling winnings — to pay for a $50 million bond to buy and clear several blocks. But Revel has struggled, losing money, laying off workers, filing for bankruptcy and changing executive teams.So CRDA is using a more modest $8.5 million from unrestricted funds to remake the neighborhood and is willing to use its eminent domain powers if owners decline to sell.Many residents received eviction notices with deadlines to leave by last week, but they can stay longer to find suitable places, said Palmieri, who acknowledges they have a right to be angry.Palmieri says his organization helps relocate the displaced residents, offering house-hunting help it doesn’t have to and paying more for moving and new places than is required. His staff says three tenants who have moved out of South Inlet have used CRDA funding for down payments on homes of their own.

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    A large gathering of people checks out the new chapel Friday at the Alexian Brothers Hospice Residence in Elk Grove.

    Alexian hospice residence opens in Elk Grove Village

    Many local officials and residents were on hand for the ceremonial opening of Alexian Brothers Health System’s hospice residence in Elk Grove Village Friday afternoon. The $7.5 million, 19,150-square-foot facility took just over a year to build and boasts 16 patient rooms.

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    When you buy an iPhone, it works exactly as Apple intended; it’s never adulterated by “features” that the company didn’t approve. But when you buy an Android phone, even a really great one, you’re not getting the device that Google’s designers had in mind when they created the OS.

    I tried the Android. Now give me back my iPhone!

    It’s unclear if Google makes much money from Android directly — by some estimates Google makes as much from ads on Apple’s iOS devices as it does on Android machines. But there’s no question that Android has helped lower the prices of smartphones across the globe, which can only help Google’s ad business. It’s hard to call Android anything other than a resounding success. Well, except for one small thing: Most Android phones are lousy.

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    Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer speaks during a news conference in New York. Not much had been going right for Yahoo until it lured Marissa Mayer away from Google to become its CEO last summer. The move is shaping up as the best thing to happen to Yahoo since 2005 when it invested $1 billion in Alibaba, a then little-known Internet company in China.

    Yahoo under Mayer remains work in progress

    Yahoo chief executive Marissa Mayer wrapped up her first year as head of the world’s largest Internet portal with tepid results on almost every metric. The results reinforce analysts’ claims that Yahoo’s soaring stock prices, up 73 percent since last July, have less to do with the 38-year-old chief executive’s attempted turnaround and more to do with Yahoo’s tantalizing stake in the Alibaba Group, the Chinese e-commerce giant that may go public this year.

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    New York judge blasts refusal to review online TV ruling

    A federal appeals judge warned that the revenue streams that finance free television were being undermined by court rulings permitting a startup company to offer live television broadcasts over the Internet without paying fees to broadcasters. U.S. Circuit Judge Denny Chin included the warning in a blistering dissent after the full 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan refused to make the Aereo Inc. case one of the rare instances when it assembles all of its judges to decide an issue.

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    A video camera for Twitter aims at Taro Yamamoto as he delivers a speech during his campaign rally for the upcoming upper house election in Tokyo. The Sunday parliamentary election marks the first time Internet campaigning is legal in Japan. Yamamoto, a movie star turned lawmaker hopeful, is live-streaming his campaign speeches and urging crowds to tweet his photo. The tech-savvy approach is a major departure from the old-style campaigning that has long dominated here.

    Japan gets Internet campaign, but not savvy candidates

    An upper house election this Sunday marks the first time Internet campaigning is legal in Japan. That has political parties and candidates, many still novices at social media, scrambling to figure out how to use it to woo voters. Some boast only a few hundred Twitter followers; their Facebook posts are often just photos of the noodles they ordered for lunch. Advocates of Internet campaigning hope that, over time, it will help voters learn what candidates stand for and make more informed decisions.

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    China’s population of Internet users has grown to 591 million, driven by a 20 percent rise over the past year in the number of people who surf the Web from smartphones and other wireless devices.

    China’s online population rises to 519 million

    China’s population of Internet users has grown to 591 million, driven by a 20 percent rise over the past year in the number of people who surf the Web from smartphones and other wireless devices, an industry group reported Wednesday. The communist government encourages Internet use for business and education but tries to block access to material deemed subversive or obscene.

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    Over the last several years, AT&T has poured tens of billions of dollars into improving its network.

    Review: Apple, AT&T, Microsoft now stink less

    It’s hard for a company that’s improved a pilloried product to announce to the world, “Hey, we stink less than we used to.” So, Apple, AT&T and Microsoft, I’m here to do it for you. With relatively little fanfare, the three tech giants have significantly improved offerings that, in their earlier forms, earned scathing criticism and damaged reputations: AT&T’s voice service, Apple Maps and Windows 8.

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    Tech firms, liberties groups: More sunlight on surveillance

    A coalition of technology companies and civil liberties groups have called on President Barack Obama and congressional leaders to dramatically expand the amount of information reported publicly about U.S. government surveillance efforts. The request, made in a letter with more than 50 signatories, is the most sweeping and cohesive push to bring more accountability to electronic government eavesdropping in the aftermath of revelations about National Security Agency collection of user data.

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    App reviews: Flying Alphabetinis, Poetry App
    “The Flying Alphabetinis,” from Fingerprint Digital, is a Boggle-like game, recommended for ages 6 and up, that pits players against each other, and the clock, to find as many words as possible in a grid. If you’re looking for a little inspiration or simply another way to slowly get the students in your house back into the swing of things before school starts again, drop in a little appreciation for the written word with the Poetry App from the Josephine Hart Poetry Foundation.

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    Tech center falters in Russian political turf war

    Since announcing the creation of Skolkovo in 2010 as part of a drive to wean the economy off oil and gas, which represent half of state revenue, Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev lured almost $500 million of investment pledges from companies including Intel, Microsoft, Siemens and Samsung Electronics. But the pledges have become increasingly tenuous since last year, when Putin wrested back the Kremlin from his former protégé.

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    The Pebble functions as an extension of the smartphone, a replacement for the ring signal whenever you get a call, text, email or calendar reminder. It also shows the first few lines of messages, so the wearer would know whether to fish out the phone for replies.

    Review: Pebble watch is a great way to be bugged

    The Pebble has a lot of rough edges, but it does a good job of demonstrating the potential of “wearable” computing. Apple has filed patents that demonstrate it’s working on a watch, and other “smart” watches are proliferating. The Pebble has impeccable underdog credibility as the brain child of a 26-year-old Canadian entrepreneur who struggled to find money to make it until he posted his project on the fundraising site Kickstarter.

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    Google is increasing its Washington footprint at a time when it is lobbying lawmakers on several issues.

    Google to get bigger Washington D.C. digs

    Google is dramatically expanding its Washington offices and relocating them to within a couple of blocks of the U.S. Capitol. The tech giant signed a lease for a 55,000-square-foot building at 25 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington.

Life & Entertainment

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    “Man of Steel” director Zack Snyder announced at San Diego’s Comic-Con that he will be making another Superman film that will also feature Batman.

    Superman is coming back and this time with Batman

    SAN DIEGO — Superman is coming back, and he’ll have a caped co-star.“Man of Steel” director Zack Snyder made a surprise appearance at Comic-Con on Saturday to announce he is making another Superman film and it will include Batman — the first time the two superheroes will be united on the big screen.He declined to reveal many details, saying the script is just being written. He then invited an actor onstage to read a passage to hint at the storyline.“I am the man who beat you,” read Harry Lennox, before an image of the Superman logo, backed by the Batman symbol, flashed on the screen.Warner Bros. confirmed the first pairing in a statement.Snyder re-imagined Superman in his June blockbuster “Man of Steel,” starring Henry Cavill and Amy Adams. The film has grossed more than $630 million worldwide.Cavill and Adams will appear in the sequel, Warner Bros. said.Reaction to the news stunned Twitter and left fans at Comic-Con giddy.“Personally, I love him,” said Claudia Gomez, who was wearing a Batman T-shirt while her niece, Ana, wore a Superman shirt. Gomez, who traveled to Comic-Con from Mexico City, said the pairing of both heroes left her optimistic about a new Superman film.Benjamin Ha, who dressed as Superman to his wife’s Wonder Woman, said bringing the two superheroes together will yield fireworks.“They’re both alpha males,” he said.Production is set to begin next year and the film is expected to be released in the summer of 2015.

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    Spider-Man, left, and Jamie Foxx attend the “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” panel on Day 3 of Comic-Con International on Friday.

    Jamie Foxx backs Trayvon Martin’s mom ‘forever’

    “It was great to see Bruce Springsteen in Ireland dedicate a song to Trayvon. I think that’s what really makes it universal in the fact that we know that there’s race involved, but to see all races coming together and saying that hey, there’s something wrong,” Jamie Foxx said.

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    Chef Greg Denton tops of his grilled Metrovino's grilled halibut dish with a black trumpet and bacon vinaigrette. Denton's restaurant, Ox, is making its mark in a competitive food scene, one thatís quickly establishing itself as a hub for fare that brings the essence of a place to the diner's plate. That is usually something in season, close by, and in most cases, organic.

    Armed chefs get closer to food they make

    Hoping to bridge the gap between the urban food scene and rural hunting traditions, Oregon partnered with Nicky Farm — which raises game and cattle for Portland's burgeoning restaurant scene — to teach some of the region's elite chefs what's really involved in getting dinner on the table.

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    Roselyn Sanchez finds fame speaking second language

    Puerto Rican actress Roselyn Sanchez has found fame using English, her second language. Sanchez is one of the stars of the new Lifetime series “Devious Maids,” from producer Marc Cherry, which airs Sundays on Lifetime.

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    Samantha Critchell, fashion reporter and editor at The Associated Press, wears a technology-infused sports jacket. The jacket is made of breathable wicking fabrics used in the sports market to regulate body temperatures.

    Can athletic gear solve a nonathletic problem?

    Pulling on the track jacket when the newscaster on the radio just said it was 7 a.m. and already 83 degrees felt a little weird. Maybe even crazy. I did it anyway. I had read and heard so much about the technology-infused breathable wicking fabrics being used in the sports market to regulate body temperatures that I wanted to put them to the test — in a decidedly nonathletic environment.

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    Rosario Dawson stars as a psychiatrist in Danny Boyle’s “Trance.”

    DVD previews: ‘Trance,’ ‘Ginger and Rosa’
    Danny Boyle plays fast and loose with reality in “Trance,” a trippy thriller about an amnesiac man who gets hypnotized to remember where he has hidden a stolen painting. You’re never quite sure whether what you’re seeing is actually happening or merely the result of a character’s posthypnotic suggestion. That’s one of the pleasures of this film, coming Tuesday to DVD.

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    The group Arrival From Sweden presents “The Music of ABBA” in a concert at the Rosemont Theatre.

    Saturday picks: Music of ABBA

    The original members of ABBA have pledged never to reunite in concert, so the Swedish tribute band Arrival is probably the closest you can get in the show “The Music of ABBA.” Relive the flashy 1970s disco costumes Saturday at the Rosemont Theatre. Also, bands from across the country will perform at the Wheaton Band Festival in Memorial Park, 208 W. Union Ave., Wheaton.

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    What was the purpose of this device?

    Odd shaped spoon device has unusual use

    Q. I found this piece while going through old stuff in a deceased relative’s house. It caught my eye because it looked to be silver. I have no idea what it might be. My best guess is a snuff spoon. Other than the spoon, it also has a retractable blade. On the back is engraved, “Gifford’s Pat. Nov. 5, 1867.” It is 2-1/4 inches long closed and 2-3/4 inches long when opened. I am stumped. What was it used for, and does it have any value?

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    “My Lunches with Orson: Conversations Between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles” edited by Peter Biskind

    Filmmaker’s wit enlivens ‘My Lunches With Orson’

    For years, writer and director Henry Jaglom joined Orson Welles at Ma Maison for lunch nearly every week. He was Welles’ unofficial agent and representative, trying to get his friend’s movie projects off the ground. Over lunch, they discussed practically anything — Welles’ weight was out of bounds — and Welles offered seemingly unguarded observations, at times humorous and profane. Decades after Welles’ death in 1985, author Peter Biskind presents the transcripts from those recorded lunches. Welles appears uncensored — and it’s not a pretty sight.

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    Twenty years ago, many Phoenix-area resorts shut down for the summer because of the heat, now substantial deals are offered that attract locals and tourists alike to places like the Wildfire Golf Club.

    Desert deals heat up in Arizona

    Winter turns the Valley of the Sun into a destination, luring visitors from colder climates around the world to the warmth of the desert. Once the searing heat of summer hits, the tourists tend to stay away and even the locals look to escape, heading off to the mountains of Flagstaff or beaches of Southern California.But here’s a little secret for you value-conscious travelers out there: Summer is the best time to get deals in the desert.

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    Karen Anderson’s houseboat, Serendipity 2, at Gangplank Marina in Washington. The Serendipity, a barge that looks like an A-frame with the top lopped off, has less than 500 square feet.

    Houseboat neighbors enjoy views, commutes, camaraderie

    The view from David Murray’s home in Washington is among the best in the city, a panorama of the Washington Channel bookended by the army’s Fort McNair and the Washington Monument. “What more could I ask for?” asks Murray, surveying his surroundings as his shirt flutters in a breeze city dwellers would envy. Murray, 30, is one of about 140 waterborne householders who live in Washington’s Gangplank Marina, a vibrant, tightknit and quirky community of folks who have given up life on land — “on the hard,” as they say — and maintain year-round homes on the ebb and flow of a waterway.

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    Fee paid to real estate brokers varies by region

    Q. I would like to know what the commission rate is for sellers?

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    Mortgage are underappreciated, and often misunderstood

    The standard mortgage contract in the U.S. today calls for full repayment of the balance over the term with equal monthly payments of principal and interest. I will save space by calling a fully amortizing mortgage with equal monthly payments a FAM.

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    A condo board can buy bulk high-speed Internet service

    Q. The board of our condominium association is considering entering into a bulk high speed Internet service contract for all units. I don’t want the service, and I certainly don’t want to pay for it. Does the board have the authority to enter into this agreement and charge me for the Internet service?

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    Recess lighting can overheat attic insulation

    Q. I recently moved to Camarillo, Calif., and bought a condo. We have recess lighting in the kitchen and bathrooms. In the attic, the insulation around the recess lighting has been removed. Why? Can I insulate safely?

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    A comfortable kitchen prepared using universal design

    When considering the most comfortable spot in the home, the kitchen probably isn’t the first room that comes to mind. But the heart of the home has come a long way in the realm of comfort, with designers making kitchen work easier than ever on the mind and body.

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    This modern, contemporary home in Arlington Heights stands out visually, and is also more friendly to the environment, than most houses in the suburbs.

    Architect's contemporary suburban home gets off tract

    Kenneth Turner, design partner in the international architecture firm of Turner + DeCelles, travels all over the world designing high-rise buildings. He directed design for the world's tallest tower, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai. So when he returns home in Arlington Heights, Turner wants to find himself in a home that meets his modern architectural standards.

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    New Kids on the Block is set to perform at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont on the same bill with Boyz II Men and 98 Degrees.

    Weekend picks: OMG! NKOTB plays Allstate

    The girls will be screaming Friday when New Kids on the Block headlines The Package Tour, which also features Boyz II Men and 98 Degrees, at Allstate Arena in Rosemont. If you can't stand the heat, head inside for Chris Isaak's concert at the Arcada in St. Charles or Harry Connick Jr.'s performance at Symphony Center in Chicago. Or laugh it up when Jay Pharoah performs celebrity impressions at Zanies in the suburbs.

Discuss

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    The Soapbox
    The Daily Herald editorial board writes about summer heat, summer exercise and summer road construction -- as well as suburban topics not so seasonally related.

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    Union members culpable in rat incident
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: This is in response to the July 13 article, “Man accused of stabbing inflatable rat.” George Koukos was arrested with bail set for $100,000 on charges of stabbing and running over an inflatable union rat. But who caused the scene?

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    GOP is too cool to cap and trade
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: Cap and trade is berated by the Republicans as being too costly of a solution to a problem they don’t want to admit exists because it is anathema to their donors. How many of us recall the great concerns of the states in the eastern United States of the problem of acid rain of a generation ago?

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    Cubs, fans deserve a better ballpark
    A Fox Lake letter to the editor: It’s time for the Ricketts family to consider the other offers from Arlington Heights or Rosemont. The mayor of Rosemont has offered a tremendous section of land to build one of these beautiful ballparks close to public transportation.

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