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Daily Archive : Sunday July 14, 2013

News

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    Vancouver police say Canadian born actor Corey Montieth, star of the hit show "Glee" has been found dead in his hotel room.

    'Glee' co-stars react to news of Monteith's death

    Cory Monteith, the handsome young actor who shot to fame in the hit TV series "Glee" but was beset by addiction struggles so fierce that he once said he was lucky to be alive, was found dead in a hotel room, police said. He was 31. Monteith, who played star quarterback-turned-singer Finn Hudson on the Fox TV series, was found dead in his hotel room.

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    Some changes are being made Lake Arlington following the death of a pedestrian last month.

    Changes planned at Lake Arlington path following death

    The Arlington Heights Park District announced this weekend that it will make a few interim changes at Lake Arlington in light of the recent death of a pedestrian who was struck by a bicyclist last month. As part of the interim action plan for Lake Arlington, the park district will restrict bicycle and other wheeled use to the outside lane of the path and require people to only travel one-way...

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    Throngs of marches gather on Times Square as they listen to a speaker Sunday in New York for a protest against the acquittal of volunteer neighborhood watch member George Zimmerman in the 2012 killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

    Rallies large and small follow Zimmerman verdict

    Thousands of demonstrators from across the country — chanting, praying and even fighting tears — protested a jury's decision to clear neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman in the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager while the Justice Department considered whether to file criminal civil rights charges.

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    Director Edmond Coisson monitors filming of the movie “Precious Mettle” at a home in downtown Naperville last month. Other scenes were shot at a home in Aurora.

    Suburban homes wanted for TV, film projects

    Want your home to be featured in movies, on TV, or in ads? Suburban homes are in demand right now, and while it can be a lucrative and brag-worthy opportunity for homeowners, there are some downsides, too. How do you get your home chosen? We have some tips, but in the end, “it’s a lot of luck,” said Timothy Tiedje who’s worked on dozens of movies.

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    Evan, left, and Liam Fisher of Round Lake get a good look at the jaws of a 20 foot long Great White Shark during The Ocean Adventure, a program by Wayne and Karen Brown, marine biologists, about their Australian Great White Shark Expedition.

    Images: The Week in Pictures
    This edition of The Week in Pictures features young fishermen with a plan, kids learning about sharks, and a friendly turtle at a pet blessing ceremony.

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    Malian troops march on the Champs Elyses during the Bastille Day parade in Paris Sunday. Troops from 13 African countries who backed France in a war against al-Qaida-linked extremists in Mali marched with the French military during the Bastille Day parade in Paris on Sunday to honor their role in the conflict.

    Malian troops open France’s Bastille Day parade

    Troops from 13 African countries who backed France in a war against al-Qaida-linked extremists in Mali marched with the French military during the Bastille Day parade in Paris on Sunday to honor their role in the conflict.

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    No horses, but McHenry Sheriff nets triple crown award

    The McHenry County Sheriff’s Department recently earned a “Triple Crown," but it has nothing to do with horse racing. The National Sheriff's Association term is a distinction held by less than 1 percent of sheriff's offices across the country.

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    Michael Zajac

    School principal from Itasca faces DUI charge

    An Itasca man who is a principal of a South suburban school was arrested over the weekend for his third DUI, officials said.

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    Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, center, speaks during a news conference outside the Senate Chambers in Austin, Texas, where on last week lawmakers pushed through new abortion restrictions.

    For 2014 elections, abortion returns to forefront

    With no immediate hope of overturning the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision legalizing abortion, Republicans around the country are increasingly pushing legislation to restrict the procedure, and Democrats say they’ll make the GOP pay in coming elections.

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    Senate Majority Leader, Democrat Harry Reid of Nevada, and Senate Minority Leader, Republican Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, right, sparred Sunday on a morning news program. Today the Senate holds a rare closed-door session, where all senators will consider a proposal to change Senate rules to remove a 60-vote threshold for President Barack Obama’s nominations to win confirmation.

    Party leaders spar over Senate rule changes

    Proposed changes to Senate rules would either ease the way for President Barack Obama to assemble his second-term team or permanently threaten the body’s deliberative style, the chamber’s top Democratic and Republican lawmaker said Sunday. Democratic Leader Harry Reid and Republican Leader Mitch McConnell once again strongly disagreed during separate television segments of a morning news program.

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    George Zimmerman leaves court with his family after Zimmerman’s not guilty verdict was read in Seminole Circuit Court in Sanford, Fla., Saturday.

    Zimmerman fate following acquittal uncertain

    Following his acquittal on all charges in the fatal shooting death of Trayvon Martin, George Zimmerman will spend no time behind bars. But that is about the only certain thing that can be said about the former neighborhood watch volunteer’s immediate future.

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    Wauconda Rodeo celebrates 50 years, says goodbye to 2 longtime volunteers
    Wauconda Rodeo’s golden anniversary was capped Sunday by the retirement of two longtime volunteers. Co-chairs Rosann Hansen and Jim Schwantz are stepping away from leading the annual event at the Golden Oaks Equestrian Center grounds after making sure the roughly 100 daily volunteers under them and other aspects of the rodeo are running smoothly.

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    From left to right, Jim Schranz, of Lindenhurst, Steve Smunt, of St. Charles, Mike Novak, of Crystal Lake, and Dave Corbett, of Buffalo Grove, play period music Sunday during Civil War Days at the Lakewood Forest Preserve near Wauconda.

    Civil War scenes re-enacted in Lake County

    For the 22nd year, the Lakewood Forest Preserve near Wauconda resounded with the rattle of rifle shots and the concussion of cannon fire during the annual two-day Civil War commemoration.

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    Pro-democracy leader Mohamed ElBaradei, a leader of the National Salvation Front, center left, shakes hands with interim President Adly Mansour after being sworn in as vice president in Cairo on Sunday.

    Egypt’s army chief defends ousting president

    Facing unrelenting pressure from Muslim Brotherhood protesters, Egypt’s military chief sought to justify his decision to remove Mohmmed Morsi from office, saying Sunday in a televised speech that the Islamist leader had violated his popular mandate and antagonized state institutions.

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    Pakistani Taliban patrol in their stronghold of Shawal in Pakistani tribal region of South Waziristan on Aug. 5, 2012. Dozens of domestic and foreign militants have left Pakistan for Syria in recent months.

    Islamic militants leave Pakistan to fight in Syria

    An increasing number of militants have left Pakistan for Syria in recent months. The fighters have contributed to a growing presence of Islamic extremists there and complicated U.S. efforts to help Syria's rebels.

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    Mark Kreder, Jr. rides a bareback bronc during the 50th Annual IPRA Championship Wauconda Rodeo Sunday at Green Oaks Rodeo Grounds. The Wauconda Area Chamber of Commerce sponsored the event that featured a mechanical bull, pony rides and calf roping as well as the rodeo show.

    Images: The Wauconda Rodeo
    Action at the 50th Annual IPRA Championship Wauconda Rodeo at the Golden Oaks Rdeo Grounds on Sunday.The event sponsored by the Wauconda Area Chamber of Commerce featured bull riding, bareback bronc riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling and barrel racing.

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    Christian Myers, 13 of Carol Stream rides the YoYo swing ride during the final day of the 2013 Glendale Heights Fest, Sunday.

    Images: Sunday’s Suburban Festivals
    Images from festivals in the suburbs on Sunday, July 14.The events included Lake County Civil War Days, Glendale Heights Fest, Windmill City Fest, West Chicago Railroad Days and St. Sophia Greek Fest.

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    “Fake” Stevenson letter offering extra credit for cash was part of history course

    Stevenson High School officials say they have figured out the source and reason for a letter that surfaced on social media last week claiming students could make cash donations for extra credit and other favors. As it turns out, the phony letter was crafted by a summer school world history teacher for instructional purposes.

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    Hanover Township hosts recycling event

    Hanover Township will host a “recycling extravaganza” from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 3. Drop off electronics, prescription drugs, batteries, cellphones and more at the township campus.

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    Links Technology Cup golf outing Aug. 14

    The annual Links Technology Cup golf outing benefiting the Schaumburg Park Foundation will be held Aug. 14 at the Schaumburg Golf Club.

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    Island Lake group collecting coupons for troops’ families

    An Island Lake community group called Marion’s Angels is collecting coupons for the families of active-duty military personnel. The coupons can even have expired up to six months ago.

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    Glendale Heights man slain in Maywood

    A Glendale Heights man was fatally shot in Maywood over the weekend, authorities said Sunday. Marquise Coleman, 33, of the 400 block of Sidney Avenue, died from multiple gunshot wounds, a spokeswoman for the Cook County medical examiner said. His death was ruled a homicide.

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    Gail Borden Library District hosts “edible book” contest

    All bakers, amateur and professional, are invited to make a creation for Gail Borden Public Library’s annual Edible Book Festival. Registration is open until Aug. 5. Participants will create an edible book that will be on display Aug. 17-18. The creation can be in the shape of a book, or based on a favorite tale or be a pun on a famous title. Prizes will be awarded for the children/teen,...

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    Lisa Archer, 24, of Atlanta, chants during a protest the day after George Zimmerman was found not guilty in the 2012 shooting death of teenager Trayvon Martin on Sunday in Atlanta.

    Jury instructions at center of Zimmerman verdict
    Despite a clamoring by some for a conviction against George Zimmerman, jurors acquitted the former neighborhood watch leader of all charges, leaving many Americans to wonder how the justice system allowed him to walk away from the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin.

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    Gurnee firefighters rescue man from burning home

    Firefighters are crediting thermal imaging cameras with saving the life of a young man during a residential fire early Sunday morning in Gurnee.

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    Friedreich's ataxia forces Nicole Kramer to use a walker to help with an unsteady gait, but the 19-year-old Villa Park woman finds freedom while cruising the neighborhood on her new custom cycle. She plans to ride in next Sunday's Ride Ataxia fundraiser through the southern suburbs.

    Villa Park teen rides to raise money for her rare disorder

    Literally racing for a cure, Nicole Kramer of Villa Park will be using her custom bicycle to raise funds to fight the progressive disease attacking her body. Kramer was 14 when she began having troubles with her back, coordination, balance and breathing. As doctors conducted tests, one mentioned to the girl's mother a worst-case scenario of a rare, unlikely and cruel disease called Friedreich's...

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    Sidonie Fery in New York. She was about 10 years old when she and a playmate placed a note inside a ginger ale bottle and threw it in the Great South Bay off Long Island. Sidonie was tragically killed in a fall at a Swiss boarding school in 2010.

    Plaque marks where Sandy message in a bottle found

    A seaside Long Island village on Saturday honored the memory of a girl whose message in a bottle was found after Superstorm Sandy, discovered by cleanup workers a dozen years after she tossed it into the ocean.

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    Jack Franks

    Is it time to start over with new Metra board?

    Does the growing scandal over ex Metra CEO Alex Clifford's lavish separation deal mean the entire board should resign? A key Republican lawmaker is calling for that. With the shadow of Democratic House Speaker Mike Madigan hovering over the agency, other lawmakers weigh in.

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    A group of men look Friday at the wreckage of Asiana Flight 214, which crashed on July 6 at San Francisco International Airport.

    Flight attendants sprang into action after crash

    In the July 6 crash three members of the crew were ejected from the plane’s sheared off tail section while still strapped in their seats. Those who were able, meanwhile, oversaw the emergency evacuation of nearly 300 passengers — using knives to slash seatbelts, slinging axes to free two colleagues trapped by malfunctioning slides, fighting flames and bringing out frightened children.

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    A public bus maneuvers through a path of debris from strong winds of Typhoon Soulik early Saturday, in Taipei, Taiwan.

    Powerful typhoon forces evacuations in China

    A powerful typhoon has surged into southeast China, forcing the evacuation of hundreds of thousands of people from a coastal province after passing across northern Taiwan, killing at least two people.

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    Alex Demos

    A new day for once-feuding Glen Ellyn and COD?

    Glen Ellyn Village President Alex Demos is confident that détente has been achieved in the relationship between the village and College of DuPage — which engaged in a protracted and expensive legal dispute over jurisdictional matters for more than two years. “We’re going to work together in every capacity,” he said. “It’s a beginning of a new...

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    U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano speaks during a luncheon to the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials in Denver in 2010.

    Is Janet Napolitano leaving the worst job in Washington?

    Wanted: A public servant who will pledge to keep America safe in a world that is fundamentally, relentlessly, hide-under-your-bed dangerous. Must have cool temperament, intestinal fortitude. Will receive much criticism, scant praise. Any takers? Janet Napolitano will step down in September from her post as secretary of the Department of Homeland Security

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    “Kerry Khan was the ringleader of the largest bribery and bid-rigging scheme in the history of federal contracting,” U.S. Attorney Ron Machen said in a statement after a sentencing hearing Thursday. “His corrupt network of public officials and private contractors looted the U.S. Treasury for years.”

    How manager stole $30 million through government contracts

    With his baggy blue jumpsuit pant legs stuck in white socks and white canvas slip-ons, Kerry Khan looked more like a broken man — certainly a caught one. Now he'll be a number, a Bureau of Prisons inmate looking at almost 20 years for his scheme to cheat taxpayers out of $30 million through bribery and kickbacks connected to bogus and grossly inflated U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracts.

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    On Nov. 22, 1963, right-wing protesters carrying a Confederate flag and anti-Kennedy placards await the arrival of President John F. Kennedy at Love Field in Dallas. The 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination throws a new spotlight on the deep hostility toward Kennedy that some Dallasites voiced before the assassination.

    Dallas sheds shadow of JFK’s assassination 50 years later

    As the nation and world mark this year’s 50th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy, special attention once again falls on the Texas metropolis. It was a legacy that took time for the young city to come to terms with — a conundrum symbolized by its debate over the fate of the Texas School Book Depository, where Lee Harvey Oswald fired on the presidential motorcade from a...

Sports

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    For Len Kasper, the highlight of the Cubs’ first half was, without a doubt, the ascendance of pitcher Travis Wood.

    An up-and-down first half is in the rearview mirror

    It was an interesting Cubs’ first half to say the least. The highlight for me, without a doubt, was Travis Wood’s ascendance. I've always liked how he competes, but this year he has added a laser-like side-to-side command of all of his pitches and it has made him an elite guy, at least for half a season.

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    White Sox reliever Matt Thornton was one of the top relievers in franchise history, better than 96 percent of 1.977 qualified relievers all time in Wins Above Replacement, according to Chris Rongey.

    Former Sox pitcher Thornton did not deserve the venom hurled his way

    Anyone with a crumb of knowledge will admit that Matt Thornton enjoyed some excellent seasons on the South Side and, at times, was absolutely dominant. He was particularly outstanding from 2008-10, and though his performance declined the last few seasons, he was still, at minimum, a serviceable reliever. But even the word “serviceable” undermines what he did while he was here.

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    Cubs starter Travis Wood deals in Sunday’s first inning at Wrigley Field.

    All-star Wood bound for Big Apple

    Travis Wood is indeed going to the All-Star Game. Wood started Sunday night’s 10-6 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals at Wrigley Field and worked 5 innings in getting a no-decision. Because the All-Star Game is Tuesday, it was up to Wood whether he wanted to pitch. He said yes, and after the game, was on his way to New York.

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    Baker takes next step in comeback

    Right-handed pitcher Scott Baker began his minor-league rehab stint Sunday, pitching for the Kane County Cougars at West Michigan. Baker is on the mend from Tommy John surgery. Even though he gave up 4 runs in the first inning, the Cubs are happy he is back throwing in games.

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    Cubs outfielder Dioner Navarro catches a fly ball hit by St. Louis Cardinals’ Jon Jay during the seventh inning of a baseball game in Chicago, Sunday, July 14, 2013.

    Molina’s late homer crushes Cubs

    Yadier Molina hit a three-run homer in St. Louis’ four-run ninth inning, and the Cardinals beat the Cubs 10-6 on Sunday night at Wrigley Field in the majors’ final game before the All-Star break. Allen Craig lined a tiebreaking RBI single into left field before Molina drove an 0-2 pitch from Kevin Gregg (2-2) over the wall in left for his seventh homer. Craig and Molina tuned up for Tuesday’s game in New York with four hits apiece, helping St. Louis to a season-high 21 hits overall.

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    Jordan Spieth reacts after winning the John Deere Classic on Sunday at TPC Deere Run. Spieth, who is two weeks away from his 20th birthday, defeated Zach Johnson and David Hearn in a five-hole sudden-death playoff.

    Fairy-tale finish for 19-year-old Spieth

    It’s not unusual for golfers to get their first PGA Tour victory at the John Deere Classic. Jordan Spieth became the 19th player in the tourney’s 43-year history to do it on Sunday.Spieth’s win, though, was different from all the others — a lot different.

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    Red Stars rally to earn tie

    The Red Stars scored a pair of goals over the final minutes to rally from a 3-1 deficit and tie FC Kansas City 3-3 Sunday afternoon in Lisle.

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    Boomers head into break with loss

    Host Schaumburg collected 7 hits, the 15th time in the last 18 games the Boomers have had at least that many, but they still dropped a 5-3 decision to the Traverse City Beach Bums in the finale of a three-game series Sunday at Boomers Stadium.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Jose Quintana throws against the Philadelphia Phillies in Sunday’s first inning.

    Sox force extras, lose in 10th

    John Mayberry Jr. hit an RBI single with two outs in the 10th inning, lifting the Philadelphia Phillies over the Chicago White Sox 4-3 on Sunday. Chase Utley led off the 10th with a double and David Purcey (0-1) walked Jimmy Rollins. The runners advanced on Domonic Brown's groundout and Darin Ruf was intentionally walked to load the bases. Ramon Troncoso relieved and struck out Young. But Mayberry lined Troncoso's first pitch up the middle for the winning run.

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    Baker roughed up in rehap start with Cougars

    The Kane County Cougars could not overcome a 4-run first inning by the West Michigan Whitecaps and went on to lose 5-2 on Sunday at Fifth Third Ballpark. Right-hander Scott Baker (0-1) started for the Cougars (4-18, 34-54), making his first rehab appearance having been sidelined by Tommy John surgery since April 2012.

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    Chicago White Sox’s Hector Santiago delivers a pitch in the first inning of the second game of a baseball doubleheader against the Philadelphia Phillies on Saturday, July 13, 2013, in Philadelphia.

    Ramirez helps White Sox split vs. Phillies

    With a catcher playing second base to finish a long day of baseball, the White Sox at least got one win to show for it. Alexei Ramirez hit a tiebreaking double in the 11th inning to lift Chicago over the Philadelphia Phillies 5-4 in the opener of a day-night doubleheader Saturday. Michael Young hit an RBI single with two outs in the 13th inning to give Philadelphia a 2-1 win in the nightcap.

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    San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Tim Lincecum threw his first no-hitter against the Padres Saturday night, beating them 9-0 in San Diego.

    Giants’ Lincecum throws 1st no-hitter, beating SD 9-0

    Tim Lincecum has thrown his first career no-hitter and the second in the majors in 11 days, a gem saved by a spectacular diving catch by right fielder Hunter Pence in the San Francisco Giants’ 9-0 win against the last-place San Diego Padres on Saturday night.

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    Blackhawks general manager Stan Bowman and his staff have worked for the last three years to ensure not just another shot at a Stanley Cup, but also a chance to get back to the final four every year, according to Barry Rozner.

    Blackhawks' master plan looks very different this time

    For the last three years, the Blackhawks' Stan Bowman has been working to ensure not just another shot at a Stanley Cup, but also a chance to get back to the final four every year, something a team can't possibly do if it has to subtract 10 players in the summer.

Business

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    Would buying these six stocks now be a hot-weather impulse or a coldly-calculated move? All six have improving earnings outlooks, analysts say.

    6 stocks that stand out in a sizzling stock market

    A handful of companies stand out for investors. Six stocks — Amazon, Starbucks, UnitedHealth, Visa, Mastercard, and Discover Financial — notched their own records this week, helped by the growing confidence of American consumers.

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    Two of the most powerful members of Congress, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Max Baucus, a Montana Democrat, left, and the House Ways and Means Committee Chairman, Rep. Dave Camp, a Michigan Republican, are touring the country to rally support for their effort to overhaul the nation’s tax laws.

    Max and Dave, Washington’s newest power couple

    Welcome to the “Max and Dave Show,” a campaign-style swing around the country featuring two of the most powerful members of Congress rallying support for their effort to overhaul the nation’s tax laws — and, just maybe, change the way Washington works.

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    A free online course that starts Monday will offer students the chance to learn about giving from Warren Buffett and help decide how to spend more than $100,000 of his sister’s money.

    Online course will let students give money away

    A free online course that starts Monday will offer students the chance to learn about giving from Warren Buffett and help decide how to spend more than $100,000 of his sister’s money.

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    Career Coach: Focus on getting what you want

    Focusing our thinking on what we want is a prerequisite to mobilizing our efforts to achievement-oriented activities. Eliminating or avoiding an undesirable condition — a job problem, negative interpersonal dynamics, or avoiding an error — does not ensure that we will attain what we desire.

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    Work Advice: Ask me no favors, I'll tell you no lies

    Karla L. Miller writes an advice column on navigating the modern workplace. Each week she will answer one or two questions from readers.

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    Roxi Pfliiger, Dan Johnson, Kari Warberg Block, Andrea Stewart, Becky Smith and Kacey Galster review year-to-date goal progress at Earth-Kind headquarters, in Bismarck, N.D. CEO Warberg Block had a day of reckoning when she realized she had neglected her personal finances to the point where she had little set aside for retirement.

    Small business owners neglect retirement savings

    For many small business owners, the golden years aren’t looking so shiny. Many have devoted so much time and money to their businesses that they have failed to plan for retirement. Catch-up plans for these owners usually consist of aggressively putting money aside, or taking another big risk: Planning to sell their companies one day to fund their retirement.

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    In this Monday, Aug. 27, 2012 photo provided by Ford Motor Co., workers assemble a car at a new Ford/CFMA Chongqing Plant after its launching ceremony in Chongqing, China. Ford aims to increase its share of the market as more Chinese consumers buy vehicles.

    Late to the Chinese market, Ford aims to catch up

    Every year, tens of millions of Chinese are reaching the income threshold they need to buy a car. Ford wants to double its Chinese market share by 2015, so the company is launching six new vehicles in China this year. “They used to be laggard, cautious. But now they’re all in,” says Michael Dunne, president of the automotive consulting group Dunne and Co. in Hong Kong. “They are saying, `We have confidence in the China market. We have confidence in our products. We can win here.’”

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    Used cars have gotten more affordable, especially if youíre looking for a small car or a hybrid.

    New car too pricey? Used car prices are dropping

    Used car prices have been falling since 2011, and they’re expected to decline gradually for the remainder of this year. That’s good news for those joining or re-entering the workforce, or anyone else who might find a payment on a new car too steep. There is some volatility. The price of a 3-year-old car fell 4 percent between April and June, estimates Alex Gutierrez of car-pricing company Kelley Blue Book.

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    Small-cap funds have packed the biggest punch

    The biggest returns this year have come from the smallest stocks. Indexes that track small stocks are at record highs. Small- and mid-cap stocks have dominated their larger peers over much of the current bull market, which began in 2009.

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    Insurance Auto Auctions hopes to move onto this property at the corner of Route 72 and Commonwealth Drive in East Dundee. The village board is scheduled to vote on the project's redevelopment agreement Monday, but the vote was held up over a property access dispute between IAA and ComEd. Barrington Hills residents opposed to the project plan on speaking out against the project at Monday's meeting.

    E. Dundee to vote on auto auction business Monday

    When East Dundee trustees decide Monday whether to let a wrecked auto auctioneer do business in town, Barrington Hills residents will protest one more time. “Unless they can guarantee that Barrington Hills, East Dundee and Barrington Area Council of Governments residents' water supply will not be contaminated, the project should not go forward,” said Marvin Husby.

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    The bill passed by the House on Thursday didn’t deal with food stamps at all. And the lack of congressional action on food stamps could keep the $80 billion-a-year program untouched by any cuts.

    Farm bill doesn’t end food stamps

    One after another, angry Democrats took to the House floor to say Republicans would increase hunger in America by stripping food stamps from the farm bill. In reality, though, the bill passed by the House on Thursday didn’t deal with food stamps at all. And the lack of congressional action on food stamps could keep the $80 billion-a-year program untouched by any cuts.

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    This photo shows Lawrence Carrel, the author of The Associated Press’ “Of Mutual Interest” column on July 5, 2013.

    Is it time to buy Japanese stock mutual funds?

    The Japanese market began its rally in November with the dissolution of Japan’s parliament, which paved the way for the election of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. But it was Abe’s package of policies to grow Japan’s moribund economy that really sent stocks soaring. The quick turnaround has led many to ask if this market correction is a buying opportunity, or merely a head fake as the Japanese market returns to the doldrums it’s been sitting in for the past two decades.

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    Revelers carry a gay pride flag during the Gay Pride parade in Madrid, Saturday, July 6, 2013.

    A financial checklist for same-sex couples

    Legally married same-sex couples are now entitled to the same federal benefits as their straight counterparts. But the decision still leaves a lot of unanswered questions. What do couples who move to states that don’t recognize gay marriage do? It could take a few months before there are clear answers, says Lisa Siegel, a senior wealth planner at Wells Fargo Private Bank. But gay married couples can take action now by checking in with an adviser to set out a plan.

Life & Entertainment

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    This film publicity image released by Universal Pictures shows the minion characters in “Despicable Me 2.”

    ‘Despicable Me 2’ holds top spot

    Universal’s minions ran away with the box office for the second week in a row. With $44.8 million in domestic ticket sales Friday through Sunday, the animated sequel “Despicable Me 2” outdid the debuts of the Adam Sandler comedy “Grown Ups 2” and director Guillermo del Toro’s monsters-versus-robots action flick “Pacific Rim.”

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    Actors Olivier Martinez and Halle Berry married at a weekend ceremony in a church near a chateau in France’s Burgundy region. The owner of the Chateau de Vallery, where the couple stayed with their 60 guests, said on Sunday that the betrothal a day earlier ended with a dinner and fireworks display.

    Halle Berry ties knot in France

    Halle Berry married her fiancé, French actor Olivier Martinez, in a weekend ceremony in a village church where princes are buried in France’s Burgundy region. Berry, who has a 5-year-old daughter, is expecting her first child with Martinez.

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    Chuck Fanaro, president of DWG Corporation, the owner, developer, builder and manager of Saddlebrook Farms in Grayslake, went against conventional wisdom at the time when he started offering factory-built homes. He overcame concerns about quality by building his own factory to build the homes.

    Saddlebrook Farms offers custom homes in retirement community

    Many people who want to live an active life during retirement do not have a limitless supply of funds. In fact, more retired adults probably fall into this category than into the group that can invest in a large home in a southern climate.

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    Home repair: Try spray-on options to remove unwelcome roof guests

    Q. I have various forms of mold and algae growing on a shingled roof facing east over my kitchen and mudroom. I have not had any luck finding a contractor or roofer to come take a look. I am wondering if there is a spray that will kill the molds and algae and not stain the roof or painted shingles.

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    Pig races are popular at the DuPage County Fair in Wheaton.

    County fairs more than just tractor pulls and livestock

    County fairs are just part of summertime traditions. From tractor pulls to bull riding to livestock competitions, county fairs give city folks a real taste of country. Some fairs are even going a little upscale with local wineries and microbreweries as part of their attractions. At the Lake County Fair, the Chicago Flower & Garden Show is returning with a special exhibit that will appeal to gardeners and flower lovers alike. So mark your calendars, and get ready to go to the fair.

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    Indie rock band She & Him with Zooey Deschanel and M. Ward performs at the Mann Center in Philadelphia.

    Zooey Deschanel switches from acting to singing

    During a summer tour with her musical duo She & Him, Zooey Deschanel has performed songs about tortured love and broken hearts. Since she wrote the songs with her partner, M. Ward, and she’s recently gone through a divorce herself, she’s obviously using her musical career to purge some emotions, right? Wrong, says Deschanel. “That is not what I do,” said Deschanel.

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    The Love Shots' bassist Mark Gorney, left, and singer/songwriter Daniel Craig recently put out their second album, “Summerlakes,” independently.

    Elgin-based Love Shots gels creatively on second album

    Critics of The Love Shots' first album have described the band's sound as “1950s doo-wop meets punk rock.” Lead singer Daniel Craig of Elgin says the label is “fairly accurate” and lists the legendary punk band, The Ramones, as his favorite band. The Love Shots will celebrate their new “Summerlakes” release with a show in Elgin on Friday, July 19.

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    Creating strong relationships out of sticky situations

    Q. I have always been the smart one. The sister was an average student, and I have always excelled in all areas of academia. This sounds conceited, I know, and I’m not writing off my sibling. She has many talents I simply don’t possess, like the ability to make people feel comfortable.

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    Jeff Daniels return as Will McAvoy for the second season of “The Newsroom,” which premieres at 9 p.m. Sunday, July 14, on HBO.

    'Newsroom' cast talks critics, season 2

    Even the star of HBO's drama “The Newsroom” admits that season one had its growing pains. Creator Aaron Sorkin's show-about-a-news-show was last year's TV series most likely to be hated, or loved — or one that viewers actually loved to hate. “Season one, we're guessing,” noted actor Jeff Daniels, who portrays cable-news anchorman Will McAvoy. “It's like a first draft. ... But coming into season two, it's like we own it.”

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    Book notes: Libertyville native signs debut novel
    Meet Libertyville Helene Wecker as she reads from and signs copies of her debut novel, "The Golem and the Jinni," at 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 16, at the Libertyville Civic Center and at 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 17, at Anderson's Bookshop in Naperville.

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    Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History is faced with almost $170 million in debt.

    Money woes crimp Field Museum budget

    Best known for impressive public displays such as Sue, the towering Tyrannosaurus rex that greets visitors in the lobby of its Lake Michigan campus, the Field Museum’s larger mission always has been behind-the-scenes research on its 25 million-piece — and growing — collection of birds, mammals, fish, plants, fossils and artifacts. Field scientists travel the globe to retrieve specimens that could produce medicines, document the effects of climate change or explain the secrets of genetics. But the 120-year-old museum, founded during the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition and named for department store magnate Marshall Field, now is setting the scientific world abuzz for another reason. Faced with almost $170 million in debt, the museum is cutting next year’s research budget 20 percent, including by shrinking its science staff and merging departments.

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    “Junius and Albert's Adventures in the Confederacy” by Peter Carlson.

    Reporters' Civil War capture, escape saga

    Among the tens of thousands of books written about the American Civil War, there are dense histories of campaigns, profiles of leaders, compilations of battlefield photos or soldiers' letters home. Then, once in a while, you run across just a really good yarn. That's what Peter Carlson has written in his nonfiction account of two New York Tribune reporters' unique experience of the war.

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    The interior of the Boeing 777 Asiana Airlines Flight 214 aircraft that crashed upon landing in San Francisco last week. Two of the 307 passengers aboard were killed.

    Unusual pattern of spine injuries from jet crash

    Many survivors of the recent plane crash in San Francisco have a surprising pattern of spine injuries that a doctor says shows how violently they were shaken despite wearing seat belts. So far, two people are unable to move their legs — doctors don’t yet know if the damage is permanent — and several others have needed surgery to stabilize their spines so they can move, said Dr. Geoffrey Manley, neurosurgery chief at San Francisco General Hospital who is overseeing their care.

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    These beads look a bit like pearls, but are they?

    A pearl of wisdom about grandmother’s beads

    Q. I am hoping you can tell me how much my grandmother’s pearls are worth. She said they were made from walrus ivory that my grandfather purchased sometime in the late 1920s or 1930s when he was working in Alaska. I would appreciate any help.

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    Tourists walk on the shore of the Raymond les bains beach in Jacmel, Haiti. The Haitian government is to trying to revive the country’s long stagnant tourism industry with investments totaling more than $160 million.

    Impoverished Haiti seeks to reinvigorate struggling tourism

    The only leisure tourist among the U.N. peacekeepers, aid workers, embassy personnel and missionaries on this beach north of the Haitian capital must have been Anne Fournier. She didn’t live or work in Haiti or pretend to help. Fournier was here for fun, traveling to Haiti for the first time with her Port-au-Prince-born husband of almost two years. “You can tell that the tourism isn’t very developed yet, and that’s the big charm of it,” Fournier, 26, of Montreal, Canada, as she sipped juice from a cut-open coconut. “Everything is an adventure here.”

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    Eat, drink and play bocce ball at Festa Italiana in Milwaukee.

    On the road: A celebration of Italy in Milwaukee

    When in Milwaukee, do as the Italians do and celebrate La Famiglia at the annual Festa Italiana. Test your bocce ball skills, try crooning on the Italian Idol stage, watch the Pinocchio parade and let the kids enjoy their own activities and entertainment. Closer to home, there's Chicago’s 34th annual Chinatown Summer Fair. The neighborhood festival features a Lion Dance procession plus Asian cultural entertainment from music to dance. Have a taste of Chinatown’s many restaurants along with browsing the gift shops, arts and crafts exhibits and children’s area during the daylong family event.

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    Willie Nelson performs Sunday at the Ravinia Festival in Highland Park.

    Sunday picks: Ravinia hosts Willie & Family

    Country fans won't want to miss Willie Nelson & Family with special guest Lukas Nelson & P.O.T.R. performing Sunday at Ravinia. See hundreds of rare vehicles and special displays at the 7th Annual Barrington Concours d'Elegance. Cheer on the brave riders at the Wauconda Chamber of Commerce 50th IPRA Championship Rodeo at Golden Oaks Rodeo Grounds today.

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    Mostly A: Traditional/Classic Functional spaces with personality showing up in the details, traditional design often features white, dark or neutral color palettes. Add a spot of color for some fun.

    Take this quiz to learn your kitchen style

    A kitchen remodel is a big investment, and there are so many decisions to be made. Depending on your needs and personality, find out which design style works best for you.

Discuss

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    Suburban municipalities with populations of 25,000 or more have the authority under new state legislation to ban assault weapons — but only if they opt to do so by Friday.

    Editorial: Outlaw assault weapons in the suburbs

    A Daily Herald editorial calls on suburban municipalities to ban assault weapons since the state is not likely to do so.

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    A peace process on hold

    Columnist Michael Gerson: Majorities of Israelis and Palestinians support a two-state solution. The broad parameters of a deal have been clear since the Clinton administration (though the details are devil-filled). The American secretary of state is energetically on the job. But little is likely to change.

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    Tax increases result of pension problem
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: In 1988, people had jobs — remember Searle Labs, Boggies? — teachers taught, kids absorbed as much as they wanted, and college was completed without years of servitude due to student debt. Was 1988 the “good old year”? Do we need a seat at the negotiations table?

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    Keep education the ‘great equalizer’
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: Many Americans don’t really believe in equal educational opportunity for all. It may be that they don’t want the children of taxi drivers and house cleaners to compete with their children for admission to Harvard and Yale.

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    A suggestion to make lake path safer
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Walkers could all go in one direction on perhaps the inside of the path, and bikers and skaters go in the opposite direction on the outside of the path. This would allow bikes to pass on the outside grass if needed. New markings and signs, along with initial enforcement presence, should soon lead to this compromise working out, without much additional expense.

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    Love brings peace, no matter who loves
    An Antioch letter to the editor: This is in response to Aadil Ahmad (July 7) and his/her view of a very dangerous trend. Human beings do not learn what true love is through marriage. Human beings do not possess natural powers. And your choice of words “used correctly and at an appropriate time”? What is that?

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    Lack of action will hurt Wauconda
    A Wauconda letter to the editor: Wauconda’s newly elected Mayor, Frank Bart, ran in part on a pledge to be more transparent. He has failed to live up to that pledge.

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    Minimize the cost of a demotion, Metra
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: Regarding the Metra board’s generosity, it would seem to be a primary and critical concern to minimize the cost to force someone out of authority.

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    Ashamed to say we live in Illinois
    Ashamed to say we live in IllinoisIn the June 22 business section is an article that should have been on the front page. The situation in this state is beyond belief and we are planning to leave as soon as we can. My husband has lived here 73 years and I have lived here 65. We are leaving family behind because we cannot afford or tolerate the situation any more.The stock market crash took half of our retirement investment and now the state is trying to gobble up what we have left in high gas prices, increased taxes and wasted spending in Springfield. It’s a very sad state of affairs to live in the worst state in the nation. We are ashamed to say we live in Illinois.Marianne B. KingWest Chicago

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    Fourth noise was tough on many
    Fourth noise was tough on many I wish to respond to Amy Gilbertson’s July 6 letter respecting veterans and fireworks. I would like to add that in addition to veterans with PTSD, there are those of us living with autism spectrum disorders and animals who are terrified of the military grade fireworks. This was one of the worst Independence Days in a decade in terms of persistent use of military grade fireworks by neighbors. My aunt’s Great Pyrenees trembled and hid in the closet all day. His Thundershirt did not help. There are veterans with autistic children who are trying to be strong for their families as well as for themselves. None of us need the added burden of listening to a battlefield on what is supposed to be a day of sweet freedom.There are many other fireworks to be enjoyed, such as roman candles and bottle-rockets (any risk is up to the user). Freedom is defined as enjoying oneself within the confines of the law. If we can compromise and respect one another, this should not be complicated. Ms. Gilbertson pointed this out in her letter as well. I would also advise earplugs and earmuffs (earplugstore.com). Keep white noise on during peak times for noise such as dusk.Allison M. KramerCarpentersville

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    New policy puts Boy Scouts in peril
    New policy puts Boy Scouts in peril As a male youth of 13 (many years ago) I was approached in a men’s bathroom facility by an older youth soliciting sex. I was able to flee the scene, but I have not forgotten the encounter.Now that the Boy Scouts of America have made a policy decision to accept openly gay and active teens into the Scouts they should realize that they are putting many other scouts in peril.J.W. JenkinsMedinah

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