SCGT

Daily Archive : Thursday July 11, 2013

News

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    Ivan Moctezuma directs some of his 25 student dancers in his temporary studio in the Milk Pail banquet hall on Route 25 in East Dundee. Moctezuma and his brother, Angel, own and operate Ivangel Dance Studio.

    Dance studio to open in Elgin business complex

    Ivangel Dance Studio will move from East Dundee to a business complex on Dundee Avenue in Elgin sometime next month. Owners said they were looking for a "proper facility" for their studio. The Elgin City Council approved the business's petition this week.

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    Cary residents have their say about flooding

    Tears from Cary residents and stories of how the flooding from late June ruined their lives, dominated a specially called village board meeting Thursday night. There was Marisol Adamo, a single mother who moved to Cary in October, not knowing about the flooding issues. After nearly six inches of rain fell in less than three hours, Adamo had more than four feet of water in her house and sustained...

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    Island Lake to pay $20,000 to settle lawsuits

    A politically connected Island Lake resident will be paid $20,000 in exchange for dropping a lawsuit against the village, trustees agreed Thursday night.

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    In this photo provided by passenger Benjamin Levy, passengers from Asiana Airlines flight 214, many with their luggage, are seen on the tarmac just moments after the plane crashed at San Francisco International Airport.

    Asiana passengers called 911 begging for help

    Stunned and bleeding after a Boeing 777 crash-landed at the San Francisco airport, hundreds of passengers staggered across the debris-strewn tarmac, some trying to help the critically injured, others desperately calling 911 and begging for more ambulances as dire minutes ticked away.

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    “Bad guys” Shawn Sponenburg of Lake Geneva, Wis., and John Alvarez of Crystal Lake shoot it out with the law Thursday evening on Main Street to promote the Wauconda rodeo this weekend.

    Wild West Wauconda-style kicks off rodeo weekend

    The Wauconda Area Chamber of Commerce’s 50th annual IPRA Championship Rodeo weekend got off to a rousing start Thursday evening with a Wild West-style "shootout" on Main Street in the village’s downtown. The shootout kicks off a weekend of live music, family activities and professional rodeo performances at Golden Oaks Equestrian Center, Case Road and Route 12.

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    New mobile website available in emergencies

    The Illinois Emergency Management Agency says it has activated a new mobile version of its Ready Illinois website. The site — m.ready.illinois.gov — has information about disasters, hazards and emergency preparedness and recovery.

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    President Barack Obama meets with members of Loyola University’s 1963 NCAA championship team on Thursday in the Oval Office.

    1963 Loyola championship team goes to White House

    Loyola University’s 1963 national championship basketball team is in Washington to meet with President Barack Obama. The White House said Obama was to meet with the team in the Oval Office Thursday afternoon to mark the 50th anniversary of the Chicago team’s win, as well as the role the played breaking racial barriers.

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    State Supreme Court court: Parents must be notified of teens’ abortions

    Illinois joins 38 other states w/parental notification #abortion law

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    An ambulance departs the scene where two people were rescued Thursday from a 12-foot-deep manhole in Long Grove.

    Workers overcome by fumes in Long Grove

    Two workers were rescued from a manhole containing dangerous gases Thursday afternoon at old Route 53 and Old McHenry Road in Long Grove.

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    Alex Clifford

    New details emerge in Metra controversy

    Metra officials were forced to air more of their dirty laundry Thursday in six hours of testimony that included accusations of “hush money,” charges of political interference from Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan and even a call to oust the majority of the beleaguered board.

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    U-46 families who sued the school district argued that black and Latino students were sent to crowded schools that used mobile classrooms more often than schools their white peers attended, but a judge Thursday found mostly for U-46.

    Judge: U-46 did not slight minorities in boundary changes

    Eight years after a group of Elgin Area School District U-46 families sued the district for racial bias, Judge Robert Gettleman has found mostly in favor of the district. Gettleman said the district did not discriminate against minority students when it redrew school boundaries in 2004. “We’re really gratified that the judge found in our favor on the majority of the issues in the case...

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    W. Dundee honored for insurance claims procedures

    Due to its record on insurance claims and loss prevention procedures, West Dundee has received recognition and a cash award from the consortium that ensures it and 69 other governmental agencies.

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    Judge Debra Nelson gives instructions to attorneys during George Zimmerman’s trial in Seminole circuit court in Sanford, Fla. Thursday. Zimmerman has been charged with second-degree murder for the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

    Jury in Zimmerman trial may consider lesser charge

    In an unmistakable setback for George Zimmerman, the jury at the neighborhood watch captain’s second-degree murder trial was given the option Thursday of convicting him on the lesser charge of manslaughter in the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

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    This Feb. 25, 1967, file photo shows self-confessed Boston Strangler Albert DeSalvo minutes after his capture in Boston. DeSalvo confessed to the string of 1960s killings but was never convicted. He died in prison in the 1970s.

    DA: Dead suspect tied to ‘64 Boston Strangler case

    The man who once claimed to be the Boston Strangler has been linked to one of the 11 victims by DNA evidence for the first time, leading to the planned exhumation of his remains and perhaps putting to rest some speculation that he wasn’t the notorious killer.

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    In a Dec. 16, 1966, photo, co-inventors of the game “Twister” Charles Foley, left, and Neil Rabens demonstrate the game for Charles McCarty, foreground, president of Research and Development, Inc., in Minnesota. Foley died Monday at a care facility, according to his son. He was 82.

    Inventor of iconic party game Twister dies

    Charles “Chuck” Foley, the father of nine who invented "Twister," the game that became a naughty sensation in living rooms across America in the 1960s and 1970s because of the way it put men and women in compromising positions, has died. He was 82.

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    Antoine Adams

    Chicago men charged in Elgin armed robbery

    A Cook County judge set bail at $500,000 each for two Chicago men charged with the armed robbery of an Elgin electronics store. Ronaldo Crawford, 33, and Antoine Adams, 38, also face similar charges related to a case in Des Plaines.

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    Cash found in garden given to neighbor’s daughter

    A McHenry County judge awarded most of the $150,000 found by a Johnsburg man to the daughter of the neighbor who claimed the money.

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    Former comptroller Rita Crundwell embezzled nearly $54 million from the town of Dixon.

    Former Dixon comptroller’s lawyer appeals sentence

    An attorney for a former Dixon comptroller who was convicted of stealing nearly $54 million from the city is appealing her nearly 20-year federal prison sentence. Among Paul Gaziano’s arguments in a Wednesday filing is that the residents of Dixon shouldn’t consider themselves victims.

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    University of Wisconsin regents approve tuition freeze

    Tuition will be frozen for all students attending the University of Wisconsin System over the next two years, while fees and room and board costs will go up, under action taken Thursday by the Board of Regents. The average cost for an undergraduate at UW-Madison starting in the fall of 2013 will be $9,273 in tuition, $1,130 in fees and $8,287 for room and board.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A 19-year-old Mount Prospect youth was arrested around 6:10 a.m. July 3 in Mount Prospect and charged with zero tolerance-driving under the influence of alcohol. Reports said an officer found him passed out in his car, which was running and in drive, but Mueller had his foot on the brake.

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    A Hoffman Estates man says he regularly has problems picking up his wife, who uses a walker, from the Metra station in Roselle because of other motorists using or blocking the handicapped parking spaces.

    Roselle cops checking on handicapped parking complaints

    A Hoffman Estates man says he regularly has problems picking up his wife, who uses a walker, from the Metra station in Roselle because of other motorists using or blocking the handicapped spaces. Roselle police are looking to address the situation.

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    Streetscape design talk ruffles feathers on Batavia council

    Tension rose again at a Batavia City Council meeting this week between newer aldermen and some of the veterans, this time over a proposal to redesign the Houston Street part of the streetscape project.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Tito J. Aguilar, of the 1100 block of Birch Street, Elgin, was arrested at 9 p.m. Tuesday and charged with possession of cocaine and suspected delivery of a controlled substance, according to a police report.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Between 12:30 and 11:30 a.m. Sunday, someone stole an Alpine stereo amplifier out of the trunk of a vehicle in the 800 block of Foxmeadow Drive, Geneva police said.

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    The Hi Guy’s rickshaw locked up at the downtown Arlington Heights train station.

    Rickshaw at Arlington Hts. train station belongs to Hi Guy

    Frequent visitors to the Arlington Heights downtown Metra station may have noticed a strange bike locked on one of the racks every night.

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    A truck remains stranded on a road damaged by the powerful 2011 earthquake in Japan that set off tremors around a West Texas oil field, suggesting a link between gas drilling operations and seismic activity in geological fault zones.

    Study: Distant quakes can affect oil, gas fields

    The powerful earthquake that rocked Japan in 2011 set off tremors around a West Texas oil field, according to new research that suggests oil and gas drilling operations may make fault zones sensitive to shock waves from distant big quakes.

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    Francisco Marquez

    Westmont man charged with firing on crowd

    A Westmont man has been charged with firing his gun from his car at a group of people last week, authorities said Thursday. Francisco Marquez, 20, of the 4100 block of North Park Street, was arrested Wednesday night in Melrose Park, following an incident July 5 in Westmont.

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    Blurry camera footage shows the woman’s rescuer chasing the robber with the purse through the parking lot.

    Arlington Hts. police release photos of robber

    Arlington Heights police have released photos from a parking lot camera in an effort to identify a man who attempted to rob an elderly woman in a grocery store parking lot last week.

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    Lake Zurich High School students in an Advanced Placement studio art class created this mural, composed of 29 separate wooden panels, that’s been installed on an exterior wall at the Barn at Paulus Park. An official unveiling reception open to the public is set for 2 p.m. Sunday.

    Students create public art for Lake Zurich’s Paulus Park

    Lake Zurich High School art students have left a mark on the village that’ll be showcased at a reception Sunday afternoon. More than 20 students in the school’s Advanced Placement studio art class created a mural that’s been installed on an exterior wall of the Barn at Paulus Park. The mural is made up of 29 panels stretching 40 feet along the barn wall.

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    Thirsty visitors to this year’s Last Fling festival in Naperville will have to buy beverage tickets worth $1 each before purchasing drinks, festival organizers told the city’s liquor commission Thursday.

    Beverage tickets on tap for Last Fling in Naperville

    Anyone who wants to celebrate the last hurrah of summer with a beer at the Naperville Jaycees’ Last Fling over Labor Day weekend will have to buy a handful of beverage tickets worth $1 each, organizers said Thursday.

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    Gurnee police traffic campaign results

    Gurnee police have announced results from a special enforcement campaign over the Fourth of July holiday. Officers logged 58 extra hours during the campaign, issuing 47 safety restraint citations and making four drug- and alcohol-related arrests.

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    Frank Bart

    Wauconda officials considering online access for water bills

    Wauconda's water bills were a big issue during the mayoral and trustee campaigns earlier this year. Two months into new Mayor Frank Bart's term, officials are investigating how to provide online account access and electronic billing for customers.

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    Rosemont offers homeowners property tax grants

    Rosemont will again offer homeowners property tax grants up to $3,692 in 2013. The deadline to apply is Nov. 30. Last year, homeowners received more than $1 million through the program, and over the past 19 years, they have received about $13 million.

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    “Little Mermaid” in Round Lake Beach

    "Ariel’s Little Mermaid Under the Sea Story Time” is the latest in a series of performances for children ages 3 to 12 at Round Lake Beach’s cultural and civic center. The performance will be at 10:30 a.m. July 16 at the civic center, 2007 N. Civic Center Way.

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    The silos at Inverness village hall are deteriorating.

    Iconic Inverness silos in need of repairs

    The century-old silos that frame Inverness village hall stand as the village’s quintessential image. They’re also slowly deteriorating, and officials are starting to investigate how to best prevent the four structures at Baldwin and Roselle roads from falling into disrepair. “There’s recognition by the board of the imagery associated with the silos, and that’s not lost on anyone,” village...

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    Batavia ban on assault weapons doesn’t look likely

    Batavia Mayor Jeff Schielke said he is unsure if the city will do anything regarding concealed-carry of certain types of weapons.

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    Hanover Township, Crespo to hold manufacturing job fair

    Hanover Township and state Rep. Fred Crespo are co-sponsoring a manufacturing job fair from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1, at the Hanover Township Senior Center, 240 S. Route 59, Bartlett.

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    ’Dead’ candidate elected in south Mexico village

    Lenin Carballido narrowly won Sunday’s election for mayor of San Agustin Amatengo, near the colonial city of Oaxaca. But then a death certificate surfaced, indicating that Carballido had died in 2010 of a diabetic coma.

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    Elk Grove High School graduate Tom Kudyba, 28, a former quarterback for the school’s football team, said his goal is to one day be the head coach for the school. But for now, he is going to Brazil to be the head coach for a professional football team there.

    Former Elk Grove High quarterback to coach in Brazilian league

    Elk Grove High School graduate Tom Kudyba, 28, a former quarterback for the school's football team, has been selected as head coach for a professional football team in Brazil. He's part of an effort to popularize American football in the country. “I’ve always dreamed of being a head football coach,” Kudyba said, adding that it didn’t matter that the job isn’t stateside.

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    Black caucus members focus on Chicago gun violence

    Provoked by continued gun deaths and shootings in Chicago, several members of the Congressional Black Caucus said Thursday they would gather in the city for an “emergency” summit on urban violence. Illinois Democrat Bobby Rush said in a news conference at the Capitol that the intent is to bring together national and local minds to address the causes of shootings that have become a focus of the...

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    Gerald Carey

    Arrest made in Oak Brook break-ins

    A 46-year-old Chicago man is facing a burglary charge in connection with several commercial break-ins along 22nd Street in Oak Brook. Police said Carey is accused of entering office suites and removing cellphones, iPads, laptops, wallets and purses. They didn’t say when or exactly where the burglaries happened.

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    Woodlands Academy hosts open house

    Woodlands Academy in Lake Forest will be hosting an open house at 7 p.m. July 18 to discuss uses for the 23 acres donated to the boarding school from nearby Barat Woods. Community members are invited to the open house to listen to Woodlands Academy’s plans for campus expansion, including landscaping and outdoor gathering spaces along with the preservation of the current forest’s environment.

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    Wauconda seeks nominees for Mayor’s Community Service Awards

    Wauconda officials are seeking nominations for the 2013 Mayor’s Community Service Awards. The awards recognize individuals, organizations and businesses that have made significant, positive impacts on the Wauconda community and take pride in public service.

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    Former state Rep. Terry Parke was the original sponsor of the law requiring doctors to tell parents if a minor wants an abortion.

    Parke: Illinois ‘caught up’ on abortion law

    The Illinois Supreme Court’s decision to uphold a law requiring doctors to tell teenagers’ parents if they want an abortion enacts legislation championed by former state Rep. Terry Parke of Hoffman Estates back in 1995.

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    Cantigny Park hosts Dog Days on Aug. 3 at the Parade Field.

    Summer fun at Cantigny
    Correct dates for several summer events at Cantigny Park in Wheaton.

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    Kane sheriff urges patience, privacy in fatal shooting probe

    Kane County Sheriff Pat Perez urges patience and rebuffs "arm-chair quarterbacking" during the investigation of a Monday incident in which a sergeant shot and killed a Batavia Township man who authorities said was perched on his roof with a rifle. Perez also expressed his condolences to the family of Luke Bulzak, 52, and said the investigation is going to be comprehensive.

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    Farmer Myles Goodrich loading a feed wagon at his farm in Danville, Vt. House Republicans have stripped food stamps from the farm bill in an attempt to get the legislation passed after an embarrassing defeat last month.

    Republicans drop food stamps from farm bill

    House Republican leaders bruised by the defeat of a massive farm bill last month are working to quickly revive the measure with a vote on a pared-down version that avoids an immediate showdown on food stamp cuts.

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    A bottle containing a message by Sidonie Fery is shown Tuesday, July 9, 2013, in New York. Sidonie was tragically killed in a fall at a Swiss boarding school in 2010. But two years later, as workers were cleaning up a Patchogue, Long Island, beach after Superstorm Sandy, they discovered the note Sidonie had sent.

    Note found amid NY Sandy debris helps grieving mom

    Fery was about 10 years old when she and a playmate placed a note inside a ginger ale bottle and threw it in the Great South Bay off Long Island. Sidonie was tragically killed in Switzerland in 2010. But two years later, as workers were cleaning up a Long Island, beach after Superstorm Sandy, they discovered the note Sidonie had sent. Although it only traveled a mile or two from where it was...

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    Rolling Meadows Mayor Tom Rooney

    Rolling Meadows council rejects prevailing wage ordinance

    The prevailing wage ordinance is one of those things that every spring sails through most local governing bodies with a whimper at most. But not in Rolling Meadows, where officials have refused to pass the measure for more than a decade.

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    US begins flying deportees to Mexico City

    U.S. immigration authorities have begun flying deportees deep into Mexico in an effort to discourage them from trying to return. The flights are not voluntary, unlike a previous program to deport Mexicans arrested by the Border Patrol during Arizona’s deadly summer heat.

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    Tia Skinner looks to her family and addresses them during her resentencing hearing in 31st Circuit court in Port Huron, Mich. on Thursday, July 11, 2013. Skinner, who was convicted of plotting to have her father stabbed to death when she was just 17 years old was sentenced again to life in prison without parole.

    Mich. woman again sentenced to life in dad’s death

    A former honors student who was convicted of plotting to have her father stabbed to death when she was 17 years old was sentenced Thursday to life in a Michigan prison without parole — the same punishment she first received in 2011. “Justice demands that you serve not one day less,” Judge Daniel Kelly said.The evidence showed that Tia Skinner orchestrated the attack because she was upset at her...

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    This file photo downloaded from the Arabic language web site www.muslm.net, believed to have been taken in July 2009, shows a man identified by the site as Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the accused mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, in detention at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

    Did 9/11 mastermind design vacuum cleaner in prison?

    Confined to the basement of a CIA secret prison in Romania about a decade ago, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the admitted mastermind of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, asked his jailers whether he could embark on an unusual project: Would the spy agency allow Mohammed, who had earned his bachelor’s in mechanical engineering, to design a vacuum cleaner? The agency officer in charge of the prison called CIA...

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    Nominations open for Arlington Heights Cultural Arts Award

    9.71- page 2The Village of Arlington Heights Arts Commission is calling for nominations for its third annual Arlington Heights Cultural Arts Award. The award will celebrate achievements in arts produced by artists, writers and performers in the Arlington Heights community.

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    Youth homicide rate hits lowest mark in 30 years

    Health officials say the homicide rate for older children and young adults has hit its lowest point in at least three decades. The government report released Thursday echoes earlier findings about a national decline in murders and other crimes in the last two decades. Youths account for about a third of homicide victims.

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    Hanover Park Mayor Rodney Craig

    Hanover Park mayor opposes assault weapons ban

    When the Hanover Park village board meets next Thursday, the agenda will include a proposal to ban assault weapons. But Mayor Rodney Craig plans to ask that it be withdrawn. “It’s an issue that doesn’t really belong at the municipal level,” he said. “It’s not our battle."

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    Saudi princess charged with US human trafficking

    Meshael Alayban, who prosecutors said is one of the wives of Saudi Prince Abdulrahman bin Nasser bin Abdulaziz al Saud, was charged Wednesday with human trafficking. The victim said she was offered a job, but she said she was forced to work excessive hours, was paid less than promised and was not allowed to leave. “This is not a contract dispute,” District Attorney Tony Rackauckas said. “This is...

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    Police and city leaders in Sanford and South Florida are preparing for the possibility of mass demonstrations and civil unrest if Zimmerman is acquitted in the killing of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin, particularly in African-American neighborhoods where passions about the case run strongest.

    Fla. cities on guard for any post-Zimmerman unrest

    Police and city leaders in Florida say they have taken precautionary steps for the possibility of mass protests or even civil unrest if George Zimmerman is acquitted in the killing of unarmed teen Trayvon Martin, particularly in African-American neighborhoods where passions run strongest over the case.

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    Spoons not required: gather your friends for this year’s ice cream eating contest at Batavia’s Windmill City Festival. Teams can sign up for the 2 p.m. Sunday contest in front of the main stage.

    Batavia’s Riverwalk comes alive for Windmill City Festival

    Roger Breisch remembers how his daughter Kathryn would spend the entire afternoon at the carnival when she would celebrate her birthday at the Windmill City Festival. “They’d get those unlimited ride wristbands and they’d ride and ride and ride,” said the 23-year resident of Batavia. The long-running festival has become a tradition of the community. It will run July 12-14...

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    Mario Melgar, 5, who was born in Prince Georges County, Md., joins his Guatemalan mother, not in picture, during a rally for citizenship on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 10, 2013, coinciding with the GOP House Caucus meeting.

    GOP rejects comprehensive approach on immigration

    House Republicans are embracing a step-by-step approach to immigration, in contrast to the sweeping plan passed by the Senate and backed by the White House. But they’re offering neither specifics nor a timetable — nor any mention of possible citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants living in the country unlawfully.

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    An Egyptian boy stands among the supporters of ousted Egypt’s President Mohammed Morsi, who are offering the Tarawih prayer, after the evening meal when Muslims break their fast during the Islamic month of Ramadan, in Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday July 10, 2013.

    Egypt’s Brotherhood vows to keep defying coup

    Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood vowed Thursday to continue its “peaceful” resistance in defiance of the military’s ouster of the country’s Islamist President Mohammed Morsi. A Brotherhood statement also distanced the group from an assassination attempt Wednesday against a senior army commander in the Sinai Peninsula.

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    Settlers Hill is no stranger to seeing a high volume of truck traffic. In its days as an operational landfill, the facility hosted multiple Waste Management garbage trucks every day.

    Kane County may enter dirt business at Settlers Hill

    It will be two to three years before Kane County residents see any redevelopment at the former Settlers Hill landfill. Turns out the first project, a cross country track, needs 500,000 yards of dirt to pull it off. That's an expensive proposition, but there are some ideas about how the county can both get the dirt and make a profit from it.

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    Rosemont-based Rail World Inc. President Edward Burkhardt faced jeers from residents as he toured the site of the fiery crash of a runaway oil train in Lac-Megantic, Quebec. Burkhardt blamed the accident on an employee who he said had failed to properly set the brakes.

    Quebec crash missing presumed dead, making toll 50

    Everyone missing in the fiery crash of a runaway oil train in Quebec is presumed dead, police told grieving families, bringing the death toll to 50 in Canada’s worst railway catastrophe in almost 150 years. Meanwhile, attention focused on the CEO of the railway’s Rosemont-based parent company, who faced jeers from local residents and blamed the train’s engineer for improperly setting its brakes...

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    Batavia discovered last year that five of the six utility poles on Western Avenue brought down in a storm in July 2012 had significant rot. It prompted officials to order a check of all 2,600 of the city’s wooden utility poles.

    Batavia, ComEd inspect thousands of utility poles for rot

    It may seem a little strange, but don’t be alarmed if you see people hitting wooden utility poles with a hammer this month and next. It’s happening in Batavia; the people with the hammers have been hired to test the soundness of 2,600 wooden poles that carry electrical, telephone and cable wires. “These things come from trees, you know, so anything that makes a tree rotten will...

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    Jeff Noblitt, president of Aurora Downtown and spokesman for Waubonsee Community College, says the college’s new $50 million campus and RiverEdge Park top a list of projects reshaping land use along the Fox River through the city’s commercial center.

    Aurora embraces Fox River in its revitalization efforts

    As downtown revitalization efforts in Aurora increasingly focus on the Fox River, the city of lights may be gaining a new identity. “Aurora is a river town. We can’t turn our backs on who we are, and the river is part of who we are,” said Jeff Noblitt, president of Aurora Downtown and spokesman for Waubonsee Community College. “The river is what makes us distinctive.”

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    Jazz drummer Paul Wertico headlined Jazz in Glen Ellyn last year and is back again, this time opening the show on Main Street in Glen Ellyn. Wertico, who has seven Grammys to his credit, will take the stage with jazz musicians John Moulder and Larry Gray.

    Grammy-winning drummer returns for encore at Jazz in Glen Ellyn

    Seven-time Grammy-winning jazz drummer Paul Wertico had so much fun headlining last year’s Jazz in Glen Ellyn that he simply had to come back. “He has such a great following, a lot of people came down to hear him (last year),” said Georgia Koch, co-director of the Glen Ellyn Chamber of Commerce. “He enjoyed it so much he said, ‘Why don’t I come back and open for you guys?’” He opens the show at...

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    Acting out Aesop's fable about a smart crow, a rook, a member of the crow family, drops stones into a tube to raise the water level and bring a worm into reach during this experiment a few years ago at the University of Cambridge.

    Rabbits rule since crows vanished from neighborhood

    When I pull into my garage, I know they'll be be waiting in my backyard. At least one, maybe a half dozen. Fearless, brazen rabbits treat my yard as their own personal salad bar. That's when I wish I had my crows back. In the local battle of fur vs. feathers, I always rooted for the crows. Even with a wingspan of 3 feet and a body that weighs a pound and stands a foot high, it isn't that easy for...

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    The Railroad Days Parade, with a theme of “We Have a Dream,” steps off at 1 p.m. Sunday, July 14. The festival opens Thursday in Reed-Keppler Park

    Fallen trees return to Reed-Keppler Park for West Chicago Railroad Days

    Before Railroad Days could open last year, West Chicago's Reed-Keppler Park needed a cleanup after a fast-moving summer storm felled and damaged dozens of the parks oak trees. Thanks to Ron Meyers, Jeff Perkis and some IIT students, the trees are returning to the park July 11 to 14 for this year's fest -- but now the trees have a new life as hand-crafted furniture.

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    Family members walk to a limo with the remains of Anthony Rose of Beach Park at Waukegan Regional Airport Wednesday night. Rose was killed June 30 along with other members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots while battling a wildfire north of Phoenix.

    Dawn Patrol: Firefighter honored; Itasca man wins baking competition

    Firefighter who died in Arizona returns to suburbs. Stevenson High: Letter offering extra credit for cash was fake. Itasca dad wins CBS baking competition. North Aurora police: Man beat relative, fired shotgun into ceiling. World War II vet from Mt. Prospect remembered for his humor. DuPage secures state money for roads. Cubs’ four-game winning streak snapped. Sox give up 8 in loss to Detroit.

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    Behold, the lowly utility pole

    We take them for granted. What is a utility pole made of? How long do they last? What do they cost?

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    Naperville’s Riverwalk Commission is going to ask the city and park district for permission to extend the iconic path by another block on its south end.

    Naperville Riverwalk group wants to make path longer

    It’s often called the “crown jewel” of Naperville. It lines the west branch of the DuPage River with brick paths, fountains, sculptures and meeting places. It’s nearly two miles and it could soon get longer. It’s the Naperville Riverwalk, and officials on Wednesday said they are ready to ask the park board and the city council for the go-ahead to extend the riverside...

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    Salvador Serna of Elgin holds up his new citizenship recognition certificate Wednesday during the 15th annual ceremony by the Elgin City Council to recognize new U.S. citizens. Serna said he’s been in the United States “a long, long time.”

    Elgin City Council honors new U.S. citizens

    Jose Arroyo of Streamwood has been a U.S. citizen for just two months, but he already has his new American passport. “I have always been the kind of person who likes to have all his papers in order,” he said. Arroyo was among about 45 new U.S. citizens — including natives of India, Iraq, France, Laos, and Peru — who were honored Wednesday night at the Elgin City Council...

Sports

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    Baker will make first rehab start Sunday in Kane County

    Pitcher Scott Baker threw from the Wrigley Field bullpen mound Thursday as he prepares for Sunday's rehab start for the Kane County Cougars. Baker is on the mend from Tommy John surgery, perforrmed in April 2012 while he was with the Twins.

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    Cubs starting pitcher Edwin Jackson earned his third straight victory by shutting down the Cardinals on Thursday night.

    Jackson's turnaround key to Cubs win

    After a brutal start to his first season with the Cubs, Edwin Jackson has begun to turn things around. He earned his third straight victory Thursday night as the Cubs took the series opener from the St. Louis Cardinals 3-0 at Wrigley Field. “Like I told you guys earlier in the season when I was struggling, it's a crazy game,” he said. “You just have to keep throwing. You just have to have confidence that things will change, and the ball will roll your way.

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    An artist rendering provided showing planned renovations at Wrigley Field. The Cubs said that have reached an agreement with the city that would allow the team to build a Jumbotron in left field while adding another sign in right field.

    Landmarks commission OKs Wrigley changes

    The proposed modernization of historic Wrigley Field overcame an important hurdle Thursday when the Cubs and the city reached an agreement allowing the team to build a first-ever electronic Jumbotron and another sign above the ivy-covered outfield walls. The city's landmarks commission unanimously voted to approve the deal.

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    Edwin Jackson earned his third straight win, combining with four relievers on a four-hitter, and Anthony Rizzo drove in all the runs to lead the Cubs to a 3-0 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals on Thursday night. St. Louis had the tying run at the plate in the ninth inning after Kevin Gregg dropped a throw covering first on Allen Craig's grounder, and David Freese walked.

    Jackson, Rizzo lead Cubs over Cardinals, 3-0

    Edwin Jackson earned his third straight win, combining with four relievers on a four-hitter, and Anthony Rizzo drove in all the runs to lead the Cubs to a 3-0 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals on Thursday night. St. Louis had the tying run at the plate in the ninth inning after Kevin Gregg dropped a throw covering first on Allen Craig's grounder, and David Freese walked.

  •  
    Former Bulls star Scottie Pippen is being sued over a fight with an autograph-seeker at an upscale Southern California restaurant. Attorneys filed the $4 million lawsuit Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court. They say Camran Shafighi asked Pippen for an autograph for his girlfriend's son and instead got a “brutal and unjustified” attack.

    Scottie Pippen sued for $4M over Malibu fight

    Former Bulls star Scottie Pippen is being sued over a fight with an autograph-seeker at an upscale Southern California restaurant. Attorneys filed the $4 million lawsuit Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court. They say Camran Shafighi asked Pippen for an autograph for his girlfriend's son and instead got a “brutal and unjustified” attack.

  •  

    Cougars dumped by Silver Hawks

    For the second straight night, the Kane County Cougars scored first only to watch the South Bend Silver Hawks cruise to a victory, this time 6-1 at Coveleski Regional Stadium.

  •  
    White Sox catcher Josh Phegley is congratulated by teammates Jeff Keppinger, left, and Gordon Beckham after his grand slam in the sixth inning of Thursday’s victory at Detroit. Phegley and Beckham are two players who figure to stay put on the South Side.

    White Sox offensive prospects still need time

    General manager Rick Hahn is looking to retool the White Sox' disappointing offense, but minor-league prospects like Trayce Thompson, Jared Mitchell, Courtney Hawkins and Tim Anderson still need more time to develop on the farm.

  •  
    Blackhawks prospect Garret Ross

    Blackhawks prospect Ross familiar with Saad’s success story

    It seems every Blackhawks prospect wants to be the next Brandon Saad, the rookie who spent most of last season on a line with Jonathan Toews and Marian Hossa and wound up winning the Stanley Cup. But only Garret Ross knows what it’s really like to follow Saad.

  •  
    Christopher Froome of Britain, wearing the overall leader's yellow jersey, celebrates on the podium of the twelfth stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 218 kilometers (136.2 miles) with start in in Fougeres and finish in Tours, western France, Thursday July 11 2013. (AP Photo/Laurent Rebours)

    Cavendish no longer fastest Tour man on 2 wheels

    At this Tour de France, it is Marcel Kittel and no longer Mark Cavendish who is looking like the fastest man on two wheels.Everything was primed on Thursday for Cavendish to win a 25th Tour stage in his illustrious career. His beefy teammate from Belgium, Gert Steegmans, did his job to perfection, guiding Cavendish into position for the final sprint to the line in Tours in the Loire valley.But Cavendish simply wasn’t quick enough. Kittel overtook him just before the line.

  •  
    Los Angeles Dodgers' Yasiel Puig (66) and Mark Ellis high-five after scoring on a double by Hanley Ramirez during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks, Wednesday, July 10, 2013, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York)

    Freeman, Delabar elected as All-Stars; Puig misses

    So much for Puig-mania sweeping the country. Give this contest to Atlanta first baseman Freddie Freeman.Freeman and Toronto reliever Steve Delabar won the fan voting for the final spots in next week’s All-Star game, meaning Los Angeles Dodgers sensation Yasiel Puig is likely headed for a few days off after a terrific stretch to begin his major league career.

  •  
    New York Yankees' Derek Jeter reacts during a sixth-inning at-bat in a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals at Yankee Stadium on Thursday, July 11, 2013, in New York. The Yankees beat the Royals 8-4. Jeter left the game early with a tight right quadriceps. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Jeter returns, exits with tight quad

    Derek Jeter was back, and the New York Yankees felt a whole lot better. At least until he needed to make an early exit. The Yankees captain singled on his first pitch of the season, then was pulled for a pinch-hitter in the eighth inning with a tight right quadriceps in an 8-4 victory Thursday over the Kansas City Royals.“I hope it’s not a big deal,” Jeter said.

  •  

    Baseball union head assails leaks on drug inquiry
    The head of the players’ union said Thursday baseball’s drug agreement could be undermined by leaks to the media about whether players are cooperating with an investigation by the commissioner.

  •  
    White Sox catcher Josh Phegley, (36) is congratulated by teammates Jeff Keppinger, left, and Gordon Beckham (15) after his grand slam Thursday during the sixth inning against the Detroit Tigers in Detroit.

    Sale thrilled to get run support as Sox top Tigers

    Joshua Phegley’s sixth-inning grand slam gave Chris Sale some long-awaited run support, and the Sox went on to beat the Detroit Tigers 6-3 on Thursday in a game that included a bench-clearing altercation shortly after the White Sox took the lead. The Sox trailed 3-1 when Phegley cleared the bases with a homer off Detroit starter Anibal Sanchez (7-6).

  •  

    Mike North video: Steroid suspensions
    MLB continues their investigations about the steroid scandals. Mike North is interested about who is on the list of 20 plus baseball players they plan on naming.

Business

  •  

    Woodfield convention bureau names 2013-14 officers

    The Woodfield Chicago Northwest Convention Bureau, the tourism sales and marketing organization for eight Northwest suburbs, has announced its officers and board members for the next fiscal year. The executive committee will be chaired by Brett Hintz of TopGolf, with Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center General Manager Lisa Timbo named chair-elect.

  •  
    Mount Prospect leaders continue to study ways to finish redevelopment efforts in the village’s downtown area.

    Study of downtown Mt. Prospect moves forward

    With the third and final public meeting about the future of downtown Mount Prospect complete, village leaders look forward to receiving a final report in September on the issue. “The amount of public input we received was fairly good overall,” said Nellie Beckner, a long-range planner with the village of Mount Prospect. “What was particularly nice to see was the variety of people who took part — young people, older residents, moms, dads. It was a great mix.”

  •  
    David Hagopian, vice president of operations, left, and Ron Sheble, vice president of finance, head Advanced Vehicle Technology Services Inc. in Buffalo Grove.

    Buffalo Grove firm promotes gas technology for your vehicle

    Kukec's eBuzz column features Buffalo Grove-based Advanced Vehicle Technology Serivces Inc., which promotes and installs compressed natural gas as an energy source for commercial and consumer vehicles.

  •  

    Microsoft reshuffles company structure
    Microsoft Corp. is reshuffling its business in an attempt to promote faster innovation and a sharper focus on devices and services. The move by the world’s largest software maker comes amid lukewarm response to the latest version of its flagship Windows operating system and a steady decline in demand for PCs as people turn to tablets and other mobile gadgets.

  •  
    David Karp, center, founder and CEO of Tumblr, reacts during the opening bell at Nasdaq Thursday in New York. Yahoo acquired the online blogging forum for $1.1 billion in June. Tumblr will remain independently operated and Karp will stay CEO.

    Stocks surge after Bernanke allays stimulus fear

    Call it the Bernanke Boost. The stock market got extra fuel Thursday after Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said the central bank will keep supporting the economy, sending the Dow Jones industrial average and Standard & Poor’s 500 to all-time highs.

  •  
    Chicago’s Landmarks Commission is set to consider the most hotly-debated part of the Cubs’ $500 million plan to renovate Wrigley Field. That is the proposal to build a massive video scoreboard in left field.

    City, Cubs agree on new signs at Wrigley

    The Chicago Cubs say they've reached an agreement with the city that would allow the team to build a Jumbotron in left field at the team's historic ballpark while adding another sign in right field.

  •  
    Figures of the fictional character Waldo from illustrator Martin Handford’s “Where’s Waldo” books are hiding in more than 40 Naperville businesses as a promotion throughout July.

    Naperville Waldo hunt promotion lasts all month

    Waldo has been to outer space, the beach, other worlds and back in time. Now he’s hidden somewhere at more than 40 businesses in Naperville. Launched last year when the fictional character created by London illustrator Martin Handford turned 25, the “Where’s Waldo? on Main Street, USA” campaign celebrates the “uniqueness, fun and strength of community,” said Becky Anderson, owner of Anderson’s Bookshop.

  •  
    Speaker of the House John Boehner and GOP leaders meet with reporters following a Republican strategy session at the Capitol Tuesday. Republicans have seized on the White House delay of a health law requirement for employers and are demanding that the Obama administration give individual Americans an equal break.

    Q&A: Latest health law fight: Battle of mandates

    If businesses get an extra year to meet a new health care mandate, why not everybody else? Republicans, seizing on the White House delay for employers, are demanding the Obama administration give individual Americans an equal break.

  •  
    Prospective students and their parents tour Georgetown University's campus in Washington, Wednesday. The defeat of a student loan bill in the Senate on Wednesday clears the way for fresh negotiations to restore lower rates, but lawmakers are racing the clock before millions of students return to campus next month to find borrowing terms twice as high as when school let out.

    Deal emerging on student loans, talks continue

    An emerging deal to lower interest rates on student loans took shape Thursday, offering Democrats promises that interest rates would not reach 10 percent and giving Republicans a link between borrowing terms and the financial markets. Lawmakers and their aides were in talks about how they might reduce rates on subsidized Stafford loans, which doubled to 6.8 percent last week in the wake of congressional inaction.

  •  

    Philip Caldwell, First Ford CEO Not Named Ford, Dies at 93

    Philip Caldwell, Ford Motor Co.’s first chief executive officer who wasn’t a member of the founder’s family, and who gambled the automaker’s future on the Taurus sedan in the 1980s, has died. He was 93. He died yesterday at his home in New Canaan, Connecticut, his family said in a statement provided by the company. The cause was complications of a stroke.

  •  

    Rate on 30-year mortgage at 2-year high: 4.51 pct.

    The average U.S. rate on the 30-year fixed mortgage rose this week to 4.51 percent, a two-year high. Rates have been rising on expectations that the Federal Reserve will slow its bond purchases this year. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday that the average on the 30-year loan jumped from 4.29 percent the previous week. Just two months ago, it was 3.35 percent — barely above the record low of 3.31 percent.

  •  

    U.S. airlines’ on-time rating drops again in May

    Summer travelers should pack plenty of patience: More flights are running late this year than in 2012. The U.S. Department of Transportation says that only 79.4 percent of domestic flights arrived on time in May, down from 83.4 percent in the same month last year.

  •  
    Souvenir plates to mark the forthcoming birth of Prince William and Kate, Duchess of Cambridge’s baby are seen on display in a souvenir shop in central London, Wednesday, July 10, 2013.

    Name game gives manufacturers a royal challenge

    It’s a royal bonanza — but for Britain’s souvenir makers, also a royal headache. The upcoming birth of Prince William and his wife Kate’s first child is a golden opportunity. But while merchants have known for months that the future heir to the throne is due in mid-July, they’ll be sent into a mad dash to put finishing touches on royal baby memorabilia once the gender and name are known.

  •  
    Fewer U.S. homes entered the foreclosure process or were repossessed by banks in June, the latest sign that the nation is shaking off its housing bust hangover.

    Home repossessions declined in June

    Fewer U.S. homes entered the foreclosure process or were repossessed by banks in June, the latest sign that the nation is shaking off its housing bust hangover. Lenders initiated the foreclosure process on 57,286 homes last month, the lowest level for any month in 7½ years, foreclosure listing firm RealtyTrac Inc. said Thursday. Foreclosure starts are on pace to reach roughly 800,000 this year, down from 1.1 million last year, the firm said.

  •  
    Drew Miller in Silver Spring, Md. Miller quit a steady government contract job to take a chance on a company that’s using “smart technologies” to help big corporations cut lighting costs.

    Study: Youth attitudes shift in Great Recession

    Drew Miller clearly remembers the day his father was laid off. Miller, now 25, was a freshman at an Ohio college, full of hope and ready to take on the world. But here was this “red flag ... a big wake-up call,” he says. The prosperous years of childhood were over, and his future was likely to be bumpier than he’d expected. Across the country, others of Miller’s generation heard that same wake-up call as the Great Recession set in. But would it change them? And would the impact last?

  •  
    The D.C. Council issued a legislative rebuke to Wal-Mart on Wednesday, approving a bill that would require the retail giant and other big-box chain retailers operating in the nation’s capital to pay their employees a “living wage” of at least $12.50 an hour.

    DC Council rebukes Wal-Mart over wages

    The D.C. Council issued a legislative rebuke to Wal-Mart on Wednesday, approving a bill that would require the retail giant and other big-box chain retailers operating in the nation’s capital to pay their employees a “living wage” of at least $12.50 an hour. Wal-Mart has warned it would scrap plans for three of the six stores it had hoped to build in Washington if the bill becomes law.

  •  
    Illinoisans can now use their smartphones or tablets to get information on emergency preparedness or where to get help in a disaster.

    New state mobile website available in emergencies
    Illinoisans can now use their smartphones or tablets to get information on emergency preparedness or where to get help in a disaster.The Illinois Emergency Management Agency says it has activated a new mobile version of its Ready Illinois website. The site is m.ready.illinois.gov. It has information about disasters, hazards and emergency preparedness and recovery.Jonathon Monken is director of the Illinois Emergency Management Agency. He says the mobile website will be particularly helpful during disasters. He says it will allow people to get real-time updates about road closures, shelters and other critical information.In addition to general preparedness information, the site includes a “How Do I?” section. It provides quick information on more than 40 topics, including pet emergency preparedness.

  •  
    Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan

    Madigan: Illinois AG will seek damages from Apple

    Attorney General Lisa Madigan says Illinois will seek to recover damages from Apple Inc. after a federal judge found the company violated antitrust laws. A U.S. District Court judge in New York on Wednesday ruled Apple conspired with book publishers to raise electronic book prices significantly in spring 2010.

  •  
    Deerfield-based Walgreen Co. said Wednesday it will raise its quarterly dividend to 31.5 cents from 27.5 cents.

    Walgreen raises quarterly dividend to 31.5 cents
    Associated PressDeerfield-based Walgreen Co. said Wednesday it will raise its quarterly dividend to 31.5 cents from 27.5 cents.The company’s next dividend is payable Sept. 12 to shareholders of record on Aug. 20.Walgreen runs 8,098 drugstores in all 50 U.S. states, Washington DC, and Puerto Rico.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    This Cape Cod in Barrington Hills was designed by Robert Parker Coffin.

    Barrington Hills home designed by Robert Parker Coffin

    Anyone could have an idyllic life if they lived in this classic Cape Cod home, designed by well-known local architect Robert Parker Coffin, and located on five rolling acres along a private 23-home lane in Barrington Hills.

  •  

    If a deal goes bad, just move on, find a new buyer

    Q. We had our property listed for sale for over a year. Last week, a couple came along and gave us an offer. After a little negotiating, we settled on a contract. We were thrilled as we had been wanting to move south before it got cold again.

  •  
    Lucky Boys Confusion regroups for a hot summer show headlining Taste of River North Friday, July 19.

    Songs from a scene: The evolution of LBC

    Anyone who has spent any amount of time with me in the last 15 years knows I have a special place in my heart for Lucky Boys Confusion. And while I've never met the guys, we have a long history together. But not in a creepy way.

  •  
    Anita Baker

    Anita Baker’s Ravinia show canceled

    Anita Baker has cancelled her concert appearance at the Ravinia Festival on Saturday, July 13.

  •  
    Now 3,700 never-before-published negatives and transparencies that celebrity photographer Milton H. Greene shot of Marilyn Monroe in the 1950s are going on the auction block.

    Auction selling copyright with Monroe negatives

    Fashion and celebrity photographer Milton H. Greene was only 26 years old when he photographed Marilyn Monroe for Look magazine. He went on to take thousands of photos of the Hollywood siren, capturing both her vulnerability and her sex-bomb persona. Now, 3,700 unpublished black-and-white and color negatives and transparencies of Greene’s Monroe archive are going on the auction block — with copyright.

  •  
    The Grand Ole Pry is offering the VIP Behind the Opry Curtain Tour and Opry House Post Show Tour showing a variety of dressing rooms and inner workings of the Opry moments before the big curtain goes up.

    Grand Ole Opry installs 2 new tours

    Darius Rucker’s surprise invitation to become a member of the Grand Ole Opry is a moment he says he will always cherish — and now fans will be able to share the experience with him over and over again. The singer, who rose to fame as the frontman for South Carolina rockers Hootie & The Blowfish, began pursuing his lifelong passion for country music a few years ago. Now he is the video host for one of two new tours that have been added to the Opry’s backstage tour line-up.

  •  

    Is it back-to-school time already — really?
    Are you one of those people who get upset when you see Christmas sales go up in mid-October? Me, too. But I’m far more upset by the back-to-school sales that crop up as soon as the previous school year ends.

  •  
    This May 13, 2013 photo shows the giant round tower above the grave of 19th Century Irish politician, Daniel O'Connell, who founded Glasnevin Cemetery in Dublin in 1832. The cemetery, steeped in Irish history, is hosting events related to The Gathering, a yearlong initiative to bring Irish emigrants and their descendants back to Ireland to celebrate their heritage. The cemetery's family events for clans (O'Neills, O'Donnells, O'Briens, etc.) include a walking tour, a museum visit and help in tracing kin. (AP Photo/Helen O'Neill)

    The Gathering calling Irish home

    The tall ships looked majestic as they sailed into the bay — replicas of the masted, rigged vessels that once transported millions of emigrants from these shores. The ships had departed from Liverpool, England, three days earlier, carrying descendants of Irish emigrants in a reverse voyage billed as an opportunity to “Sail Home to Your Roots.” A crowd on the docks cheered as they entered Dublin port and the crew unfurled a giant green banner with the words, “Welcome to Our Gathering.”

  •  
    Kevin James, left, David Spade, Adam Sandler and Chris Rock reunite in the childish “Grown Ups 2.”

    Grow up already! Sandler and the boys childish as ever

    It would be dishonest to call “Grown Ups 2” the most repellent high-profile comedy in recent memory, but it might come close. Adam Sandler returns as Lenny, a Hollywood player who has moved his family to his rural hometown, where Dad gets plenty of Guy Time with pals Eric (Kevin James), Kurt (Chris Rock), and Marcus (David Spade). Happily, this film's conception of male friendship is less reliant on insults and abuse than its predecessor, but still, the humor has not matured.

  •  

    Night life events: Drink specials highlight Snuggery’s opening

    Celebrate The Snuggery Elmhurst’s grand opening this weekend with drink specials and more. Hear the best of John Mellencamp at Cubby Bear North when Mellencougar plays starting at 10 p.m. Friday, July 12.

  •  

    Theater events: Steel Beam hosts picnic and a show

    Steel Beam Theatre stages a Sam Shepard one-act and Oak Park and Arc Theatres produce unique interpretations of Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" this week in suburban theater.

  •  
    Jo Lawry, Judith Hill and Lisa Fischer are three of many backup singers profiled in Morgan Neville's documentary “Twenty Feet From Stardom.”

    'Stardom' doc grabs the limelight

    Dann Gire reviews Morgan Neville's new documentary “Twenty Feet From Stardom,” which pays tribute to backup singers. If Dann can get to the stage without being bitten, he'll introduce novelist Max Brooks when he speaks at 7 p.m. Friday, July 12, at the Performing Arts Center at Palatine's Harper College. Brooks wrote the book used as the source for Brad Pitt's film “World War Z.” Dann also supplies film notes and more.

  •  
    Shishito peppers are small, thin Japanese peppers that resemble jalapeno but generally taste sweeter than they do hot. Try them grilled or seared.

    Grilled Shishito Peppers
    Grilled Shishito Peppers

  •  
    Raleigh (Charlie Hunnam) and Mako (Rinko Kikuchi) prepare to take on the aliens in “Pacific Rim.”

    Humans match machines for robotic personalities in noisy 'Rim'

    Filmmaker Guillermo del Toro wanted to make “Pacific Rim” for the 10-year-olds in all of us. You know, the 10-year-olds who don't care about intelligent dialogue and characters with personalities or emotional depth. The 10-year-olds who just want to see mass destruction and giant space monsters vomiting acid on gargantuan robots operated by humans linked by a connection called “the drift.”

  •  
    A model wears a sheer ribbed pullover paired with tuxedo slim leg jeans. Back-to-school shopping doesn’t have to be all kids’ stuff.

    Teachers can use clothes to communicate with kids

    Back-to-school shopping doesn’t have to be all kids’ stuff. The wardrobe to complement that first opening bell can help set the tone for a teacher’s year, too. There’s nothing in the contract that requires dangling cat-character earrings or kooky bow ties. The right look can command respect while earning a little street cred.

  •  
    Spicy Broccoli with Salami and Fried Egg comes together fast, like a stir-fry.

    On the fridge: Fried egg dinner in 25 minutes

    Spicy Broccoli with Salami and Egg comes together like a stir-fry, relying on the salami to add savory flavor. It eats like something you might put together on your own when faced with these ingredients in the refrigerator. And that alone could be a kitchen lesson that will stick.

  •  
    Shishito peppers are small, thin Japanese peppers that resemble jalapeno, but generally taste sweeter than they do hot. Try them grilled or seared.

    Shishito peppers: From hipster menus to your grill

    Shishito peppers are small, thin Japanese peppers. They look a bit like a longer, thinner jalapeno. But the flavor is quite different. While jalapenos have thick flesh and an assertive heat most of us a familiar with, shishitos are thin skinned and generally sweeter than they are hot.

  •  
    This Bible is, evidently, almost 100 years old, but does its age make it valuable?

    Is this family Bible dated 1913 worth much beyond any sentimental value?

    Q. I am sending you photographs of my grandmother’s Bible that is dated Nov. 12, 1913. Is there a market for this? Thank you.

  •  
    Schaumburg native Sahaj Shah, 21, aka DJ Mr. Shaw, talks about his passion for being a DJ while practicing in his studio/bedroom. His craft requires him to be part-musician, part-engineer and part-street performer.

    Schaumburg native making waves on the DJ scene

    Give Sahaj Shah a turntable, laptop and some headphones and watch as he transforms into DJ Mr. Shaw. The 21-year-old Columbia College student from Schaumburg last month won the Boom DJ Battle, part of the B96 Summer Bash festivities at Toyota Park. “When he was a baby, he'd use my kitchen utensils like drumsticks and make dents and bumps all over my pots,” she said. “... I never imagined it would lead to this.”

  •  
    A view of “QuickBrix,” paper decor that uses everyday cardboard packaging created by artist, Jan Mollet.

    Artful decor from recycled paper

    Many of us dispatch our used paper to a bin, the first step on the way to Recycle Land. These household accumulations of paper and cardboard are just one more thing to get rid of. Luckily, there are designers and artists who see possibilities in all that wood pulp. They’re busy using it to create art, decorative accessories, even furniture. So what you sent to the recycling center just might find its way back, in some form, to your home.

Discuss

  •  
    Barbara Pagano

    Editorial: Walker's death a clarion call for safety

    The death of a pedestrian who was hit by a bicyclist on an Arlington Heights path is a wake-up call for all to use suburban paths safely, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  

    If it please the public

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: As a courtroom junkie since my early reporting days, it is at great personal sacrifice that I suggest the following: It may be time to get television cameras out of the courtroom.

  •  

    Hawks a model for young athletes, parents
    A Hoffman Estates letter to the editor: Child athletes (and their parents) may not be the Blackhawks, but they can certainly learn from them. Parents can loudly and enthusiastically cheer their children during the games. But more important than that, in those quiet times between games, and especially after the losses, simply encourage your children to continually get a little better at what they do.

  •  

    Volunteers answer the call after storms
    A Geneva letter to the editor: Since OEM volunteers seldom receive acknowledgment of their hard work and dedication, I want to say that I’m proud to be associated with such a fine group of unsung heroes who work so hard to keep our county safe every day of the year.

  •  

    Weak argument against gay marriage
    A Wood Dale letter to the editor: -I am writing in response to David Smith’s July 1st letter written on behalf of the IFI. His letter claims the unique purpose of marriage “is to create the best environment for raising children” and that it is the responsibility of the government not to undermine it.

  •  

    Think critically on global warming
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: You mention that most scientists believe in global warming, but that isn’t true. If you look at the ones who are adamant perhaps you should also look at their funding.

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