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Daily Archive : Tuesday July 2, 2013

News

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    Rosemont Mayor Brad Stephens, right, covers his face as Pat McGann cracks a joke Saturday at a roast at Zanies Comedy Club in Rosemont. Proceeds from the event, which commemorates Zanies anniversary, benefit the Bear Necessities Pediatric Cancer Foundation

    Rosemont mayor takes it on the chin — and laughs about it

    If anyone harbored any illusions that Saturday night’s roast of Rosemont Mayor Bradley Stephens would be “playful” - as promised in the invitation- those illusions were quickly shattered. Roastmaster Pat McGann tore the invitation in half and then, along with several comedians, proceeded to turn Stephens into what McGann aptly described as a pinata.

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    From left, Lisa Lemajeur and Emily Jerosz, both of Arlington Heights, compete in the pie-eating contest at the Arlington Heights Frontier Days on Saturday.

    Frontier Days fun ends Sunday
    Festival fun continues Sunday at Frontier Days in Arlington Heights with entertainment, a pet parade, wheelchair basketball, water fights, a cake deorating contest, competitions, games and a carnival.

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    Anthony Rose

    Arizona firefighter had ties to Lake County

    One of the 19 firefighters who died Sunday in an Arizona wildfire grew up in Lake County. Anthony Rose, 23, lived in Wadsworth and Beach Park before moving to Arizona as a teen, said his mother, Athena Rose Sperry. “I'm numb,” she said Tuesday.

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    Mariano's Fresh Market in Vernon Hills has expanded its parking lot twice since opening in June 2011. That's one reason a developer intends create more parking than originally proposed for the Mariano's that would be built in Lake Zurich on the northwest corner of Route 22 and Quentin Road.

    Lake Zurich approves changes in Mariano's Fresh Market plan

    A developer of a project to be anchored by Mariano's Fresh Market in Lake Zurich has received permission to drop a bank from the original plan and create more parking spaces. Bradford Real Estate Cos. intends to build more parking for Mariano's where the Chase bank had been slated at the northwest corner of Route 22 and Quentin Road in Lake Zurich.

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    Fountain Blue wedding parties booked as early as late July for this outdoor tent could be in jeopardy, as Des Plaines city officials recently voted it must be removed. The city and Fountain Blue will meet to decide how soon it must come down.

    Fountain Blue tent removal could affect weddings

    With less than 24 days until their wedding, Judy Pike broke down in tears while trying to convince the Des Plaines City Council to let Fountain Blue Banquets operate its outdoor tent. Pike said her parents' wedding was the first at Fountain Blue in 1978. With the passing of her father earlier this year, she said the venue now has more sentimental value.

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    Rolling Meadows police investigate a bike accident on Algonquin Road a few hundred feet west of Wilke Road Tuesday morning that sent a female bike rider to Northwest Community Hospital.

    Cyclist stable after being hit, dragged by car in Rolling Meadows

    A female bicyclist is in stable condition after being hit by a car and dragged for 20 feet on Algonquin Road in Rolling Meadows on Tuesday morning, officials said. “It looked horrible, but it wasn't quite as bad,” Battalion Chief Jeff Mosley said.

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    Scott Lutz and Anna Herpolsheimer were some of the more highly decorated participants in Tuesday's Independence Day Parade at Warrenville's Elementary School.

    DuPage elementary school gets into spirit of Fourth

    The parade at Bower will feature an opera singer singing the national anthem and the Warrenville Fire Dept. Students learn about fire safety and get to climb through the truck and try on fireman gear – very sweet.

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    Rick Kronberg of Palatine, left, and Don Lukeon of Arlington Heights make their selections in the buffet line as Daily Herald premium subscribers are treated to “Grilling University,” a two-hour tutorial accompanied by food and drinks at Weber Grill Restaurant in Schaumburg Tuesday.

    Premium subscribers learn grilling techniques from pros
    Just in time for Fourth of July cookouts, Daily Herald subscribers are treated to "Grilling University," a two-hour how-to accompanied by drinks and appetizers at the Weber Grill Restaurant in Schaumburg.

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    Bolivia’s Foreign Minister David Choquehuanca, speaking in La Paz, Bolivia, Tuesday, said the plane bringing President Evo Morales home from Russia was rerouted to Austria after France and Portugal refused to let it to cross their airspace because of suspicions that NSA leaker Edward Snowden was on board.

    Snowden hits hurdles in search for asylum

    The plane carrying Bolivian President Evo Morales was rerouted to Austria Tuesday after France and Portugal refused to let it cross their airspace because of suspicions that NSA leaker Edward Snowden was on board, Bolivian officials said. Officials in both Austria and Bolivia said that Snowden was not on the plane.

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    Fireworks burst over opponents of Egypt’s Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday. With a military deadline for intervention ticking down, protesters seeking the ouster of Egypt’s Islamist president sought Tuesday to push the embattled leader further toward the edge with another massive display of people power.

    Defiant Egyptian president says he won’t step down

    His fate hanging in the balance, embattled President Mohammed Morsi vowed not to resign Tuesday, hours before a deadline to yield to the demands of millions of protesters or see the military suspend the constitution, disband parliament and install a new leadership.

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    Jimmy Bell Jr.

    Police: Elgin man ‘brutally’ stabbed woman, her boyfriend

    A Crystal Lake woman and her boyfriend were brutally stabbed early Tuesday morning and police say they’re searching for an Elgin man believed to be an ex-boyfriend of the female victim.

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    Firefighters gather during a memorial service Monday in Prescott, Ariz., honoring their 19 fellow firefighters killed battling a wildfire near Yarnell, Ariz., Sunday. All but one of the Prescott-based Granite Mountain Hotshots’ 20 members died Sunday when a wind-whipped wildfire overran them on a mountainside north of Phoenix.

    Investigators to examine why Ariz. blaze killed 19

    Fire crews battling a wildfire should identify escape routes and safe zones. They should pay close attention to the weather forecast. And they should post lookouts. Those are standards the government follows to protect firefighters, which were toughened after a wildfire tragedy in Colorado nearly two decades ago.

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    Jacob Nodarse

    Convicted Darien killer to be sentenced in August

    A man who admitted killing three members of a Darien family will be sentenced Aug. 13, a judge said Tuesday. The hearing for 26-year-old Jacob Nodarse is set to take place about a month after sentencing for co-defendant Johnny Borizov, who was convicted by a DuPage County jury in May.

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    Carol Stream installing new lighting

    Carol Stream will replace more streetlights with LED bulbs this year as part of an ongoing effort to increase the life span for devices that brighten village streets.

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    Bloomingdale Park District receives grant to hire 30 youth

    Bloomingdale Park District has received a $61,072 state grant to hire 30 youth this summer.

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    Wheeling OKs car title loan company

    The Wheeling Village Board Monday reversed its decision from a few weeks earlier and allowed a short-term title loan company to move into a rehabbed shopping center on Dundee Road just east of Route 83. “You have to use common sense,” said village President Dean Argiris, explaining that the parking requirements cited in the original denial are too high for the type of business using the space.

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    Periodic closures on Route 21:

    Motorists in the Libertyville area are being cautioned to expect substantial delays Tuesday, July 9 as part of the Route 137/Milwaukee Avenue project.

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    New law: Schools must conduct drills to prepare for shooters

    Starting in the 2013-14 academic year, all school districts in the state will have to hold drills to prepare for scenarios where a shooter gets in their buildings. Schools don't have to hold the drills with students but they must partner with law enforcement agencies to get feedback on their procedures.

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    Volunteers wanted for lake cleanup:

    A group called Below the Surface is looking for volunteers to help clean up Butler Lake in Libertyville on Saturday, July 6.

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    Woodland golf outing:

    The Woodland Educational Foundation is sponsoring its seventh annual golf outing on Aug. 12, at Geneva National Golf Club in Lake Geneva, Wis.

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    Joe McMahon

    6 years later, Aurora calls cold case convictions a success

    In the six years since 28 Aurora gang members were charged in 22 cold case murders, Kane County prosecutors have secured convictions in 17 cases. Three more cases are pending and another man was sentenced to life in prison Tuesday for killing two brothers in 1993. "We will not give up on behalf of victims," said State's Attorney Joe McMahon. "Justice will come and I think it came rather loudly...

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    Elgin man charged with sexually assaulting girl he met on Facebook

    A 21-year-old Elgin man faces charges of sexually assaulting a 14-year-old girl he met on Facebook. Diego Muro was ordered held on $100,000 bond Tuesday and to have no contact with the girl or with anyone under age 18 while his case is pending.

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    Brian Vetter

    Two charged with theft at Addison-area teen party

    Two men have been charged with stealing money, electronics and other valuables during a teen party near Addison, police said Tuesday. Brian Vetter, 19, of the 300 block of Major Drive in Northlake, and Anthony Finn, 18, of the 200 block of Milford Lane in Bloomingdale, were arrested Monday.

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    The U.S. Coast Guard performs a water rescue demonstration off Waukegan Harbor.

    Expect more boat patrols on Chain, Lake Michigan to boost safety this holiday weekend

    The Lake County sheriff’s marine unit and the U.S. Coast Guard will launch extra patrols during the upcoming holiday weekend to keep drunks from operating boats on the Chain O’ Lakes and Lake Michigan, officials said. “In order to keep everyone safe on the water, the marine unit will be out in force, conducting boat safety inspections and monitoring boaters for unsafe behavior,” Sgt. Louis Kent...

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    Family bike ride in Hoffman Estates

    The Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee of Hoffman Estates is hosting a free family bike ride 9 a.m. Saturday, July 6, as part of the village’s Fourth of July festivities. Cyclists of all skill levels will gather at Cannon Crossings Park, 1675 Nicholson Drive, in western Hoffman Estates.

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    Joe Cantore

    Forest preserve commissioner donates part of salary to Graue Mill

    Late last week Graue Mill officials took a “leap of faith” by purchasing a $6,000 corn grinder to get them through the season. Tuesday morning a DuPage County Forest Preserve District commissioner threw them a safety net.

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    Daily Herald File Photo The AAA reports that gas prices are dropping as refineries increase production in the region.

    Gas prices dropping in the suburbs, region

    The good news is gas prices are dropping in the region. And if you're vacationing outside of Illinois, you can get an even better deal for gas, AAA reports. “It’s coming down significantly since some of the higher prices we saw in May and June,” said Michael Leahy, an economist with the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

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    Quinn: Let suburbs ban assault weapons

    Gov. Pat Quinn’s rewrite of legislation to allow Illinoisans to carry loaded weapons in public would reinstate the ability of larger suburbs to ban the ownership of so-called assault weapons. The proposal approved by lawmakers earlier this year would have denied suburbs from banning assault weapons if they didn’t do it within 10 days of the law taking affect.

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    Lake Park teachers get new contract

    Teachers and support staff in Lake Park High School District 108 have a new four-year contract with the understanding that issues related to their compensation must be revisited in two years. School board members on Tuesday unanimously approved an agreement with the Lake Park Education Association that will pay the union’s members pay raises averaging a total of 7.78 percent over the next two...

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    Jack R. Gray

    Sucker punch outside St. Charles bar nets 5-year sentence

    A 29-year-old St. Charles man was sentenced to five years in prison Tuesday for sucker punching a man outside a St. Charles bar in 2009. Jack R. Gray can have his sentenced halved for good behavior in prison. The victim told Judge Karen Simpson that he spent 10 days in the hospital with a skull and he has a constant ringing in his right ear, a perpetual reminder of what happened and how his...

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    Fox Valley police reports
    An armed man attempted to rob a woman at about 1:30 a.m. Sunday. The woman was depositing money into an ATM at a bank in the 500 block of Shady Oaks, Elgin, police said. The woman sped away and called police, who were unable to locate the man.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Jacob A. Pesavanto of Lockport and Jordan P. Matzen-Campise of Batavia, both 19, were both charged with illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor at 12:09 a.m. Sunday in the 1100 block of West Wilson, according to a police report. Pesavanto was also taken to the Kane County jail on a failure to appear in court warrant.

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    Robert Skidmore

    Skidmore to call it a career at the end of fourth term at Lake County treasurer

    Robert Skidmore has been Lake County treasurer since 1998 but won't be seeking a fifth term, he announced Tuesday. Skidmore said he has become burned out on the poltics of the post.

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    St. Charles to support heritage center with hotel taxes

    St. Charles aldermen have decided to add the cost of helping finance the operations of the St. Charles Heritage Center to the annual budget from now on.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn

    Quinn changes Illinois concealed carry legislation

    Gov. Pat Quinn will put an end Tuesday to weeks of speculation and waiting by using his amendatory veto powers to rewrite legislation allowing the concealed carry of weapons in Illinois, the bill's sponsor says. State Rep. Brandon Phelps, a Harrisburg Democrat, said the governor's office told him Quinn will sign an amended bill Tuesday — seven days before a July 9 deadline to legalize carry...

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    In this June 27, 2013 photo provided by the Chicago Zoological Society, a male giraffe, born June 21, gets the attention of his mother, 7 1/2-year-old Jasiri, at the Brookfield Zoo’s Habitat Africa! The Savannah exhibit. The male calf is her first birth — and experts say he could grow to 18-feet-tall. He’s the 59th giraffe born at the zoo.

    Baby giraffe born at Brookfield Zoo
    The Brookfield Zoo has a new arrival — a baby boy giraffe that weighs 173 pounds and is 5-foot 9-inches tall. The suburban Chicago zoo announced the birth on Tuesday. Zoo officials say mother Jasiri had the baby on June 21. The male calf is her first birth — and experts say he could grow to 18-feet-tall.

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    Paul Smiley of Chicago pulls on a cable as he and other workers set up the Touchdown ride in the Sears Centre parking lot.

    Northwest Fourth-fest readies for second year

    Workers on Tuesday are preparing the parking lot at the Sears Centre Arena for Northwest Fourth-Fest, the five-day festival sponsored by Hoffman Estates, Elgin, Hanover Park and Hanover Township.

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    Brad O’Halloran

    Metra chair will speak to RTA board

    Metra Chairman Brad O’Halloran will face scrutiny from Regional Transportation Authority directors next week over the separation agreement given to former CEO Alex Clifford. O’Halloran, an Orland Park trustee, will appear before the RTA board at a 9 a.m. meeting Wednesday, July 10. The agency has financial oversight of Pace, Metra and the CTA.

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    Kurt Serzen

    ‘Nightmare’ rapist gets 60 years for Bensenville attack

    A man described by a DuPage County judge as “every woman’s nightmare” was sentenced Tuesday to a maximum 60 years in prison for raping a Bensenville woman nearly 17 years ago. Kurt Serzen, 55, was convicted of the August 1996 attack in 2011 after authorities matched his DNA profile to saliva taken off the victim’s body.

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    Have childlike faith and trust in God

    Childlike faith relieves stress as it places its trust in God, says columnist Annettee Budzban.

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    U.S. Supreme Court won’t hear Palatine parking ticket lawsuit

    The U.S. Supreme Court last week declined to hear a proposed class action lawsuit over Palatine’s practice of printing personal information on parking tickets. Though the high court’s decision sends the case back to the district court to proceed, several municipalities across the country already have taken the pre-emptive step of redacting information that previously appeared in...

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    Annabelle Robinson, daughter of Wheeling Park District Superintendent of Recreation Elizabeth Robinson, enjoys the new swings at Husky Park.

    Wheeling dedicates new Husky Park

    With school out of session and the first day of summer passed, children and their parents look for new jungle gyms to climb and swings to push. The Wheeling Park District dedicated the new and improved Husky Park June 20, revealing a new playground, gazebo and basketball court to the village. The park is at 1100 Lee St. behind Jack London Middle School. Husky Park’s makeover includes new...

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    A gun is seen among the personal belongings confiscated in a carry-on bag at Indianapolis International Airport in April.

    More air passengers show up with guns

    Several times every day, at airports across the country, passengers are trying to walk through security with loaded guns in their carry-on bags, purses or pockets, even in a boot. And, nearly a dozen years after 9/11, it’s happening a lot more often.

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    Juana Ocompo of Chicago waters flowers Monday at the Our Lady of Guadalupe Shrine in Des Plaines. The Founding Committee of the Des Plaines Our Lady of Guadalupe Shrine announced Monday they're launching a campaign to build a basilica at the site.

    Our Lady of Guadalupe shrine leaders launch plan for Des Plaines basilica

    Leaders of Des Plaines' Our Lady of Guadalupe shrine are launching a national campaign to to build the world's second largest basilica of its kind at the site. The shrine's rector, the Rev. Marco Mercado, announced the plan Monday during a new conference held to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the shrine, which was placed at Maryville City of Youth on July 4, 1988.

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    Work is expected to begin later this month on a multiyear project to add more than 95 acres of wetlands to the West Branch Forest Preserve near Bartlett.

    DuPage River projects aim to ease flooding

    Two large projects to provide additional flood protection along the West Branch of the DuPage River could move forward tonight. One would bring a flood protection berm and river restoration in Warrenville, and the other a wetlands project at the West Branch Forest Preserve near Bartlett. “They will help considerably with the flooding along the West Branch through those parts of the...

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    Peter Isely, the Midwest Director of SNAP (The Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests), speaks to reporters outside the steps of the U.S. Federal Courthouse in Milwaukee regarding documents the Archdiocese of Milwaukee released Monday, July 1, 2013. Then-Milwaukee Archbishop Timothy Dolan’s correspondence with Vatican officials and priests accused of sexual abuse was included in about 6,000 pages of documents the Archdiocese of Milwaukee released Monday as part of a deal reached in federal bankruptcy court with clergy sex abuse victims suing it for fraud.

    Milwaukee archbishop paid problem priests to leave

    The archbishop of Milwaukee wrote a letter in 2003 to the Vatican office overseeing clergy sex abuse cases begging it to remove a priest who had repeatedly abused children, showed no remorse and at least once engaged in sexual activity with a young boy, the child's mother and her female friend.

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    Hoffman Estates grants Montessori school permission to expand

    A growing Montessori school in Hoffman Estates will be expanding to a vacant shopping center on Freeman Road. The board unanimously agreed Monday to allow the Montessori School of North Hoffman to expand onto commercial property at 1250 Freeman Road, just west of its original location at 1200 Freeman Road.

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    Elgin Union veterans pose in a 1908 picture. In 1913, eight local veterans attended a reunion at Gettysburg.

    Elgin veterans attended 1913 Gettysburg reunion

    “I can’t wait for the time to come. I want to be on the way,” said Elginite Fred Kohn, 80, about his upcoming trip to 50th anniversary of the Civil War Battle at Gettysburg in July 1913.

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    John Joseph Percin Jr., 24, was among the 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots firefighters who were killed Sunday, June 30, 2013 when a windblown wildfire overcame them north of Phoenix.

    Hotshots killed in Ariz. fire remembered, mourned

    Nineteen members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots, based in Prescott, Ariz., were killed Sunday when a windblown wildfire overcame them north of Phoenix. It was the deadliest single day for U.S. firefighters since Sept. 11. Fourteen of the victims were in their 20s. Here are the stories of those who died.

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    Dave DiNaso, helping an audience member get a good look at a Burmese python, brings his Traveling World of Reptiles to Lisle’s Eyes to the Skies on Thursday as part of a lineup of animal shows in the children’s area.

    Eyes to the Skies features chances for kids to play, explore

    Children of all ages will find oodles of fun things to do at fair prices this Independence Day holiday in Lisle. Grab your camera, get ready for music and bring the family to savor some summer bliss. A must to include is Lisle’s Eyes to the Skies Festival, running Wednesday to Saturday, July 3 to 6, and concluding with a carnival-only day on Sunday, July 7.

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    Wheaton police investigate indecent exposure report

    Wheaton police said they are looking for a man who exposed himself to a young female, then drove away in his car on Monday night. The indecent exposure incident took place at 5:45 p.m. near Warrenville and Shaffner roads, police said.

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    Firefighters gather in an embrace to a standing ovation during a memorial service for 19 firefighters of the Granite Mountain Hotshot Crew that were killed battling a wildfire.

    Arizona ‘Hotshots’ lived the meaning of the word

    They were fathers and expectant fathers. High school football players and former Marines. Smoke-eaters’ sons and first-generation firefighters. What bound the members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots together was a “love of hard work and arduous adventure,” and a willingness to risk their lives to protect others. And now, 19 families share a bond of grief.

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    Brian Townsend

    St. Charles city administrator contract held up over severance clause

    St. Charles aldermen inked a third temporary contract extension with City Administrator Brian Townsend. Now they will have to come to terms on the severance clause in his existing contract. “I would like to bring this to a timely conclusion sooner rather than later,” St. Charles Mayor Ray Rogina said Monday night.

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    A Russian booster rocket carrying three satellites crashes at a Russia-leased cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Tuesday July 2, 2013 shortly after the launch.

    Russian booster rocket crashes in Kazakhstan

    A Russian booster rocket carrying three navigation satellites burst into flames and crashed on live TV moments after its launch Tuesday, dealing another painful blow to the nation’s space prestige. The failure follows a long string of launch mishaps that could tarnish Russia’s reputation and eventually cost it a share in the lucrative satellite launch market.

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    Police say approximately $500,000 worth of jewelry has been stolen in a smash-and-grab at a store in the Borgata Hotel on Monday, July 1, 2013 amid the casino’s 10th anniversary celebration.

    Cops: $500K in jewelry stolen from Atlantic City casino

    Police are looking for three men they believe stole $500,000 worth of jewelry during a smash-and-grab at a store in the Borgata Hotel amid the Atlantic City casino’s 10th anniversary celebration.

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    In this photo taken Monday, July 1, 2013, newlyweds Paul and Hava Forziano celebrate their first day in their new apartment at a group home in Riverhead, N.Y. The mentally disabled couple started a court fight after the group homes where they formerly lived denied them the opportunity to live together as a married couple.

    Mentally disabled NY newlyweds find home to share

    Who could blame Paul and Hava Forziano for celebrating Independence Day a few days early? The mentally disabled newlyweds, who filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against group homes that refused to allow them to live together, held a joyous moving-in party Monday at their new apartment. “We can be together all the time now,” Paul Forziano said. Added his wife, “Happy, not sad.”

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    Mass. DA seeks public’s help in Hernandez case

    A Massachusetts prosecutor on Tuesday asked for the public’s help in finding a car mirror that may be connected to the murder case against former New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez.

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    Jose Guerrero, left, and Patrick Rodriguez chat before their wedding ceremony in West Hollywood, Calif., Monday, July 1, 2013. The city of West Hollywood is offering civil marriage ceremonies for same-sex couples free Monday.

    Gay, lesbian couples flock to Calif. courts to wed

    Jubilant gay and lesbian couples flocked to city halls and county courthouses across California to wed with pets, siblings and kids in tow as same-sex marriages resumed across the state following a five-year legal hiatus. Monday was the first chance for all but a handful of the state’s same-sex couples to wed since 2008, when about 18,000 marriages went forward during a brief legal window before...

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    Waukegan Police Chief steps down after 2 months

    Waukegan’s police chief has resigned, two months after taking the post in Chicago’s northern suburbs.The (Waukegan) News-Sun reports Robert Kerkorian stepped down Monday, several days after acknowledging he incorrectly claimed to have trained as a Navy SEAL.He included that information when he first applied to work at the department in 1987.

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    The saga of Edward Snowden and the NSA makes one thing clear: The United States’ central role in developing the Internet and hosting its most powerful players has made it the global leader in the surveillance game.

    In ‘golden age’ of surveillance, U.S. has big edge

    The saga of Edward Snowden and the NSA makes one thing clear: The United States’ central role in developing the Internet and hosting its most powerful players has made it the global leader in the surveillance game. Other countries, from dictatorships to democracies, are also avid snoopers, but experts say Silicon Valley has made America a surveillance superpower.

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    North Aurora hires new administrator

    North Aurora has hired a new administrator, filing a vacancy left 10 months ago when the former one quit to take a job in private industry. Steven Bosco, currently working in Bartlett, will start the job Aug. 5.

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    Sanford police officer Chris Serino listens to a question during cross examination from defense attorney Mark O’Mara, during the George Zimmerman trial in Seminole circuit court, Tuesday, July 2, 2013 in Sanford, Fla. Zimmerman has been charged with second-degree murder for the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

    Judge strikes detective statements on Zimmerman

    A prosecutor in George Zimmerman’s murder trial on Tuesday tried to pick apart the statements of a Sanford Police detective who had been called as a prosecution witness a day before but gave testimony that seemed to benefit the defense.

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    In this 1996 photo, South African President Nelson Mandela, left, and Deputy President F.W. de Klerk chat outside Parliament after the approval of South Africa’s new constitution. de Klerk, the last leader of the apartheid era and a co-recipient of the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize with Nelson Mandela, has suffered dizziness and will be fitted with a pacemaker, Tuesday June 2, 2013, to help his heart function.

    South Africa: Apartheid-era leader de Klerk falls ill

    JOHANNESBURG — F.W. de Klerk, the last leader of South Africa’s apartheid era and a co-recipient of the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize with Nelson Mandela, has suffered dizziness and will be fitted with a pacemaker to help his heart function, a foundation said Tuesday.

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    Smoke rises from a NATO compound following a suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, July 2, 2013. Militants blew up a suicide car bomb at the gate to the NATO compound in Kabul early Tuesday and attacked guards with small-arms fire, killing four guards and two civilians, police said. All four suicide attackers were also killed.

    Taliban hit NATO supply compound in Kabul, killing 7

    Taliban suicide attackers blew up a truck bomb early Tuesday at the gates of a NATO supplier’s compound in Kabul and sprayed gunfire at security personnel, killing five guards and two civilians, Afghan officials said. The morning attack was the latest in a series targeting high-profile locations in the Afghan capital.

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    U.S. President Barack Obama, right, and former President George W. Bush walk off after a wreath-laying ceremony to honor the victims of the U.S. embassy bombing on Tuesday, July 2, 2013, in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. The president is traveling in Tanzania on the final leg of his three-country tour in Africa.

    Obama ends Africa trip by joining Bush at memorial

    Democratic President Barack Obama and Republican predecessor President George W. Bush found common ground in Africa on Tuesday, honoring the victims of a terrorist attack in an unprecedented encounter a world away from home. The U.S. presidents observed a moment of silence together at a monument to victims of the 1998 embassy bombing.

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    Looted ancient coins identified in Chicago return to Romania from U.S.
    Authorities have displayed 2,000-year-old silver coins that were looted a decade ago from an archeological site in Transylvania and smuggled to the United States.

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    Coast Guard warns of hazards on Lake Michigan
    Associated PressThe U.S. Coast Guard is warning of hazardous conditions on Lake Michigan for boaters and swimmers near Chicago.The Coast Guard put out a release Monday, saying a small craft warning remains in effect through Tuesday night. Authorities say high winds and heavy surf were responsible for capsizing two sailboats on Sunday.

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    Officials at the Itasca Community Library are conducting a technology assessment this year as part of a program called the Edge Initiative funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

    Itasca library conducting technology assessment

    The Itasca Community Library has 29 public computers but are they enough? Staff offers 25 classes on how to use everything from a desktop computer to an iPad. But is that too many?These are just a few of the questions Executive Director Betsy Adamowski hopes to have answered as part of the library’s participation in the Edge Initiative this summer.

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    Round Lake Heights seeks resident input on long-range plan

    Enhancing the commercial base while preserving natural areas are among the issues addressed in a new comprehensive plan for Round Lake Heights. Staff of the Chicago Metropolitian Agency for Planning, which has been guiding the effort, will available July 13 at the village festival to answer questions and provide information regarding the village's first long-range plan update in 30 years.

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    The Illinois Lottery plans to sponsor Fourth of July fireworks displays in five Illinois cities this year including Batavia.

    Illinois Lottery to sponsor fireworks in Batavia, 4 other cities

    The Illinois Lottery plans to sponsor Fourth of July fireworks displays in five Illinois cities this year including Batavia. Lottery officials announced Monday that it'll sponsor fireworks shows in Batavia, Champaign, Chicago, Harvey and Rockford. Harvey hasn't had a fireworks show in years because of a lack of money.

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    Wheeling rejects assault weapon ban

    The almost unanimous vote against an assault weapon ban in Wheeling was anti-climatic Monday night, following impassioned pleas against it by nine residents.

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    Does everyone look happy here? Chicago Bulls head Coach Tom Thibodeau, left, and general manager Gar Foreman, right, introduce NBA basketball draft picks Erik Murphy, left center, and Tony Snell at the Berto Center yesterday in Deerfield. The Bulls selected Snell with the 20th pick out of New Mexico, and Murphy with the 49th pick out of Florida. But it was the firing of assistant coach Ron Adams that left a chill in the air.

    Dawn Patrol: No Wheeling gun ban; calls for flooding relief

    Wheeling rejects assault weapon ban. River towns push for Wheeling flood-relief project. Lake Zurich residents seek flood help. Bensenville man gets 6 years for stealing car with child in it. Bensenville rape victim confronts attacker. Lake Villa twins died of overdoses. Palatine housing complex detractors turn to money. Bulls butting heads in unhealthy way.

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    The Lake in the Hills Airport acquired a building through eminent domain and forced the business owner out. They plan to raze the building to expand. In the meantime, the building is for rent for the next few months.

    Lake in the Hills forced firm to sell site, now wants to lease it

    The village of Lake in the Hills has condemned property twice since 2007 to acquire property for its airport expansion project. The former owner in the latest acquisition claims he was forced off the property in June only to witness the village's search for a new tenant this month. “If the village would have just let us stay there until they tore the building down, none of this would have...

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    Arlington Heights denies karaoke bar liquor license

    The Arlington Heights village board voted to deny a liquor license to local karaoke bar after questions were raised about the owner’s control over the business, previous violations and ties to a convicted prostitute.

Sports

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    Sky watches big lead evaporate

    Despite missing three starters, including two of the best players in WNBA history, the Seattle Storm unleashed a downpour on the Sky's perfect record at Allstate Arena. The Storm overcame an early 15-point deficit and wound up rolling to a 69-60 victory.

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    Mike Dunleavy has improved his three-point shooting accuracy in recent years and should help spread the floor for the Bulls next season.

    Did Bulls make right call on Dunleavy, Mohammed?

    The Bulls made an expected move Tuesday, agreeing to bring veteran center Nazr Mohammed back for another season. The real news, though, was making Mike Dunleavy Jr. their biggest free-agent addition late Monday night. Was it the right call? The 6-foot-9 Dunleavy, who turns 33 in September, is an interesting choice and fits into the summer theme of improved 3-point shooting, which began on draft night with the selection of Tony Snell and Erik Murphy.

  •  
    Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo, chases the Athletics’ Coco Crisp in a rundown between first and second in the fourth inning Tuesday, July 2, 2013, in Oakland, Calif. Crisp was called out for running outside the baseline.

    A’s slip past Cubs, 8-7

    Derek Norris hit a three-run homer with two outs in the eighth inning, and the Oakland Athletics rallied to beat the Chicago Cubs 8-7 on Tuesday night to regain the AL West lead. Alfonso Soriano hit a three-run homer to highlight a five-run fifth inning and Welington Castillo drove in three runs for Chicago, which twice blew a two-run lead.

  •  
    John Danks improved to 2-5 as the White Sox beat Baltimore 5-2 on Tuesday.

    Danks solid as Sox snap five-game skid

    John Danks shut down a dangerous Baltimore lineup, and home runs by Conor Gillaspie and Adam Dunn helped the White Sox top the Orioles 5-2 to snap a five-game losing streak.

  •  
    Chicago White Sox's Adam Dunn watches his two-run home run against the Baltimore Orioles during the seventh inning of a baseball game, Tuesday, July 2, 2013, in Chicago. (AP Photo/David Banks)

    Dunn, Gillaspie homer, White Sox top Orioles 5-2

    Adam Dunn and Conor Gillaspie homered while John Danks pitched into the eighth inning to help the White Sox snap the Baltimore Orioles’ four-game winning streak with a 5-2 victory Tuesday night.

  •  
    Jim Thome, right, talks with the Orioles’ Buck Showalter, his last major-league manager before Tuesday night’s 5-2 White Sox victory.

    Thome back with White Sox as assistant to GM

    Tuesday was a day of addtions for the White Sox. They signed 16-year-old Dominican Republic outfielder Micker Adolfo Zapata and hired former slugger Jim Thome as special assistant to general manager Rick Hahn.

  •  

    Storm top Sky, 69-60
    Camille Little and Temeka Johnson led a balanced attack with 16 points apiece as the Seattle Storm snapped a three-game losing streak with a 69-60 victory over the Sky on Tuesday night.The Storm (5-6) shook off poor early shooting and an early 14-point deficit to catch and pass the Sky for a 34-31 lead just before halftime.

  •  
    Goalies Ray Emery, right, and Corey Crawford share a laugh after a Blackhawks victory in March.

    Stalberg will test NHL free agent waters

    Now that Dave Bolland and Michael Frolik have been traded to help create the cap space to re-sign left wing Bryan Bickell, Blackhawks general manager Stan Bowman can turn his attention to other pressing matters, namely the futures of backup goalie Ray Emery, defenseman Nick Leddy, center Marcus Kruger, and Viktor Stalberg, who is expected to test the market on Friday when he becomes an unrestricted free agent.

  •  
    Cincinnati Reds starting pitcher Homer Bailey throws to a San Francisco Giants batter in the first inning of a baseball game, Tuesday, July 2, 2013, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

    Reds Homer Bailey's throws 2nd no-hitter

    Homer Bailey threw his second no-hitter in 10 months and the first in the majors this season, pitching the Cincinnati Reds to a 3-0 victory over the slumping San Francisco Giants on Tuesday night. Bailey (5-6) became the third Reds pitcher with more than one no-hitter, joining Jim Maloney and Johnny Vander Meer — still the only big leaguer to toss two in a row. Bailey beat the Pirates 1-0 in Pittsburgh last Sept. 28 and got another 17 starts later.

  •  

    White Sox in need of boost, so here’s the deal

    Jay Blunk has been a key member of the team that marketed the Blackhawks back from the abyss, so the White Sox should aggressively pursue him and hire him to see whether the similar methods can work on the South Side.

  •  
    The Cubs traded pitcher Scott Feldman and catcher-infielder Steve Clevenger to Baltimore on Tuesday for pitchers Jake Arrieta and Pedro Strop along with money for international free-agent signings.

    Cubs trade Feldman, Clevenger, Marmol

    The Cubs wasted little time getting the July trading season under way Tuesday, when they sent pitcher Scott Feldman and catcher-infielder Steve Clevenger to Baltimore for pitchers Jake Arrieta and Pedro Strop along with money for international free-agent signings. They also dealt former closer Carlos Marmol to the Los Angeles Dodgers for right-hander Matt Guerrier.

  •  

    Ex-Cub Milton Bradley gets nearly 3 years in jail

    Former Los Angeles Dodgers and Cubs outfielder Milton Bradley was sentenced Tuesday to more than 2 ½ years in jail for abusing and threatening his estranged wife.

  •  

    Cougars fall in Wisconsin, 5-3

    GRAND CHUTE, Wis. — Starting pitcher Tyler Wagner worked into the ninth inning to secure a 5-3 victory for the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers over the Kane County Cougars on Tuesday afternoon at Fox Cities Stadium.

  •  

    Affrunti’s 4-putt will be hard to forget

    Good things may still be ahead for Joe Affrunti, who gets back on the PGA Tour at the John Deere Classic in the Quad Cities in two weeks, but the Crystal Lake golfer will have a hard time forgetting what happened to him in his last tournament. Len Ziehm explains what happened.

  •  
    NBA Commissioner David Stern, here presiding over the NBA draft on Thursday, will officially step down next February after 30 years of running the league.

    Longing for the good ol’ days of sports

    Mike North longs for the days when the best sports stories were about what was happening on the field. He wonders if it's possible to go for a week without a scandal or disaster, and believes the steroid era is what ushered in a different time in sports. He also gives kudos to MBA Commissioner David Stern for the job he’s done with the league.

Business

  •  

    Batavia gives billboard idea a ‘maybe’

    Batavia aldermen aren't necessarily against allowing billboards in industrial areas of town, a discussion about such a request revealed Tuesday. A company wants to put a billboard up on city property on Kirk Road, near a water tower.

  •  
    Trips by United’s six Dreamliners were scrubbed 3.8 percent of the time from May 20 through June 26, according to a study. United’s rate excluding the 787s was 1 percent in the same period.

    United scrubs 787 flights far more often than other jets

    Chicago-based United Airlines, the only U.S. operator of Boeing Co.’s 787 Dreamliner, is canceling flights by those planes almost four times as often as on the rest of its fleet, signaling that the new jets remain prone to breakdowns.Trips by United’s six Dreamliners were scrubbed 3.8 percent of the time from May 20 through June 26, according to Houston- based data tracker FlightAware.com, which reviewed the flights at the request of Bloomberg News. The rate excluding the 787s was 1 percent in the same period.

  •  
    Northrop Grumman engineer Brian Dolder sits in the Black Hawk helicopter.

    Northrop Grumman celebrates America Day and honors military families

    Northrop Grumman employees saw their work come to life Tuesday, when a Black Hawk touched down in the Rolling Meadows company's parking lot Tuesday for the 22nd annual America Day. "I see men and women who every day strive to protect the lives of my soldiers and of my airmen," said Daniel Krumei, Adjutant General of the Illinois National Guard told them.

  •  
    U.S. stocks fell, erasing earlier gains, as the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index failed to hold above its average level from the past 50 days and investors awaited a monthly jobs report and the start of corporate earnings.

    U.S. stocks turn lower after Egypt turmoil worsens

    The stock market ended slightly lower Tuesday after reports of intensifying political turmoil in Egypt offset good news about the U.S. economy.

  •  
    U.S. home prices jumped 12.2 percent in May from a year ago, the most in seven years. The increase suggests the housing recovery is strengthening.

    U.S. home prices rise in May by most in 7 years
    U.S. home prices jumped 12.2 percent in May from a year ago, the most in seven years. The increase suggests the housing recovery is strengthening. Real estate data provider CoreLogic said Tuesday that home prices rose from a year ago in 48 states. They fell only in Delaware and Alabama. And all but three of the 100 largest cities reported price gains.

  •  
    New 2013 Ford Fusions at an automobile dealer in Zelienople, Pa. U.S. buyers snapped up new cars and trucks in June at a pace not seen since before the recession. Continuing demand for big pickups helped boost sales for Detroit’s automakers. Ford said Tuesday that its sales rose 14 percent,

    Strong June seen for auto sales, led by pickups

    U.S. buyers snapped up new cars and trucks in June at a pace not seen since before the recession. Continuing demand for big pickups helped boost sales for Detroit’s automakers. Ford said Tuesday that its sales rose 14 percent, while Chrysler’s were up 8 percent. Volkswagen’s sales fell 3 percent.

  •  
    Longboards are displayed for sale at the Becker Surf retail store, purchased by Billabong in 2010, in Hermosa Beach, California. Orders to U.S. factories rose in May, helped by a third straight month of stronger business investment. The gains suggest manufacturing may be picking up after a weak start to the year.

    U.S. factory orders rise 2.1 percent in May
    Orders to U.S. factories rose in May, helped by a third straight month of stronger business investment. The gains suggest manufacturing may be picking up after a weak start to the year. The Commerce Department said Tuesday that factory orders rose 2.1 percent last month. April’s increase was revised higher to 1.3 percent from 1 percent.

  •  

    Hyatt Hotels, union resolve dispute

    Hyatt Hotels Corp. has reached a tentative contract with the union representing thousands of it employees, ending a four-year dispute that led to dozens of protests and a global boycott against the Chicago-based hotel chain.The agreement between Hyatt and Unite Here announced Monday will go into effect once union contracts are approved by workers in Chicago, Honolulu, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

  •  
    A federal judge is backing an effort by Northfield-based Kraft Foods to keep Cracker Barrel Old Country Store from expanding into grocery stores.

    Judge backs Kraft Foods, blocks Cracker Barrel from stores

    A federal judge is backing an effort by Kraft Foods to keep Cracker Barrel Old Country Store from expanding into grocery stores.U.S. District Judge Robert Gettleman in Chicago granted a preliminary injunction on Monday blocking Tennessee-based Cracker Barrel from selling its branded meats in grocery stores. Kraft claims that would infringe on its own Cracker Barrel-trademarked cheese and confuse consumers.

  •  
    Vendors who provide some of the state’s most important services will continue to endure long waits to get paid, Republican Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka said.

    Illinois ends fiscal year $6.1 billion in red

    Illinois finished the fiscal year with a smaller-than-projected backlog of unpaid bills thanks to a spring influx in unanticipated tax revenue, but those gains will be short-lived due to the state’s unresolved pension problem, the comptroller warned Monday. In fact, a $1.3 billion April windfall in unexpected revenue from residents’ sales of assets before new tax laws took effect will be erased within weeks, ensuring that vendors who provide some of the state’s most important services will continue to endure long waits to get paid.

  •  
    Illinois’ auditor general says “material weaknesses” in the state Lottery’s internal financial controls have resulted in significant reporting errors.

    Illinois auditor cites errors in Lottery reports

    Illinois’ auditor general says “material weaknesses” in the state Lottery’s internal financial controls have resulted in significant reporting errors. Auditor General William Holland says an audit prepared by the accounting firm KPMG found repeated errors in reports submitted to the state lottery to the Illinois comptroller’s office.

  •  

    Chicago hospital closes after investigation

    State health officials say Sacred Heart Hospital on Chicago’s West Side is closing immediately.Illinois Department of Public Health spokeswoman Melaney Arnold says her agency received a call on Monday afternoon from the 119-bed hospital saying it was voluntarily closing the same day. State law requires 90 days’ notice.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Her father’s widow is a hard pill to swallow

    Her father married a woman 20 years younger and since he passed away, his widow hasn’t invited her family over to the house where they grew up. She always thought she married her dad for his money, and she insisted that he leave her everything. She think the woman is evil, but she camouflages herself as a super-religious churchgoer. How does one handle this?

  •  
    Mark Welsh/mwelsh@dailyherald.com ¬ Pam Soramuk of Palatine with her fresh Spring Rolls, perfect for a summer meal.

    Cook of the Week: Mom relies on fresh ingredients to fuel family
    When Pam Soramuk was 10 years old and living in Thailand, her mother taught her how to cook. Pam pretty much hated it.“I didn't like it because it was something I had to do!” she laughs. In fact, even though her family owned a bakery in Thailand, she wasn't interested. Now, Pam, who now lives in Palatine, loves to cook. She and her husband own a restaurant, and that often Pam calls home for recipes from the bakery?

  •  
    Pierce Brosnan’s daughter Charlotte died in London on June 28 after battling ovarian cancer, his publicist confirms.

    Pierce Brosnan’s daughter dies of ovarian cancer

    Pierce Brosnan’s daughter has died from ovarian cancer, his publicist confirms. Charlotte was 41 years old when she passed away in London on June 28, after battling the disease for three years.

  •  
    Gabrielle Union plays a successful TV news anchor who attempts to juggle work, relationships and the needs of her family in BET’s “Being Mary Jane.”

    Gabrielle Union stars in BET’s ‘Being Mary Jane’

    Even though Gabrielle Union lost the lead role of ABC series “Scandal” to Kerry Washington, she says the experience gave her hope that strong female characters can be created for black actresses. “I said to myself, ‘Oh my God, these roles are out there,’” Union recalled. Now, Union is ready to make her mark. She will star in the dramatic movie “Being Mary Jane,” which premieres at 9:30 p.m. Tuesday on BET.

  •  
    Parts of the brick walkway of Liberty Island that were damaged in Superstorm Sandy are shown during a tour of New Yorkís Liberty Island.

    Statue of Liberty to finally reopen

    Months after Superstorm Sandy swamped her little island, the Statue of Liberty will finally welcome visitors again on Independence Day. Sandy made landfall one day after the statue’s 126th birthday, flooding most of the 12 acres that she stands upon with water that surged as high as 8 feet. Lady Liberty herself was spared, but the surrounding grounds on Liberty Island took a beating.

  •  
    Mounted Union reenactors takes part in a demonstration of a battle during ongoing activities commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.

    Hollywood helps turn Gettysburg hill into top site

    The booms of ground-rattling cannon fire Monday marked the ceremonial start of the Battle of Gettysburg, 150 years to the day after Union and Confederate troops fought the defining encounter of the Civil War. But instead of sabre-carrying soldiers, tourists and history buffs are now swarming the battlefield in this small, south-central Pennsylvania town to commemorate the milestone anniversary of the three-day battle. Little Round Top figures to be one of the most popular destinations Tuesday. No place in Gettysburg has become more popular to visit in recent years than the hill desperately defended by the 20th Maine Regiment on July 2, 1863 — Day 2 of the three-day encounter — in one of the key moments that ultimately led to Union victory.

  •  

    Readers discuss, babies, bombshells and bullies

    While Carolyn Hax is off, readers offer their own advice.

  •  
    In “The Lone Ranger,” Tonto (Johnny Depp) takes the spotlight away from Texas Ranger-turned-vigilante John Reid (Armie Hammer).

    Depp rides off with exhausting, overdone 'Ranger'

    Johnny Depp's performance as Tonto dominates every scene in this misguided attempt to breathe new cinematic life into the Lone Ranger myth. His Tonto leaps with comic abandon from one noisy, epic action set piece to another with a placid facial expression, save for smirks of disapproval. Depp commands the screen here just as his Jack Sparrow does the “Pirates of the Caribbean” franchise.

  •  
    Ex-villain Gru (Steve Carell) counsels his three wards on acceptable behavior in the animated 3-D sequel "Despicable Me 2."

    'Despicable' sequel dumbed-down but still funny

    If you loved the original “Despicable Me,” you'll probably like “Despicable Me 2” quite a lot. But full-blown love might be tough to muster for this fast-paced, frequently funny, but decidedly dumbed-down animated 3-D action comedy. This sequel brings back Steve Carell and his Russian accent as Gru, the villain who once plotted to steal the moon. Now he just wants to make jellies and jams.

  •  
    Fred Armisen has confirmed that he has left “Saturday Night Live” after 11 years. The actor dispelled any doubt about his exit in an interview posted Monday by comedy website Splitsider.

    Fred Armisen confirms his exit from ‘SNL’

    Fred Armisen has confirmed he has left “Saturday Night Live” after 11 years. Armisen dispelled any doubt about his exit in an interview posted Monday by comedy website Splitsider. “SNL” often doesn’t announce its cast changes, but the show’s season finale in May concluded with a farewell for Armisen and Bill Hader.

  •  
    Roma Downey played Mary, the mother of Jesus, in “The Bible” miniseries.

    NBC announces sequel to ‘Bible’ miniseries

    NBC says it will air a sequel to the hit cable miniseries “The Bible.” The network said Monday that it will join with producer Mark Burnett and his actress-wife, Roma Downey, on the sequel. Burnett and Downey produced “The Bible” for the History channel.

  •  
    Joe Daniels, left, 911 Memorial president, and Anthoula Katsimatides, a member of the 911 Memorial board, is seen through tangled steel recovered from the World Trade Center site and installed at the 911 Memorial Museum.

    Beneath NYC’s ground zero, a museum takes shape

    Gray dust blankets everything in the subterranean halls of the unfinished National September 11 Memorial & Museum. But while the powder may look ominously like the ash that covered lower Manhattan after the terrorist attacks, this time it is a product of rebirth, not destruction. After a yearlong construction shutdown because of a funding dispute, and additional months of cleanup following a shocking flood caused by Superstorm Sandy, work has been racing ahead again..

  •  
    “The Fame Thief” by Timothy Hallinan

    'The Fame Thief' is taut crime fiction

    Junior Bender is a professional burglar, and he's very good at it. He's been breaking into houses and making off with valuables for a long time and has never been arrested. Along the way, though, he's also picked up a sideline, moonlighting as a private eye of sorts whose clients are all fellow criminals. In “The Fame Thief,” Timothy Hallinan's third novel in this series, Bender must find out what happened to a young Hollywood starlet 60 years ago.

  •  
    Arlington Heights native Keith Huff went from writing plays for small Chicago theater productions to hit TV shows.

    Arlington Hts. writer segues from small plays to big TV shows

    Sitting alone in the basement of his home, a space he calls “The Bunker,” Keith Huff writes some of his most successful stories. It's where the Arlington Heights native wrote his latest play, “Big Lake Big City,” directed by “Friends” star David Schwimmer and now in its world premiere at Chicago's Lookingglass Theatre. And it's where he's worked on Hollywood scripts for “Mad Men” (which earned him a Writers Guild Award), “House of Cards,” and projects for Steven Spielberg, Jason Lee and Brad Pitt.

  •  
    LongHorn’s peak menu items include fire-roasted corn.

    Dining events: Seasonal fruits, veggies star at LongHorn Steakhouse

    LongHorn’s peak menu features asparagus, corn and berries at the peak of their seasons; e+o offers a weekend-long barbecue cookout to celebrate Independence Day; and COD's Waterleaf pours the wine for summer dinner pairing.

  •  
    Australian recording artist Kylie Minogue has compiled a book looking back at her fashion choices, particularly her stage costumes, in a new book called “Kylie Fashion,” published by Running Press.

    Kylie Minogue releases fashion retrospective book

    Before Lady Gaga, Rihanna or Katy Perry married music with fashion, there was Kylie Minogue. The singer compiled a look at her fashion choices, particularly her stage costumes, in a new book called “Kylie Fashion.” “It was lots of fun to look at my life in fashion through the years,” said Minogue in a recent interview. “There've been ups and downs and fabulous moments and not so fabulous moments, but basically the book was a celebration of 25 years.”

  •  

    Thai Spring Rolls
    : Pam Soramuk

  •  

    Pad Thai Noodle
    Pad Thai Noodle: Pam Soramuk

  •  

    Shrimp Fried Rice
    Shrimp Fried Rice: Pam Soramuk

  •  
    The Bristol Renaissance Faire returns for the 2013 summer season starting Saturday, July 6.

    Best bets: Revel in Ren Faire fun once again

    Revel in the re-created world of Elizabethan England when the Bristol Renaissance Faire returns for its summer season this weekend near Kenosha, Wis. Fans of Japanese comics and cartoons won't want to miss the weekend-long Third Annual Anime Midwest Convention complete with meet-and-greet star sessions, video game competitions and more at the Hyatt Regency O'Hare in Rosemont.

  •  
    Lindsey Rebhan, with her late mini Australian shepherd Jack, at their home in Auburn Hills, Mich. The Rebhans purchased Jack from Petland store in Novi, Mich. in Nov. 2011 before discovering the dog had severe epilepsy.

    ASPCA uses photos in fight over puppy mills

    The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is bolstering its campaign against puppy mills by showing photos of sick puppies and harsh kennel conditions taken by the federal agency that licenses commercial breeders. The organization has added 10,000 photos to its “NoPetStorePuppies” website showing dogs at breeders across the U.S. with matted hair, bloody stool, long nails, injured eyes and dental disease.

  •  
    It wasn't until she took a guitar class at age 70 at the Old Town School of Folk Music that Marge Weber found an outlet for her musical passion. Strumming her Martin guitar under the watchful eye of teacher Mark Dvorak, the 79-year-old Elk Grove Village grandmother debuted her new CD last week.

    Pushing 80, Elk Grove Village grandma records a CD

    Many suburban grandmas pushing 80 wouldn't think of driving into Chicago at 9:30 on a weeknight to hear a new performer play guitar and sing at a bar. But 79-year-old Marge Weber of Elk Grove Village had to go. She was the artist performing pieces from her debut CD. “I still can't wrap my head around it,” says Weber, who spent most of her first 75 years focusing the spotlight on others during her life.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: The dangerous problem of street racing

    A fatal crash in Gurnee last week, blamed by police on street racing, called attention to yet another behavior behind the wheel with the potential for disaster, and reminds us all of the need for vigilance, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  

    The N-word vs. cracker

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: Cracker may be a pejorative in some circles. It may even be used to insult a white person. But it clearly lacks the grievous, historical freight of the other.

  •  

    Congress needs to remember how to make policy

    Columnist Lee Hamilton: Politics is always going to be important, but it ought not dominate lawmakers’ actions. They can be politicians at election time, but once they reach Capitol Hill our Constitution expects them to be policymakers and legislators. So do ordinary Americans.

  •  

    Socialist programs working in U.S.
    A Wheeling letter to the editor: This is in response to the June 30 letter by Mr. Steve Howard in which he states that “socialist policies have failed in every nation on earth.” This must be news to the Scandinavian countries (Denmark, Norway, Sweden) all of which have socialist economies (and are democracies) and, by many measurements, are better off than we are.

  •  

    Jacksons deserve to lose law licenses
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Illinois has a reputation as one of the most corrupt states in the U.S., and it is well deserved. The who’s who book of Chicago politics is littered with the names of convicted felons. Yet, they keep on stealing!

  •  

    Deen missed an opportunity to help
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: I regret that Ms. Deen didn’t use the “lemon” of diabetes and come clean with her public until after she had landed a promotional contract with a drug company three long years after diagnosis. Her legacy would have soared had she revealed her illness, shared by so many uninformed Americans, while she helped them deal with the necessary dietary changes.

  •  

    Definition of marriage now is wide open
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: A group of consenting adults should be able to form a marriage and a family in any way it deems appropriate. Why should people who love each other in committed, familial relationships be denied any benefit of the state? You say that could never happen?

  •  

    Execs win while taxpayers lose
    A Barrington Hills letter to the editor: Your editorial on the outrageous generosity of the Metra Board expressed the same outrage and frustration felt by many taxpayers. The free-spending attitude among many government leaders has to be discouraged or we will all be paying much higher taxes.

  •  

    Gay marriage won’t dissolve families
    Gay marriage won’t dissolve familiesNot everyone shares the same religious beliefs or studies the Bible. There is a clear choice to practice a specific religion or to practice religion at all. This does not make any one person better than another. They just believe differently and that is what religion is all about and that is why there are so many different religions and why within a religion some people believe and feel differently. This is why the religion stance against gay marriage doesn‘t work for all.Marriage is based on law. An individual applies for a marriage license and they can choose to participate in a religious ceremony or have a civil/non-religious ceremony. And, laws have been changed throughout the ages to accommodate changes and necessity for human rights. In my lifetime I have seen many laws changed to provide for freedom and rights for people of specific gender and color, etc. And, in an attempt to keep those laws from changing many people found many reasons, but it was clear the laws had to change and they did. And, no one was hurt and the country did not crumble.It is time to change the laws to provide for gay marriage and when this finally this happens across the country families will not fall apart and children will not be harmed by this. Gay people are people plain and simple. How a person conducts themselves has nothing to do with race, gender or sexuality. It has to do with that person themselves. And, I have seen plenty of loving gay couples who provide wonderful loving homes for their children — better than many hetero couples, I might add.Our country was is supposed to be based equality and it is time that gay couples receive that equality.Cheryl BastSouth Elgin

  •  

    Jesus did not invent marriage
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: I cannot agree with the June 22 letter from Joe Schrantz that marriage was instituted by Jesus Christ as a holy sacrament and ceremony between a man and a woman, and therefore gay marriage is not right for Illinois.

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