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Daily Archive : Monday July 1, 2013

News

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    Car crashes into Hanover Park backyard
    A car ended up in a Hanover Park backyard Monday morning after colliding with another vehicle in a busy intersection nearby. A 22-year-old Hanover Park man sustained minor injuries.

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    Carol Stream hears new plan for waste transfer facility

    Carol Stream is considering leasing a portion of its Water Reclamation Center to a composting company that wants to put a landscape waste transfer facility there. Village officials say the facility proposed by Green Organics, Inc. “differs greatly” from the controversial solid waste transfer facility proposed by Flood Brothers in 2004.

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    Adan Ozuna

    Bensenville man gets 6 years for stealing car with toddler inside

    After he realized he'd stolen a car with an 18-month-old girl in the back seat, Adan Ozuna dumped the vehicle at a friend's house, leaving the toddler alone and without heat for more than six hours on a cold January morning. On Monday, the 35-year-old Bensenville man was sentenced to six years in prison for the crime, described by a DuPage County judge as "egregious" and "heart-wrenching" for the...

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    Catherine Alice Gardens is a permanent supportive housing facility being proposed in Palatine for people with disabilities. Critics have questioned some of the financial figures cited by its developers.

    Palatine housing project reps say facility makes financial sense

    Despite an argument by some opponents that the Catherine Alice Gardens permanent supportive housing facility being proposed in Palatine isn't a good use of tax dollars, project representatives say the controversial plan makes financial sense.

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    Al Jourdan

    Lawmakers: Shake up RTA board appointment

    Two suburban lawmakers are asking McHenry County leaders to open up their next pick to be on the Regional Transit Authority Board to new candidates instead of reappointing longtime member Al Jourdan. Democratic state Rep. Jack Franks of Marengo and Republican state Sen. Dan Duffy of Lake Barrington argue the process should be more open to less-connected candidates, especially after Metra hastily...

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    About 50 residents attended Monday's Lake Zurich village board meeting with concern over last week's flooding.

    Lake Zurich residents plead for village's flood help

    Lake Zurich residents whose homes sustained significant damage from last week's flooding turned to village officials Monday night. Several of about 50 residents described how they endured floodwater filling their homes, the loss of vehicles, refused insurance claims and other problems. “We need help,” said Bristol Trail Road resident Lisa Greenberg, whose neighborhood sustained severe...

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    People who now have student loans don't have to worry about their monthly payments rising. The new rates are for one particular set of government-backed loans and only for new borrowing after July 1.

    Student loan rate doubles, but bigger bills not imminent

    Today's doubling of some student loan rates polarized suburban members of Congress, but graduates grinding through the working world to try to pay off their college debts need not worry about their monthly payment rising. “I think that's one of the misconceptions out there,” Northern Illinois University Director of Financial Aid Rebecca Babel said.

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    The DuPage County sheriff's office is asking for help identifying a human skull found more than three years ago near Wheaton. Authorities say the man, believed to be Hispanic or Native American, may have looked like this.

    Cops seek help identifying remains found near Wheaton

    The DuPage County sheriff's office is again asking the public for help identifying a human skull found more than three years ago at a Wheaton-area forest preserve. Police on Monday released an image of what the man may have looked like, according to digital facial-reconstruction software.

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    Northwest suburban communities along the Des Plaines River met Monday to discuss operations of Levee 37 along River Road in Mount Prospect as well as the need to accelerate the pace of construction of stormwater basins in Wheeling’s Heritage Park.

    River towns push for faster compeltion of Wheeling flood-relief project

    Leaders from Northwest suburban communities along the Des Plaines River say they will push for the ongoing flood relief project in Wheeling’s Heritage Park to be finished as soon as possible. The agreement came Monday after officials from Des Plaines, Mount Prospect, Prospect Heights and Wheeling met with representatives of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Army Corps of...

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    Batavia firefighters respond to flash fire

    Batavia firefighters say an employee mixing flammable chemicals without proper grounding caused a chemical flash fire at a business at 11:10 a.m. Monday in the 400 block of north Kirk Road.

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    A photo of one of the 19 Granite Mountain Hot Shot crew members killed fighting a wildfire near Yarnell, Ariz., Sunday sits at a makeshift memorial outside the crew's fire station Monday in Prescott, Ariz.

    Portable shelters couldn't save 19 firefighters

    With no way out, the 19 elite firefighters did what they were trained to do when trapped by a wildfire: They unfurled their foil-lined, heat-resistant tarps and rushed to cover themselves on the ground. But that last, desperate line of defense couldn't save the “Hotshot” crew from the flames that swept over them. All 19 men died, marking the nation's biggest loss of firefighters in a...

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    Toby Schultz pauses after laying flowers at the gate of the Granite Mountain Hot Shot Crew fire station, Monday, July 1, 2013, in Prescott, Ariz.

    Images: Reaction to the Arizona Firefighter Fatalities
    Images of reaction to the deaths of nineteen firefighters of the Granite Mountain Hotshot Crew that were killed battling a wildfire in Arizona.

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    Kurt Serzen

    Bensenville rape victim confronts ‘monster’ who attacked her

    A rape victim confronted her attacker in DuPage County court Monday, calling him a "monster" who made her afraid to sleep in her own bed. "Whether he is in jail or not, I live in fear," the woman said at a sentencing hearing for Kurt Serzen, who was convicted of breaking into her Bensenville home and assaulting her in August 1996.

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    Esther Noffke

    Decorated military pilot helped build Palwaukee Airport

    Esther Noffke of Wheelingserved her nation as the member of a female pilot group during World War II then landed in the suburbs, where she helped build the former Palwaukee Airport into the facility it is today. Noffke died Friday. She was 91.

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    President Barack Obama said his staff will review a German news article that says the U.S. is spying on European diplomats, declining to say if it’s true and explaining that “every intelligence service” in the world uses its resources to try “to understand the world better.”

    Obama suggests spying on nations’ allies is common

    President Barack Obama brushed aside sharp European criticism on Monday, suggesting that all nations spy on each other as the French and Germans expressed outrage over alleged U.S. eavesdropping on European Union diplomats. American analyst-turned-leaker Edward Snowden, believed to still be at Moscow’s international airport, applied for political asylum to remain in Russia.

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    Robert M. Jastrebski

    Mount Prospect man charged with stabbing brother

    A 55-year-old Mount Prospect man is scheduled to appear in court Tuesday facing up to five years in prison on allegations he stabbed his brother Saturday during an argument in the suspect’s home. Robert M. Jastrebski, of the 100 block of South Audrey Lane, is charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, a Class 3 felony, as a result of the altercation.

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    An Egyptian protester covers his head by a national flag during a demonstration against Egypt’s Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in Tahrir Square in Cairo Monday. Elsewhere in Cairo, protesters stormed and ransacked the headquarters of President Mohammed Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood group early Monday, in an attack that could spark more violence as demonstrators gear up for a second day of mass rallies aimed at forcing the Islamist leader from power.

    Egypt’s military gives Morsi 48-hour ultimatum

    Egypt’s military gave a “last-chance” ultimatum Monday to President Mohammed Morsi, giving him 48 hours to meet the demands of millions of protesters in the streets seeking his ouster, or the generals will intervene and impose their own plan for the country. Army helicopters swooped over Tahrir Square trailing Egyptian flags, to the cheers of the crowd opposed to the Islamist leader.

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    Daily Herald File Photo An FAA air traffic control facility in Elgin was evacuated for a fire alarm Monday, triggering flight delays.

    O’Hare, Midway flight delays blamed on fire alarm

    Travelers ready to take on the world Monday morning got a reality check with flight delays at O'Hare and Midway. The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed 79 arrival and departure delays at O’Hare and Midway International Airport occurred because of the mix up. As of 10 a.m. service was back to normal, the FAA said. “A fire alarm went off at FAA’s Chicago TRACON after detecting water flowing...

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    Master gardener’s fundraiser

    Roti Mediterranean Grill hosts a Give Back Night with the University of Illinois Lake County Extension on Tuesday, July 9 from 4 to 8 p.m. During that time, 20 percent of the generated gross sales will go to the University of Illinois Lake County Extension Master Gardener’s Program.

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    Route 120 resurfacing

    The Illinois Department of Transportation has announced that weather permitting, a resurfacing project on Route 120 (Belvidere Road) from Route 60 to Bacon Road near Volo/Round Lake, will begin Monday, July 8.

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    Coroner: Lake Villa twins died of overdoses

    Twin brothers found in their Lake Villa home last week died of drug overdoses, Lake County Coroner Thomas Rudd said Monday. Eugene and John Meek, both 25, were discovered Thursday in a bedroom of the house on the 0-100 block of West Grand Avenue. They had been dead for two or three days, Rudd said.

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    Coroner: woman committed suicide:

    A Spring Grove woman who was hit by a train near Round Lake on Saturday committed suicide, Lake County Coroner Thomas Rudd said Monday.

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    Thieves stealing West Chicago sewer grates

    Thieves have been stealing storm sewer grates throughout West Chicago, putting both pedestrians and bicyclists in danger, authorities said Monday. Many of the thefts have occurred in the Hampton Hills and Westgrove subdivisions, officials said, but grates have been stolen throughout the community.

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    Under the shade of an umbrella with temperatures already in triple digits by mid morning, tourists walk north along Las Vegas Boulevard toward The Strip in Las Vegas. Temperatures were on the rise again after the city reported a record overnight low of 89 degrees Sunday and forecasters predicting a high of 116.

    Why this heat wave’s so scary and what’s behind it

    Excessive heat is the No. 1 weather killer in the United States and it’s at its most dangerous when it doesn’t cool down at night. The current heat wave over California, Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico has temperatures hitting triple digits, with little relief at night. Hot weather is also baking the rest of the far West, including Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and parts of Utah and Montana.

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    As Ribfest returns to Naperville’s Knoch Park this week, families will find deals during Family Fun Time, which offers reduced adult admission and deals on meal prices from noon to 3 p.m. daily.

    Naperville’s Ribfest sticks with winning formula

    A longstanding Naperville tradition is about to begin anew as hundreds of volunteers turn Knoch Park at West Street and Martin Avenue into the bustling grounds of the 26th annual Ribfest. Residents and visitors alike know Ribfest for its spread of competing rib vendors, its Fourth of July fireworks, famous musical acts and family friendly entertainment -- and organizers say there will be plenty...

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    Portable toilets are moved into place Monday in preparation for Naperville's 26th annual Ribfest, which begins at 4 p.m. Wednesday in Knoch Park, 724 S. West St.

    Buzz builds as Ribfest preparations continue

    Ribfest grounds in Naperville already are abuzz as volunteers, electricians, fencing companies and rib vendors all play their part in getting Knoch Park ready for the five-day celebration of ribs, music and American independence. "There's a great buzz in the park," Ribfest Chairman Marty Walker said Monday.

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    Cornelius “Connie” Shanahan

    ‘Connie’ Shanahan latest candidate for Mundelein-area county board seat

    Fremont Township board member Cornelius “Connie” Shanahan on Monday said he’s running for the Lake County Board’s 10th District seat. Shanahan’s announcement to the Daily Herald quickly followed Mundelein Trustee Terri Voss’ declaration of intent to run for the post, now held by Mundelein-area Republican Diana O’Kelly.

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    U.S. stocks rose, with the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index rebounding from its first monthly loss since October, as reports showing improved manufacturing from Japan to the U.S. bolstered confidence in the global economy.

    U.S. stocks advance as stimulus concerns fade

    Investors have stopped worrying about the Federal Reserve. At least for now. Stocks rose on Wall Street Monday as investors judged that the economy still isn’t growing fast enough for the central bank to cut back on its stimulus program.

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    July is Park Month in the Fox Valley Park District

    It wasn’t long ago when “staycations” were all the rage. People quickly discovered they didn’t have to spend big bucks or drive long distances to enjoy good times with family and friends.

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    Hanover Park police hold annual Cops Day Picnic

    The Hanover Park Police Department will host its annual Cops Day Picnic from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, at East Harbor Park, Wildwood Lane and Grosse Point Circle. The event is an opportunity for the community to have a relaxing, fun evening and meet its local police officers.

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    Ronnie Ristich of Addison, is being held in the Kane County jail on a burglary charge out of New York City.

    Addison man in Kane County jail on New York burglary charges

    An Addison man, facing charges in Cook County of trying to con an elderly person to burglarize them, is awaiting extradition to New York City to face similar charges there. But his attorney says the man has not been to New York in over two years.

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    Tanker 910 makes a retardant drop Yarnell Hill Fire to help protect the Double Bar A Ranch near Peeples Valley, Arizona, Sunday, June 30, 2013. The lightning caused blaze began on Yarnell Hill on Sunday.

    Images: Arizona Wildfires
    A massive wildfire continues to burn near Yarnell, Arizona. The fire claimed the lives of 19 firefighters on Sunday and has spread to 2,000 acres. The fast moving fire is being fueled by hot, dry conditions.

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    Caroline Hutton, left, and Hannah Rice, both 17-year-old seniors at Dundee-Crown High School, have been selected to take their volunteer involvement with Relay For Life to the regional level, with the Lakeshore Division Campus Advisory Team. Hutton and Rice are pictured here before the District 300 2013 Relay event, which was held at Hampshire High School with the farm theme “Mooooove Over Cancer.”

    Dist. 300 teens fight cancer through Relay

    Hannah Rice and Caroline Hutton, both 17-year-old seniors at Dundee-Crown High School, have been selected for two prestigious spots on the Lakeshore Division Campus Advisory Team for Relay for Life, the American Cancer Society's signature fundraisers. The girls will help students organizing Relays at high schools and colleges across the state while co-chairing District 300's fast-growing, annual...

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    Glen Ellyn man gets 4 years for child porn

    A Glen Ellyn man was sentenced Monday to four years in prison for possessing child pornography videos. Liviu Babei, 45, pleaded guilty in May.

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    Sparky, the Barrington Fire Department safety dog, is a popular figure at the 4th of July celebration.

    Brat Tent cooking up another great Fourth of July in Barrington

    Barrington’s 29th annual 4th of July Festival will feature four days of great food, music and family entertainment in the heart of downtown, July 3 through Saturday, July 6.

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    Former Metra CEO Alex Clifford will receive a hefty severance package.

    Metra facing more questions after Clifford's exit

    Could it get any more complicated at Metra? The agency experiences yet another leadership void, a divided board, service delays and lost revenues. “Metra riders ought to be infuriated following a fare increase and all of the incredible increases in delays, especially on the BNSF, over this enormously large package a person who barely got the seat warm in his short stay as executive director...

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    Fireworks light up Fourth at Naperville’s Ribfest

    Back on July 4 by popular demand, the fireworks show at Ribfest in Naperville is set to blast off at 9:30 p.m. Thursday. Last year’s fireworks show took place July 3, but Ribfest Chairman Marty Walker said guests prefer to experience the patriotic display of lights on Independence Day itself.

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    Pilot Brian Anderson positions his helicopter inches above a 130-foot electrical tower so ComEd aerial specialist Ron Kellett can climb in after swapping out old porcelain insulators for new glass ones.

    ComEd's aerial team has high-wire job

    Using a helicopter and special safety equipment and techniques, ComEd's aerial specialist team takes to the skies to work on one of its 28,000 transmissions towers that keep the power flowing. This elite group calls the dangerous job "riding the lightning."

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    Water main work set to begin in Naperville

    Construction on Naperville’s Washington Street water main improvement project is scheduled to begin Monday, July 8, and continue through September, officials said. The water main installation and associated work will be done in phases along several portions of Washington, they said, including Hillside Avenue from Main Street to the east side of Washington; Washington just south of Martin Avenue;...

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    Vernon Area Public Library held a yo-yo program June 13 with Barry North.

    Yo-yo is low-tech toy with worldwide appeal

    “Where was the yo-yo invented?” asked a young patron at the Vernon Area Library’s yo-yo workshop last month.

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    Fireworks, parades and fests in the Fox Valley

    Parades, fireworks and fests: Fourth of July in the Fox Valley

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    Balloon launches will be at 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday, weather permitting, during Lisle's Eyes to the Skies festival.

    Eyes to the Skies takes flight again in Lisle

    Lisle residents will once again see hot air balloons rising skyward this week for the 31st edition of the Eyes to the Skies Festival. And for festival committee member Mike Shuta, the allure of hot air balloons never seems to disappear. “It's so unusual to see,” he said. “One minute there's an empty field and the next minute there's an eight-story building — and there are...

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    Ron Raglin, U-46 chief of equity and social justice, has been developing a new mentor initiative for the district since he started last fall. The research-based program teaches mentor-advocates how to connect with and support students.

    U-46 aims to mentor its most vulnerable students

    Elgin Area School District U-46 is hoping to match all of its at-risk students with mentors through an initiative spearheaded by Ron Raglin, chief of equity and social justice. “We're in intervention,” he said. “We're trying to move to prevention. The goal is to move all the way down to the elementary level — thoughtfully, succinctly, but systematically.”

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    Terri Voss

    Voss to run for Lake County Board

    Mundelein Trustee Terri Voss will run for a seat on the Lake County Board in 2014. Voss will run as a Republican for the 10th District seat held for nearly 20 years by Diana O’Kelly, also of the Mundelein area.

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    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, speaks during a meeting with Japan and South Korea during the ASEAN meetings in Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei, on Monday.

    Kerry presses North Korea over nuke disarmament

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry stepped up pressure Monday on North Korea to give up its atomic weapons program, saying key regional powers, including Pyongyang ally China, are all “absolutely united” in demanding nuclear disarmament. Kerry made the comments on the eve of Asia’s largest annual security conference, the 27-country Association of Southeast Asian Nation Regional Forum, which...

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    Backhoe operator uncovers historic Ill. cemetery
    An historic cemetery was uncovered in southern Illinois during work to build a new water line. A backhoe operator was digging a trench for the water line when the gravestones were uncovered just off Route 159 near Prairietown last week. The Telegraph in Alton reports that Fosterburg Water District officials called project engineers, who notified the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency.

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    Dan Hampton stopped chasing opposing quarterbacks years ago but hasn’t stopped playing the bass guitar. He and the Chicago 6 will perform on Saturday, June 6, at the Eyes to the Skies Festival in Lisle.

    1985 Bears ready to jam at Eyes to the Skies

    Dan Hampton is putting the band back together. The ex-Chicago Bear star and NFL Hall of Famer is partnering with two of his former teammates from the Bears teams of the 1980s for a revival of the Chicago 6 — a band originally formed out of the free time created by the 1987 NFL players’ strike. Hampton, Otis Wilson and Steve McMichael — all members of the 1985 Super Bowl championship defense —...

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    U.S. President Barack Obama, center-right, and first lady Michelle Obama, right, wave as they enter State House accompanied by Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete, center-left, and Tanzanian First Lady Salma Kikwete, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Monday. Teeming crowds and blaring horns welcomed President Barack Obama to Tanzania’s largest city, where the U.S. president’s likeness is everywhere as he arrived on the last leg of his three-country tour of the African continent.

    Obama, Bush to join together in Africa

    Teeming crowds and blaring horns are welcoming President Barack Obama to Tanzania’s largest city, where the U.S. president’s likeness is everywhere as he arrives on the last leg of his three-country tour of the African continent. Obama, first lady Michelle Obama and their two daughters touched down Monday afternoon in Dar es Salaam, where a marching band awaiting them on the tarmac danced and...

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    Early Monday, two of San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit’s largest unions went on strike after weekend talks with management failed to produce a new contract.

    S.F. Bay Area braces for first day of transit strike

    Commuters braced for traffic snarls Monday morning as two of San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit’s largest unions went on strike, halting train service for the first time in 16 years. The walkout promised to derail the more than 400,000 riders who use the nation’s fifth-largest rail system and affect every mode of transportation. Transportation officials say another 60,000 vehicles could be on...

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    Tens of thousands of Hong Kong residents gather at Victoria Park before an annual pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong Monday. The protesters demanded their widely disliked Beijing-backed leader resign and pressing for promised democratic reforms so they can choose their own top representative.

    HK protests for Beijing-backed leader to resign

    Tens of thousands of Hong Kongers took to the streets in protest Monday, demanding their widely disliked Beijing-backed leader resign and pressing for promised democratic reforms so they can choose their own top representative. The annual protest march has become increasingly popular in recent years, underscoring the growing gulf between Hong Kong and the mainland 16 years after the city ceased...

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    Protesters ransack the Muslim Brotherhood headquarters in the Muqatam district in Cairo Monday in an attack that could spark more violence as demonstrators gear up for a second day of mass rallies aimed at forcing the Islamist leader from power.

    Egypt: 5 ministers meet to consider resignation

    Egypt’s official news agency says five cabinet ministers are meeting to consider resigning their posts and joining the mass protests calling on the Islamist president to step down. The MENA agency said Monday that the ministers of communication, tourism, legal affairs, environment and utilities met at the Communications Ministry in a suburb west of Cairo to consider resigning.

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    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry arrives for a news conference at the ASEAN meeting in the International Conference Center in Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei, Monday. Kerry swapped his Mideast peace portfolio for issues in emerging Southeast Asia and road bumps in U.S. relations with Russia and China when he landed Monday in Brunei for a regional security conference.

    Kerry: China could have helped with Snowden case

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says the U.S. thinks China could have “made a difference” in the case of National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden if it had returned him to America to face charges.

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    Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, center, holds up two fingers to signal a “No” vote as the session where she tried to filibuster an abortion bill draws to a close in Austin, Texas. Hundreds of abortion rights activists ensured that the first special legislative session descended into chaos. Now, Texas Gov. Rick Perry has convened a second one and urged abortion opponents to respond with mobilizations of their own.

    Texas lawmakers are back, and so is abortion fight

    Round two of Texas’ fierce ideological battle over abortion limits was set to begin Monday, less than a week after a Democratic filibuster and hundreds of raucous protesters threw the end of the first special session into chaos. The Legislature’s Republican majority has vowed to pass wide-ranging abortion restrictions quickly and easily this time, even as opponents mobilize for more protests.

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    Brad Stephens

    Rosemont Mayor Stephens roast this Saturday

    Tickets are still available for the Saturday, July 6, roast of Rosemont Mayor Brad Stephens at Zanies Comedy Club. Chicago area comedians, television and radio personalities, and business and civic leaders will be among those skewering Stephens. “I look forward to the roast at Zanies,” Stephens said. “It will be a fun way to benefit Bear Necessities Pediatric Cancer Foundation...

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    Ryan Hartman, a winger and native of West Dundee, pulls on a Chicago Blackhawks sweater after being chosen 30th overall in the first round of the NHL hockey draft Sunday in Newark, N.J.

    Weekend in Review: Charges in robbery; Families clean up after flood
    What you may have missed over the weekend: Elmhurst woman crowned Miss Illinois: Blackhawks draft West Dundee native; Elgin mom advocates for skipping immunizations; police reviewing video in Inverness shooting; Palatine residents want cell tower moved; Blackhaws trade Bollan, Frolik; Bulls cut assistant coach loose; rumors and losses mount for White Sox; and Cubs' Sweeney headed to DL.

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    Chicago Blackhawks center Dave Bolland (36) celebrates his game winning goal against the Boston Bruins during the third period in Game 6 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Finals, Monday, June 24, 2013, in Boston. The Blackhawks won 3-2. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    Dawn Patrol: Elmhurst woman named Miss Illinois; Blackhawks trade Bolland

    Police say electronic tracker led them to robbers; Elmhurst woman wins Miss Illinois pageant; Inverness police investigating shooting; Palatine residents want cell tower removed; Blackhawks make flurry of moves Sunday.

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    Pilot Brian Anderson positions himself inches above the 130 foot electrical tower so ComEd overhead electrician Ron Kellett can climb into the helicopter after changing porcelain insulators for new glass insulators. The overhead electricians uses a fiberglass wand to ground themselves before and after exiting the helicopter on the de-energized voltage wire.

    Images: ComEd aerial line repair
    ComEd's Aerial Specialist Team takes to the skies to improve and repair one of its 28,000 transmissions towers that keep the power flowing to our suburbs.

Sports

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    Bulls general manager Gar Forman speaks to the media about not renewing the contract of assistant coach Ron Adams for the 2013-2014 season after introducing NBA basketball draft picks Tony Snell and Erik Murphy at the Berto Center on Monday. The Bulls selected Snell with the 20th pick out of New Mexico, and Murphy with the 49th pick out of Florida.

    Chilly mood as Bulls introduce draft picks

    Tom Thibodeau and Gar Forman have had an impressive run of success together. There’s really no reason why they should have a rocky relationship, but the team’s decision to ax lead assistant Ron Adams from Thibodeau’s coaching staff has brought that into question.

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    Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau, left, and general manager Gar Forman, right, introduce the team’s 2013 draft picks — Erik Murphy (31) and Tony Snell (20) — at the Berto Center on Monday.

    This butting of Bulls’ heads not very healthy

    Intramural bickering within a team's organization rarely ends well, so it'll be interesting to see where the Gar Forman-Tom Thibodeau relationship goes. A good guess is that the friction will continue to simmer. The only way it will end is if Forman or Thibodeau is gone or both are.

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    Fire goalkeeper Sean Johnson saves a shot by New England Revolution midfielder Kenny Mansally during the 2010 season. With Johnson honoring national team duty, Paolo Tornaghi gets the start Wednesday against the San Jose Earthquakes.

    Duka getting it done for Fire

    The word usually used to describe Dilly Duka the past few seasons has been “potential.” Now it seems Duka might be ready to fulfill his potential. The 23-year-old winger acquired in February in the trade that sent Dominic Oduro to Columbus finally looks like he’s feeling comfortable in Chicago. He scored his first goal in a Fire uniform a couple of weeks ago against his former team, for which he scored just twice in three seasons. He’s playing more aggressively now, taking on more defenders on the dribble and having more success at it.

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    Paul stays with Clippers; Howard investigates exit strategies

    Chris Paul’s answer was brief, just like his time on the free agent market. “I’M IN!!!” he wrote Monday on Twitter. He will be staying with the Clippers, the longtime losers he helped turned into a division champion in just two seasons. Dwight Howard, meanwhile, will need more time to think.

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    Ben Smith, who got a chance to play in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup Final, will get a good look when Blackhawks training camp opens in September.

    Blackhawks’ Bowman eager to give prospects their shot

    Blackhawks general manager Stan Bowman said the trades of Dave Bolland and Michael Frolik was more about what’s coming up through the system than holding on to the two veterans for sentimental reasons. “We’ve got guys that are knocking on the door to get into the NHL,” Bowman said.

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    Bulls draft picks Erik Murphy, left, and Tony Snell, meet in the hallway at the Berto Center on Monday after changing into their new uniforms for the first time. The Bulls took Snell (New Mexico) with the 20th pick and Murphy (Florida) with the 49th.

    Snell’s hooked on emulating Pippen

    Bulls draft pick Tony Snell is demonstrating he has good taste in role models. When asked if he styled his game after anyone, Snell selected a Bulls great. “I follow Scottie Pippen,” Snell said. “He’s kind of like my same height and same wingspan. I try to watch his game.” That was convenient, since Pippen was in the gym watching the news conference. “I met him today. Hall of Famer, it’s pretty great,” Snell added.

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    Matt Rife

    A busy summer calendar for new Harvard AD Rife

    He wrapped up three weeks of teaching summer school at Lakes, Harvard approved him as its new director of athletics and activities at its June school board meeting, and on Monday, Matt Rife officially began his new job at his alma mater. Now he can turn his attention to what will always be his most important day of every summer: Aug. 5. His wife, Erin, will celebrate her 32nd birthday. Matt and Erin’s daughter, Grace, turns 2 on the same day. Call it a doubleheader Monday.

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    Cubs starting pitcher Scott Feldman, above, and starter Matt Garza could be traded for prospects by the July 31 trade deadline.

    Cubs will be subject of plenty of trade rumors

    Now that July is here, the month figures to be taken up by trade talks concerning the Cubs. Daily Herald Cubs writer Bruce Miles takes a look at who might go, and he weighs in on the Alfonso Soriano market, if there is one. The Cubs will be sellers again, and Sunday in Seattle, team President Theo Epstein told reporters there’s a 50-50 chance the Cubs will make a deal. Figure on the odds being better than that.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Chris Sale talks with catcher Tyler Flowers after giving up 2 runs in the fourth inning Sunday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Chris Rongey: Sale shows won-loss record means little

    To see a standard for the win-loss record of a pitcher meaning very little, take a look at what White Sox starter Chris Sale has done this season. Through Sunday, he's 5-7 despite the fact that he has an ERA near the top 10 of all pitchers who have started games in the American League this season.

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    Dale Schabert, the only head football coach South Elgin has known, has announced he is stepping down after a 33-year coaching career.

    Schabert steps down at South Elgin

    South Elgin football coach Dale Schabert pulled the trigger last week on a decision he said he had been contemplating for months: his retirement from coaching. Schabert informed members of his staff last Thursday night and broke the news to the incoming senior class on Friday morning that he is stepping down as South Elgin coach, effective immediately.

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    Top honors for Sky’s Delle Donne

    NEW YORK — Elena Delle Donne of the Chicago Sky and Diana Taurasi of the Phoenix Mercury were named the WNBA’s Eastern and Western Conference Players of the Week, respectively, for games played June 24 — June 30.

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    Mike North video: Partying and the parade
    Mike North thinks the Blackhawks parade is exciting but putting on the Hawks jersey and getting downtown is a young man's game. The crowd is looking to party and that's just what they'll get with the Blackhawks celebration.

  •  
    Jan Bakelants, wearing the overall leader’s yellow jersey, rides in the pack Monday during the third stage of the Tour de France in Calvi, Corsica island, France.

    Gerrans holds off Sagan to win 3rd stage of Tour

    Australian sprinter Simon Gerrans held off a late charge by Peter Sagan to win Monday’s hilly third stage of the Tour de France by less than half a wheel. And Belgian rider Jan Bakelants did enough in the sweltering heat to keep the race leader’s yellow jersey. Bakelants, the winner of Sunday’s second stage, finished in 19th place.

  •  
    Sabine Lisicki beat Serena Williams 6-2, 1-6, 6-4 in the fourth round of Wimbledon.

    Serena Williams loses to Lisicki in Wimbledon 4th round

    Add Serena Williams to the list of big names eliminated early at this wild and unpredictable Wimbledon. The defending champion failed to close out a see-saw third set Monday, dropping the last four games against Sabine Lisicki of Germany to lose 6-2, 1-6, 6-4 in the fourth round and end her career-best 34-match winning streak. “I’m still shaking,” Lisicki said in a post-match interview, covering her face with her hands to wipe away tears. “I’m just so happy.”

  •  

    Len Kasper: Busy week indeed for Cubs

    Lots of Cubs news in the past week, including Carlos Marmol being designated for assignment and Ian Stewart getting released from AAA Iowa.

Business

  •  
    Edward Hospital & Health Services in Naperville merged Monday with Elmhurst Memorial Healthcare, forming a new network of three hospitals and 1,680 physicians.

    Edward, Elmhurst Memorial finalize merger, announce leaders

    Edward Hospital & Health Services in Naperville and Elmhurst Memorial Healthcare have merged to create one new health system, officials from both organizations said Monday. The finalization of the merger creates a three-hospital system that serves 44 communities with 1.7 million residents in the west and southwest suburbs. "Our collaboration will lead to even higher quality and improved services and efficiencies for our patients as we meet the challenges of healthcare reform," Pam Davis, CEO of the new system, said in a statement.

  •  

    Tribune to acquire 19 TV stations for $2.73 billion

    Tribune Co. said Monday that it reached a deal to buy Local TV Holdings LLC’s 19 TV stations for $2.73 billion in cash, significantly boosting its television business as it looks to sell its newspaper operations. Tribune currently owns 23 TV stations and cable network WGN America, along with the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times and other newspapers.

  •  
    A worker applies the finishing touches to a Steinway piano at piano maker’s factory in the Queens Borough of New York. The famed piano maker Steinway is being acquired by private equity firm Kohlberg & Co. for about $438 million.

    Steinway accepts $438M buyout from Kohlberg & Co.

    The famed piano maker Steinway is hoping that the sale of the company to private equity firm Kohlberg & Co. will strike the right chord. Steinway Musical Instruments, which has been in business for 160 years, said Monday that it has agreed to be bought by Kohlberg for about $438 million.

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    Fewer Illinois state workers retiring this fiscal year

    New numbers show that fewer Illinois state employees will have retired during the fiscal year that ends Sunday compared with the previous fiscal year. About 3,100 employees will have retired in fiscal year 2012, compared with the 4,700 state employees who took their pensions during the previous fiscal year, according to the State Employee Retirement Systems.

  •  
    Carpenters John Bazan, left, and Brian Uteg of Novak Construction discuss the new bar for craft beers at Sunset Foods in Libertyville. Sunset is undergoing renovation to provide a variety of improvements, including a full-service floral design center and an outdoor cafe area.

    Sunset Foods makes big investment in Libertyville

    Sunset Foods is refreshing its store in Libertyville with a variety of improvements including a full service floral design center and an in-store bar selling boutique wine and craft beer. A variety of other offerings are designed to enhance the shopping experience in a competitive market. “We're going to really improve and enhance the shopping experience here,” says John Cortesi, president and CEO of Sunset Foods.

  •  

    Consultant lists top small business issues, suggests solutions

    Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall finds that the three biggest issues most small businesses face and chances are you'll get this list: Differentiation other than price. Getting new customers. Managing cash flow.

  •  
    Citigroup has agreed to pay $968 million to Fannie Mae to resolve potential future repurchase claims on residential mortgage loans originated between 2000 and 2012.

    Citigroup agrees to pay $968 million to Fannie Mae

    Citigroup has agreed to pay $968 million to Fannie Mae to resolve potential future repurchase claims on residential mortgage loans originated between 2000 and 2012. A sizeable group of the loans were originated during the U.S. housing boom. Mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac bought mortgage loans from banks like Citigroup in the run-up to the financial crisis.

  •  

    U.S. construction spending up 0.5 percent in May

    Spending on residential housing rose in May to the highest level in 4½ years, helping to send overall construction spending higher despite a big drop in nonresidential activity. Construction spending rose 0.5 percent in May compared with April when spending was up 0.1 percent, the Commerce Department said Monday.

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    U.S. factory activity expands in June, jobs decline

    U.S. manufacturing activity grew in June behind a pickup in new orders and stronger production. The increase suggests factories could rebound in the second half of the year and help the economy grow. The Institute for Supply Management said Monday that its index of factory activity increased to 50.9 in June. That’s up from 49 in the May, which was the lowest reading in four years. A reading above 50 suggests growth, while those below indicate contraction.

  •  
    ENAZ in Northfield is expanding and plans to open a shop in downtown Libertyville this summer.

    ENAZ boutique planning Libertyville expansion
    Susan Lurie, who started her career a custom leather designer, started ENAZ 20 years ago in Highland Park. Over the years, her three daughters have joined and assisted in expanding the business. The most recent expansion involves opening on Church Street in downtown Libertyville this summer. We talk to the owners about how they have managed to grow the stores that cater to women.

  •  

    Chicago starts warning drivers about speed cameras

    The city of Chicago is letting residents know about automated speed cameras that will go up later this year around schools, parks and other places where children congregate. The Chicago Department of Transportation has started a campaign to educate residents about the cameras. Affected areas are within 1/8th of a mile from parks or schools.

  •  

    Inmates to build 200th Habitat for Humanity house

    Inmates who take construction classes at Taylorville Correctional Center are poised to finish building their 200th home for Habitat for Humanity on Wednesday.The program started 15 years ago as a partnership between the Illinois Department of Corrections, Luther Social Services of Illinois and Habitat for Humanity. Since then more than 350 inmates have helped build homes for needy central Illinois families. The house scheduled to be finished this week will go to a family from Sangamon County.

  •  

    NHI joint venture buying 17 properties for $135M

    Health care real estate investment trust National Health Investors Inc. said Monday that its joint venture with Bickford Senior Living paid $135 million to buy 17 assisted living and memory care communities. The joint venture purchased 14 of the properties from a Care Investment Trust Inc. subsidiary for about $123 million. It bought another three properties from affiliates of Bickford for approximately $12 million.

  •  
    BlackFinn American Grille is one of the restaurants that has opened at Randhurst Village in Mount Prospect.

    Dining, entertainment drive Randhurst Village's success

    When the acclaimed restaurant e+o Food and Drink opened in Randhurst Village earlier this year, it left some people pondering a question: What's a place like this doing in a mall? Randhurst Village isn't a traditional mall, though. It's an example of what retail experts say is a national trend — an open-air shopping center with a dining/entertainment component. “It's already become a destination type of place,” Mayor Arlene Juracek said.

  •  
    A 70,000-square-foot Caputo´s Fresh Markets grocery store is expected to open by the end of the year or early next year at North Avenue and Schmale Road in Carol Stream.

    DuPage County getting three new grocery stores

    New grocery stores will do more than provide additional options for shoppers later this year in three DuPage County communities, officials say. If all goes well, the stores also will generate sales tax revenues, create jobs and help put a fresh face on some areas that needed a little pick-me-up. “What that means in sales tax for us is phenomenal,” Wheaton Mayor Michael Gresk said.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    In Jason Statham’s latest film, “Redemption,” the actor turns it up a notch, playing a homeless soldier on the streets of London.

    Jason Statham showcases acting range in new film

    With the success of his own franchise films like “The Transporter” and “Crank,” as well as being a part of “The Expendables” and newly added to the “Fast and Furious” series, Jason Statham is a bonafide action star. But with his latest film, “Redemption,” the actor shows his acting range by playing a homeless soldier on the streets of London. The 45-year-old is hoping to add another dimension to his movie career.

  •  
    Afghans visit the National Museum in Kabul, Afghanistan. Looters stole tens of thousands of artifacts from the National Museum of Afghanistan during the country’s civil war in the 1990s, and then thousands more were destroyed by the Taliban when they took power. Now the museum is slowly coming back to life, helped by millions of dollars in U.S. and other foreign aid.

    Afghan museum on the mend, but long way to go

    Looters stole tens of thousands of artifacts from the National Museum of Afghanistan during the country’s civil war in the 1990s, and then thousands more were destroyed by the Taliban when they took power. Now the museum is slowly coming back to life, helped by millions of dollars in U.S. and other foreign aid. Every day 300 to 400 visitors a day come to see the collections of sculptures, jewelry, coins and other artifacts dating from the Stone Age through the 20th century.

  •  
    The cast of “Below Deck,” which premieres Monday on Bravo.

    Bravo launches ‘Below Deck’

    Bravo, the network known for depicting the antics of the insanely wealthy, has finally decided to make a show about the working class. Naturally, it takes place on a $20 million mega-yacht. Certain elements of “Below Deck,” a listless docu-series, which premieres at 9 p.m. Monday, follows the staff of a 164-foot charter boat, seem so scripted — the stereotypical spoiled crew members, the neatly wrapped-up “plotlines” — that it’s hard to take seriously, even in the dubious cable reality show genre.

  •  
    Sticklers for tradition will appreciate this mayo-based potato salad at your Fourth of July gathering.

    Potato salads a must for Fourth of July cookouts

    Baked beans, potato salad and coleslaw come up frequently when people vote on their favorite summer barbecue side dishes. I personally don't know anyone who puts baked beans at the top of the list but I know plenty who say it's just not a summer cookout without potato salad. So this year, for the Fourth I'm giving you four fun takes on potato salad.

  •  
    A model wears a creation by fashion designer Raf Simons for Christian Dior’s Haute Couture Spring-Summer 2014 collection presented in Paris.

    Dior Homme uses geometry to mix office, beach
    Dior Homme’s designer Kris Van Assche is a self-confessed minimalist. It sits quite nicely, therefore, that the main motif of his spring-summer 2014 menswear show in Paris was the minimalist, neat and geometric shapes of modernist painters such as Piet Mondrian.

  •  

    Three Pepper Barbecue Potato Salad
    Three Pepper Barbecue Potato Salad

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    Sticklers for tradition will appreciate this mayo-based potato salad at your Fourth of July gathering.

    The Best Traditional Potato Salad
    The BestTraditional Potato Salad

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    Feta cheese, tomatoes and fresh dill give potato salad a Greek flare.

    Greek Potato Salad
    Greek Potato Salad

  •  
    Chef and “Chopped” judge Alex Guarnaschelli garnishes her baked potato salad with fried skins of the peeled spuds.

    Baked Potato Salad
    Baked Potato Salad

  •  
    Potatoes stand in for lettuce in this riff on a Cobb salad.

    Cobb Potato Salad
    Cobb Potato Salad

  •  

    Judge tosses 3 N.Y. lawsuits against ex-Elmo actor

    A judge in New York has tossed out three lawsuits brought by men who said former Elmo puppeteer Kevin Clash sexually abused them when they were underage. Federal Judge Kevin Koeltl threw out the lawsuits Monday. He said the claims came more than six years after each man reasonably should have become aware of Clash’s alleged violations.

  •  
    Carrie Underwood used Twitter to oppose the “Ag Gag” bill that opponents claimed would have stopped investigation into animal abuse on farms in Tennessee, reaching out directly to Gov. Bill Haslam with a boldly worded message saying if he signed it “he needs to expect me at his front door.”

    Carrie Underwood gets political on Twitter

    Carrie Underwood has found her voice on Twitter. The country music star and former “American Idol” champion admitted 3½ years ago she was afraid to join Twitter, but since deciding to take the leap in 2011 she’s embraced the social media tool in ways that go beyond fan engagement. Recently she used Twitter to oppose the “Ag Gag” bill in Tennessee, reaching out directly to Gov. Bill Haslam with a boldly worded message saying if he signed it “he needs to expect me at his front door.”

  •  

    Toby Keith not on board when tour bus catches fire

    A tour bus for country singer Toby Keith caught fire on a highway near Indianapolis, though the singer wasn’t on board and no one was injured. Lebanon fire chief Jason Lee says the bus was taking crew members to Nashville, Tenn., after a Sunday concert in Chicago when the driver spotted the flames around 4:45 a.m. Monday on Interstate 65.

  •  
    Pharrell Williams, left, Justin Timberlake and Charlie Wilson perform onstage at the BET Awards at the Nokia Theatre on Sunday. The show was more about the performances than the awards this year.

    Timberlake, Wilson, Monae shine at BET Awards

    Who won video of the year again? The BET Awards were barely about the actually awards as wild performances stole the night. They also didn’t present the top honor Sunday. Janelle Monae ended the three and a half hour-plus event with a top-notch performance of “Q.U.E.E.N.” alongside Erykah Badu, who brought a white poodle onstage. It was just one of the night’s best performances, which also featured stolen moments from a seductive Ciara, a slick Miguel, a random — but welcomed — reggae set and a playful Justin Timberlake with an even more playful Charlie Wilson.

  •  
    Pat Mulieri, like many parents, struggled for years with a grown child who abused drugs.

    Menace of addiction knows no bounds

    Pat Mulieri has earned a doctoral degree and taught college English for 26 years. She is known for a kind heart, for aiding the poor and homeless. She rescues stray animals. But no matter how hard she tried, she couldn't save her own daughter, the pretty cheerleader and prom queen who grew up to be a drug addict.

  •  
    Sarah Guyard-Guillot, left, and Sami Tiaumassi perform as “Forest People” during Cirque du Soleil’s “Ka” at MGM Grand Resort in Las Vegas. Guyard-Guillot, a mother of two young children, was pronounced dead at a hospital late Saturday night after falling about 50 feet from the show’s stage during a performance of Cirque du Soleil’s “Ka.”

    Cirque du Soleil artist dies after fall in Vegas

    A Paris-born performer in Cirque du Soleil’s “Ka” died after a fall during a show in Las Vegas. Sarah Guyard-Guillot was pronounced dead late Saturday night at a hospital after falling about 50 feet from the show’s stage. Witnesses told the Las Vegas Sun that the accident occurred near the end of the production Saturday night at the MGM Grand. Cirque du Soleil founder Guy Laliberte issued a statement Sunday praising Guyard-Guillot and saying performances of “Ka” have been canceled until further notice. Guyard-Guillot, a mother of two children, had been with the original cast of “Ka” since 2006, and had been an acrobatic performer for more than 20 years.

  •  

    Afraid of the dentist? These strategies can help

    I’m a rational person, but I have a deep fear of the dentist that I just can’t overcome. Any suggestions?

  •  
    Exercise needs aren’t that much different as you age. Just make sure you add strength training to your cardio workouts.

    Your Health: Exercising as you age

    According to government recommendations, you should do at least 2 1/2 hours of moderate aerobic activity per week and twice-weekly sessions of strength training to improve your health, no matter your age. But don’t physical fitness needs change as we grow older? Not that much, it turns out, says The Washington Post. A combination of cardio and strength training is a must to keep your heart and muscles in good shape and your weight under control.

  •  
    1963 Chevrolet Corvette, John Mrock, Arlington Heights

    Owner’s 1963 Corvette is an island treasure

    As a young man, John Mrock lived out a double dream — owning a great classic and cruising some of the best beaches. The Arlington Heights resident spent several years in his 20s stationed on the sun-soaked shores of Hawaii. “As a kid, I read all the hot rod and speed magazines. The Corvette was always the iconic sports car,” Mrock said. “I always wanted one.” This burning desire became a reality, thanks to very affordable prices. “In 1967, I bought a ’57 Vette for several hundred dollars.”

  •  
    Maria Buchanan talks with her counselor during a one-on-one session at Great River Recovery Resources in Quincy, Ill.

    Quincy woman determined to stay off crack and on road to recovery

    Tears streamed down Maria Buchanan’s face and dripped into the pile of crack cocaine in her lap. She’d finally hit bottom. Her addiction spanned two decades, numerous jobs, significant others and jail stays. Buchanan, 49, previously had tried to clear her mind and quit using drugs, but she caved to feelings of worthlessness and self-doubt. She hadn’t known strength. She’d only known using.

  •  

    Simple strategy may be best to reduce infections

    Using germ-killing soap to wash the sickest patients every day and applying antibacterial ointment inside their noses turns out to be the most effective way to reduce deadly hospital bloodstream infections, according to a study that has broad implications for practical use. The findings suggest the simple strategy could save lives, researchers said.

  •  

    Healthy fats may benefit prostate cancer patients

    Men with early stage prostate cancer may live longer if they eat a diet rich in heart-healthy nuts, vegetable oils, seeds and avocados, researchers said. Their analysis of 4,577 men found those who reported eating vegetable fats were less likely to develop fatal tumors or die from other causes than those with diets high in animal fats and carbohydrates.

  •  

    Mastectomies on the rise among younger women

    A majority of young women diagnosed with breast cancer opt to have a mastectomy rather than a more modest, but in many cases equally effective, procedure that spares much of the breast, according to new research. The study found that 62 percent of women with breast cancer under age 40 chose to have their breasts removed despite previous research showing that women who have more targeted procedures coupled with radiation have similar survival rates.

  •  

    Hospital to offer hand transplants for kids

    A Boston hospital is starting the world’s first hand transplant program for children, and doctors say it won’t be long until face transplants and other radical operations to improve appearance and quality of life are offered to kids, too. The move shows the growing willingness to do transplants to enhance a patient’s life rather than to save it as donated hearts, livers and other organs have done in the past.

Discuss

  •  

    Traffic a problem for proposed Palatine facility
    Letter to the editor: Prayag Patel of Palatine is concerned that the active and often hazardous nature of the truck and forklift traffic on Eric Street makes it a poor choice for the Catherine Alice Gardens project.

  •  

    Comic strip on prayer crossed the line
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: I feel that a line was crossed in the June 19 comic strip of Soup to Nutz, by Rick Stomoski.

  •  

    Quality of life not set by magazines
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: You maintain that “Suburban quality of life [is] still healthy.” However, you never give reasons that I would consider attractive for a potential resident.

  •  

    Keep working to fix immigration
    A Lakemoor letter to the editor: Over the last few years, it’s become commonplace for Congress to fight and not get anything done. However, lately, at least on the issue of immigration reform, that hasn’t been the case.

  •  

    Throw out pols for pension crisis failure
    A Sleep Hollow letter to the editor: Financing Illinois’ pension debt just cost taxpayers dearly. Taxpayers will have to pay 40 percent more in interest payments for the next 25 years on $1.3 billion in general obligation bonds.

  •  

    Was ‘Sopranos’ so entertaining?
    A Bloomingdale letter to the editor: The majority of America’s print and TV media seems to have gone way overboard reporting the untimely passing of Sopranos star Gandolfini. The Daily Herald was one of the few papers that didn’t sensationalize the news item as a front pager.

  •  

    Enforce current immigration laws
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: The U.S. doesn’t need new immigration laws. We especially don’t need the Senate’s bloated, pork laden, 1,200 page “immigration bill” which will shovel out our tax dollars to such “noble” causes as Alaska’s fishing industry and Florida’s cruise lines but does nothing to stop the influx of illegal aliens.

  •  

    Senate should confirm NLRB nominees
    A Chicago letter to the editor: We all think Washington, D.C., is dysfunctional and simply not working properly these days. But this month there is a chance for Sen. Mark Kirk to start to prove us wrong.

  •  

    Housing project will be good for Palatine
    Letter to the editor: Hugh Brady, co-president of the Housing Task force, argues why Eric Street in Palatine is a good location for a supportive housing project."We urge the Palatine village council to listen to facts and not to unsubstantiated fear, and to approve the proposal," he writes.

  •  

    Palatine location ideal for housing
    Letter to the editor: Former Wheeling village president Sheila Schultz, an advocate for housing for people with mental illnesses, commends the Palatine Plan Commission for its support of Catherine Alice Gardens. "This site at 345 Eric Drive in Palatine is an excellent location," she writes.

  •  

    If state’s inclusive, why not religion?
    A Campton Hills letter to the editor: When I was a child attending St. Mary’s in Wisconsin, Father Haussmann would often teach “religion” class. He would ask us, “Who made you?” And we were taught to respond, “God made me.” We were taught that God made all of us, not some of us or most of us but “all” of us.

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