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Daily Archive : Thursday June 20, 2013

News

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    Jerry Lockhart

    Court upholds conviction in Hanover Park dollar-store murder

    An appellate court has upheld a Hanover Park man's murder conviction in the 2008 stabbing death of a dollar-store clerk, prosecutors said Thursday. Jerry Lockhart, 44, had argued his conviction should be overturned because the trial court admitted as evidence a knife that was not the murder weapon and allowed jurors to hear a secretly obtained jailhouse recording of him talking to a co-defendant.

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    Debbie Herrmann

    Herrmann campaign got cash from Island Lake’s lawyers, records show

    In the week before former Island Lake Mayor Debbie Herrmann lost her re-election bid in April, the lawyers then representing the town dumped $2,500 into her campaign coffers, financial disclosure forms show.

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    Arlington Heights Police sketch of suspect.

    Arlington Heights woman fights off attacker with pepper spray

    A woman fought off an attacker with pepper spray on Monday night and now Arlington Heights police are asking for the public's help catching the man. The 23-year-old woman was grabbed around the neck from behind when she was about to exit her vehicle.

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    Joshua Romero

    Aurora teen shocked by ‘coldhearted’ driver who struck his brother

    The brother of a 13-year-old Aurora boy who was seriously injured by a hit-and-run driver said Thursday he was stunned anyone could be so "coldhearted." "I'm shocked anybody would hit a kid and leave him in the street like that,” Angel Romero, 15, said. Angel said he and his brother, Joshua, were riding their bicycles to a friend’s house Wednesday when he heard a loud crash and then...

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    George Zimmerman, right, talks to jury consultant Robert Hirschhorn during the final stages of jury selection for his trial in Sanford, Fla., Thursday.

    All-women jury chosen for George Zimmerman’s trial
    Prosecutors have said Zimmerman, 29, racially profiled the 17-year-old Martin as he walked back from a convenience store on a rainy night in February 2012 wearing a dark hooded shirt. Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in the case and even clouded jury selection.

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    Small fire at Northwest Community Hospital

    Arlington Heights firefighters were called Thursday to a minor fire at Northwest Community Hospital. Maintenance workers had pulled an alarm after detecting an odor and observing a slight haze on the third floor.

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    Man saved from burning car in Arlington Hts.

    A man was extricated from a burning car Thursday evening in Arlington Heights. Officials said the man, who is in his 30s, was taken to Northwest Community Hospital but did not suffer serious injuries.

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    Senators nudge Quinn on concealed carry

    Some Illinois Democrats on Thursday urged the governor to act quickly on legislation allowing the carrying of concealed weapons in the state, saying they need him to accept or reject the measure so lawmakers can avert a “public safety and constitutional crisis” as they try to meet a court-ordered deadline.

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    An image of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl of Hailey, Idaho, who is being held captive in Afghanistan, is worn at a rally for POW/MIA awareness. A Taliban spokesman said Thursday they are ready to hand over U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl held captive since 2009 in exchange for five of their senior operatives being held at the Guantanamo Bay prison.

    AP: Taliban offer to free U.S. soldier

    The Taliban proposed a deal in which they would free a U.S. soldier held captive since 2009 in exchange for five of their most senior operatives at Guantanamo Bay, while Afghan President Hamid Karzai eased his opposition Thursday to joining planned peace talks.

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    U.S. Border Patrol agent Jerry Conlin looks to the north near where the border wall ends as is separates Tijuana, Mexico, left, and San Diego, right.

    Border security: Boost for Senate immigration bill

    A breakthrough at hand, Republicans and Democrats reached for agreement Thursday on a costly, military-style surge to secure the leaky U.S.-Mexican border and clear the way for Senate passage of legislation giving millions of immigrants a chance at citizenship after years in America’s shadows.

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    Helmut Stankevicius of Elmhurst, a veteran of the Army’s 9th Division, pays his respects Thursday at The Wall That Heals, a traveling replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall. The replica is on display in Bensenville’s Redmond Park through Sunday.

    Vietnam veterans flock to Wall That Heals in Bensenville

    Vietnam veteran Helmut Stankevicius was at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C. when it opened in 1982, and has returned several times to visit, as recently as two years ago. On Thursday the Elmhurst resident didn’t have far to travel to see a half-scale traveling replica of the wall in nearby Bensenville, where he and other veterans touched the names of their fallen comrades...

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    Fun and Fit Family Day is June 29

    Lambs Farm and Advocate Condell Medical Center will host Fun and Fit Family Day on Saturday, June 29, inviting families to spend a day outdoors and learn how to be healthy together.

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    Garage sale fundraiser Saturday in Buffalo Grove

    Vernon Township will hold a community garage sale from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, June 22, to raise money for the Vernon Township Food Pantry.

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    Mundelein to spend $15,000 on fireworks

    The Mundelein village board on Monday will consider a $15,000 contract for the Community Days fireworks show, scheduled to be held about 9:30 p.m. July 4 at the festival grounds on Seymour Avenue.

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    DuPage E. coli outbreak grows to 11 confirmed cases

    The number of confirmed E. coli cases among customers of Los Burritos Mexicanos restaurant at 1015 E. St. Charles Road in Lombard has risen to 11, DuPage County health officials said Thursday.

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    Des Plaines accelerates ash tree removal

    The Des Plaines City Council this week approved spending an additional $100,000 for the replacement of trees affected by the emerald ash borer infestation.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn announced road projects in the suburbs Thursday.

    Mannheim Road widening starts soon

    Work on widening Mannheim Road through Des Plaines, Rosemont and Schiller Park near O’Hare International Airport will start soon.

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    Streamwood teen charged with sexual assault

    A Cook County judge set bail at $500,000 Thursday for a Streamwood teen charged with sexually assaulting a 3-year-old. The defendant Alejandro Hurtandro, 16, has no criminal background, prosecutors said.

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    Earlier this month, former Miss America Erika Harold, 33, announces her plans to challenge first-term U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis in the 2014 Republican primary in Urbana.

    ’Appalling’ email in spurs new GOP rift

    An Illinois Republican official resigned from his leadership post Thursday amid outrage over an email in which he berated a biracial former Miss America as a “street walker” who could fill a law firm’s “minority quota” if she loses her bid for Congress. The controversy, involving a county GOP leader in central Illinois who campaigned for U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis, created a new rift for Republicans...

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    University of Chicago student drowned in lake

    The Cook County medical examiner says the death of a University of Chicago student recovered from Lake Michigan was accidental. The medical examiner said Thursday that 20-year-old Austin Hudson-LaPore’s cause of the death was drowning.

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    Plea deal reached in final NIU ‘coffee fund’ case

    The DeKalb County state’s attorney says prosecutors were too aggressive when they filed felony charges after employees set up a private bank account at Northern Illinois University. Prosecutor Richard Schmack made the statement Thursday after announcing a plea agreement with the last of the defendants in the “coffee fund” case.

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    23 arrested in connection with drug trafficking

    Chicago police and federal DEA officials say 23 people have been arrested and charged in connection with the distribution of heroin and cocaine in Illinois, Indiana and Wisconsin.

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    Owner of well-known Cicero pizzeria slain

    A man who immigrated from Sicily in 1968 and worked odd jobs before opening a pizzeria was shot to death when he confronted a robber at his suburban eatery. The Cook County medical examiner’s office announced Thursday that 64-year-old Giovanni Donancricchia died from a gunshot to the chest.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Three Des Plaines men were arrested and charged with burglary to vehicle after several reports of burglary on the 1800 block of South White Street and 1600 block of South Illinois Street.

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    Ellen Correll

    Pay hikes for Grayslake Dist. 46 administrators

    Grayslake Elementary District 46 board members have approved raises for the superintendent and 11 other administrators.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Anthony Osborne, 49, of Elgin, was charged Wednesday with manufacture/delivery of between 1 and 15 grams of cocaine, according to court records. His bail was set Thursday at $100,000 in Kane County bond court. His next court date is June 28.

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    Timothy A. Carpenter

    Man living in Naperville basement faces child porn charges

    A 30-year-old man living in the basement of a Naperville home is facing six counts of possession of child pornography after police found images and videos on his computer, authorities said Thursday. Timothy A. Carpenter, who police said was living in a basement on the 1500 block of Treeline Court in central Naperville, was taken into custody about 6:15 a.m. Wednesday.

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    Bartlett approves purchase of nine police vehicles

    By fall, Bartlett residents can expect to see some members of their police force patrolling town in nine shiny new police vehicles. On Tuesday, the village board approved the purchase of three 2013 Ford Utility Interceptor police vehicles and six 2013 Ford Interceptor police sedans for a total of $242,884.

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    Wheeling Park Board in search for new park commissioner

    The Wheeling Park District is opening applications to fill Park Commissioner Larry Widmer's seat. The two-year position will likely involve a minimum 10-hour monthly commitment, and the commissioner will attend regular meetings held twice a month.

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    Extreme weather journalist Warren Faidley will be the guest speaker Friday night at Elgin’s first “Disaster Preparedness Expo.”

    Storm chaser part of Elgin’s disaster expo

    Tornadoes may not be frequent in northern Illinois, but people still need to know how to deal with them — just in case, says extreme weather journalist Warren Faidley. Faidley will be the guest speaker at Elgin’s first“Disaster Preparedness Expo” 2 to 9 p.m. Friday in the Heritage Ballroom of the The Centre of Elgin, 100 Symphony Way.

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    Man to climb Mount Everest for marriage equality

    A veteran mountain climber is training to ascend Mount Everest to increase awareness for marriage equality in Illinois. Chicagoan Joe Rudy says he thinks the mountain climb isn’t much different than the fight for gay rights.

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    Audit: DCFS case backlog biggest since 2006

    A state agency that reviews child abuse claims missed a deadline to investigate cases nearly 900 times in 2012, according to a review by the Illinois Auditor General.

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    Nordic musical groups will entertain at the eighth annual Scandinavian Midsommar Festival at Vasa Park in South Elgin.

    Bonfires, maypoles and Viking tales star in Midsommar Festival

    Celebrate the solstice and get a taste of Nordic culture at the eighth annual Scandinavian Midsommar Festival Saturday, June 22, at Vasa Park in South Elgin. The all-day celebration starts with a Maypole raising and costumed children's parade, and features music, horse-drawn wagon rides, food, games, crafts, Viking tales and a bonfire.

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    Naperville marathon route changes course

    Course changes approved this week mean the Inaugural Naperville Marathon and Half Marathon on Nov. 10 will be run exclusively in their namesake city, without crossing into Bolingbrook.

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    Dylan Domek

    Fundraisers planned for Addison student struck by car

    Fundraising efforts have begun to help the family of an Addison Trail High School senior who was struck by a car on graduation day. Dylan Domek, 19, remained in critical condition Thursday at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where he’s been treated since the early June 9 accident in Chicago.

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    Schaumburg announces Septemberfest music acts

    Schaumburg has announced several of the main stage musical acts for this year’s 43rd annual Septemberfest over Labor Day weekend. Lee Rocker of The Stray Cats will perform from 8:30 to 10 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31; Steve Augeri, onetime lead singer of Journey, will perform from 8:30 to 10 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 1; and Septemberfest regulars 7th heaven will perform from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, Sept. 2.

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    Don Miletic was appointed this week as the Des Plaines Park District assistant executive director who will ultimately replace Executive Director John Hecker when he retires in June 2014.

    Des Plaines park district names inside candidate as new director

    After a yearlong search, the Des Plaines Park District board this week selected a new executive director to eventually replace John Hecker, who is retiring in June 2014 after a 36-year career in parks and recreation. The job will go to Don Miletic, the superintendent of business and golf operations. “I’m excited to have the opportunity to help craft the future of this great park...

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    Senator Mark Kirk. 2013 photo

    Kirk will back immigration plan with changes

    U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk says he'll support a sweeping immigration reform package after additional border security measures are attached. “Over the last few days, I worked with my colleagues to craft a two-step immigration reform that first secures our southern border and then creates a tough but fair path to citizenship for immigrants living illegally in the United States,” Kirk said in a...

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    Paul Froehlich

    Former state Rep. Froehlich retires to Panama

    You can call him Panama Paul now, but you'll be calling long-distance. Former 56th District state Rep. Paul Froehlich and his wife Marilyn — herself a former Schaumburg Township District Library trustee — have sold their Schaumburg home and retired to Panama.

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    People hold banners during a demonstration against domestic violence near Big Ben in London, in the lead up to International Women’s Day. About a third of women worldwide have been physically or sexually assaulted by a former or current partner, according to the first major review of violence against women.

    Report: Third of women suffer domestic violence

    About a third of women worldwide have been physically or sexually assaulted by a former or current partner, according to the first major review of violence against women. Experts estimate nearly 40 percent of women killed worldwide were slain by an intimate partner and that being assaulted by a partner was the most common kind of violence experienced by women.

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    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about Instagram’s new video feature at the company’s headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif., Thursday.

    Facebook introduces video on Instagram

    Facebook is adding video to its popular photo-sharing app Instagram, following in the heels of Twitter’s growing video-sharing app, Vine. Instagram co-founder Kevin Systrom said Thursday that users will be record and share 15-second clips by tapping a video icon in the app.

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    Hall-of-Fame golfer and PGA legend Billy Casper will make a visit to Aurora’s Orchard Valley Golf Course on Monday, June 24, when the 19th annual Golf for Kids Benefit Outing is held in support of local children.

    Hall of Famer Billy Casper to visit Golf for Kids outing in Aurora

    Hall-of-Fame golfer and PGA legend Billy Casper will make a visit to Aurora's Orchard Valley Golf Course on Monday, June 24, when the 19th annual Golf for Kids Benefit Outing is held in support of local children.

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    Barrington union firefighters, who also staff this Barrington Hills station of the Barrington Countryside Fire Protection District, are supporting a new proposal that would maintain a relationship between the village and district.

    Union supports lease of Barrington firefighters

    Barrington's union firefighters are supporting a proposal from the Barrington Countryside Fire Protection District to lease 18 firefighters from the village as a better alternative to the total separation of the two agencies now being pursued. “Certainly we're in support of the intent of the proposal. It's a step in the right direction,” local union President Eric Brouilette said.

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    Dana Rzeznik

    Lake Zurich cops back to delivering board packets

    Lake Zurich Mayor Thomas Poynton is defending his move to reinstate the practice of police officers delivering village board documents to elected officials' homes. A trustee this week questioned whether that is a wise use of village resources. “I just felt that as trustees — the $3,000-a-year stipend and very few other benefits to this job — it was small 'pay' for the job and...

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    James Gandolfini had appeared at the L.A. premiere of “Nicky Deuce” on May 20. The actor died Wednesday in Italy at age 51.

    James Gandolfini, 51, dies of cardiac arrest in Italy

    James Gandolfini's lumbering, brutish mob boss with the tortured psyche will endure as one of TV's indelible characters. But his portrayal of Tony Soprano in HBO's “The Sopranos” was just one facet of his rich legacy of film and stage work. Gandolfini, 51, who died Wednesday of cardiac arrest while vacationing in Rome, refused to be bound by his star-making role in the HBO series...

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    Cliff McIlvaine, who was sued by the city of St. Charles in an effort to get him to finish a project he first pulled a permit for in 1975, stands on a landing between his original home to the left and new, super-insulated addition on the right, which he hopes to turn into a museum.

    City moving along on work at McIlvaine home

    St. Charles leaders have signed off on a $27,300 contract for a firm to install a conventional roof at the home of Cliff McIlvaine, who first began a home addition project in 1975. Officials hope the roofer can be done by the next time the city and McIlvaine are due before a judge July 12.

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    How our eating habits reflect our self-concept

    Our Ken Potts says our eating habits sometimes can reflect our own self image.

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    Buffalo Grove firefighters William Navarro, left, and Daniel Pasquarella were honored for their bravery in going into a chemical tank to recover the body of a man who had died.

    Buffalo Grove honors two firefighters

    Buffalo Grove has honored two firefighters who risked their lives to recover the body of a man trapped in a chemical tank in Wheeling. Firefighters William Navarro and Daniel Pasquarella distinguished themselves for their bravery in going into the tank, officials said.

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    People shop in Mosul, 225 miles northwest of Baghdad, Iraq. Al-Qaida’s Iraq arm is gaining strength in the restive northern city of Mosul, reviving its fundraising efforts through gangland-style shakedowns, feeding off anti-government anger and increasingly carrying out attacks with impunity.

    In northern Iraqi city, al-Qaida gathers strength

    Al-Qaida’s Iraq arm is gathering strength in the restive northern city of Mosul, ramping up its fundraising through gangland-style shakedowns and feeding off anti-government anger as it increasingly carries out attacks with impunity, according to residents and officials.

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    Ohio man gets 36 years to life in dying blink case

    An Ohio man convicted in a murder trial that hinged on a paralyzed victim blinking his eyes to identify his shooter was sentenced Thursday to 36 years to life in prison.

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    President Barack Obama is planning a major push using executive powers to tackle the pollution blamed for global warming in an effort to make good on promises he made at the start of his second term. “We know we have to do more — and we will do more,” Obama said Wednesday in Berlin.

    Obama commits to tough push on global warming

    President Barack Obama is planning a major push using executive powers to tackle the pollution blamed for global warming in an effort to make good on promises he made at the start of his second term. “We know we have to do more — and we will do more,” Obama said Wednesday in Berlin.

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    A floral painted screen that frames two metal patio chairs and a table is an inviting place to enjoy the Buehler garden.

    Lisle garden walk showcases private yards and landscaping trends

    With cool temperatures and gentle, penetrating rains at the end of many days, gardeners are as happy as kids in a candy store this year. Even nongardeners could appreciate the prolonged show of flowering spring trees, shrubs and bulbs. The 2013 Lisle Woman's Club Garden Gait Walk will offer gardeners and nongardeners alike a feast for the senses with its selection of six unique gardens on its...

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    George Zimmerman, right, talks to co-counsel Don West, during questioning of potential jurors in Seminole circuit court on the eighth day of his trial, in Sanford, Fla., Wednesday, June 19, 2013. Zimmerman has been charged with second-degree murder for the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

    Zimmerman jurors asked about presumption of innocence

    SANFORD, Fla. — George Zimmerman’s defense attorney is probing a pool of 40 potential jurors about their views on the concept that a defendant is presumed innocent.Defense attorney Mark O’Mara asked the jury candidates Thursday about their views that a person charged with a crime is innocent until prosecutors prove the defendant guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

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    Steph Nowak says her life has been changed by her brother, Tyler, who has learning disabilities. Their relationship has led her to an internship at Little Friends in Naperville and to walk in the Step Up for Autism event Sunday, June 23.

    Little Friends’ ‘Step Up’ event benefits autism center

    Steph Nowak doesn’t know who she would be without her brother Tyler, but she knows for certain she would be different. Growing up with a brother who has learning disabilities shaped Steph Nowak’s outlook and drew the North Central College student to an internship with Little Friends. She will be taking part in Little Friends’ Step Up for Autism walk Sunday, June 23.

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    Most friends use the word “patriotic” to describe Jonathan Ehret. The 18-year-old from Mount Prospect is the Illinois finalist for a national American Legion scholarship, an Eagle Scout who broke his 82-year-old troop's record for the most merit badges and a member of the Civil Air Patrol.

    Mt. Prospect teen dedicated to U.S.

    Though barely old enough to vote, Jonathan Ehret has managed to revolve his life around activities and leadership opportunities that reflect his patriotism. The Mount Prospect teen, just graduated from a French-speaking school, is an Eagle Scout who broke his 82-year-old troop's record for the most merit badges and hopes to serve as a U.S. Army officer. “I've always known I wanted to serve...

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    Blackhawks left wing Brandon Saad, center, celebrates a goal by Blackhawks center Michal Handzus, right, in front of Boston Bruins defenseman Zdeno Chara (33) during the first period last night in Boston. Five other Blackhawks scored in the overtime Game 4 win.

    Dawn Patrol: Hawks tie series; Aurora boy hurt in hit-and-run

    Dawn Patrol: Blackhawks even series against Bruins with 6-5 overtime win. Police searching for hit-and-run driver who seriously injured Aurora boy. Aurora gym owner, office manager acquitted of forgery. West Aurora Dist. 129 superintendent retiring next year. Arlington Heights roommates get 12 years for armed robbery.

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    For many of the young people in Maryville Academy programs, these trophies, T-shirts and framed certificates presented during Maryville’s annual awards banquet might be the first positive attention bestowed on them.

    These awards matter to Maryville Academy kids

    Many suburban kids compile a glut of ribbons and trophies as rewards for virtually every activity they attempt. But the certificates awarded to these wards of the state pack a real punch. As organizer for Maryville’s annual awards banquet, volunteer coordinator Mary Kieger makes sure each kid receives an award. “Even if they do one thing right, you have to encourage them, because...

Sports

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    For hockey players, pain part of the game

    This time of year, hockey players will play through anything to get the job done, including excruciating pain. It’s just one more reason the Stanley Cup Final between the Blackhawks and Bruins is so compelling.

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    Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro has struggled at the plate this season and continues to be a work in progress on defense.

    Cubs' Castro continues to be hot-button issue

    Cubs manager Dale Sveum was not afraid to say that shortstop Starlin Castro has "regressed" in this, his fourth season in the big leagues. Castro went 0-for-4 Thursday night in the Cubs' 6-1 loss to the Cardinals in St. Louis.

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    LeBron James reacts to being fouled during the second half of Game 7 against the Spurs Thursday in Miami.

    LeBron leads Heat to second straight title

    LeBron James had 37 points and 12 rebounds and the Miami Heat repeated as champions with a 95-88 victory over the San Antonio Spurs in Game 7 of the NBA Finals on Thursday night. James made 5 of 10 3s, all the while hounding Spurs star Tony Parker on defense to make the Heat the first back-to-back champs since the Lakers in 2009-10.

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    Cougars strand 15, fall to River Bandits

    Despite collecting 14 hits, the Kane County Cougars left 15 runners on base in a 5-3 loss to the Quad Cities River Bandits on Thursday night at Modern Woodmen Park.

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    The Miami Heat's Chris Bosh celebrates winning the NBA title over the San Antonio Spurs on Thursday in Miami.

    Images: Heat win NBA title over Spurs
    Led by LeBron James, the Miami Heat defeated the San Antonio Spurs on Thursday night in Game 7 of the NBA Finals.

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    Boston Bruins' right wing Nathan Horton watches defenseman Johnny Boychuk's goal against goalie Corey Crawford during the third period in Game 4 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Finals Wednesday. The Bruins seemingly exposed a weakness in Crawford's game as all 5 goals he gave up were to the high side of his glove.

    Quenneville has no plans to replace Crawford

    Most likely the phrase that pays from here on out when it comes to Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford will be “glove hand, high.” That's because of the success Boston had shooting to that exact spot in the Hawks' 6-5 overtime victory Wednesday, as NBC's repeated replays clearly showed. “Yeah, it's pretty obvious,” Crawford said of all the Bruins' glove-side goals. “I can't start thinking about it; that's when I get myself in trouble if I start thinking about that.”

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    Cubs left fielder Alfonso Soriano misses a ball hit by the Cardinals’ Yadier Molina in the sixth inning Thursday in St. Louis.

    Cards top Cubs 6-1 as Lynn wins his 10th

    Lance Lynn earned his 10th victory to tie for the NL lead, Matt Holliday homered and drove in two runs, and the St. Louis Cardinals beat the Chicago Cubs 6-1 on Thursday night. Welington Castillo homered leading off the third for the Cubs, who are 9-24 against teams in the Central Division.

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    Abbott, Bandits earn 1-0 victory over Pride

    In a battle for first place, the host Chicago Bandits edged the USSSA Pride 1-0 in the opener of a four-game series Thursday night in Rosemont. Monica Abbott notched her third win of the season for the Bandits (7-2), striking out 13.

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    Boomers’ six-game winning streak snapped

    The Schaumburg Boomers saw their franchise record six-game winning streak snapped in a 4-1 loss to the visiting Frontier Greys at Boomers Stadium on Thursday night.

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    Abby Wambach is showered by teammates after a friendly match against South Korea at Red Bull Arena Thursday in Harrison, N.J. Wambach is now the greatest goal scorer in international soccer.

    Wambach breaks Hamm’s mark for career goals

    Abby Wambach broke Mia Hamm’s record for international career goals by a soccer player, scoring four times in the first half against South Korea to push her total to 160. “I’m just so proud of her,” Hamm said. “Just watching those four goals, that’s what she is all about. She fights for the ball, she’s courageous and she never gives up."

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    No matter what happens the rest of way in the Stanley Cup Final, captain Jonathan Toews, middle, and the Blackhawks have shown tremendous heart throughout their playoff run.

    Blackhawks a team Chicago can be proud of

    Heart is not something easily measured or quantified, but you know it when you see it. This Blackhawks squad has plenty of it, and it’s a team that should remain in the hearts of its fans for a long time.

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    Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Brent Seabrook (7) celebrates his game-winning goal against the Boston Bruins during the first overtime period in Game 4 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Finals, Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Boston. Chicago won 6-5. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    In more ways than one, Seabrook provides spark

    Brent Seabrook doesn’t need to wear a letter on the front of his sweater for his fellow Blackhawks to recognize the caliber of leadership he provides.

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    Sympathy no part of who wins, loses in sports

    A Stanley Cup would do wonders forthe moods of Boston residents still recovering from the Marathon bombings. However, fans here shouldn't feel bad about rooting for the Hawks to beat the Bruins any more than Diamondback fans felt bad about beating the Yankees in 2001. There's a separation of sports and sympathy.

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    The Blackhawks’ Marian Hossa checks Boston’s David Krejci during the second period in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Final on Wednesday.

    Spellman’s Scorecard: Just believe in Hossa

    Mike says lay off Marian Hossa. One guy calls him soft, and people are jumping on the bandwagon? Geesh. That and much more this week in Spellman's Scorecard.

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    Bryan Bickell’s big hit on Boston Bruins’ monster defenseman Zdeno Chara early in Game 4 was part of the Hawks’ strategy to engage Chara and make him skate and it worked to perfection on Wednesday.

    Bickell’s big hit on Chara serves notice

    It was the hit heard around the hockey world. OK, maybe that’s overdoing it a little, but Bryan Bickell’s smackdown of Boston’s monster blueliner Zdeno Chara early in Game 4 sure made people sit up and take notice.

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    Pitcher Erik Johnson is 8-2 with a 2.33 ERA and 3 complete games with the Class AA Birmingham Barons.

    Help for Sox may be just a phone call away

    The White Sox are now 12 games under .500 for the first time since 2007. It looks like they'll be subtracting veteran players in advance of the July 31 trade deadline. Sox beat writer Scot Gregor looks at some minor leaguers who could be on their way to the South Side.

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    White Sox starting pitcher John Danks reacts Thursday after Minnesota Twins' Clete Thomas hit a solo home run during the fourth inning in Minneapolis.

    White Sox swept by Twins

    Brian Dozier's two-run homer for Minnesota was one of a career-high four long balls hit off White Sox starter John Danks, and the Twins finished their first three-game sweep of the season and their first over White Sox in three years with an 8-4 victory on Thursday. Oswaldo Arcia went deep in the second inning ahead of Dozier. Clete Thomas and Eduardo Escobar hit back-to-back shots in the fourth, sending the White Sox to their seventh defeat in the last eight games. They fell to a league-worst 13-28 on the road and 5-13 in June.

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    Inbee Park throws the ball into the stands after winning a playoff for the LPGA Championship on June 9.

    Park refreshed at NW Arkansas Championship

    Top-ranked Inbee Park will tee off Friday at the NW Arkansas Championship after a week in Florida, a much-needed bit of rest after a difficult LPGA Championship win two weeks ago.

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    Penn State adds 7-foot SMU transfer

    Seven-foot center Jordan Dickerson has transferred to Penn State from SMU. Dickerson will have three years of eligibility left after sitting out the 2013-14 campaign in accordance with NCAA transfer rules.

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    Penn State head coach Bill O’Brien drew interest from NFL teams including the Eagles and Browns following the 2012 season in which he electrified Penn State’s offense with schemes resembling the high-scoring attack of the Patriots.

    Penn State football coach gets $1 million raise

    Bill O’Brien is getting a nearly $1 million raise after his “tremendous job” in his debut season as Penn State’s football coach. His contract when he arrived in January 2012 called for a base salary of $950,000. That’s going up to $1.9 million starting July 1, the school said Thursday.

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    Jay-Z is friendly with a number of sports superstars and could quickly make Roc Nation a force in the agency field.

    Jay-Z certified as NBA player agent

    Rap mogul Jay-Z has been certified by the NBA players’ association, spokesmen for the union and Roc Nation Sports said Thursday. However, it’s unclear exactly what he can do. He would have to sell his minor share of the Brooklyn Nets before he can represent players.

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    At age 68, Hale Irwin still competes on the Champions Tour, and he hopes the success he's had in Chicago over the years will give him a boost at this week's Encompass Championship in Glenview.

    Can Irwin tame Chicago field one more time?

    Hale Irwin, who has enjoyed more success on Chicago courses than any pro golfer, has high hopes for the future of the 54-hole Encompass Championship, which tees off Friday at North Shore Country Club in Glenview.“I’ve always loved Chicago. It’s a great sports town, and we’ve had great success here with golf tournaments,” said Irwin. “Coming to North Shore, all the players are very impressed with the golf course. … This tournament is going to rank in the top five or 10 right now and, with a successful week of golf, it’s going to rise very rapidly to the top of the heap, one of the best we have out here.”Len Ziehm has more in this tournament preview.

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    Last-place Tulsa sends Sky to defeat

    TULSA, Okla. — Riquana Williams came off the bench to score a team-high 21 points and Glory Johnson added 14 points and 10 rebounds as the Tulsa Shock snapped a three-game losing streak with a decisive 83-74 victory over the Chicago Sky on Thursday.

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    Mike North video: Future Looks Bright For Bulls Fans

    Mike North is daydreaming about the Chicago Bulls. He wonders, with a healthy Derek Rose, if the Bulls couldn't have beaten the Heat this year and won a championship. Word is that Rose's explosiveness is back and he thinks the future looks bright.

  •  
    Don't count Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews and the rest of the boys out.

    Once again, Blackhawks prove skeptics wrong

    Go ahead and doubt the Blackhawks. And every time they will make you pay for giving up on them. Looking dead and buried after Game 3, the Hawks bounced back once more in an epic and instant classic Stanley Cup Final contest, and just like that this appears to be a seven-game series again.

Business

  •  
    The former eSkape Entertainment Center in Buffalo Grove is undergoing a major renovation by new owner Brunswick Corp. It will have a 32-lane bowling alley, a game room, a laser tag area, party rooms, a restaurant and a much larger outdoor patio seating area.

    Buffalo Grove eases patio restrictions, OKs Brunswick special use

    Buffalo Grove has approved a special use that will allow Brunswick Corp. to operate a new bowling center on the site of the former eSkape family entertainment center at 350 McHenry Road. The vote came after the board weakened a long list of proposed restrictions on the use of the patio area. Trustee Beverly Sussman objected to the change, saying, “Now they can do anything they want.”

  •  

    Court rules MetLife must pay $2 million fine

    Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. is on the hook for a $2.2 million tax penalty imposed by a 2003 amnesty program even though it didn’t know it owed extra taxes at the time, the Illinois Supreme Court ordered Thursday. In a 4-2 decision with one justice not taking part, the court ruled that the phrase “all taxes due” in the amnesty act means just that: taxes due, whether the taxpayer knows they are. Justice Rita Garman, writing the court’s opinion, found a simple definition for the language of the tax-collection law.

  •  
    Jen Hoelzle, deputy director of the Illinois Department of Tourism, discusses the state’s tourism campaign at the Woodfield Chicago Northwest Convention Bureau’s annual breakfast.

    Regional, state tourism success focuses on people

    The greatest asset to tourism in the suburbs and Illinois lies in the local people whose interaction with tourists make the area a great place to visit, officials said Thursday at the Woodfield Chicago Northwest Convention Bureau’s annual breakfast meeting in Schaumburg. Bureau President David Parulo highlighted many of the major events that took place in the region during the previous year.

  •  
    Nigel Lockyer

    Fermilab picks new director

    Nigel Lockyer, director of Canada's TRIUMF laboratory for particle and nuclear physics, has been tapped to lead Fermilab, officials announced Thursday. Lockyer, 60, also a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of British Columbia, succeeds Pier Oddone, who announced his retirement after serving as director for eight years.

  •  
    Passengers from a United Airlines Denver-to-Tokyo flight that diverted to Seattle when the Boeing 787 had an oil filter issue resumed their trip Wednesday, a spokeswoman said.

    FAA: Boeing 787 diverted over low oil indicator

    A United Airlines Boeing 787 flying from London to Houston was diverted to Newark, N.J., on Thursday because of a low engine oil indicator, the second unscheduled landing for Boeing’s newest plane this week.

  •  
    There was no letup in the flight from stocks and bonds Thursday, and the Dow Jones industrial average fell more than 300 points.

    Markets are roiled by prospect of early Fed exit

    There was no letup in the flight from stocks and bonds as traders reacted to news that the Federal Reserve could end its massive bond-buying program as next year and as China’s manufacturing slowed. The Dow Jones industrial average plunged 353 points, or 2.3 percent, to 14,758 points Thursday.

  •  
    State officials say Illinois’ $1-per-pack cigarette tax increase isn’t bringing in as much money as they’d hoped. The year-old tax took effect in June 2012 and raised the state tax on a pack of cigarettes from 98 cents to $1.98. At the time, officials said the money would bring in desperately needed revenue, while also discouraging people from smoking.

    State cigarette tax falling short of estimates
    State officials say Illinois’ $1-per-pack cigarette tax increase isn’t bringing in as much money as they’d hoped. The year-old tax took effect in June 2012 and raised the state tax on a pack of cigarettes from 98 cents to $1.98. At the time, officials said the money would bring in desperately needed revenue, while also discouraging people from smoking.

  •  
    Trader Robert Moran works Thursday on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Just a day after the Federal Reserve roiled U.S. financial markets when it said it could step back from its aggressive economic stimulus program later this year, a slowdown in Chinese manufacturing added to Wall Street’s worries.

    Stocks extend slide as China adds to worries

    There was no let-up in the flight from stocks and bonds Thursday, and the Dow Jones industrial average fell more than 300 points. A day after the Federal Reserve roiled U.S financial markets when it said it could step back from its aggressive economic stimulus program later this year, financial markets continued to slide. A slowdown in Chinese manufacturing added to Wall Street’s worries.

  •  
    Yahoo is buying blogging network Tumblr for $1.1 billion as Chief Executive Officer Marissa Mayer seeks to lure users and advertisers with her priciest acquisition to date.

    Yahoo completes $1.1 billion deal for Tumblr

    Yahoo has completed its $1.1 billion acquisition of online blogging forum Tumblr. The move represents Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer’s boldest move since she left Google a little less than a year ago to lead Yahoo’s comeback.

  •  
    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke speaks during a news conference in Washington Wednesday, when the Fed signaled it’s moving closer to slowing its bond-buying program,

    Bernanke clarifies Fed plan to cut bond purchases

    A muddled message from the Federal Reserve has rattled investors for weeks. So Chairman Ben Bernanke tried to set the record straight Wednesday about the Fed’s plans to shrink its bond-buying program later this year and end it entirely in 2014 if the economy continues to improve.

  •  
    U.S. sales of previously occupied homes surpassed the 5 million mark in May, the first time that’s happened in 3 ½ years. The gain shows the housing recovery is strengthening.

    U.S. home re-sales surpass 5 million in May
    U.S. sales of previously occupied homes surpassed the 5 million mark in May, the first time that’s happened in 3 ½ years. The gain shows the housing recovery is strengthening. The National Association of Realtors said Thursday that home re-sales rose 4.2 percent in May to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.18 million. That’s up from April’s pace of 4.97 million.

  •  
    A motorist pulls into the driveway in a neighborhood in Henderson, Nev. U.S. mortgage rates declined this week, with the average on the 30-year fixed loan remaining just under 4 percent. But rates likely will surge next week now that Chairman Ben Bernanke said the Federal Reserve is likely to reduce its bond purchases later this year.

    U.S. rate on 30-year mortgage falls to 3.93 pct.

    U.S. mortgage rates declined this week, with the average on the 30-year fixed loan remaining just under 4 percent. But rates likely will surge next week now that Chairman Ben Bernanke said the Federal Reserve is likely to reduce its bond purchases later this year.

  •  

    Court rules for Amex in dispute with merchants

    The Supreme Court has ruled against merchants who object to having to accept American Express debit and credit cards along with the company’s iconic charge card. The justices said in a 5-3 decision Thursday that the merchants could not band together, but rather must use arbitration to resolve their claims against American Express one by one.

  •  
    A job seeker stops at a table offering resume critiques during a job fair held in Atlanta. Applications for U.S. unemployment benefits rose by 18,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 354,000. Despite the gain, the level remains consistent with moderate job growth.

    Weekly U.S. jobless aid applications rise to 354,000

    Applications for U.S. unemployment benefits rose by 18,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 354,000. Despite the gain, the level remains consistent with moderate job growth.The Labor Department said Thursday that the less volatile four-week average increased by 2,500 to 348,250. Applications are a proxy for layoffs. Since January, they have fallen 6 percent. That suggests companies are cutting fewer jobs.

  •  

    IDOT proposes tolls for Illiana Expressway

    Transportation officials in Illinois have proposed that the planned Illiana Expressway be a tollway.The SouthtownStar reports that the Illinois Department of Transportation unveiled a revised plan for the expressway on Tuesday during a public hearing in Peotone. The 47-mile route will go from Interstate 55 in Wilmington to Interstate 65 in Indiana.

  •  

    AP buys stake in live video service Bambuser

    The Associated Press said Thursday that it has bought a minority stake in the live video service Bambuser, boosting its ability to acquire and distribute video collected by people who have witnessed news events.

  •  
    Gov. Pat Quinn’s administration will start paying overdue raises to unionized workers July 1 even though Illinois lawmakers didn’t approve extra funding, officials said Wednesday.

    Union back wages to be paid to state workers

    SPRINGFIELD— Gov. Pat Quinn’s administration will start paying overdue raises to unionized workers July 1 even though Illinois lawmakers didn’t approve extra funding, officials said Wednesday. Employees in six state agencies will get raises of at least 7.25 percent starting with the new fiscal year, according to an email sent to the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees’ 35,000 members and obtained by The Associated Press.But Quinn’s administration doesn’t have enough money to pay all the back wages immediately because legislation that would have appropriated the $140 million to $160 million necessary never got a vote in the House, where it was introduced, AFSCME director Henry Bayer said in the email. He blamed House Speaker Michael Madigan for “blocking” the legislation, but a spokesman for the Chicago Democrat said many agencies were given unrestricted appropriations to pay the raises if they chose. Abdon Pallasch, Quinn’s assistant budget director, confirmed the details of Bayer’s message Wednesday evening. “I know how frustrating this situation is for those of you who have been waiting almost two years now for the wages you are due,” Bayer wrote, adding, “The Quinn administration has been working to meet its terms regarding employee wage levels. However, we still face a number of obstacles — operational, political and legal.” Under the last union contract negotiated by his predecessor, Quinn reneged on raises owed AFSCME employees in 2011 and 2012 totaling 5.25 percent, contending he could not pay the increases because the Legislature had not sent him enough money. The union sued, and in December a judge ruled Quinn had to pay. Employees in the six agencies, including the Department of Human Services, the state’s largest, will get 7.25 percent hikes July 1, including 2 percent due under a new agreement replacing the one that expired in June 2012.As part of a settlement on the new deal, which wasn’t reached until this spring, Quinn agreed pay the overdue money, to ask Attorney General Lisa Madigan to drop an appeal of the Quinn lawsuit, and to seek money for the raises from the General Assembly in a supplemental appropriation. It was unclear late Wednesday how much is available for obligations without the extra funding. A judge had ordered Quinn to set aside about $39 million from the 2012 budget year and, according to Bayer’s email, unspent agency money from this year will go toward the raises. But in both cases, the money is restricted to the agencies, programs or facilities to which it was allocated, limiting how far it can go. Bayer used the lengthy message to rally AFSCME members to “keep the pressure on their state legislators” to approve a supplemental appropriation in the fall legislative session. Steve Brown, a spokesman for the House speaker, said the proposed 2014 budget includes $35 billion in spending, in many instances sent with few restrictions on how to use it. “We spent what the House decided was the revenue that was available and sent it in lump sums so the agencies could manage the situation,” Brown said. The operational holdup, Bayer said, is in payroll departments, where short-handed staff members have worked “countless hours of overtime for the past few months” determining how much money is owed to each employee. AFSCME continues to seek dismissal of the lawsuit, but the attorney general’s office said in April it would not drop the appeal until the appropriation was approved. A spokeswoman for the office did not immediately have a comment Wednesday night.

  •  
    Visitors walk by a Russian Antonov 58, in the background, during the 50th Paris Air Show at Le Bourget airport, north of Paris, Wednesday, June 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

    Airbus signs 59 orders for new A350, Boeing finalizes deal

    Airbus raked in orders Wednesday for its new A350, announcing 59 sales of the wide-body jet that flew for the first time last week. Singapore Airlines ordered 30 A350-900s, with an option to buy another 20 of the 900s or the larger 1000 model. The airline had already ordered 20 of the A350. Air France-KLM also put in an order for 25 A350 jets, saying the plane will be central to its plan to expand long-haul flights after years of struggling against discount carriers in Europe.

  •  
    As hundreds of thousands of Illinoisans become newly eligible for health insurance next year, their search for adequate medical services will be most difficult in pockets of the state where a shortage of primary care physicians could be made more acute by the federal health overhaul.

    Newly insured Illinoisans may not find doctors

    As hundreds of thousands of Illinoisans become newly eligible for health insurance next year, their search for adequate medical services will be most difficult in pockets of the state where a shortage of primary care physicians could be made more acute by the federal health overhaul. Illinois is slightly above average compared to other states in its overall supply of primary care doctors.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    “Buddy — The Buddy Holly Story,” with Andy Christopher alternating in the title role, tells the story of the musician's brief career. It runs through June 30 at Chicago's Cadillac Palace Theatre.

    Hoo boy — Not much spirit in serviceable 'Buddy'

    On the strength of the wild popularity of retro musicals like “Jersey Boys” and “Million Dollar Quartet,” you might expect one of the first of the genre to swing comfortably into a city primed to swivel back to the Happy Days of early rock and roll. Well, maybe not so much. “Buddy — The Buddy Holly Story,” which opened this week at the Cadillac Palace Theatre in downtown Chicago, closes with a modestly energetic half-hour or so of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and Big Bopper hits. Unfortunately, you have to sit through an hour and a half of unimaginative dialogue, unimpressive acting and uninspired musicianship to get there.

  •  
    A reserved sign sits on the booth where the last show of the HBO series “The Sopranos” was filmed at Holsten’s ice cream parlor, Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Bloomfield, N.J. The sign was put on the booth where the last scene was filmed in honor of actor James Gandolfini who died Wednesday in Italy. He was 51.

    Gandolfini mourned in NJ’s ‘Sopranos’ towns

    James Gandolfini was mourned in the northern New Jersey towns where his TV character Tony Soprano lived, loved and whacked people. The star of the HBO series about a New Jersey mob boss died Wednesday night in Italy of an apparent heart attack. In the Bloomfield ice cream parlor where its famous cut-to-black last scene was shot, a “Reserved” sign marked the table where Tony had his last on-screen meal.

  •  
    Wheeling native Jillian Jocson plays Kim Mercado in “Mahal,” the story of a Filipino-American family struggling with the death of their matriarch.

    Culture helps Wheeling actress connect to 'Mahal'

    Wheeling native Jillian Jocson couldn't put the script for "Mahal" down. She laughed and cried all the way through, seeing her own Filipino family in the story of Reyes clan, starting previews this week at Chicago's Stage 773. “I felt so connected,” Jocson said.

  •  
    Edie Falco, left, and James Gandolfini at the 55th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards in 2003. Gandolfini died Wednesday, June 19, 2013, in Italy. He was 51.

    Stars share reaction to James Gandolfini’s death

    James Gandolfini’s fans and colleagues shared reaction to his death Wednesday. “I am shocked and devastated by Jim’s passing. He was a man of tremendous depth and sensitivity, with a kindness and generosity beyond words. I consider myself very lucky to have spent 10 years as his close colleague.” — Edie Falco, who played Tony Soprano’s wife, Carmela, on “The Sopranos.”

  •  
    Michael Kobold, founder of Kobold wristwatches and knives company, and friend of actor James Gandolfini, wipes away a tear as he meets journalists at the Exedra hotel in Rome where Gandolfini was staying while vacationing in Rome, Thursday, June 20, 2013. Gandolfini, 51, suffered a fatal cardiac arrest and was pronounced dead at 11 p.m.

    Friend: Stricken Gandolfini found by family member

    A friend of “Sopranos” star James Gandolfini said Thursday the actor was discovered by a family member in his hotel room in Rome before he was pronounced dead of cardiac arrest at a hospital. Michael Kobold, who described himself as a close family friend, did not say who discovered Gandolfini, 51, but NBC quoted Antonio D’Amore, manager of the Boscolo Excedra hotel, as saying it was the actor’s 13-year-old son, Michael.

  •  
    Benedick (Alexis Denisof) and Beatrice (Amy Acker) engage in a merry war of words in Joss Whedon's contemporary reworking of William Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing."

    ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ a mixed bag

    Dann reviews famed action movie director Joss “The Avengers” Whedon’s “Much Ado About Nothing,” a contemporary reworking of William Shakespeare’s comedy as a black-and-white sitcom. Whedon shot it in 12 days, using his own house as the set. Dann also responds to a reader’s charge that he is both wrong and “jaded” when it comes to his review of Zack Snyder’s Superman reboot “Man of Steel.”

  •  
    Winnetka native Katie Chang stars with Israel Broussard in Sofia Coppola’s fact-based drama “The Bling Ring.”

    ‘Bling’ rings with adolescent fantasies of fame, fortune

    Sofia Coppola’s “The Bling Ring,” inspired by a Vanity Fair article, tells the story of foolish, materialistic teen narcissists who prey upon foolish, materialistic adult narcissists. Curiously, Coppola’s fact-based teen crime drama steps back from any easy critical conclusions about the superficial, values-challenged characters it examines. This creates both fascinating ambivalence and sheer frustration for us as viewers.

  •  
    In Pixar's "Monsters University," Sully (John Goodman) triumphantly hoists one-eyed Mike (Billy Crystal) during the Scare Games contest.

    When Mike met Sully: Pixar creates cute prequel

    “Monsters University” ranks as a more engaging Pixar production than the under-fueled “Cars 2,” and barely musters the octane power of “Cars.” Packed with cuteness, it has clearly been pitched to the kid market. None of the scary parts comes off as remotely scary, and potentially serious emo-moments give way to superficial drama of the sort that evaporates 10 minutes after the movie ends.

  •  
    Robbie Gould shows off his Goulden Burger, now available at Meatheads. A portion of the proceeds will benefit his charity.

    Dining events: Go Goulden at Meatheads

    Chicago Bears kicker Robbie Gould has partnered with Meatheads to create the Goulden Burger: one-third pound burger with bacon, lettuce, tomato, ketchapolte, American cheese and spicy Cajun fries for $6.75. Ten percent of the sales goes to Gould’s charity, The Goulden Touch.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: Hiring best local leaders may mean dropping residency requirements

    A Daily Herald editorial says it's understandable why towns are abandoning residency requirements for some administrators, as Des Plaines did this week

  •  

    A reminder of perspective and personal debate

    Columnist Jim Slusher: I just got off the phone with a good guy. And he was an Illinois lawmaker.

  •  

    The GOP’s leadership challenge

    Columnist Michael Gerson: It is often argued, including by me, that the GOP needs its own Bill Clinton or Tony Blair -- a leader to reposition the party and reinvigorate its political appeal. But if these figures are examples of successful reform, British Prime Minister David Cameron is a warning of its perils.

  •  

    Hats off to the whistle-blowers
    An Inverness letter to the editor: The nation owes a great deal to all those who have come forward to expose the abuse of power and lies of this administration. I sincerely hope the bright light of intense scrutiny is aimed at what happens to the reputations, careers and pensions of these brave people of integrity and that there are severe consequences for any person or agency who seeks retribution.

  •  

    Syrian involvement ignores history
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: What have we learned from the war-faring adventures of George W. Bush in Afghanistan and Iraq?

  •  

    Clinton’s words were revealing
    A Prospect Heights letter to the editor: What difference does it make? Those were the words of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton when questioned about Benghazi. If that is her interest in an ambassador of the U.S. who was killed in Benghazi, what must she think of us as citizens?

  •  

    Mandate preschool attendance for all
    A letter to the editor: I urge our elected leaders to enact legislation that addresses so many problems with one rule. Having mandatory school attendance set at 7 years of age is unenlightened. Preschool for all is infinitely more cost effective than prison.

  •  

    Senator had reason for missed pension vote
    A Barrington letter to the editor: I have consistently fought for substantial pension reform since the day I took office. It has been my No. 1 priority which is reflected in my voting record.

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