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Daily Archive : Tuesday June 11, 2013

News

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    Decorations of all kinds are worked into the scenery in the back yard of Sandi and David Leeming’s Batavia home. Their gardens will be part of the Batavia Plain Dirt Gardeners “Gardens of De-Light and Shade” garden walk on Saturday, June 22.

    Batavia club’s garden walk set for Saturday

    In the French-inspired garden of Sandi and David Leeming of Batavia, the star attraction is the water feature. Two streams flow over waterfalls and come together in a large koi pond nestled along the patio. The Leemings' garden, and several others, will be showcased in the Batavia Plain Dirt Gardeners' 2013 garden walk, "Gardens of De-Light and Shade." Tickets are $13-$15 for the walk, set for...

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    The Prospect Heights city council agreed this week to hire seasonal help for public works. Overgrown grass dominates the intersection near Hintz and Schoenbeck roads in Prospect Heights.

    Prospect Heights to hire seasonal help to cut neglected grass

    Prospect Heights city officials voted this week to hire seasonal help to aid the public works department in mowing cul-de-sac islands and Cook County and state of Illinois property. "We're working hard to make things good for the city; it should be visually good, too," said Alderman Scott Williamson.

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    A derecho weather pattern can spawn sudden windstorms with gusts of about 100 mph, even in metropolitan areas.

    Illinois braces for strong storms, wind, hail

    Forecasters say hot weather could give way to violent storms across parts of Illinois and are warning residents to be prepared for strong winds, hail and even tornadoes.The National Storm Prediction Center says a "large and organized cluster of storms" could pelt northern and central Illinois on Wednesday afternoon and evening. The National Weather Service in suburban Chicago says there could be...

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    DuPage County Board members have postponed a vote related to the proposed Irshad Learning Center along 75th Street near Naperville until they get a clarification about what a federal judge wants them to do.

    DuPage County delays vote on Islamic learning center

    DuPage County officials say they intend to comply with a federal judge's ruling related to a planned Islamic education facility near Naperville. But first they want a clarification about exactly what the judge wants them to do.

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    Police investigate Tuesday on Oldfield Road near Darien where four members of a family were found dead.

    4 killed in apparent DuPage County murder-suicide, sources say

    Four family members were killed in an apparent murder-suicide Tuesday in unincorporated DuPage County, according to multiple law enforcement sources. The bodies were found at a house on Oldfield Drive, just yards from a home where three members of a Darien family were shot to death three years ago. Sheriff’s spokeswoman Dawn Domrose described the situation as an “isolated...

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    Rolling Meadows street repairs hit snag

    Disappointed that only one company bid to resurface streets this year, the Rolling Meadows City Council Tuesday decided to rebid the project, but did approve acontract for $130,000 worth of sidewalk and curb and gutter replacements.

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    Batavia council working out kinks in new committee plan

    The Batavia City Council is trying out a different way of doing business, and getting used to a bunch of new faces and opinions, in a process that is still a little rough around the edges.

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    Wisconsin bill would bar police from enforcing gun bans

    Wisconsin police would be forbidden from enforcing any new federal gun and ammunition restrictions, bans or registration requirements under a bill a Republican lawmaker is circulating. Rep. Michael Schraa of Oshkosh, a first-term legislator and a member of the National Rifle Association, sent out an email Tuesday to his fellow lawmakers seeking co-sponsors for the proposal.

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    Mom, caretaker charged in autistic boy’s stabbing

    The mother of a 14-year-old with severe autism who was found stabbed to death Sunday in River Grove has been charged with murder. His live-in caretaker also has been charged.

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    The proposed Illinois Virtual Charter School at Fox River Valley would give students their lessons through online modules. Suburban school boards all have rejected the concept, and Gov. Pat Quinn had approved a one-year moratorium on new charter schools. Now officials in charge of the proposed charter school have withdrawn its appeal to the charter school commission ahead of the Tuesday meeting.

    No suburban virtual charter school, for now

    There will be no multidistrict virtual charter school serving suburban students next year. A controversial push to open the Illinois Virtual Charter School at Fox River Valley in August ended during Tuesday’s state charter school commission meeting, barely 24 hours after the applicants withdrew their pending appeals in a surprise change-of-course. School boards in 18 districts from Algonquin to...

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    Have coffee with state Rep. Yingling

    State Rep. Sam Yingling, a Democrat from Grayslake, wants constituents to share their thoughts while getting their morning coffee on Tuesday, June 18.

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    Lincolnshire board honors students

    Award-winning students from the Lincolnshire area were honored by the village board Monday night.

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    When the federal government went looking for phone numbers tied to terrorists, it grabbed the records of just about everyone in America.

    ACLU sues over NSA phone records program

    The American Civil Liberties Union sued the Obama administration Tuesday, asking the government to halt a phone-tracking program that collects the telephone records of millions of Americans and that it says is unconstitutional.

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    Bike Barrington event to teach biking safety

    The village of Barrington, in conjunction with the Barrington Junior Women’s Club and the Bike and Pedestrian Advisory Committee, will host a Bike Barrington event on Saturday, June 22. The free, family-friendly event will teach bike safety and encourage the whole family to ride in and around Barrington.

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    House Intelligence Committee member Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, a Maryland Democrat, is followed by reporters following a closed all-member briefing on the NSA on Capitol Hill Tuesday.

    Congress briefed on US surveillance programs

    Dogged by fear and confusion about sweeping spy programs, intelligence officials sought to convince House lawmakers in an unusual briefing Tuesday that the government’s years-long collection of phone records and Internet usage is necessary for protecting Americans — and does not trample on their privacy rights.

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    Patrick W. Ludvigsen

    Prospect Hts. parks leader remembered for love of family, community

    Patrick W. Ludvigsen had two passions — his family and Prospect Heights. And he served them both well, his son, city Alderman Patrick J. Ludvigsen said Tuesday. The elder Ludvigsen, 66, died Monday after a long illness.

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    Firefighter Jason Stockton, of the Lincolnshire-Riverwoods Fire Department, helps resident Arlene Marshack, right, as other firefighters help her husband, Martin, and another homeowner, Wendy Kritt, along Lincolnshire Drive after flooding overwhelmed the neighborhood in Lincolnshire in April.

    If your Lincolnshire property flooded, officials want to hear from you

    Weeks after parts of the town flooded, Lincolnshire officials want local residents to help them develop a flood mitigation plan. The team will identify steps that can be taken to prevent flood damage and ways to improve safety during a natural disaster, officials said.

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    Raymond Nathan

    Schaumburg man a no-show for stalking trial

    Authorities are searching for a Schaumburg man who didn’t show up to court Tuesday for the start of his trial on stalking charges. Raymond Nathan, whose last known address is on the 1600 block of Hartmann Drive, is considered armed and dangerous, according to a crime bulletin circulated by the Hanover Park Police Department.

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    President Barack Obama speaks about immigration reform at the White House Tuesday hours before the Senate cast the first votes on a landmark bill that offers the best chance in decades to remake the nation’s immigration system and offer eventual citizenship to millions.

    Immigration debate clears procedural Senate hurdle

    In Spanish and English, the Senate pushed contentious immigration legislation over early procedural hurdles with deceptive ease on Tuesday as President Barack Obama insisted the “moment is now” to give 11 million immigrants in the United States illegally a chance at citizenship.

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    Police have cited a California truck driver blamed for a May 23 crash with a freight train at the Canadian National railroad crossing with Route 14 in Barrington.

    Truck driver ticketed in Barrington train crash

    Barrington police have issued three citations to the truck driver blamed for a May 23 crash with a freight train at the Canadian National Railway crossing of Route 14 that injured two and delayed traffic for hours.

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    Naperville council costs taxpayers more than $238,000

    Barely on the job a month, Naperville City Councilman Dave Wentz soon will be collecting the fourth-largest compensation package of all eight seated council members. Wentz’s annual compensation package is worth $26,700, nearly $12,000 more than Grant Wehrli, who has served seven years on the council, and only $1,000 less than 24-year council veteran Doug Krause. That type of discrepancy has...

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    Protesters react during clashes at the Taksim Square in Istanbul Tuesday. Hundreds of police in riot gear forced through barricades in the square early Tuesday, pushing many of the protesters who had occupied the square for more than a week into a nearby park.

    Police crush protest barricades in Istanbul

    Hundreds of riot police overran improvised barricades at Istanbul’s Taksim Square on Tuesday, firing tear gas, rubber bullets and water cannons in running battles with protesters who have been occupying the area for more than a week.

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    A shopper passes a sign advertising a shop that sells commemorative coins with the face of Nelson Mandela at ashopping center in Johannesburg, South Africa, Tuesday.

    Mandela daughters visit him in hospital

    Doctors are doing all they can to for Nelson Mandela as the 94-year-old icon spent a fourth day in the hospital for a recurring lung infection, South Africa’s president said Tuesday, as two of Mandela’s daughters visited their father.

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    Richard J. Hayes was sworn in earlier this week as the second-in-command of the Illinois National Guard.

    Buffalo Grove officer No. 2 at National Guard

    Richard J. Hayes of Buffalo Grove has been named the Illinois National Guard's assistant adjutant general, making him the force's No. 2 officer. Hayes led the Illinois National Guard's response after Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, among other things, and says the force presents a good military value when Congress is looking to cut spending.

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    Glenbard approves contract with support staff

    Educational and instructional aides, secretaries, library clerks, technology specialists and other support staff members at the four Glenbard District 87 high schools will have a new three-year contract starting this summer that includes annual raises of about 3 percent each year. But the new agreement, approved unanimously by the school board this week, also allows some who announce plans to...

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    Kane Republicans push back against union-supported law change

    In a close and unusually partisan vote, the Kane County Board rejected a portion of the annual prevailing wage ordinance with the belief that it gives unions an unfair advantage in the bidding process of county projects. The dispute centered on a section of the ordinance that may already be changed at the state level through pending legislation. It requires contractors to pay into a U.S.

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    A police sketch of a man authorities say approached a 12-year-old girl in Rolling Meadows on Sunday and demanded she get in his car. The girl fled and was unharmed.

    Rolling Meadows police seek man who tried to lure 12-year-old girl

    Rolling Meadows police are looking for a man they say tried to lure a 12-year-old girl into his car Sunday morning. Police say the girl fled from the man after he demanded she get into his vehicle.

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    Carly Rousso, 18, of Highland Park, in the courtroom of Lake County Judge James K. Booras for a pretrial hearing Tuesday. Rousso was charged with reckless homicide and four counts of aggravated driving under the influence of an intoxicating compound in a 2012 fatal crash.

    Attorney: Settlement near in Highland Park fatal crash

    A settlement is near in the criminal case against a teen accused of sniffing cleaning products before driving into and killing a 5-year-old girl in Highland Park, an attorney said in Lake County court Tuesday. Defense attorney Douglas Zeit asked Judge James Booras to continue Carly Rousso's criminal trial, saying a settlement is close, but a few small details remain.

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    Ex-coroner didn’t pay arson fine, back in prison

    When former Will County Coroner Robert Tezak was sentenced to prison in 1994 after pleading guilty to arson, he was ordered to pay $1.24 million in fines and restitution. Tezak, who was released in 2002, has been ordered back to prison by U.S. District Court Judge Matthew Kennelly for failing to pay it.

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    Tyler E. White

    Geneva man faces heroin charge after coffee shop arrest

    A Geneva man already facing charges of delivering Ecstasy was arrested at a local Starbucks and charged with possession of heroin. Tyler E. White, 21, of the 300 block of North First Street, was arrested at 8:21 p.m. Monday at the Starbucks at 229 W. State St.

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    Tri-cities police reports
    Tri blotter

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A Des Plaines man was charged with felony making a false request for an ambulance. According to police reports, he phoned 911 and told the dispatcher he was injured and needed an ambulance, when he wanted a place to sleep because he had been drinking and was not allowed in the house.

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    Marquette student dies in fall from ledge in Rome

    A Marquette University student studying abroad has died after falling from a ledge on the banks of a river in Rome. Marquette’s president, the Rev. Scott Pilarz, announced the death of Andrew Keith Carr in a universitywide email.

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    Volunteer Marsha Gordon of Springfield uses a hand-forged hoe around heirloom vegetables Friday in a heritage garden behind the Harriet Dean House at the Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield.

    Lincoln Home needs volunteers after budget cuts

    Federal budget cuts mean the Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield will be depending on more volunteers this summer. Site superintendent Dale Phillips says he has had staff reductions and $160,000 in budget cuts this fiscal year.

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    Elizabeth Clark, director of the Juvenile Justice Initiative watchdog group.

    Report: Sex abuse plagues youth detention centers

    A top corrections official pledged swift action following a report that shows Illinois’ imprisoned juveniles report more incidents of sexual abuse behind bars than young inmates in almost every other state. But a watchdog group suggested Tuesday that the changes don’t go far enough and should warrant an outside review.

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    Drivers reported “near-apocalyptic” conditions Monday evening in a sandstorm on I-80 at Winnemucca, Nev.

    Chicago man killed in 27-car sandstorm pileup

    Twenty-seven vehicles slammed into each other during a sandstorm that blinded drivers on Interstate 80 in rural northern Nevada, killing a truck driver from Chicago, seriously injuring several other people and sapping already thin emergency resources, officials said.

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    Police: Aurora man tried to foil drug test

    A 22-year-old from Aurora got a chance to clear his record after being caught with a small amount of marijuana earlier this year. But Dedrick Glover Pool now faces a felony charge. Authorities say he tried to foil a drug test that was part of his pretrial diversion program.

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    Dylan Domek

    Addison Trail senior still critical after graduation-day accident

    Addison Trail High School senior Dylan Domek remained in critical condition Tuesday, two days after he was struck by a vehicle in Chicago, official said. Domek, 19, was being treated at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where he’s been since the accident early Sunday on Lake Shore Drive near Division Street.

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    Car wash supports Des Plaines Explorer post

    Des Plaines Police Explorer Post 142 and the Des Plaines Car Wash, 513 S. River Road, are teaming up to raise funds for the post’s efforts to attend this year’s Illinois State Law Enforcement Explorer Conference in Springfield. Area residents can get their cars washed from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday, June 23 to support the effort.

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    Cook Park Library to host Friends book sale

    The Friends of the Cook Memorial Public Library District hosts a summer book sale, June 21 to 23, at Cook Park Library, 413 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville.

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    Work was well under way Tuesday in the demolition of Coultrap School in Geneva. Desks and other items were donated to schools in Aurora and Elgin.

    Geneva school items put to good use in Aurora, Elgin

    The Geneva school district managed to raise a little cash with auctions of items from Coultrap School in April, to put toward the demolition of the building. And what it didn't sell, it gave to three grateful schools in Aurora and Elgin.

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    Barrington adopts policy for prayers at meetings

    Barrington’s village board meetings often begin with a religious invocation just after the Pledge of Allegiance, but now the village has a new written policy designed to ensure outreach and diversity in those opening prayers. “The intent of the policy is to embrace a practice of diversity,” Village Attorney Jim Bateman said.

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    Holly Kim

    Mundelein eyeing zoning rules for marijuana centers

    With a bill legalizing medical marijuana dispensaries awaiting Gov. Pat Quinn’s signature, Mundelein officials are taking steps to regulate where such shops can open. The village board has agreed to direct the town’s planning and zoning commission to schedule a public hearing about whether marijuana centers should be limited to specific business districts.

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    No serious injuries in Long Grove house fire

    Authorities are still investigating the cause of a house fire Monday in the 1500 block of Chickamauga Lane in Long Grove, which sent one firefighter to the hospital with a shoulder injury. Heavy smoke was billowing from the front door, the first floor windows and eaves, and from small cracks in the mortar on the lower level of the brick, raised ranch home when firefighters arrived at about 9:30...

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    Willard Helander

    Lake County Board asks Quinn to veto election legislation

    Lake County commissioners on Tuesday formally opposed state legislation that would strip oversight of elections from the county clerk’s office. They voiced their objections with a resolution asking Gov. Pat Quinn to veto the provision, which mandates the creation of a five-member election commission in Lake County — and nowhere else.

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    Bill Daley announced he is forming a committee to explore running for Illinois governor in 2014, saying the people of Illinois deserve political leaders who are prepared to fix the state’s unemployment, pensions and education woes.

    Daley forms committee to explore run for governor

    Former White House chief of staff Bill Daley announced Tuesday he is forming a committee to explore running for governor in 2014, saying Illinois deserves political leaders who are prepared to fix the state’s unemployment, pensions and education woes.

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    Hand-dyed yarns and fiber for hand-spinning will be among the items for sale in the Vendor Marketplace at the 2013 Midwest Fiber & Folk Art Fair.

    Midwest Fiber and Folk Art Fair returns to Lake County

    Returning this month to the Lake County Fairgrounds, the Midwest Fiber & Folk Art Fair is the only event in the Chicago area that covers all the fiber arts, from fleece to finished fabric.

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    Customers shop for produce during a Mundelein Farmers Market.

    Mundelein Farmers Market ready to grow

    An expanded Mundelein Farmers Market will be held from 3 to 7 p.m. Fridays, June 14 to Oct. 11, downtown at Park Street and Seymour Avenue. Many of the vendors have been with the market since it began in 2010, but there are new arrivals.

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    Myrlie Louise Evers comforts her 9-year-old son, Darrel, at the funeral in Jackson, Miss. for slain integration leader Medgar Evers. Several events are being held to remember Evers, the first Mississippi field secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. He was 37 when he was assassinated outside the family’s north Jackson home on June 12, 1963.

    Widow works to preserve Evers’ civil-rights legacy

    Myrlie Evers-Williams acknowledges it would be easy to remain mired in bitterness and anger, 50 years after a sniper’s bullet made her a widow. Instead, she’s determined to celebrate the legacy of her first husband, Medgar Evers — a civil rights figure often overshadowed by peers such as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. He was 37 when he was assassinated on June 12, 1963.

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    George Zimmerman, left, and defense attorney Don West listen to the questioning of prospective jurors in Seminole circuit court for his trial, in Sanford, Fla., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Zimmerman has been charged with second-degree murder for the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

    Day 2 of Zimmerman jury selection, questioning

    Attorneys resumed jury selection Tuesday in the trial of the neighborhood watch volunteer charged with fatally shooting Trayvon Martin, interviewing a middle-aged black man who said the case was politicized and a middle-aged white man who questioned the need for Florida's “stand your ground” self-defense law.

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    Dem senator weighs changes to military prosecution

    The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee says Congress is considering stripping the military of its authority to prosecute sexual assault cases and shifting the responsibility to state prosecutors.

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    Hagel: Budget forces review of outside contracts

    Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says the Pentagon is reviewing all private contractors as the department deals with budget cuts and the lucrative payment to an NSA leaker casts a spotlight on the outside work.

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    Arlington Heights police report scams

    Con artists are using a variety of scams in their attempts to prey on Arlington Heights residents, police reports show. In the latest report, a potential victim in the 1000 block of North Wilshire Lane received a telephone call Monday from a subject who claimed to work for the insurance company that was sending a check for a claim. The complainant has not idea how the offender knew about the...

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    Family and friends march to Santa Monica College Corsair football stadium Monday, June 10, 2013, during a vigil for the five people killed in Friday’s shootings in Santa Monica, Calif.

    Police probe past turmoil in Calif. gunman’s home

    The mother of a gunman who fatally shot five people during a rampage on a Southern California college campus said her husband became abusive five years into their marriage when she moved from Lebanon to join him in the U.S., according to court records obtained by The Associated Press. Investigators were trying to determine whether the family’s problems played any role in the killings, which came...

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    Sarah Murnaghan, center, celebrates the 100th day of her stay in Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia with her father, Fran, left, and mother, Janet. The national organization that manages organ transplants on Monday June 10, 2013 resisted making emergency rule changes for children under 12 who are waiting on lungs but created a special appeal and review system to hear such cases.

    Transplant vote seeks medical and legal balance

    Faced with a federal judge’s order in the heart-wrenching cases of two terminally ill children seeking lung transplants, a national review board sought a balance that will keep such decisions in the hands of doctors, not lawyers or judges. “I think what they’re trying to tell the judge is: ‘We have a system. It’s working. Let us decide, not you,” said Dr. Arthur Caplan.

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    Members of the bomb squad walk off a Southwest Airlines plane on the ground at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport after the FBI says a “telephonic bomb threat” against a Southwest flight from Los Angeles to Texas led to the plane being diverted to Phoenix on Monday, June 10, 2013. Flight 2675 left Los Angeles International Airport at 2:12 p.m. and was heading to Austin before the threat was received by telephone. The plane landed safely at the Phoenix airport at about 3 p.m.

    No bomb found aboard LA-to-Texas Southwest flight

    No explosives were found on a Southwest Airlines plane that was diverted to Phoenix with 143 passengers on board, authorities said. The FBI said Monday that an afternoon flight from Los Angeles to Austin, Texas, landed in Phoenix after a “telephonic bomb threat” was made.

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    Daniel Ellsberg, the whistle-blower responsible for releasing the Pentagon Papers, called the revelations by government contractor Edward Snowden on U.S. secret surveillance programs the most “significant disclosure” in the nation’s history — more important than the Pentagon Papers as well as information given to the anti-secrecy website Wikileaks by U.S. Army intelligence analyst Bradley Manning.

    Ellsberg: No leaks more significant than Snowden’s

    Pentagon Papers leaker Daniel Ellsberg calls the revelations by a government contractor on U.S. secret surveillance programs the most “significant disclosure” in the nation’s history. “I was overjoyed that finally an official with high or a former official with high access, good knowledge of the abusive system that he was revealing was ready to tell the truth at whatever cost to his own future...

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    Glenn Greenwald, a columnist for The Guardian, has made no secret of his distaste for intrusions on privacy.

    No mistaking how NSA story reporter feels

    The man who claimed to leak state secrets on U.S. government eavesdropping sought to break the story through a columnist for a UK-based publication who has made no secret of his distaste for intrusions on privacy. Edward Snowden brought his information first to Glenn Greenwald of The Guardian, illustrating the passion an opinion-driven journalist can bring to a breaking news story at the same...

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    The Lake County Board Tuesday will decide whether to establish a special taxing area and borrow up to $46 million to pay costs associated with providing Lake Michigan water to those towns. It would also include water systems operated by the county in unincorporated Grandwood Park and Fox Lake Hills.

    $46 million to extend Lake Michigan water in Lake County?

    Lake County is considering whether to borrow up to $46 million to bring Lake Michigan water to Lindenhurst, Lake Villa and two county systems. Property owners in a special service area, which includes and estimated 11,300 parcels, would cover the cost for as long as 30 years.

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    Accident reported on I-88 near Aurora

    I-88 has been shut down near Aurora following a crash.

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    Pence urges lawmakers to uphold Indiana tax bill veto

    Indiana Gov. Mike Pence is asking lawmakers to keep from handing him his first veto override. Pence sent a letter to legislators on Monday urging to uphold his veto of a local tax measure. The measure retroactively approves taxes collected by Jackson and Pulaski counties to pay for new jails.

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    Wis. DNR hires new deer, elk researcher

    Wisconsin wildlife officials have named a new deer and elk researcher. Dan Storm will work on Department of Natural Resources projects studying buck and fawn mortality and the nutritional condition of car-killed deer. He’ll also serve as a consultant on deer and elk issues for DNR managers.

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    Charges not likely for drunken Janesville teacher

    A fifth-grade teacher who passed out on a field trip and was later found to be legally drunk isn’t likely to face criminal charges, police said Monday. Janesville deputy police Chief John Olsen said no one called police on the 50-year-old teacher, and the other chaperones apparently thought she was having a medical issue.

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    Students learn Ind. history through tourism course

    Fourth-graders in a Noblesville school are meeting the requirement to learn Indiana history by learning how to promote the state to tourists. The Indiana Office of Tourism Development has provided teachers at Promise Road Elementary School in Noblesville with a program called “Visit Indiana: 4th Grade Social Studies.”

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    Corn planting winds done; focus turns to beans

    Corn growers across Illinois and the rest of the nation’s midsection appear to have finally gotten their crops in the ground after an uncooperative, storm-prone spring left them weeks behind schedule. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s weekly crop progress report shows 95 percent of the nation’s corn crop had been sown as of Sunday.

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    Police looking for roommate in woman’s death

    Black River Falls police are looking for the roommate of a woman who died suspiciously. Investigators say the 36-year-old male roommate may have been the last person to see the woman alive. Police found the body of the 34-year-old woman Sunday evening after officers went to her apartment to check on her welfare. The La Crosse Tribune says autopsy results are pending.

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    No charges in fatal Galesburg dog mauling

    Authorities say they won’t file charges in the mauling death of a 7-year-old Galesburg boy who was attacked by a dog in March.Ryan Maxwell died shortly after he was bitten by the chained pit bull owned by family friends. The dog was killed by police. Galesburg Police Sgt. Bob Schwartz tells The (Galesburg) Register-Mail that they couldn’t find a statute to apply to the attack, so no charges could...

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    Twenty-four sets of twins are fifth-graders at Highcrest Middle School in Wilmette. The school is attempting to break a Guinness World record for the amount of twins in one grade, which is currently 16 sets.

    Dawn Patrol: No book ban in Glen Ellyn; Barrington fire protest

    Book won't be banned in Glen Ellyn District 41. Crowd protests Barrington fire district split. Arlington Heights to join online hotel tax lawsuit. Quinn pushes for combined pension plan. Naperville woman fighting cancer vies for Kona Ironman spot. Wilmette school sees double times 24. Addison Trail senior still in critical condition. Hoffman Estates library branch closed.

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    A necktie might be the fitting gift for a Father's Day holiday that always seems less important than Mother's Day.

    Dear old Dad and his holiday can't compete with Mom

    Dear old Dad just never seems to be as dear as Mom. And Mother's Day always is going to be a bigger deal than Father's Day. The average American will spend $119.84 on Dad this year, according to the National Retail Federation, which notes we spent $168.94 on Mother's Day last month.

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    Stevenson High School graduate and Buffalo Grove native Dave Roskelley holds a laminated Stevenson High School sports logo sign which he left at the summit of Mount Everest.

    Buffalo Grove native conquers Mount Everest

    A former Buffalo Grove native and Stevenson High School graduate climbed to the top of Mt. Everest in May and planted an SHS flag there. Dave Roskelley, 44, said he received a go-ahead from, of all things, a Panda Express fortune cookie. “Soon,” the tiny piece of paper said, “you will be sitting on top of the world.”

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    “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” by Stephen Chbosky

    Controversial book headed back to Glen Ellyn District 41 library shelves

    A controversial book removed in April from eighth-grade classrooms at Hadley Junior High School in Glen Ellyn will be back on the shelves when students return to class in the fall. The Glen Ellyn Elementary District 41 school board voted 6-1 Monday to overturn the decision by a previous board to remove copies of “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” from eighth-grade literacy classrooms at Hadley...

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    Geneva schools consider increase in education fund spending

    The Geneva school district is tentatively proposing to spend $58.26 million in its education fund in the fiscal year that starts July 1, 2.89 percent more than it plans to spend this year.

Sports

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    Carrie Vodnik says her husband, Greg, is the biggest die-hard Blackhawks fan she knows. And she does deserve wife of the year for this Stanley Cup wedding cake in 2011. The couple lives in Downers Grove.

    Images: Blackhawks fan photos
    We asked Daily Herald readers to share their Blackhawks spirit with pictures. Here is what you shared. Go Blackhawks!

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    Blackhawks defenseman Michal Rozsival, who is 34 years old, will finally realize his dream of playing in a Stanley Cup Final.

    Hawks' Rozsival excited to play in finals

    While much of the talk heading into the Stanley Cup Finals has centered around all the young Blackhawks and how pumped they are to participate in their first Stanley Cup Finals, there’s a certain older guy in the room who’s just as excited. Say hello to 34-year-old defenseman Michal Rozsival.

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    San Antonio Spurs' Gary Neal celebrates a 3-point basket — one of 16 during the game against the Miami Heat Tuesday night. The Spurs beat the Heat 113-77 in Game 3 of the NBA Finals.

    Spurs rout Heat 113-77 in Game 3 of NBA Finals

    Danny Green scored 27 points, Gary Neal added 24 and the San Antonio Spurs set an NBA Finals record with 16 3-pointers in a 113-77 victory over the Miami Heat on Tuesday night that gave them a 2-1 series lead. Green hit seven of nine 3s, Neal was six for 10 from deep and Tim Duncan chipped in 12 points and 14 rebounds for the Spurs, who responded to a 19-point drubbing in Game 2 with a blowout of their own.

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    Maicer Izturis scores on a Munenori Kawasaki double as Tyler Flowers tries to apply the tag during the 10th inning of Toronto's victory over the White Sox on Tuesday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Sox get what they deserve
    The White Sox were one strike away from beating the Blue Jays Tuesday night and extending their winning streak to four games. But given their sloppy overall play, the Sox deserved their 7-5 loss to Toronto in 10 innings.

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    Matt Garza left, reacts as Cincinnati Reds' Xavier Paul rounds the bases after his 3-run home run during the sixth inning of a baseball game Tuesday, June 11, 2013, in Chicago. Garza allowed 9 runs in 5-plus innings.

    Stewart's rant brings swift action from Epstein

    The last thing the Cubs need is another circus. That's why team president Theo Epstein acted quickly Tuesday in suspending minor-league third baseman Ian Stewart for tweeting comments deemed to be derogatory about the organization and manager Dale Sveum. Stewart later apologized.

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    The Bruins’ Jaromir Jagr was 20 years old and playing for Pittsburgh in 1992 when the Penguins swept the Blackhawks in the Stanley Cup Finals.

    Jagr fondly recalls 1992 vs. Hawks

    Jaromir Jagr, then a 20-year-old superstar, remembers everything about the 1992 Stanley Cup Finals when his Pittsburgh Penguins swept the Blackhawks.That’s 1992, folks.Jagr especially remembers the clutch goal he scored with 4:55 to play in Game 1 when he weaved his way through Brent Sutter, Frantisek Kucera and Igor Kravchuk, then beat goalie Eddie Belfour with a backhander, to make it 4-4 in a game the Penguins once trailed 4-1.Mario Lemieux scored in the final half-minute to give Pittsburgh the 5-4 win.

  •  
    Chicago Cubs' Alfonso Soriano watches his sacrifice fly against the Cincinnati Reds during the fourth inning of a baseball game on Tuesday, June 11, 2013, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Jim Prisching)

    Baez’s 4-HR night could lead to promotion

    Even though the Cubs were still abuzz about minor-league prospect Javier Baez hitting 4 home runs Monday night, they're not going to rush him up through the system based on one game.

  •  

    Boomers zapped by ThunderBolts

    Game coverage of the Schaumburg Boomers of the Frontier League:The Schaumburg Boomers put the tying run on base in the sixth, but they were unable to rally from an 8-0 deficit and dropped a 9-5 decision to the Windy City ThunderBolts in the opener of a six-game road trip Tuesday night in Crestwood.

  •  
    Gordon Beckham is tagged out at third base by Toronto Blue Jays third baseman Mark DeRosa (16), after Tyler Flowers singled during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Chicago, Tuesday, June 11, 2013.

    Crain likely best all-star choice

    If only one White Sox player gets to go to the All-Star Game this season, relief pitcher Jesse Crain would be a smart choice. Crain has not allowed an earned run in his last 26 appearances, a span of 25.1 innings.

  •  
    Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, second from right, is joined by Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn, left, Rev. Jesse Jackson, and former Illinois Senate President Emil Jones as Patrick receives a sign naming part of his hometown street Honorary Governor Deval Patrick Ave., in Chicago. Patrick grew up near the intersection of 53rd Street and Wabash Avenue and a portion of Wabash Avenue will bear his name.

    Quinn makes Stanley Cup Finals bet with Massachusetts governor

    They're not betting money or locally made foods, as politicians typically do. Instead, the bet between Illinois Governor Pat Quinn and Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick over the Stanley Cup series is a visit to each other's local food bank. A wager also is reportedly in the works between the Chicago and Boston mayors over the games, which begin Wednesday night in Chicago.

  •  
    The Chicago Blackhawks’ Patrick Kane hoists the Stanley Cup while celebrating with fans during a parade on Washington Street after the team’s cup win in 2010.

    How Hawks, Bruins reached the Stanley Cup Finals

    A quick blurb about how each team made their way to the Stanley Cup Final.

  •  
    The Chicago Blackhawks celebrate winning the NHL Western Conference Championship at the United Center in Chicago.

    Two teams playing great collide in Finals

    Blackhawks analyst Troy Murray says the answer to this question may determine who wins the Stanley Cup: can the Blackhawks’ speed and transition game find a way to score goals on a Boston team that defends well and has great goaltending?

  •  
    Corey Crawford comes up with a big save in during the Western Conference finals between the Chicago Blackhawks and the Los Angeles Kings.

    Blackhawks ride grown-up Crawford into Cup Final

    Corey Crawford has carried the Blackhawks to the Stanley Cup Final, and with all due respect to the amazing playoff thus far from Bryan Bickell, it’s Crawford who ought to be in line for the Conn Smythe if the Hawks can handle the Big Bad Bruins.

  •  
    John Starks/jstarks@dailyherald.com ¬ The Chicago Blackhawks celebrate Saturday winning the NHL Western Conference Championship at the United Center in Chicago.

    Hawks vs. Bruins a curiosity wrapped in a mystery

    Drop the puck already! Going in, this Hawks-Bruins series is a real curiosity. It's the most unpredicatable championship round that any Chicago team has played in for a half-century.

  •  
    Chicago Blackhawks coach Joe Quenneville answers questions Sunday, May 30, 2010, in Chicago. The Blackhawks are scheduled to play the Philadelphia Flyers in Game 2 of the Stanley Cup NHL hockey finals Monday. The Blackhawks lead the series 1-0. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

    Coach Q tinkering with lines again

    Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville was at it again Tuesday, tinkering with his lines on the eve of the Stanley Cup Finals just when it seemed he had found combinations that worked.Quenneville had a new first line of Jonathan Toews, Marian Hossa and Patrick Sharp, with a second line of Michal Handzus, Patrick Kane and Bryan Bickell.But the real news was on the third and fourth lines. Dave Bolland was back in the middle on the third line between Andrew Shaw and Brandon Saad, while Viktor Stalberg was out of the lineup completely, replaced by Brandon Bollig on the fourth line with Michael Frolik and Marcus Kruger.

  •  
    Quarterback Jay Cutler throws during the Bears’ mandatory minicamp Tuesday at Halas Hall in Lake Forest.

    Cutler: We’ve got some guys who can really play football

    As quarterback Jay Cutler begins learning his fourth new offensive system in his fifth year with the Bears, he says he has a better supporting cast than in the past, including tight end Martellus Bennett, who was signed in free agency after a career year with the Giants in 2012.

  •  
    Fans stream in from Madison Avenue Saturday before Game 5 of the western conference finals at the United Center.

    Group warns of Stanley Cup ticket scams

    The Better Business Bureau wants Blackhawks fans to be cautious when buying Stanley Cup Finals tickets online. Steve J. Bernas, president and CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois, says fans should do research before buying playoff tickets online.

  •  
    Luke Donald is looking to win his first major.

    Ex-No. 1 Luke Donald focuses on winning U.S. Open

    Luke Donald enters the U.S. Open more focused on a different No. 1 than reclaiming his old ranking. Like winning major No. 1. Donald is 0-for-the majors as he heads into his 10th U.S. Open, starting Thursday at Merion Golf Club. “It always crosses your mind when it’s going to happen,” he said.

  •  
    Then-Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow hugs New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick following a playoff football game in Foxborough, Mass. The high-profile quarterback who spent one season mostly on the sidelines with the New York Jets is expected to attend the start of the Patriots three-day minicamp on Tuesday.

    Tebow signs with Pats; New England opens minicamp

    The New England Patriots announced the signing of the polarizing quarterback with the poor throwing motion on Tuesday, six weeks after he was cut by the New York Jets and just in time for the start of the three-day minicamp that runs through Thursday. “Anything we do, we feel is in the best interests of the team,” coach Bill Belichick said at a standing-room-only news conference before practice. “We’ll see how it goes.”

  •  

    Forsythe, Venable homer to lead Padres over Braves

    Logan Forsythe homered in his first at-bat of the season, Will Venable added a three-run homer and Jason Marquis won his seventh straight decision to lead the San Diego Padres to a 7-6 victory against the Atlanta Braves on Monday night.

  •  

    Nava’s 14th-inning single lifts Red Sox over Rays

    Daniel Nava hit a tiebreaking single in the 14th inning and the Boston Red Sox beat the Tampa Bay Rays 10-8 on Monday night after squandering two late leads in a testy game that included a bench-clearing scrum.

  •  
    Glenbard South repeats as the Class 3A state softball champions after defeating Alton Marquette Saturday in East Peoria.

    Images: Daily Herald prep photos of the week
    The Prep Photos of the Week gallery includes the best high school sports pictures by Daily Herald photographers. This week's gallery features photos from state and sectional softball and baseball games.

Business

  •  
    Barrington officials this week heard a progress report on the tenant leasing of the pending retail-office redevelopment on the southwest corner of Hough and Main streets.

    Retail going fast, office slow, on downtown Barrington project

    Retail tenants are lining up faster than expected for Barrington’s downtown redevelopment project on the southwest corner of Hough and Main streets, but a large office tenant believed to be already committed has dropped out unexpectedly.That was the news this week out of a progress report the Evanston-based developers behind the retail-office project delivered to Barrington officials.

  •  

    Offer made for land near Fresh Market in Lincolnshire

    As the construction of a Fresh Market grocery store in Lincolnshire nears completion, village officials are weighing an offer to purchase adjoining land for a separate development. An Elmhurst company called DK Mallon has offered to buy more than 7 acres on the north and south sides of the store, which is on the northeast corner of Milwaukee Avenue and Route 22.

  •  

    Neighbors say Prospect Hts. bar is too noisy

    Prospect Heights officials promised Monday night to work with seven neighbors who say the noise from the new House of Music and Entertainment crosses Rand Road and makes sleep impossible in the wee hours of the morning.

  •  

    Lincolnshire’s Camping World acquires Marty’s U.S. RV

    Lincolnshire-based Camping World, the nation’s largest RV and outdoor retailer, and Good Sam, the world’s largest RV owners organization said it will acquire Marty’s US RV, an existing RV dealership in Berkley, Mass. in the next 30 to 45 days.

  •  
    Two sisters, Gracie and Jillian Bouchard, had no problem being “on top of the world” atop the Willis Tower Ledge in downtown Chicago this past Veterans Day.

    Willis Tower’s glass ledges boast more than 6 million visitors

    Nearly six million people have stepped out onto see-through ledges atop Chicago’s tallest building to see the streetscape below and the surrounding metropolitan area. The Willis Tower, formerly known as the Sears Tower, released that figure this week — four years after the tourist attraction opened in 2009.

  •  
    Elk Grove Township Elementary District 59 is looking to purchase the former Wellington restaurant property at 2121 S. Arlington Heights Road for possible use as office and meeting space for the district, and as additional parking for the district’s administration center.

    Dist. 59 to buy former Wellington restaurant site for $1.8 million

    Elk Grove Township Elementary District 59 has agreed to purchase the former Wellington restaurant site for $1.8 million, officials said Tuesday, describing the deal as too good to pass up. The district initially will use the site, which is adjacent to the cramped administration center, for training and meeting space while developing a longer range plan for the site. “It’s so under water that the deal we got was just amazing,” Mark Friedman, the district's interim superintendent, said.

  •  
    U.S. stocks fell, sending the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index lower for a second day, after Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda said he sees no need to expand monetary stimulus immediately.

    U.S. stocks end a choppy day with a loss

    Renewed concerns that central banks will ease off their support for the global economy hit the U.S. stock market Tuesday, wiping out its gain for the month.

  •  
    Walgreens committed numerous record-keeping and dispensing violations of the Controlled Substances Act at a major East Coast distribution center in Jupiter, Fla., and at six retail pharmacies around the state.

    DEA settles Walgreens painkiller case for $80 million

    Federal authorities have reached an $80 million settlement with the Deerfield-based Walgreens pharmacy chain over rules violations that allowed tens of thousands of units of powerful painkillers such as oxycodone to illegally wind up in the hands of drug addicts and dealers, officials said Tuesday.

  •  

    Loving Care Animal Clinic to relocate to Palatine

    Loving Care Animal Clinic, a household name to pet owners throughout Rolling Meadows and beyond, plans to relocate to a larger space in Palatine. “I’m looking to expand my business,” said owner and veterinarian Joanne Carlson, who has run the Kirchoff Road clinic since purchasing it 14 years ago. “I’ve outgrown the size where I’m at right now and looking to add more services.”

  •  
    Google is buying online mapping service Waze in a deal that keeps a potentially valuable tool away from its rivals while gaining technology that could improve the accuracy and usefulness of its own popular navigation system, the company announced Tuesday.

    Google snaps up Waze to add to mapping service

    Google is buying online mapping service Waze in a $1.03 billion deal that keeps a potentially valuable tool away from its rivals while allowing it to gain technology that could improve the accuracy and usefulness of its own popular navigation system.

  •  
    An emergency phone at a bus stop is pictured near the Euro sculpture in front of the European Central Bank, ECB, in Frankfurt, Germany, Tuesday. A key ECB program that has been credited with calming the 3½-year-old euro debt crisis faced a legal challenge Tuesday in Germany’s highest court.

    France threatens veto of EU-US trade deal

    A cloud is hanging over the upcoming free-trade talks between the European Union and the United States after France said it won’t back any deal that threatens the country’s prestigious film, radio or TV industries.

  •  
    This image provided by Cox Communications shows a program guide for television set-top boxes to make it easier to find programs available live or on demand. It’s an important development for cable TV companies, as they face criticisms for providing hundreds of channels that customers don’t watch. Making shows easier to find helps the companies justify all those channels.

    Comcast’s new X2 platform saves TV shows online

    Worried about filling up your DVR? The nation’s largest cable TV provider, Comcast Corp., is unveiling a new, compact set-top box that does away with the hard drive and saves your TV shows online. The as-yet-unnamed box, running on a platform it calls X2, was unveiled Tuesday at the annual gathering of cable TV companies.

  •  
    News Corp. said Tuesday that it expects to complete the separation of its entertainment and publishing businesses on June 28.

    News Corp shareholders approve split

    News Corp. says its shareholders have approved a plan to split into two publicly traded companies. The company says approval came with an overwhelming majority of support. It did not immediately break down vote totals.

  •  

    Office suppliers name CEO search firm

    OfficeMax Inc. and Naperville-based Office Depot Inc. said Tuesday that they have hired Korn/Ferry International in their CEO search related to the pending $1.2 billion combination of the two office supply chains. The two companies said in February they planned to combine. They have still not decided upon a CEO, a name or a headquarters for the new company.

  •  
    Plan B One-Step, an emergency contraceptive. The federal government on Monday, June 10, 2013 told a judge it will reverse course and take steps to comply with his order to allow girls of any age to buy emergency contraception without prescriptions.

    Feds now back morning-after pills for all girls

    After setting off a storm of criticism from abortion rights groups upset that a Democratic president had sided with social conservatives, the Obama administration said it will comply with a judge’s order to allow girls of any age to buy emergency contraception without prescriptions. But in doing so, at least one opponent of easy access to the contraception thinks the president is buckling to political pressure, rather than making the health of girls a priority.

  •  

    MFRI second quarter sales up 30 percent

    Piping systems manufacturer MFRI Inc.in Niles said projects in the gas and oil industry, as well as in the Mideast, boosted first quarter 2013 sales 30 percent over last year.

  •  

    Mettaway’s Grainger May sales increases 5 percent
    W.W. Grainger said sales results during May 2013 increased 5 percent over the same period last year.

  •  

    Schaumburg’s Experian Automotive sets deals with KBB, AutoTrader
    Schaumburg-based Experian Automotive said it has renewed its agreement with Kelley Blue Book for display of AutoCheck vehicle history reports in classified listings on www.kbb.com. Additionally, the company has partnered with AutoTrader.com, enabling dealers to utilize AutoCheck reports when merchandising their inventory on AutoTrader.com.

  •  

    World air fleet to double in 20 years, Boeing says
    Boeing expects its global aircraft demand to double in the next two decades with most of the orders coming from Asia, an executive from the US airplane-maker says. Speaking ahead of the Bourget International Air Salon, Randy Tinseth, vice-president of marketing for Boeing, says rising oil prices are forcing carriers to think harder about efficiency, and that means smaller planes that burn less fuel. It also means design changes and streamlined air traffic control.

  •  
    While Republican Sen. Mark Kirk says he is reviewing the immigration reform law coming before the U.S. Senate, Illinois business leaders are urging him to get behind the legislation.

    Illinois business leaders urge Kirk to back immigration

    While Republican Sen. Mark Kirk says he is reviewing the immigration reform law coming before the U.S. Senate, Illinois business leaders are urging him to get behind the legislation. The Chicago Sun-Times reports a group of CEOs wrote a letter urging Illinois’ congressional delegation to back a measure that would overhaul immigration. However, signers acknowledge they were specifically targeting Kirk.

  •  
    Boeing Co. raised its 20-year forecast for commercial jet demand by 3.8 percent as air traffic outstrips global economic growth and airlines refresh their fleets with $4.8 trillion in new planes.

    Boeing raises 20-year jet forecast 3.8% As no order bubble seen

    Chicago-based Boeing Co. raised its 20-year forecast for commercial jet demand by 3.8 percent as air traffic outstrips global economic growth and airlines refresh their fleets with $4.8 trillion in new planes. Airliner sales will total 35,280 new jets during the next two decades, compared with a 2012 projection of 34,000 planes, Boeing said today in Paris before next week’s Paris Air Show.

  •  
    Phil Spencer of Microsoft Game Studios speaks at the Microsoft Xbox E3 media briefing in Los Angeles, Monday

    Microsoft hypes next-gen Xbox One games at E3

    Microsoft has its head in the cloud with Xbox One. The company focused on how cloud computing will make games for its next-generation Xbox One console more immersive during its Monday presentation at the Electronic Entertainment Expo, the gaming industry’s annual trade show. Microsoft announced last week that the successor to the Xbox 360 must be connected to the Internet every 24 hours to operate, and the system would ideally always be online.

  •  
    Lisle-based Navistar International Corporation today announced a second quarter 2013 net loss of $374 million, or $4.65 per diluted share,

    Navistar reports second quarter net loss of $374 million
    Lisle-based Navistar International Corporation today announced a second quarter 2013 net loss of $374 million, or $4.65 per diluted share, compared to a second quarter 2012 net loss of $172 million, or $2.50 per diluted share. Excluding discontinued operations, Navistar recorded a second quarter 2013 loss from continuing operations of $353 million, or $4.39 per diluted share, compared to a second quarter 2012 loss from continuing operations of $138 million, or $2.01 per diluted share. Second quarter 2012 results included a gain of $181 million for the release of an income tax valuation allowance related to Canadian deferred tax assets.The year-over-year decline was mainly due to lower volumes and higher pre-existing warranty adjustments of $164 million in the second quarter 2013, primarily related to EPA 2010 emissions level engines. This was partially offset by $60 million in lower SG&A expenses and $32 million in reduced engineering and product development costs this quarter versus the same period one year ago.Manufacturing revenue in the quarter was $2.5 billion, down 23 percent from the second quarter of 2012. The decline reflects a 14% drop in overall industry demand and lower market share during the company’s emissions strategy transition. This was partially offset by stronger volumes in the South America engine business.“We are not satisfied with our overall financial results this quarter, but we are pleased with the continued progress we made in a number of areas on our turnaround plan,” said Troy A. Clarke, Navistar president and chief executive officer. “We still face some significant, yet solvable challenges, primarily in the areas of higher pre-existing warranty costs for our earlier EPA 2010 emissions level engines, as well as in rebuilding sales and restoring market share. However, we are already implementing the right leadership and business process changes to effectively address these priority issues.”

  •  
    Bank of America iS one of five banks making mortgage releife poaymnets to Illinois borrowers.

    Thousands of Illinoisans to share mortgage relief

    Nearly 30,000 Illinois borrowers will soon receive checks as part of a landmark multistate settlement with five U.S. banks over foreclosure abuses.Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan announced Monday that borrowers can expect a total of $43.3 million in relief payments. The average check will be about $1,500. Eligible borrowers lost their homes to foreclosure from 2008 through 2011 and had their mortgages financed by Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Citibank and Ally Bank, formerly GMAC.

  •  
    Dole Food’s Chairman and CEO David Murdock

    Dole CEO makes buyout bid; values co. at $1.07B

    Dole Food’s Chairman and CEO David Murdock and his family are offering to buy the business with a bid that values the entire company at approximately $1.07 billion.Shares jumped in premarket trading on Tuesday.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Clark Kent (Henry Cavill) emerges as Superman in the dour retelling of the comic book hero's origin in “Man of Steel.”

    Action-saturated Superman reboot a dour, humorless epic short on charm, emotion

    “Man of Steel” marks a two-and-a-half-hour epic laden with emotionally misconnecting characters prone to uttering speeches in lieu of actual conversations. The movie flirts with the notion of Superman as a Christ metaphor (more fully accomplished in 2006's tepid “Superman Returns”) while transforming Clark Kent into a philosophical, off-the-grid hot bod searching for identity and purpose.

  •  
    Singer Idina Menzel will perform July 19 at Aurora’s RiverEdge Park.

    Free lawn seats available for Menzel’s Aurora show
    Broadway star Idina Menzel will perform next month at Aurora’s new RiverEdge Park, and a number of free lawn tickets will be available starting at noon on Friday. Menzel, the Tony Award-winning Elphaba from “Wicked” as well as a reccurring star on the Fox TV show “Glee,” appears at 8 p.m. Friday, July 19.

  •  
    Hunter Hayes

    Hunter Hayes to play Rosemont Theatre
    Tickets for the Hunter Hayes concert on Friday, Oct. 25, at the Rosemont Theatre go on sale to the public at 10 a.m. Friday, June 14.

  •  
    Courtesy of E! E! marks Joan Rivers' 80th birthday with a special bash Friday on “Fashion Police.”

    'Fashion Police' celebrates host Joan Rivers at age 80

    “I'm having a great time,” Joan Rivers crows before offering a brisk self-appraisal: “Everything is working, my mind is fine." The comedian turned 80 on Saturday, a milestone that has prompted the E! network to stage a Joan Rivers “takeover”: Its regular one-hour edition of “Fashion Police” (airing Friday at 9 p.m.) will be a black-tie birthday salute.

  •  

    Dealing with life’s issues only way to move forward

    She think her boyfriend has an anxiety disorder and needs a professional, he says he's just a little stressed out. Carolyn Hax says that before they can move forward, they need to be honest about what is truly going on.

  •  
    Now your character can travel to a tropical island where he or she can compete against others in minigames like scavenger hunts or memory tests in “Animal Crossing: New Leaf.”

    'Animal Crossing: New Leaf' charms on 3DS

    They're whiny, materialistic, gossipy and co-dependent. If they weren't so cute, I would really hate the little animal people who populate Rooty, a seaside village I inadvertently became mayor of in “Animal Crossing: New Leaf,” the fourth edition of the adorable Nintendo social simulator. “New Leaf” doesn't try to uproot the humble formula established in previous “Animal Crossing” video games.

  •  
    Buddy Guy plays Blues on the Fox this weekend at the new RiverEdge Park in Aurora.

    Best bets: Buddy Guy headlines Blues on the Fox

    Buddy Guy and Dr. John headline the Blues on the Fox Outdoor Music Festival this weekend at the new venue known as RiverEdge Park in Aurora. Marvel at the competitions in heavy sports, Highland dancing and even frozen haggis tossing at the 27th Annual Scottish Festival & Highland Games this weekend in Itasca. Take a gander at the wonders of German auto engineering at the Porsche Club Concours in Long Grove Sunday.

  •  
    Bill Weir, left, and Cynthia McFadden, of the news magazine show “The Lookout.”

    ABC’s ‘Lookout’ a new outlet for ‘Nightline’

    Yes, Cynthia McFadden, Bill Weir and Terry Moran of ABC’s “Nightline” are still at work at ABC News, and this summer, even non-insomniacs can see them. The “Nightline” team is behind “The Lookout,” a prime-time newsmagazine that has gotten off to a slow start on Wednesday nights. “The Lookout” is both a chance for the journalists to try something new and an olive branch by network bosses for evicting “Nightline” from a time slot it held for three decades.

  •  
    American Pie Council director Linda Hoskins congratulates Matt Zagorski of Arlington Heights on his second place win at the National Pie Championships in Orlando, Fla., in April.

    Arlington Heights baker snags another award at pie championship

    Matt Zagorski of Arlington Heights baked the second best fruit pie in the country, according to judges at the National Pie Championship in April. His Blueberry Buckle Pie took second in the fruit/berry category.

  •  
    Matt Zagorski's Blueberry Buckle Pie

    Blueberry Buckle Pie
    Blueberry Buckle Pie: Matt Zagorski

  •  
    This recently-remodeled cedar home in Ingleside is located on Long Lake.

    Lakeside home in Ingleside is listing of the week

    This fabulous, recently-remodeled cedar home is located on one of the best kept secrets in Lake County — Long Lake near Ingleside. Long Lake is one of the smaller, more secluded lakes in the 15-lake Chain O’ Lakes.

  •  
    Mumford & Sons bassist Ted Dwayne, third from left, requires emergency surgery for a blood clot on the surface of his brain, prompting the band to postpone a few upcoming tour dates. He is expected to recover quickly.

    Mumford bassist undergoing emergency surgery

    Mumford & Sons bassist Ted Dwayne is undergoing emergency surgery for a blood clot on the surface of his brain, prompting the band to postpone a few upcoming tour dates. He is expected to recover quickly.

  •  

    Weeknight Arroz con Pollo
    Weeknigh Arroz con Pollo: Domino Rosi

  •  

    Toasted Cheese Bruschetta with Marinated Tomatoes
    Toasted Cheese Bruschetta with Marinated Tomatoes: Domino Rosi

  •  
    Domino Rosi, of Lombard, tweaked his mother's caramel corn recipe and won $1,000 in a Hungry Jack recipe conest earlier this year.

    Maple, Pecan and Bacon Caramel Corn
    Maple, Pecan and Bacon Caramel Corn: Domino Rosi

  •  
    Domino Rosi, of Lombard, tweaked his mother’s caramel corn recipe and won $1,000 in a Hungry Jack recipe contest.

    Cook of the Week: Twist on a childhood snack lands Lombard man in winner’s circle

    Domino Rosi remembers the melted butter dripping onto the hot popcorn popped in the air popper. His mom then added brown sugar to create the heavenly caramel corn that was a staple of his childhood. But it is his sticky, salty version of caramel corn that garnered the Lombard man national accolades.

  •  
    “Work With Me: The 8 Blind Spots Between Men and Women in Business” by Barbara Annis and John Gray

    Book details workplace blind spots between sexes

    Unless you live and work at a monastery, chances are you work with both men and women. According to Barbara Annis and John Gray, however, we’re kind of bumbling when it comes to sharing office space with the opposite sex. In “Work With Me,” the authors explore eight “blind spots” they say create tension between men and women in the workplace.

  •  
    Helen Mirren’s award-winning performance as Queen Elizabeth II in “The Audience” will be beamed this week from London’s Gielgud Theatre to hundreds of movie theaters around the world in a live broadcast.

    Helen Mirren talks royalty and ‘Doctor Who’

    Helen Mirren is a star of stage and screen — and now stage on-screen. Mirren’s award-winning performance as Queen Elizabeth II in “The Audience” will be beamed Thursday from London’s Gielgud Theatre to hundreds of movie theaters around the world in a live broadcast. Chicagoans can see the production June 29 and 30 at Landmark Century Centre Cinema and June 30 and July 3 at the Music Box Theatre in Chicago.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: The governor’s next step toward a pension solution

    A Daily Herald editorial says Gov. Pat Quinn is right to keep demanding a pension solution, but now he also should do more to help produce it.

  •  
    Gerg Baise

    Glean benefits of Illinois’ natural gas

    Guest columnists Greg Baise and Michael Carrigan: We’re often asked why Illinois should be excited about fracturing. First, hydraulic fracturing will generate tens of thousands of good jobs for Illinois residents and generate hundreds of millions of dollars in new revenue. It will positively impact manufacturing, mining, rail, trucking, construction, road building and other industries, many of which are represented by organized labor. Businesses and residents will pay cheaper prices for energy. Our reliance on foreign oil will continue to decrease.

  •  

    The fresh air of Pope Francis

    Columnist Michael Gerson: For Pope Benedict XVI, the college professor, it was delivering a much-misunderstood lecture at the University of Regensburg, which made controversial reference to Islam. For Pope Francis, it is kneeling to wash the feet of a young Muslim woman in a prison on Holy Thursday. With due respect to Benedict’s learning, Francis’ symbolic act managed to more effectively communicate the essence of the Christian gospel.

  •  

    Money was behind ‘house of horrors’
    A Barrington letter to the editor: There is much in the news regarding abortionist Kermit Gosnell’s “house of horrors.” In spite of a reported annual income of $1.8 million, Gosnell did not see fit to spend some of this obscene income to sanitize and clean up his “clinic” for the mothers where the killings occurred.

  •  

    Racetrack slots would show favoritism
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: The unending quest to place slots at Arlington is especially nettlesome because ownership perceives itself as “special” and entitled. Their argument is that slots are needed to keep the tracks and the horse-racing industry alive. That may be. However, if the basis for allotting slots is “saving businesses” then, to be fair, slots should be made available to all failing businesses not run by criminals.

  •  

    Larger upfront pension payments needed
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: The burden of pain should fall on the pensions of the legislators and executives who have been stealing from employee pensions for decades. And while we’re at it, why is the Illinois Supreme Court exempt from a reduction in its pension?

  •  

    Patriot Act is hardly patriotic
    A Glendale Heights letter to the editor: A month after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, George Bush signed the Patriot Act. Ostensibly this law would protect America from further attacks. In reality it gave unprecedented power to the executive branch and subverted the separation of powers.

  •  

    Batavia board neglected its job
    A Batavia letter to the editor: Dear members of the Batavia School Board, apparently, only Jon Gaspar understands his role on the school board. I am completely disappointed with the rest of you, and you failed your constituents. You are there to listen to the voters and do what’s best for the students. You are not there to rubber stamp the administration’s decisions and make a mockery out of the Democratic process.

  •  

    Difference between secure and lavish
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: I believe the Senate Democrats failed to properly represent all their constituents when they rejected the public employee pension cutting plan. They stated the plan was unfair and illegal. The state constitution has promised teachers and state workers a secure retirement.

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