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Daily Archive : Monday March 11, 2013

News

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    Antioch Elementary District 34 candidates share unique ideas

    Some of the candidates for seats on the Antioch Elementary District 34 board shared unique ideas for the schools during recent endorsement interviews with the Daily Herald. A healthier lunch menu, an emphasis on community service and involvement and curriculum supplements were among the suggestions.

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    Mundelein High spring concert set for Thursday

    Three Mundelein High School bands will present a spring concert Thursday, March 21. The show is set for 7 p.m. in the auditorium, 1350 W. Hawley St. Admission is free.

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    Patricia Beauvais

    Des Plaines 3rd Ward hopefuls weigh in on casino revenues, downtown

    The two candidates vying to represent Des Plaines' 3rd Ward say managing casino revenues and improving the city's business climate are important issues facing the next city council. Newcomer Denise Rodd will face former 1st Ward alderwoman Patricia Beauvais on April 9.

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    6-month-old child, father hit by gunfire

    A 6-month-old child and her father are reported in critical condition at a Chicago hospital after being shot while the father was changing the child's diaper.

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    The Arlington Heights village board on Monday unanimously recommended approval of the budget for the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre, which includes $317,000 in village support for fiscal year 2014.

    Metropolis gets funding from Arlington Hts. for next fiscal year

    As long as Metropolis Performing Arts Centre gets through the rest of this fiscal year, the nonprofit will receive more financial help from the village of Arlington Heights next year. On Monday, the Arlington Heights village board unanimously recommended approval of the budget for Metropolis, which includes $317,000 in village support for fiscal year 2014.

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    Geneva board has lots of questions about proposed online charter school

    The Geneva school board had a lot of questions about a proposed online charter school Monday, but nobody to ask. No representatives of Illinois Virtual Academy @ Fox Valley attended the public hearing, and a representative of the school's instruction contractor said they hadn't been told, nor saw a notice of the hearing.

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    Cook County Commissioner William Beavers speaks to reporters, as his attorney Sam Adam Jr. listens, after Beavers' arraignment on federal tax-evasion charges in Chicago. Jury selection is set to begin Monday in Chicago for the 78-year-old Democrat who is accused of diverting tens of thousands of dollars from campaign accounts for personal use without reporting it and then trying to cover it up.

    Beavers' tax evasion trial resumes

    A tough-talking Chicago Democratic politician remained defiant as his tax-evasion trial resumed Monday after a three-month delay, vowing to testify and challenge prosecutors when testimony begins in coming days. William Beavers has pleaded not guilty to charges he diverted more than $225,000 from campaign coffers to support a gambling habit and for other personal use without reporting it on 2006...

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    Hundreds of gun owners and supporters marched at the state Capitol in Springfield Wednesday in a rally sponsored by the Illinois State Rifle Association, in partnership with IllinoisCarry.com and other groups, including the McHenry County Right to Carry Association.

    Suburban lawmakers may take lead on gun issues

    Suburban lawmakers are often caught in the crossfire in the debate over guns. And as the issue is expected to reach a fever pitch this year, they could be key to victory for either side. “The suburbs are the delicate balance in the debate,” said state Rep. Dennis Reboletti, an Elmhurst Republican and supporter of letting Illinoisans carry concealed firearms.

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    No injuries, damage reported from small Ill. quake

    Authorities say a small earthquake shook parts of southern Illinois early this morning. The U.S. Geological Survey says the 2.7-magnitude temblor occurred shortly before 1 a.m. east and northeast of Benton. The closest town appears to be tiny 50-resident Macedonia in Franklin County. That county's sheriff department says the earthquake doesn't appear to have caused any injuries or significant...

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    Gov. Pat Quinn's office said Monday that the state has agreed to settle the Securities and Exchange Commission case.

    Illinois settles pension fraud charge

    Federal authorities announced Monday that Illinois has agreed to settle a securities-fraud charge that accused the state of misleading investors about the financial health of its public-employee pension systems, which are now $96.7 billion short of what's needed to cover promised retirement benefits.

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    Campground Road in Des Plaines is closed along the Des Plaines River.

    Water rises, but Des Plaines officials unworried

    Des Plaines officials say they’re not concerned about rising water levels along Des Plaines River that began spilling over Campground Road Monday afternoon. By Monday evening, river levels rose to 4.22 feet in Des Plaines, whereas 5 feet is considered flooding, said Amy Seeley, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

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    Sue Gould

    Palatine Park District board candidates tout parks experience

    From golf course design to grounds maintenance, all four candidates in the Palatine Park District board race bring related experience in their bid for one of two open seats serving 6-year terms.

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    District 300 considers taking a stand on special education ratios

    Community Unit District 300 board members are considering expanding their legislative priorities to include advocating for more local control. The state's "70/30 rule" limits the number of students with disabilities in a mixed education classroom to 30 percent of the total. The Illinois State Board of Education proposed eliminating that rule in February, which, if approved, would allow districts...

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    Combined-grade classrooms part of Dist. 41’s plan

    Starting next school year, fourth and fifth graders who attend the four elementary schools in Glen Ellyn District 41 will be in multiage grouped classrooms — just one of piece of the district's Think Tank plan approved unanimously by the school board Monday. How the proposal would be implemented districtwide has taken different forms, but on Monday, Superintendent Ann Riebock presented a...

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    Horse virus outbreak puts suburban stables on guard

    A horse virus outbreak in Gurnee has area stables on lockdown for fear of spreading the highly contagious illness that can cause death.

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    Wheeling’s Danni Allen secured her spot in the finale of “The Biggest Loser.” Allen has lost 95 pounds and gained 19 pounds of muscle throughout the weight-loss competition.

    Wheeling’s Danni Allen in ‘Biggest Loser’ finale

    Wheeling's Danni Allen smashed into the finale of The Biggest Loser Monday night, dropping 11 pounds to match the other contestant guaranteed a spot inthe finals when others had very small weight losses.

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    With Dixon Police Chief Dan Langloss at her side, Schaumburg native Erin Merryn reacts to receiving the “Champion for Children Award” from the Children’s Advocacy Center on Monday during a luncheon at Indian Lakes Resort in Bloomingdale. Merryn helped pass “Erin’s Law,” which went into effect earlier this year and mandates sexual abuse awareness programs in all Illinois schools.

    Schaumburg native receives “Champion for Children Award”

    Erin Merryn received the "Champion for Children Award" from the Children's Advocacy Center during a surprise presentation at the Indian Lakes Resort in Bloomingdale on Monday. The Schaumburg native helped pass "Erin's Law," which went into effect in January. It mandates sexual abuse awareness programs in all Illinois schools.

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    St. Charles aldermen willing to accept offices on Main St.

    With a number of vacant storefronts, St. Charles aldermen tonight will consider altering guidelines they once approved to encourage retail development, shopping and pedestrian foot traffic in the downtown area.A portion of the downtown includes an overlay district. The overlay limits the type of businesses that can occupy a first floor space to uses that generate pedestrian activity.

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    Jose M. Garcia

    Two men charged in Round Lake Beach shooting death

    Two men have been charged with the Sunday shooting death of a Zion man outside a Round Lake Beach convenience store. Jose M. Garcia, 18, of the 600 block of Deepwoods Drive in Mundelein, and Jose Rebollar-Verara, 24, of the 500 block of North Carol Lane in Round Lake Park, were arrested Monday and charged with first-degree murder.

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    La Preferida recalls cases of pinto beans

    La Preferida indicates about 420 of its 29-ounce cans of pinto beans may not have been fully processed. As a result, contents could be contaminated by spoilage organisms or pathogens and could lead to illness if consumed. The cans are coded: PINTO LP, BEST BY 01/03/2015, "Time" 3003.

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    The Obama administration last year answered its highest number of requests so far for copies of government documents, emails, photographs and more, and it slightly reduced its backlog of requests from previous years. But it more often cited legal provisions allowing the government to keep records or parts of its records secret,

    U.S. citing security to censor more public records

    The U.S. government, led by the Pentagon and CIA, censored files that the public requested last year under the Freedom of Information Act more often than at any time since President Barack Obama took office, according to a new analysis by The Associated Press. The government frequently cited national security as the reason.

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    Cardinals, including American Roger Mahony, left, and Timothy Dolan, third from left, arrive for a meeting at the Vatican Monday. Cardinals gathered for their final day of talks before the conclave to elect the next pope amid debate over whether the Catholic Church needs a manager pope to clean up the Vatican’s messy bureaucracy or a pastoral pope who can inspire the faithful and make Catholicism relevant again.

    Conclave to elect next pope opens amid uncertainty

    Cardinals enter the Sistine Chapel on Tuesday to elect the next pope amid more upheaval and uncertainty than the Catholic Church has seen in decades: There's no front-runner, no indication how long voting will last and no sense that a single man has what it takes to fix the many problems.On the eve of the vote, cardinals offered wildly different assessments of what they're looking for in the next...

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    Afghan National Civil Order Police check passengers at a checkpoint on the outskirts of Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, Sunday. Afghan President Hamid Karzai, infuriated by villager reports of forced detentions and mass arrests, gave U.S. Special Forces until Sunday, March 10, to vacate Wardak province.

    Angry Afghan villagers want US special forces out

    U.S.-Afghan relations reached a new low Monday, when an Afghan policeman gunned down two U.S. special forces in Wardak province, less than 24 hours after President Hamid Karzai's deadline expired for them to leave the area where residents have grown increasingly hostile toward the Americans.

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    South Korean protesters hit a huge banner with a picture of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a rally denouncing North Korea’s recent threat and supporting South Korean President Park Geun-hye near the presidential Blue House in Seoul, South Korea, Monday. South Korea and the U.S. began annual military drills Monday despite North Korean threats to respond by voiding the armistice that ended the Korean War and launching a nuclear attack on the U.S.

    North Korea says it cancels 1953 armistice

    A state-run newspaper in North Korea said Monday the communist country had carried out a threat to cancel the 1953 armistice that ended the Korean War, following days of increased tensions over its latest nuclear test. A U.N. spokesman said later in the day, however, that North Korea cannot unilaterally dissolve the armistice.

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    Warrenville is planning to create a tax increment financing district to promote redevelopment in a central part of the city, including a stretch of Butterfield Road.

    Warrenville candidates weigh in on TIF proposal

    With its mix of retail, residential and office uses, Warrenville's Cantera development stands as the example of what city officials would like to repeat in other parts of town. But will implementing another tax increment financing district — similar to the one that fueled Cantera's transformation — help rejuvenate the Civic Center near the intersection of Butterfield and Batavia roads...

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    A judge struck down New York City’s groundbreaking limit on the size of sugar-laden drinks Monday shortly before it was set to take effect.

    Judge strikes down NYC ban supersized sodas

    A judge struck down New York City's ban on big sugary drinks Monday just hours before it was supposed to take effect, ruling that the first-in-the-nation measure arbitrarily applies to only some sweet beverages and some places that sell them.

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    $1 million prize could be lost

    The Illinois Lottery says the lucky winners of $1 million and a $250,000 are about to become very unlucky. A $1 million winning ticket sold at TJVS Marathon in Wood Dale for a St. Patrick's Day raffle last year will be worthless if not claimed by March 17. A winning $250,000 Mega Millions ticket sold at J&K Liquors in Chicago for the March 20, 2012, drawing will be worthless on March 20, 2013.

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    Kane County court security union agrees to tentative 5-year deal

    A union representing Kane County court security officers has approved a tentative five-year contract. The full county board still must vote on the pact, which is expected to take place on April 9. The union had been working without a contract since late 2008.

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    Clare Ollayos

    ECC candidates bring diversity, favor improving relationships

    An ethnically diverse group of candidates vie for two, 6-year spots on the Elgin Community College board of trustees and a single 4-year spot. That diversity factors into some of their campaigns as voters get the option of adding people of color to a previously all-white board. Many candidates, too, focus on improving relationships between the board and college faculty.

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    Mount Prospect man pleads guilty to computer theft

    A Des Plaines man pleaded guilty Monday to burglarizing a car in Mount Prospect. Frank Sabo, 26, was on bond facing charges of retail theft, when he entered a car parked on Wego Trail and took two computers, prosecutors. A Cook County judge sentenced Sabo to a total of four years in prison in exchange for his guilty plea to both charges.

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    Dorothy “Dee” Horky

    Former president charged with $11,000 theft from Wheaton booster club

    The ex-president of a booster club at Wheaton North High School used the group as her "own personal fundraiser," stealing about $11,000 over five months, prosecutors alleged Monday. Dorothy "Dee" Horky, 57, of the 1N300 block of Richard Avenue near Carol Stream, could face up to seven years in prison if convicted of felony theft.

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    Glen Ellyn firefighters and police officers work the scene of a three-car accident Monday afternoon at the entrance of the McDonald’s on Roosevelt Road.

    Two hurt in 3-car crash in Glen Ellyn

    A driver and passenger were injured in a three-car crash Monday afternoon in Glen Ellyn, authorities said. Their vehicle was making a left-hand turn into the McDonald's parking lot at 445 Roosevelt Road when their car was struck by an eastbound vehicle about 1:30 p.m. A third car trying to exit the parking lot was hit by the other two cars, police said.

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    Chicago’s Second Presbyterian Church now a landmark

    The Department of the Interior has designated the Second Presbyterian Church on Chicago's South Side a national historic landmark. The neo-Gothic church was designed by famed architect Howard Van Doren Shaw. The sanctuary boasts Louis Comfort Tiffany stained-glass windows, an Italian limestone baptismal font, murals by Frederic Clay Bartlett, windows made in the workshop of English decorator...

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    LHS to host concert Sunday

    The North Suburban Wind Ensemble will perform Sunday, March 17, in the Libertyville High School Auditorium, 708 W. Park Ave.

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    Route 21 patching to cause delays

    Motorists can expect delays as pothole patching along Milwaukee Avenue (Route 21) and Casey Road in Libertyville resumes from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 12.

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    Lake County forest board meets Tuesday

    The Lake County Forest Preserve District Board will meet Tuesday to discuss selling surplus equipment, renewing the license agreement with the Adlai Stevenson Center and other business.

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    Green Living Fair in Libertyville

    The Libertyville Civic Center Foundation in partnership with the Lake County Green Congregations will host a Green Living Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 16, at the Civic Center, 135 W. Church St.

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    Juwan Franklin

    Glendale Heights man sentenced for role in home invasion

    A Glendale Heights man has been sentenced to 15 years in prison for his role in a home invasion last summer, authorities said Monday. Juwan Franklin, 21, was one of two men charged after the victims were beaten and robbed of cellphones, according to prosecutors.

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    John Hill, left, and other members of the Service Employees International Union at the University of Illinois walk a picket line Monday outside the Illini Union in Urbana.

    Food, building workers on strike at U of I

    Almost 800 building-service and food workers walked away from their jobs and onto the picket lines at the University of Illinois's Urbana-Champaign campus on Monday, unhappy over wages and other issues in a contract proposal from the school.

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    Man dies after snowmobile crash

    A Hinckley man has died after a snowmobile crash Sunday in DeKalb County.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    A resident of the 38W600 block of Glenview Drive near St. Charles wired $7,000 between 10 a.m. Wednesday and 12:21 p.m. Friday to an unknown person after receiving a call that a male relative had been arrested and was stranded in Peru, according to a sheriff's report. The victim became suspicious after the caller asked for more money day after day, the report said.

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    District 41 ready to vote on controversial education plan

    The Glen Ellyn Elementary District 41 school board is scheduled to vote Monday night on a controversial proposal that would combine some grade levels and allow teachers to specialize in certain subjects. District officials have proposed the combination of second- and third-grade classes, and fourth- and fifth-grade classes, and recommended that teachers specialize as either instructors in...

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    Ashley Jones, a former Hoffman Estates High School student, does the gymnastics routine that she performed at the Special Olympics 2012 State Summer Games.

    Alumna inspires Hoffman Estates H.S. SOAR club

    At the recent Polar Plunge in Palatine, Hoffman Estates High School had 40 students, faculty and staff brave the icy waters. The team leader credited the school's SOAR program with helping to fuel participation and also cited the example of a former student who is a very active participant in Special Olympics Illinois and recently made a return visit to the school.

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    D’Andre Howard

    Howard plans insanity defense in Hoffman Estates slayings

    Defense attorneys announced Monday they intend to pursue an insanity defense for D'Andre Howard, charged with the April 2009 slayings of Laura Engelhardt, an 18-year-old Conant High School senior, her father Alan Engelhardt, 57, and her maternal grandmother Marlene Gacek, 73. The defense is pursuing the strategy despite not having an expert to testify that Howard was legally insane when the...

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    Charles Amrich back on Island Lake ballot, but candidate’s fate not clear

    A Lake County judge on Monday ordered Island Lake's village clerk to resubmit a candidate list that includes mayoral hopeful Charles Amrich's name — even though the judge hasn't decided if Amrich can run. His name will be submitted with the phrase "objection pending." Voting by mail is scheduled to begin Friday.

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    Sugar Bush Fair in Schaumburg March 16-17

    The Schaumburg Park District's Sugar Bush Fair at Spring Valley this weekend will allow attendees to learn how maple sugar is made as well as to enjoy its use in a breakfast provided by Whole Foods Market. The 29th annual event will run from 9 a.m. to noon on both Saturday, March 16 and Sunday, March 17 at Spring Valley, 1111 E. Schaumburg Road in Schaumburg.

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    North Aurora police to meet with east-side residents tonight

    North Aurora police are meeting with east side residents tonight to discuss topics relevant to them including recent burglaries at a 7-Eleven and Route 25 car crashes.

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    The Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in Arlington Heights is seeking a slight increase in its subsidy from the village, as well as more than $150,000 to fund several equipment and facility upgrades.

    Metropolis seeks additional funding from Arlington Heights

    Arlington Heights trustees tonight will discuss the village's annual funding for Metropolis Performing Arts Centre, which could total more than $300,000 from a variety of sources in fiscal year 2014. According to budget documents, Metropolis is requesting that its annual subsidy increase slightly to $160,000, in addition to $32,000 for equipment replacement.

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    Moylan hosts coffee with constituents

    State Rep. Marty Moylan, a Des Plaines Democrat representing the 55th House District, will host a coffee with constituents from 10 a.m. to noon, Saturday, March 30, at the Sugar Bowl Restaurant, 1494 Miner St., Des Plaines.

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    Lexi Ryan, a pug from St. Charles, is all decked out for the dog costume contest at last year’s St. Charles St. Patrick’s Day parade.

    Bringing a piece of Ireland to St. Charles

    The 2013 version of St. Charles' St. Patrick's Day Parade will feature lucky dogs, dancer troupes and an homage to the founders of the parade.

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    With a green suit to match his bright green hair, Kevin Combest rides through the Thom McNamee Memorial St. Patrick’s Day Parade in East Dundee last year. This year’s parade is Saturday, March 16.

    Get your green on in East Dundee

    East Dundee's Thom McNamee Memorial St. Patrick's Day Parade will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 16. It honors the memory of the parade's founder, a longtime Dundee business owner who died of cancer in June 2010.

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    Sen. John McCain is giving Washington whiplash. He insists he’s consistent. But whatever the issue, McCain is involved in nearly every hot topic.

    Obama friend or foe? McCain charts his course
    Republican Sen. John McCain is a walking contradiction, antagonizing President Barack Obama over foreign policy one minute, cooperating with the Democrat the next on immigration and the budget. So who is the real McCain?

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    Peggy Babcock

    Dist. 15 candidates weigh in on financial turnaround, uncertain future

    Budget cuts and a less costly teachers contract have reversed a trend of deficit spending, and plugged a hole in the district's diminishing reserves in Palatine Township Elementary School District 15. The nine candidates seeking four school board seats in the April 9 election weigh in on the financial turnaround and future uncertainties.

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    Tuesday deadline for voter registration in suburban Cook County

    Tuesday is the last day for residents of suburban Cook County to register to vote in the April 9 election, Cook County Clerk David Orr said. Voters will elect mayors and members of municipal councils, library boards, park districts and school districts. Many communities also have referendums on their ballots.

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS Afghan villagers show a paper with pictures of relatives held in U.S. Special Forces custody in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, Sunday. Afghan President Hamid Karzai, infuriated by villager reports of forced detentions and mass arrests, gave U.S. Special Forces a deadline of March 10 to vacate Wardak province, located barely 24 miles from the Afghan capital of Kabul.

    Insider attack in Kabul kills 2 U.S. troops, 2 Afghans

    A police officer opened fire on U.S. and Afghan forces at a police headquarters in eastern Afghanistan on Monday, sparking a firefight that killed two U.S. troops and two other Afghan policemen. The attacker was also killed in the shootout, officials said.

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    Naperville to discuss funding for cultural programs

    Naperville City Council members will meet at 5 p.m. Monday to discuss and possibly approve the distribution of as much as $1.9 million to as many as 88 applicants seeking $3.1 million in grants from the city's Special Events and Cultural Amenities fund.

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    Aurora to consider RiverEdge food contract

    A contract to choose the main food vendor for RiverEdge Park will be before the Aurora City Council Tuesday for discussion and likely a vote, and the restaurant in line to get the deal is Two Brothers Roundhouse. Aldermen are set to consider an agreement that would make the Roundhouse the main food provider at the park, which is set to open this summer for Blues on the Fox June 14 and 15. The...

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    Campground Road in Des Plaines closed along the Des Plaines Rriver.

    Flood warnings for Des Plaines, Fox, DuPage rivers

    The National Weather Service has issued flood warnings for the Des Plaines River in Lake and Cook counties, the Fox River in Kane and Kendall counties and the east branch of the DuPage River near Bolingbrook in Will County.

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    Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick was convicted Monday of corruption charges.

    Jury convicts ex-Detroit mayor of corruption

    Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick was convicted Monday of corruption charges, ensuring a return to prison for a man once among the nation's youngest big-city leaders. Jurors convicted Kilpatrick of a raft of crimes, including racketeering conspiracy, which carries a maximum punishment of 20 years behind bars.

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    William Bolton

    Police: Man got haircut, then robbed salon

    A McHenry man has been charged with armed robbery, police say, after he held up a hair salon moments after getting a haircut. William Bolton, 36, of the 5000 block of Fox Lake Road, remains in Lake County jail in lieu of 100,000 bond, Fox Lake Police Lt. Mark Schindler said. Instead of paying, he pulled out a large kitchen knife and said he was robbing the victim, Schindler said. Bolton fled the...

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    Kathie Kane-Willis holds up an Overdose Prevention Rescue Kit during an emergency heroin summit held over the weekend.

    Suburban heroin problem called “a medical emergency”

    Identifying the suburban heroin problem as "a medical emergency," several public health and drug policy experts want to equip all first responders in Illinois with overdose rescue kits that each consist of a small syringe and a dose of the opiate overdose reversal drug Naloxone, also known as Narcan. The idea was proposed Saturday during an "emergency heroin summit" hosted by the Illinois State...

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    A fishing boat washed ashore by the March 11, 2011 tsunami sits in a deserted port area in Kesennuma, Miyagi prefecture, northeastern Japan, at dawn on Monday, March 11, 2013. Japan is marking the second anniversary of its earthquake, tsunami and nuclear catastrophe. Memorial services are planned Monday in Tokyo and in barren towns along the battered northeastern coast to coincide the moment the magnitude-9.0 earthquake ó the strongest recorded in Japan's history ó struck, unleashing a massive tsunami that killed nearly 19,000 people.

    Images: Second anniversary of Japan's tsunami disaster
    Japan is marking the second anniversary of its earthquake, tsunami and nuclear catastrophe. Memorial services are planned Monday in Tokyo and in barren towns along the battered northeastern coast to coincide with the moment the magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck, unleashing a massive tsunami that killed nearly 19,000 people.

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    Dave and Amy Freeman

    Minn. couple near end of 11,700-mile kayak odyssey

    DULUTH, Minn. — A Minnesota couple has approached the end of a three-year, 11,700-mile kayak odyssey.Dave and Amy Freeman started a journey in 2010 that has taken them up the Pacific Coast, across Canada and the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Coast, and down to Florida. They plan to reach Key West around April 6, the Duluth News Tribune reported Monday .

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    Endorsements: Breyer, Farwell, Glasgow, Rosenberg for Arlington Heights board
    The Daily Herald endorses Norman Breyer, Joseph Farwell, Thomas Glascow and Bert Rosenberg for Arlington Heights village board trustee

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    The mummy Hatiay (New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, 1550 to 1295 BCE) being scanned in CAiro, Egypt, where it was found to have evidence of extensive vascular disease by CT scanning. This scanning is part of a major survey to investigate some 137 mummies which has revealed that people probably had clogged arteries and heart disease some 4,000 years ago.

    Study: Even ancient mummies had clogged arteries

    Even without modern-day temptations like fast food or cigarettes, people had clogged arteries some 4,000 years ago, according to the biggest-ever hunt for the condition in mummies. Researchers say that suggests heart disease may be more a natural part of human aging rather than being directly tied to contemporary risk factors like smoking, eating fatty foods and not exercising.

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    Sugar Grove, St. Charles host candidate forums Tuesday

    Candidate forums will be held Tuesday night in Sugar Grove and St. Charles, both hosted by their respctive chambers of commerce.

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    Michael Jelinek recently won a VFW competition for high school teachers in Illinois for his work in organizing a memorial at the school for alumni killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. He also organizes a speaker series for North students with Medal of Honor recipients.

    Naperville teacher Michael Jelinek shows students how to be leaders

    Even when students are not in school for the summer, Naperville North High School teacher Michael Jelinek maintains a memorial garden for two graduates who died in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. “It’s something that you can’t just walk by it anymore,” Jelinek, 36, says. “Everyone at least takes a second to look in there and knows it’s actually a special place,...

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    Fire leaves Palatine condo building uninhabitable

    A fire killed a cat and left a small condominium building in Palatine uninhabitable early Monday, authorities said. Although the fire was contained to one unit, all six units in the building sustained considerable smoke and water damage and were deemed uninhabitable.

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    Mangelal Singh, the father of Ram Singh, the man accused of driving the bus on which a 23-year-old student was gang raped in December 2012, speaks to journalists as his mother weeps at the family’s home in New Delhi, India, Monday. Indian police confirmed that Ram Singh, one of the men on trial for his alleged involvement in the gang rape and fatal beating of a woman aboard a New Delhi bus, committed suicide in an Indian jail Monday, but his lawyer and family allege he was killed.

    Jail death of Delhi rape suspect sparks criticism

    Whether he was killed or committed suicide, the jailhouse death Monday of a man on trial for the gang rape and fatal beating of a woman on a New Delhi bus has triggered shock at the enormous security failure at one of India's best-known prisons. Authorities said Ram Singh, who was accused of driving the bus during the December attack, was in a cell with three other inmates at Tihar Jail when he...

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    U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, left, greets U.S. Army troops on the tarmac of Kabul airport Monday before boarding a flight to Washington. Hagel encountered political tension with the Afghan president and a series of security problems during his first visit to Afghanistan as Pentagon chief, but he met privately with President Hamid Karzai and says they discussed the key issues.

    Afghan troubles spell tough start for Hagel

    It's been a rough start for Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. After surviving a combative Senate confirmation battle, he jumped on a military plane to Afghanistan and was hit with the jarring difficulties of shutting down a war in a country still wracked by violence and political volatility. His stay of less than three days in the war zone was riddled with bombings, security threats, political...

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    Chicago’s Cardinal Francis George

    Chicago Catholics plan prayer before conclave
    Catholics in Chicago plan a Mass and prayer vigil as the conclave to elect a new Pope begins Tuesday at the Vatican. The Archdiocese of Chicago plans the services Monday at Holy Name Cathedral in downtown Chicago. Officials with the Archdiocese say they want to be united with Chicago's Cardinal Francis George, who is in Rome for the election.

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    fun.

    Grammy winner fun. to play Taste of Chicago

    The Grammy-winning band fun. will headline the opening night of the Taste of Chicago.

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    Downtown Chicago bridge reopens to rail service

    Repair work on a major downtown Chicago bridge has finished its first phase, alleviating headaches for some commuters at least for now.

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    Dead pigs are strewn along the riverbanks of a Shanghair river in the Songjiang district in Shanghai, China. More than 2,800 carcasses have been found floating into the financial hub through Monday.

    2,800 pigs dumped in Shanghai river raises concern

    A surge in the dumping of dead pigs upstream from Shanghai — with more than 2,800 carcasses floating into the financial hub through Monday — has followed a police campaign to curb the illicit trade in sick pig parts. The effort to keep infected pork off dinner tables may be fueling new health fears, as Shanghai residents and local media fret over the possibility of contamination to...

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    Authorities planned Monday to release more information about a Saturday house fire in the Appalachian foothills of Kentucky that killed a man, his pregnant fiancee and five children.

    Uncle says he tried to save 7 from Ky. house fire

    Authorities planned Monday to release more information about a weekend house fire in the Appalachian foothills of Kentucky that killed a man, his pregnant fiancee and five children — two of whom were friends who were spending the night. The Knox County coroner and state police have not yet identified the victims, but family members said the five children killed ranged in age from 10 months...

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    Paul and Evelyn Weber at the Cross County Mall in Mattoon.

    Mattoon man helps scientists with DNA

    Paul and Evelyn Weber of Mattoon are both cancer survivors. They know first-hand that the best treatment plan for each case is imperative for survival of the disease. As a former nurse who was diagnosed in 2002 with breast cancer, Mrs. Weber said when her husband was found to have acute myeloid leukemia in 2006, she thought, "not again." She said in comparison, his treatment was far more intense...

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    Illinois Crime Commission: Heroin is ‘medical emergency’

    The Illinois State Crime Commission says heroin use is an epidemic, and a Will County official says it should be declared a medical emergency.The commission met with experts Saturday during a summit at Prairie State College.

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    Availability of Wisconsin emergency plans varies by county

    All of Wisconsin's 72 counties have emergency plans to respond to everything from chemical leaks to weather emergencies. But the Green Bay Press-Gazette reports some counties make it harder for residents to see their plans than others, and some charge fees while others don't. Reporters with Gannett Wisconsin Media requested emergency preparedness plans from county officials across the state in...

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    Wisconsin cheese contest sees record number of entries

    Which cheese stands alone? Judges at the U.S. Championship Cheese Contest might have a hard time answering that question this week. So far, 1,702 cheeses have been entered into the contest — a record, the Green Bay Press-Gazette reported Sunday .

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    Ind. county assesses cost of death penalty trial
    Lake County officials are awaiting the final bills from the death penalty trial of a Gary man sentenced to death last week for killing his wife and two teenage stepchildren. County officials capped the costs of Kevin Isom's five-week trial at $750,000. Lake County Public Defender David Schneider tells The Times of Munster (http://bit.ly/WfGxul ) that defense-related costs are still being assessed.

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    Dawn Patrol: Elgin crash victim identified; man shot in Round Lake Beach

    Victim of Elgin crash identified; Aurora woman killed after car plunges into pond; shooting death investigation in Round Lake Beach; ex-Buffalo Grove trustee arrested; Bulls, Blackhawks both lose.

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    Weekend in Review: Fatal crash; $52,000 bill for unused sick days?
    What you may have missed over the weekend: Woman dies after car crashes into Aurora pond; a bad weekend for Blackhawks; Dist. 121 pays $52,000 for retiree's unused sick days; Elgin crash kills man, injures woman; strikes don't add much heat to school board elections; Buffalo Creek needs more cleanup; Mom, son arrested on drug charges in Round Lake Park; write-in campaigns are election longshots;...

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    A driver using a cellphone is a crash waiting to happen, safety experts say.

    Proposed hand-held ban puts distracted driving back in the hot seat

    You can't yak on a hand-held cell phone in Illinois if you're a teenager, truck driver, passing through a school or construction zones, but otherwise it's OK. Except in Chicago. And, no texting and driving anywhere. The Illinois House moved to stop the confusion with legislation banning driving while talking on hand-held phones, but will the Senate follow suit?

Sports

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    Bartlett Police Department to host annual Open House event

    The Bartlett Police Department is hosting its free annual Open House event from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sunday, March 24, at 228 S. Main St.

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    With 30 points through 26 games, right wing Patrick Kane is giving the Blackhawks plenty of scoring opportunities. Head coach Joel Quenneville, however, also likes the back checking and overall play he sees from the sixth-year NHL star.

    Win or lose, Hawks love what Kane brings

    Even when the Blackhawks lose, there's a good chance Patrick Kane will be the best player on the ice. And head coach Joel Quenneville likes what he sees from Kane, who has points in 20 of the Hawks' 26 games. “Kaner made some nice plays out there and scored some nice goals,” teammate Duncan Keith said after Sunday's loss.

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    The Blackhawks have gotten to where they are this season for the most part because “guys are playing for the team,” said coach Joel Quenneville.

    Blackhawks have given Coach Q what he wanted

    Joel Quenneville asked his players on the way out the door last year to come back thinking team first, and his players have delivered in a big way.

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    Indiana coach Tom Crean directs his team from the bench Sunday during the second half against Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich. Indiana came from behind to defeat Michigan 72071 and capture their first outright Big Ten title in two decades.

    Crean says he has apologized to Michigan assistant

    Indiana coach Tom Crean says he has apologized to Michigan assistant Jeff Meyer for their heated exchange after Sunday's game. Crean said during the Big Ten coaches conference call Monday that he apologized to Meyer over the phone on the way to the plane afterward. He said he wishes he had "never addressed anything after the heat of battle in a game, but I did and we move on. End of story."

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    Scouting the Class 4A Hinsdale Central supersectional

    Preview of the Class 4A Hinsdale Central supersectional boys basketball game between West Aurora and Proviso East

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    Monday’s girls soccer scoreboard
    High school results from Monday's varsity girls soccer games, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls water polo scoreboard
    High school results from Monday's varsity girls water polo matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s badminton scoreboard
    High school results from Monday's varsity girls badminton meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys water polo scoreboard
    High school results from Monday's varsity boys water polo meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Prospect’s Nathanael Ginnodo, center, tries to get the ball from Wheeling’s Dave Modlin, left, during MSL East play at Wheeling on Monday night.

    Prospect gets past Wheeling

    Prospect topped Wheeling 11-8 in Mid-Suburban East boys water polo Monday.

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    Former White Sox pitcher Mark Buehrle, seen here last week in spring training with the Toronto Blue Jays, escaped the tumultuous Miami Marlins thanks to a 12-player trade.

    Buehrle no longer dogged by Miami drama
    Following a tumultuous trade from the Marlins to the Blue Jays and a residency problem with the family pit bull, former White Sox starting pitcher Mark Buehrle is trying to get settled in with a Toronto team that enters the season with big expectations.

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    Former Cubs first baseman Derrek Lee, seen here hitting a homer against St. Louis in 2010, last played for the Atlanta Braves and could soon have a New York address.

    Which former Cub do the Yankees want?

    Although he has not played since 2011, former Cubs first baseman Derrek Lee is a target of interest of the New York Yankees, who need someone to replace the injured Mark Teixeira. We also take a look at other ex-Cubs, including Jeff Baker, Aramis Ramirez and Ryan Flaherty.

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    There’s plenty of blame to go around for why Derrick Rose’s comeback from knee surgery has turned into a big headache.

    Why has Rose’s return become such a headache?

    Derrick Rose's comeback from ACL surgery started out with good intentions but seems to have turned into a giant headache for all involved. At this point, it's difficult to tell if the Bulls and Rose are at odds, if Rose doesn't like the direction of the team, or if he's even coming back at all this season.

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    Konerko’s 5th HR leads White Sox over Rockies 3-1

    Paul Konerko hit his fifth home run of spring training and Chris Sale pitched into the sixth inning in his first start since signing a big contract, leading the Chicago White Sox over the Colorado Rockies 3-1 Monday.Konerko homered leading off the second against Drew Pomeranz, who struck out the side in the first.Sale gave up one hit and faced the minimum 15 batters through five innings. Yorvit Torrealba homered leading off the sixth and Tyler Colvin singled, chasing Sale. The 23-year-old left-hander, making his second exhibition start, agreed Thursday to a $32.5 million, five-year deal.

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    Samardzija homers 7-5 win

    Jeff Samardzija homered and allowed four runs over 4 2-3 innings Monday in the Chicago Cubs’ 7-5 win over the Arizona Diamondbacks 7-5.Samardzija, prepping for an opening-day start at Pittsburgh on April 1, gave up four hits and two walks and struck out two. He hit a solo homer to center in the fifth against Eury De la Rosa that pulled the Cubs to 3-2.Wellington Castillo tied the score 4-4 with a two-run homer off David Holmberg in the sixth, and Darwin Barney gave the Cubs a 6-4 lead with a two-run double against Holmberg in the seventh.Adam Eaton hit a two-run homer in the third and is batting .400 (16 for 40). Arizona starter Trevor Cahill allowed one run and three hits in four innings, walked none and struck out five, fanning the side in the second.

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    Tri-Cities water polo season preview

    A preview of the girls and boys water polo teams at St. Charles East and St. Charles North High Schools.

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    Tim Zettinger of St. Francis brings one to the net during the Wheaton Academy at St. Francis boys basketball game Friday.

    Scouting the Class 3A NIU boys basketball supersectional
    A preview of the Class 3A Northern Illinois University supersectional boys basketball game between St. Francis and Limestone

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    Glenbard East will leave the DuPage Valley Conference after the 2013-14 school year to join the Upstate Eight.

    DVC frees Glenbard East, West Aurora to leave early

    The road is clear for Glenbard East and West Aurora to leave the DuPage Valley Conference beginning in the 2014-15 school year. Reversing a previous decision, on Friday the DVC Board of Control voted unanimously to make an exception to its bylaws and allow Glenbard East and West Aurora to leave the league a year early so the schools can accept an invitation to join the Upstate Eight Conference.

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    Blackhawks center Jonathan Toews and defenseman Duncan Keith skate to the locker room with teammates Sunday after their 6-5 loss to the Edmonton Oilers.

    Finally, a breather for the Blackhawks

    After playing seven games in 11 days, the Blackhawks rested on Monday. And they'll get another day off Tuesday to regroup after 2 straight losses that followed a 24-game point streak.

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    Harper on track with indoor season

    The Harper College men's and women's track and field teams are off to a solid start after earning six NJCAA national qualifying slots in a recent indoor meet at Carthage College.

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    Fire’s Friedrich out with injured hamstring

    The Chicago Fire announced Monday that German defender Arne Friedrich has returned to Berlin to seek treatment on his injured hamstring.

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    Purdue head coach Sharon Versyp, right, celebrates with her team after their 62-47 win over Michigan State in the championship of the Big Ten Conference tournament Sundat at Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates.

    Big Ten, Sears Centre saw positive signs with tourney

    After calling Conseco Field House in Indianapolis home for 17 of the last 18 years, the Big Ten's move to the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates for the conference's women's basketball tournament this past weekend met with favorable reviews. While attendance was lower than the average in Indianapolis, it didn't totally disappoint officials from either the conference or the venue.

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    Stevenson’s Matt Morrissey fights off St. Viator’s Ore Arogundade while trying to get to the basket in sectional championship play at Waukegan on Friday.

    Scouting Stevenson vs. Rockford Boylan

    Here's a look ahead to Tuesday's Stevenson-Rockford Boylan Class 4A boys basketball supersectional at Northern Illinois.

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    Pittsburgh forward J.J. Moore (44) is pressured by DePaul’s Jamee Crockett (21) as Moses Morgan watches Saturday during the second half at the Allstate Arena. Pittsburgh won 81-66.

    Big East gets ready for farewell tourney

    The Big East tournament will have a touch of a wake to it this week. Most of the matchups will be the last meetings of the schools as members of the conference. When games end, there will be plenty of reminiscing about rivalries and talk of what is to come. "It's special because the Big East, as we have known it, is ending," Georgetown coach John Thompson III said.

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    Mike North video: Only one team can beat the Heat

    Mike North believes there is only one team out there who can beat the Heat. That team is the Chicago Bulls with a very healthy Derrick Rose. It seems the Heat might have clear sailing until they play the rapidly improving Los Angeles Lakers.

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    Derrick Rose just might have too many voices in his head as the Bulls await his return to the lineup.

    Bulls’ Rose seems more confused than afraid

    Derrick Rose's head must spinning over all the advice he's getting over whether to either return to the Bulls this season or wait until next season. Sometimes it’s easy to forget that Rose not only is young but the surgically repaired knee is his first significant injury. Even for a world-class athlete at his age and this stage of his career, life tends to be more experimental and exploratory than clear and cut.

Business

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    A study has found that clicking Facebook’s friendly blue “like” buttons may reveal more about people than they realize.

    What you ‘like’ on Facebook can be revealing

    Clicking those friendly blue "like" buttons strewn across the Web may be doing more than marking you as a fan of Coca-Cola or Lady Gaga. It could out you as gay. It might reveal how you vote. It might even suggest that you're an unmarried introvert with a high IQ and a weakness for nicotine.

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    Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, aims to arm women with the tools and guidance they need to keep moving forward in the workforce.

    Sheryl Sandberg: On a mission to elevate women

    Sheryl Sandberg is not backing down. The Facebook chief operating officer's book "Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead" goes on sale Monday amid criticism that she's too successful and rich to lead a movement. But Sandberg says her focus remains on spurring action and progress among women. "The conversation, the debate is all good, because where we were before was stagnation — and stagnation is bad," she said in an interview with The Associated Press.

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    The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index climbed within nine points of its record high and a gauge of market volatility slipped to the lowest level in six years as Apple Inc. rallied and banks advanced.

    Dow rises for seventh day running

    The stock market crept higher Monday, pushing the Dow Jones industrial average to its seventh straight day of gains. Boeing was the Dow's top stock, surging 2 percent. A Boeing executive reportedly said he's confident the aircraft maker has figured out a fix for the battery problems that have grounded the 787 Dreamliner.

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    Soda’s reign as America’s most popular drink could be entering its twilight years, with plain old bottled water making a run for the top spot.

    America’s new love: Water

    It wasn't too long ago that America had a love affair with soda. Now, an old flame has the country's heart. As New York City's ban on the sale of large cups of soda and other sugary drinks at some businesses starts on Tuesday, one thing is clear: soda's run as the nation's beverage of choice has fizzled. In its place? A favorite for much of history: Plain old H2O.

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    Blackberry Z10

    New BlackBerry coming to the U.S. on March 22

    BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion will launch its new touchscreen smartphone in the U.S. with AT&T on March 22. The release will come several weeks after RIM launched the much-delayed devices elsewhere. AT&T said Monday said the Z10 will be available for $199.99 with a two-year contract. Sales of the device began in the U.K. and Canada shortly after RIM unveiled the phone in late January.

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    Sandy work helps boost MYR Group 4Q revenues

    MYR Group Inc., a specialty contractor serving the electrical infrastructure markets, said fourth quarter revenues were up 5.8 percent over last year, partially as a result of increased work due to Hurricane Sandy.

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    LanzaTech names ex-PETRONAS exec to board

    Low-carbon fuel and chemical manufacturer LanzaTech has named a Malaysian oil and gas executive to its board of directors.

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    Land O’Frost launches new ‘Minis’ packaged meats

    Packaged lunch meat manufacturer Land O'Frost is launching its new "Minis" product nationwide this month.

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    Coleman Cable reports record 4Q, yearly earnings

    Coleman Cable Inc., a manufacturer of electrical and electronic wire and cable products, reported record earning results for the fourth quarter and year 2012.

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    Dubai faces a “pivotal year” in 2014 as the emirate tackles $20 billion of debt amid an unclear legal framework for restructurings and uncertain support from its richer neighbor, Moody’s Investors Service said.

    Dubai faces ‘debt wall’ with uncertain support, Moody’s says

    Dubai faces a "pivotal year" in 2014 as the emirate tackles $20 billion of debt amid an unclear legal framework for restructurings and uncertain support from its richer neighbor, Moody's Investors Service said. "Little progress has been made on clarifying and strengthening the legal framework for insolvencies/debt restructuring, while details of the Dubai government's capacity to support its government-related institutions remain uncertain," Moody's said in a report.

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    While the industry’s rabbits, mice or guinea pigs used in testing will now be spared, consumers are unlikely to notice immediate changes because products containing ingredients that were tested on animals before the ban can remain on the shelves.

    EU bans cosmetics with animal-tested ingredients

    No new cosmetic product sold in Europe can contain ingredients tested on animals, thanks to a European Union ban introduced Monday."This is a great opportunity for Europe to set an example of responsible innovation in cosmetics without any compromise on consumer safety," said Tonio Borg, the top official on health and consumer issues for the 27-country EU.

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    Dell lets Icahn review books amid mounting opposition to LBO

    Dell Inc., the personal computer maker facing mounting shareholder resistance to a proposed $24.4 billion leveraged buyout, has agreed to let billionaire investor Carl Icahn review confidential information. Icahn, who has amassed a stake in Dell and is pushing the company to pay a $9 a share special dividend, announced the agreement in a statement today, without providing additional details.

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    Corporate credit swaps in U.S. Rise after reaching two-year low

    A gauge of U.S. corporate credit risk climbed from a two-year low after Fitch Ratings cut Italy's credit grade and as Chinese industrial output expanded at the slowest pace since 2009. The Markit CDX North American Investment Grade Index, a credit-default swaps benchmark that investors use to hedge against losses or to speculate on creditworthiness, increased 0.8 basis point to a mid-price of 81.4 basis points at 8:13 a.m. in New York, according to prices compiled by Bloomberg.

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    Italy’s bonds decline after Ftch downgrade; German bunds gain c.2013 Bloomberg News

    Italy's government bonds fell for a second day after Fitch Ratings cut the nation's credit rating, saying inconclusive elections threatened the country's ability to respond to recession. The declines pushed the two-year yield to the most in almost two weeks as Fitch said after markets closed on March 8 that it lowered Italy's sovereign rating to BBB+ from A- with a negative outlook.

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    Cheapest treasuries since 2011 are alluring to Gundlach

    The sudden slowdown in U.S. inflation has left Treasuries at the cheapest levels in almost two years, aiding the Federal Reserve's efforts to tamp down long-term borrowing costs while the economy improves.Yields on 10-year notes, the benchmark measure for everything from home loans to corporate bonds, reached an 11- month high of 2.08 percent on March 8.

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    Markets sluggish after Chinese data dump

    Markets have started the week sluggishly Monday as investors pause for breath following a dash that's seen the Dow Jones index in the U.S. record a series of all-time highs. Chinese economic figures over the weekend were largely disappointing and prompted many investors to book some recent gains and take to the sidelines after a rally that's seen many stock indexes around the world push up to multi-year highs following a strong start to the year.

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    The price of oil fell Monday after a stronger jobs growth in the U.S. sparked speculation of an earlier end to the Federal Reserve’s loose monetary policy.

    Oil down after US posts stronger jobs growth

    The price of oil fell Monday after a stronger jobs growth in the U.S. sparked speculation of an earlier end to the Federal Reserve's loose monetary policy. Benchmark oil for April delivery was down 32 cents to $91.63 a barrel at late afternoon Bangkok time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

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    A 35-year-old deaf and mute woman threatens to take her life after climbing up the supports of a sculpture in Omonia Square, central Athens Monday. The woman, a single mother of two, was protesting serious delays in disability payments that have resulted from successive austerity measures in the crisis-hit country.

    Greek economy shrinks 5.7 percent in 4th quarter

    Updated official data show Greece's economy shrank at a slightly slower pace than initially forecast in the last quarter of 2012, but still contracted by 6.4 percent during the year. The country, which is dependent on bailout loans to survive, is in its sixth year of recession, which has been exacerbated by harsh austerity measures demanded by creditors to curb runaway budget deficits.

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    An aerial view of damage to the New Jersey shoreline following Superstorm Sandy. There are a rising number of homes damaged by Sandy hitting the market - ranging from 10 percent off pre-storm prices for upscale homes in New Yorkís Long Island and the Jersey Shore to up to 60 percent off modest bungalows in Staten Island and Queens - but itís very much a game of buyer beware.

    Sandy-damaged homes hit market at bargain prices

    It sounds like the premise for a new reality TV series: "Hurricane House" — people scouring waterside communities looking to buy homes damaged by Superstorm Sandy at a deep discount. While there are bargains out there, ranging from 10 percent off pre-storm prices for upscale homes on New York's Long Island and the Jersey Shore to as much as 60 percent off modest bungalows Staten Island and Queens, it's still very much a game of buyer beware.

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    A Kurdish flag at the Citadel fortress in the old center of Irbil, the capital of Iraq’s autonomous Kurdish region. Aided by an oil-fueled economic boom, Kurds have consolidated their autonomy, increased their leverage against the central government in Baghdad and are pursuing an independent foreign policy often at odds with that of Iraq.

    10 years after US invasion, Kurds look to the West

    At an elite private school in Iraq's autonomous Kurdish region, children learn Turkish and English before Arabic. University students dream of jobs in Europe, not Baghdad. And a local entrepreneur says he doesn't like doing business elsewhere because areas outside Kurdish control are too unstable. In the decade since U.S.-led forces invaded Iraq, Kurds have trained their sights toward Turkey and the West, at the expense of ties with the still largely dysfunctional rest of the country.

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    San Jose city workers Mark Ruffing, left, and Rita Tabaldo attach eviction notices to a tent at a tent city in San Jose, Calif. The Silicon Valley is adding jobs faster than it has in more than a decade as the tech industry roars back. Stocks are soaring and fortunes are once again on the rise. But a more ominous record is also being set this year: food stamp participation just hit a 10 year high, African American wages fell 18 percent in two years and median incomes fell throughout the region.

    Many left behind as Silicon Valley rebounds

    On a morning the stock market was sailing to a record high and a chilly storm was blowing into Silicon Valley, Wendy Carle stuck her head out of the tent she calls home to find city workers duct taping an eviction notice to her flimsy, flapping shelter walls. "I have no idea where I'm going to go," she said, tugging on her black sweatshirt over her brown curls and scooping up Hero, an albino dog. She glanced at the glimmering windows on a cluster of high-tech office buildings just blocks away and shook her head.

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    Husband and wife team, Jaime and Marc Ginsberg, operate Body Werks Physical Therapy Ltd. in Arlington Heights.

    Body Werks Physical Therapy working out in Arlington Heights

    Body Werks Physical Therapy is a provider of outpatient physical therapy and rehabilitation in Arlington Heights. The owners, a husband and wife team, facilitate in the care and prevention of orthopedic, work and sports related injuries.

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    Brad Kriser

    Kriser’s born out of love for pets

    Kukec's People features Brad Kriser, a Highland Park native who founded the Kriser's retail stores that feature all-natural foods for pets. He refers to the store as the Whole Foods for pets.

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    Small businesses should be tracking their own sales trends

    Business owners say they're struggling with sales and need to get in front of more people. Jim Kendall looks at the issue.

Life & Entertainment

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    “Modernist Cuisine at Home”

    Lean and lovin' it: Modernist spin on health-conscious cuisine

    As frequently said on Monty Python's Flying Circus: "And now for something completely different." Today I'm diving into new waters called modernist cuisine. I recently received a copy of "Modernist Cuisine at Home" (aka MC@H) by Nathan Myhrvold and Maxime Bilet and have this to say about it: If you're hungry, do not open MC@H without a bib or napkin handy because you're guaranteed to drool after just a few pages.

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    Go to dailyherald.com/contests/getyoursummeron to enter your yard in our contest for a chance to win a weekly prize and a chance to win one of several grand prize packages.

    Enter our contest to win a yard makeover!
    It's not even spring yet, but we're already daydreaming about sitting on the patio, gazing at our perfectly manicured backyard, with a couple of burgers on the grill and a nice glass of wine in our hand. But if your yard can't live up to that ideal, check out our Get Your Summer On contest.

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    Wayne Coyne, the lead singer and guitarist of The Flaming Lips during the Optimus Primavera Sound music festival in Porto, Portugal. The Flaming Lips are playing a free outdoor concert at SXSW this week, as well as premiering Coyne’s film “A Year in the Life of Wayne’s Phone.”

    Big names at SXSW, but what about big breaks?

    In the frenzy of South by Southwest, even standouts like The Flaming Lips feel the need to stand out. Now consider that problem while surveying the 2,200 mostly unknown bands packing Austin starting Tuesday for the marquee week of the trendy festival.

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    'Fat-Free' Mac and cheese
    Fat Free Mac and Cheese

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    Christopher Anderson and Janie Wang use spherification products at their home in Eliot, Maine. Anderson, a software developer by trade, launched Modernist Pantry with his wife, Wang, two years ago when he couldn't find the ingredients needed for his culinary dabbling. Today, Modernist Pantry carries more than 300 ingredients in quantities tailored to the home kitchen, as well as equipment.

    Modernist cooking creates surge of science shops

    The growing appeal of so-called modernist cooking — a science-tastic take on haute cuisine — has more home cooks adding laboratory-worthy ingredients and gizmos to their shopping. And that, of course, has spawned a mini-niche of online companies selling everything you need to play culinary alchemist at home.

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    Boxing is Joe Gundling's favorite workout with trainer Tony Figueroa.

    Intense workouts become new normal for contestants

    Exhausting, excruciating, tough, intense, painful. Those are just some of the words the Fittest Losers use to describe their workout sessions. "The workouts I've been doing have been beyond intense," says contestant Greg Moehrlin. “My trainer, Wade (Merrill), has a well-thought-out plan for me that usually involves a circuit of exercises. And he doesn't let me stop."

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    Quinn Marvin, 14, in his room at his family’s Washington home, built his own computer that includes a water cooling system.

    Parents struggle with question of how much screen time

    Based on research linking too much television to language delays and disrupted sleep patterns, the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly discourages television viewing for any child younger than 2, and recommends that older children watch no more than an hour or two per day. But for parents seeking advice on managing their kids' screen time beyond television, the recommendations go no further than the obvious: Limit it, and monitor content.

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    Look! It’s my trainer Josh and me, and I’m practicing!

    Changing approach to workouts, nutrition takes practice

    I know I'm supposed to be updating you on my Fittest Loser journey, and I will. But first, indulge me for a minute, OK? I'm going to tell you a quick story about something else that's a big part of my life: design.

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    Monday's episode of “Dallas” — surely the first without Larry Hagman's deliciously vile presence — stands as a fitting tribute both to him and to J.R., complete with a wake and a funeral for the rascally oil baron. Hagman died of cancer at 81 the day after Thanksgiving.

    'Dallas' funeral for J.R. honors Larry Hagman

    Who killed J.R.? That's the mystery propelling "Dallas" through the rest of its second season as a TNT revival. And that question hangs heavy in the upcoming episode (airing at 8 p.m. Monday), which confirms the sad truth every viewer knew was coming: glorious scoundrel J.R. Ewing has died, after decades of infamy dating back at least to 1980, when he was gunned down in his office. J.R.'s fate was sealed this time by reality.

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    PET scans allow doctors clearer view of body organs

    I'm in treatment for colorectal cancer. My doctor has scheduled a PET scan to see how well my treatment is working. What will happen during this test?

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    Trying to wean a baby from nighttime feedings

    If a 9-month-old baby is growing well and getting plenty of good calories from a daytime regimen of three hearty solid meals plus 20 to 24 ounces of formula, eliminating unnecessary nighttime bottles is the way to go and can improve the sleep of everyone in the family.

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    Lt. j.g. Shannon Posey goes through a cardiac-arrest simulation on a patient simulator at the Naval Hospital Bremerton in Bremerton, Wash.

    Realistic robots put medical staff to the test

    Doctors, nurses and corpsmen at the Naval Hospital Bremerton in Bremerton, Wash., stay sharp by working on dummies. The hospital's 2½-year-old simulation lab recently got three of the most advanced mannequins available, increasing its population to eight. The new mannequins breathe, bleed, talk and mimic other human functions.

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    Dr. Marisa Cruz at the University of San Francisco VA Medical Center in San Francisco is the lead author of a study showing that a 12-item list of health questions can help predict chances for dying within 10 years for patients aged 50 and older.

    Your chances of dying by 2023? Test offers clues

    Want to know your chances of dying in the next 10 years? Here are some bad signs: getting winded walking several blocks, smoking and having trouble pushing a chair across the room. That's according to a "mortality index" developed by San Francisco researchers for people older than 50. The test scores may satisfy people's morbid curiosity, but the researchers say their 12-item index is mostly for use by doctors.

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    Mundelein’s Park View Fittest team members, from left, Rita Kipp, Barbara Daudelin and Amy Eiserman took part in the Frosty Footrace 5-K.

    Social media spurring on competition among teams

    To get past the slump many team members experienced during week four of the 12-week Fittest Loser Community Challenge, the teams energized the competition — on Facebook. The Fittest Loser Facebook page has become a platform for teams to engage in friendly competition by posting pictures of their workout routines.

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    Oral hygiene research aiding teeth, health

    It's likely that the condition of our teeth influences health over many parts of our body beyond the digestive system. The bottom line from a 16-volunteer experiment was that using a high-fluoride toothpaste three times a day provided four times greater fluoride protection than brushing with a standard toothpaste twice a day.

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    New research could lead to male contraceptive pill

    Say what you will about size, it's the numbers that really matter. Men come armed with hundreds of millions of sperm, so a successful male contraceptive has to deal with every one of the little buggers. The sexual landscape may be changing, though, thanks to a University of Minnesota chemist who has developed a new approach to bringing men into the world of birth control, short of condoms or vasectomies.

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    Status report for the Fittest Loser contestants
    Fittest Loser vital statistics - Week 5

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    Studies have found a correlation between sexual activity and happiness among people over 65.

    Many seniors remain sexually active, study finds

    While many young people shudder at the thought of grandparents having sex, it is taking place in a wide range of settings, including single and married seniors living independently in the community to those in nursing homes. Increased sexual activity is a strong predictor for happiness, according to the data analysis of the General Social Survey.

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    Walnuts and blueberries are both good for your brain.

    Your health: Brain food
    Eat the best foods to feed your brain, and a new memoir looks at the physical and emotional toll of a common ailment -- hearing loss.

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    Fewer die in hospitals as hospice, intensive care use increase

    More people are dying in hospice care rather than in the hospital, though the shift hasn't led to less aggressive treatment or lower costs as patients spend additional time in intensive care units in the last month of life. Hospice care among the elderly doubled to about 40 percent in the past decade, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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    2013 Morgan 3 Wheeler, Norb Bries, Northshore Sportscars, Lake Bluff

    New Morgan three-wheeler is history in the making

    Passion for heritage is a chief component of any successful modern automaker. Few have gone to the lengths to honor their history quite like British automaker Morgan Motor Co.

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