Daily Archive : Wednesday November 14, 2012

News

  •  

    District 214 foundation benefit auction starts Thursday

    On Thanksgiving Day, make sure you leave room for a plateful of bidding as the 2012 Online Auction goes live at 6 p.m. through eBay, kicking off the season for holiday gift shopping with a heart! Brought to you by the District 214 Community Education Foundation, the auction runs for 10 days.

  •  
    Harper College students from left, Aydee Gutierrez, Deisy Vasquez and Virginia Pratcher visit ItCanWait.com to pledge not to text while driving.

    Lt. Gov. Simon urges Harper students to not text while driving

    They're seemingly innocuous text messages, but "lol," "yeah" and "where u at" are just a few of phrases that have led distracted drivers to cause fatal car wrecks. Some Harper students are the latest to say the texts aren't worth risking a life. The Palatine campus Thursday hosted Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon, state Rep. Tom Morrison and others to promote AT&T Illinois' "It Can Wait" campaign to urge...

  •  
    Dawn Brown

    Sheriff: Mastiff mauled, killed Big Rock woman

    A 44-year-old firefighter who was found dead in her Big Rock home earlier this week was mauled and killed by a mastiff, one of three dogs she owned, authorities said Wednesday. Dawn Brown was a veteran firefighgter at the Bristol Kendall Fire Protection District in Yorkville and also a part-time firefighter with the Big Rock Fire Protection District.

  •  
    Sharell Thomas

    Four arrested in Hoffman Estates High School bomb hoax

    Hoffman Estates police have arrested four teens, two of them juveniles, after determining a bomb threat at Hoffman Estates High School Wednesday morning was a hoax to try to get them out of school for the day. The school was on a soft lockdown for about an hour Wednesday morning after a report of a bomb in the school, according to police.

  •  
    Dan Duffy

    Should cancer center discriminate against hiring smokers?

    State Sen. Dan Duffy says he's not yet sure if he'll ask lawmakers to override a Gov. Pat Quinn veto of his plan to allow Cancer Treatment Centers of America to weigh whether someone smokes when making hiring decisions.

  •  

    Former attorney general Fahner calls pension mess “unfixable”

    After years of pushing lawmakers hard to tackle the state's growing retirement debt, a leading business group called the Illinois pension problem "unfixable."

  •  

    District 15 to look into selling 40 vacant acres

    Anticipating population growth would necessitate building a fifth junior high, Palatine Township Elementary District 15 bought close to 40 acres in Inverness back in 1999. Enrollment trends have since reversed course, however, leaving officials to ponder whether they should consider an interested developer's inquiry into the Ela Road property in the wake of current economic uncertainty and the...

  •  

    Elgin moves ahead with strategic planning process

    The Elgin City Council approved the latest progress on a five-year strategic plan that has been in the works for more than a year. City Manager Sean Stegall presented three objectives for each of the seven priority areas council members officially adopted in May and included sample strategies for achieving those objectives during the city council meeting Wednesday. The council still has to...

  •  

    Elgin Council approves moratorium on cutting trees

    The City of Elgin is taking steps to catch up to its peers when it comes to regulating tree preservation. City council members approved a three-month moratorium on tree removal Wednesday — a time period that will allow for a public hearing before the planning and zoning commission and subsequent consideration of the finished tree preservation ordinance by the council. The moratorium is...

  •  
    Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, 59, exudes a comfort with his authority, as befits the son of a hero of the revolution born into the Communist elite. Designated as successor five years ago, Xi will take over as party general secretary from Hu Jintao on Thursday and as president next spring in only China’s second orderly transfer of power.

    Xi Jinping takes helm of China amid reform calls

    Xi Jinping became leader of China on Thursday, securing the Communist Party's top spot and oversight of the military in a political transition upset by scandals that have added fuel to public demands for change as the country faces slower economic growth.

  •  
    John Hutton

    iPads for all students in Gurnee District 56

    Gurnee Elementary District 56 plans to start distributing personal tablet computers to all students next month, and Superintendent John Hutton says being among the trailblazers with such an initiative has risks. "Being a trailblazer, we do not have the benefit of learning from the mistakes of others," Hutton said. "We have done our homework and have looked at this hypothetically from every angle...

  •  
    Sen. John McCain, ranking Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee, center, accompanied by fellow committee members, Sen. Kelly Ayotte, a New Hampshire Republican, left, and Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican, said Wednesday he would do all he could to block the nomination of United Nations Ambassador Susan Rice to replace Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

    Obama defends Rice in face of GOP opposition

    President Barack Obama lashed out at senior Republican senators Wednesday over their criticism of U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice in the aftermath of the deadly Sept. 11 attack in Libya, saying they should "go after me" and not her.

  •  
    The sex scandal that led to CIA Director David Petraeus’ downfall widened Tuesday with word Marine Gen. John Allen, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, is under investigation for thousands of alleged “inappropriate communications” with another woman involved in the case.

    Obama responds warily to sex scandal, FBI probe

    Responding warily to his administration's sudden sex scandal, President Barack Obama said Wednesday he's seen no evidence that national security was damaged by the revelations that ended his CIA director's career and imperil that of his Afghan war commander.

  •  

    Plan to disband Winfield Police Department dropped

    A highly controversial plan to have the DuPage County sheriff's office take over police protection in Winfield has been scrapped. Winfield Trustee Tim Allen said he was notified on Wednesday by the sheriff's office that it's not interested in participating in the outsourcing proposal, which village officials were considering to raise money to fix the town's deteriorating streets.

  •  
    Ron Yurcus, a retired hospice chaplain and 45-year resident of Glen Ellyn, discovered a winning Powerball ticket from an Aug. 22 drawing a few weeks ago.

    Glen Ellyn man cleans desk, finds $1 million winning lottery ticket

    A Glen Ellyn man received $1 million in lottery winnings Wednesday after noticing he won on a ticket that had been sitting on his desk for two months. Ron Yurcus, a retired hospice chaplain, discovered the Powerball ticket a few weeks ago. “About 12 tickets had accumulated on my desk, and I decided to tidy up to make room for my new computer,” he said. “I checked the winning...

  •  
    Heriberto Ramirez

    11-year-old witness describes mom’s death at murder trial

    The murder trial of Heriberto Ramirez began Wednesday in Rolling Meadows with testimony from his daughters, including the now 11-year-old who said she was "sitting there scared" during the early morning hours of Feb. 14, 2011, when her mother was killed in the couple's home near Des Plaines.

  •  
    Ricardo Anderson

    Two Waukegan teens charged with robbery

    A pair of teens — one of whom had been released from juvenile custody just two days earlier — have been charged in connection with the beating and robbery of a man Friday in Waukegan.

  •  
    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is telling top donors that President Barack Obama won re-election because of the “gifts” he had already provided to blacks, Hispanics and young voters. Romney also cites as a reason for his loss the president’s effort to paint Romney as anti-immigrant. In a call Wednesday to those donors, Romney said Obama’s campaign focused on giving targeted groups what he called “a big gift” while his campaign had been about, in his words, “big issues for the whole country.”

    Romney: Obama won with ‘gifts’ to certain voters

    Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney is telling top donors that President Barack Obama won re-election because of the "gifts" he had already provided to blacks, Hispanics and young voters and because of the president's effort to paint Romney as anti-immigrant. "The president's campaign, if you will, focused on giving targeted groups a big gift," Romney said in a call to donors on Wednesday.

  •  
    This center at Recreation Park in Arlington Heights, which was built in the 1930s, would have been renovated if a tax increase had passed.

    National group spent money to defeat Arlington Hts. parks bonds

    The Illinois chapter of Americans for Prosperity made about 7,000 robocalls a few days before the election telling people to vote "no" on the Arlington Heights Park District tax increase, which lost by about 800 votes. This was one of 12 municipal level races they were involved in around Illinois, including others in West Chicago, Wauconda and Gilberts.

  •  
    In this photo from November 2011, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers is seen at left as House Speaker John Boehner speaks and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor listens. Rodgers was voted to the No. 4 leadership position among House Republicans on Wednesday.

    House GOP picks woman for a top leadership post

    Stinging from double-digit election losses among female voters, House Republicans elected a woman to their top leadership team Wednesday in a tense test of gender politics and the clout of the GOP's power brokers.

  •  
    Third-grader Brandon LaCrosse joins other Oak Grove School students during the inaugural meal-packing session Wednesday at Feed My Starving Children in Libertyville.

    Feed My Starving Children opens center in Libertyville

    About 150 volunteers cheerfully scooped and weighed essential ingredients, filled "Manna Packs" and sealed them for delivery to Haiti during the inaugural session Wednesday of what will be Feed My Starving Children's largest Chicago area operation. "This is the first day. Over the next two weeks, we'll package 272,000 meals," said Mark Crea, the organization's executive director and CEO.

  •  
    Katie Hokanson

    Sleepy Hollow woman charged with selling drugs

    A Sleepy Hollow woman is being held on a $150,000 bail after she sold drugs to undercover police officers, authorities said. Katie A. Hokanson, 20, of the 800 block of Wincrest Court, was charged with four drug-related counts, including the manufacture/delivery of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of Prairie Meadows Park in West Dundee.

  •  
    Alfredo Vidigaray

    Carpentersville man charged with sexual assault of relative

    A Carpentersville man has been charged with sexually assaulting a 14-year-old female relative. Alfredo Vidigaray, 36, of 125 San Juan Road, faces five class 1 felony charges for criminal sexual assault of a family member younger than age 18.

  •  
    Rita Crundwell walks pass the media outside of the federal courthouse in Rockford on Wednesday. The former comptroller of Dixon, she pleaded guilty to allegations she embezzled more than $50 million from the small city to fund a lavish lifestyle.

    She embezzled $50 million from a small town in Illinois

    A federal prosecutor said Wednesday that a small-town Illinois bookkeeper's admission that she embezzled more than $50 million should serve as a warning for other public officials.

  •  

    Public hearing on hospital proposal

    A public hearing regarding a proposed hospital in Lindenhurst is scheduled for 11 a.m. Thursday at the Lake Villa Township west campus, 37850 N. Route 59, Lake Villa.

  •  

    Libertyville suspends two businesses’ liquor licenses

    Two liquor licenses in Libertyville were suspended earlier this week.

  •  
    People visit the BAPS Hindu Temple in Bartlett and reflect over the annakut, or mountain of food, an offering of hundreds of vegetarian delicacies as the first meal of the Hindu New Year.

    Hundreds celebrate Diwali at Bartlett temple, other locations

    The Indian festival of Diwali this week marks the beginning of the new year for several of the world's religions. It is celebrated annually in the fall by followers of the Hindu, Jain, and Sikh religions.

  •  
    Rescuers bring people out by boat in the wake of superstorm Sandy in Little Ferry, N.J., on Oct. 30. Despite days of dire forecasts and explicit warnings, hundreds of thousands of people in New York and New Jersey ignored mandatory evacuation orders as Superstorm Sandy closed in.

    What does it take to get people to flee a storm?

    Despite days of dire forecasts and explicit warnings, hundreds of thousands of people in New York and New Jersey ignored mandatory evacuation orders as Superstorm Sandy closed in. Now, after scores of deaths and harrowing escapes, emergency officials will look at what more can be done to persuade residents to get out when their lives are in danger.

  •  
    Roger Kotecki

    DuPage forest officials clash over taxes

    The tax levy that supports operations of the DuPage County Forest Preserve is set to increase, over the objections of one forest commissioner. Linda Painter was the lone opponent of an operating tax levy of about $26 million, which is about $865,000 more than last year. "This is a tough economic time and I want to see people's taxes go down or stay flat," she said.

  •  

    Learn about scrimshaw at Great Lakes

    The Great Lakes Naval Station's museum will hold a children's program from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17 introducing participants to soap scrimshaw. For the uninitiated, scrimshaw is the traditional sailor art of decorative carving on whalebone. During this event children will have a chance to design and create their own soap scrimshaw.

  •  
    Julie Salk

    Lawyer for Barrington High administrator denies theft claims

    The attorney for a Barrington High School administrator accused of stealing more than $5,000 from the school's fine arts department called the accusations "unfounded" after a brief hearing in Lake County court Wednesday. "These charges are completely unfounded and we intend to prove that," he said.

  •  

    Woodland Primary School hosting author

    Woodland Primary School's library will welcome children's book author and illustrator Melissa Iwai and author Denis Markell on Monday, Nov. 19. The school is at 17366 W. Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake. Iwai, a returning guest to the primary school, will present her latest book, "Hush Little Monster," to the school's Early Childhood students. "Hush Little Monster," which she illustrated, was written...

  •  

    Geneva teachers ratify contract

    The Geneva Education Association Wednesday ratified a new three-year contract. Details will not be released, however, until the school board votes, likely next week, board President Mark Grosso said Wednesday.

  •  
    Metra’s new Highliner cars are built at a newly built Nippon Sharyo factory in Rochelle.

    New Metra cars don’t eclipse ‘transit desert’ concerns

    Metra officials thanked Illinois lawmakers for coming up with $585 million to pay for 160 new rail cars on the Electric Line Wednesday but said the system's needs don't end there. "I salute Metra taking this initiative to the South Side of Chicago and Chicago's south suburbs," Gov. Pat Quinn said, during a ceremony at Chicago's Millennium Station. "We don't want anyone left behind."

  •  

    Senior/Disabled Job Fair in Schaumburg Nov. 20

    Schaumburg Township and Palatine Township will host their 15th annual Senior/Disabled Job Fair at 1 p.m. sharp Tuesday, Nov. 20, at the Woodfield Hyatt, 1800 Golf Road in Schaumburg, across from Woodfield Mall. More than 200 jobs will be available to serious employment-seekers at the fair.

  •  

    Prairie Grove school board approves 4-year teachers contract

    The Prairie Grove Elementary District 46 school board and its teachers union have inked a deal on a 4-year contract that includes salary increases for teachers. Teachers in the district near Crystal Lake went on strike for one day in October as contract negotiations stalled after more than a year.

  •  
    Cliff McIlvaine

    City wants OK to demolish, or fix, bill man for home work

    The city of St. Charles will ask a judge in January for permission to demolish the home of a St. Charles man who has let a home addition project fester since 1975 or to make repairs itself and send homeowner Cliff McIlvaine the bill. "It is a final resort. I think we are at that point," said Phil Luetkehans, attorney for the city.

  •  

    Roselle police seek leads in false Lake Park bomb threat

    Lake Park High School officials said police haven't found anything dangerous so far at the school's east campus, following multiple bomb threats made by phone just before 9 a.m. today. The school was safely evacuated and classes are canceled for the day.

  •  

    Tri-Cities police reports
    Three woman in their late 20s left Alley 64, 212 W. Main St., St. Charles, at about 12:45 a.m. Tuesday without paying for $76 worth of food and drinks, according to a police report. No arrests have been made.

  •  

    Fire causes little damage at Glen Ellyn pizzeria

    A small kitchen fire at a well-known downtown Glen Ellyn pizzeria was extinguished by the restaurant's sprinkler system early Wednesday, authorities said. Fire crews were dispatched to Barone's of Glen Ellyn, 475 Pennsylvania Ave., at about 4:40 a.m. for reports of a sprinkler activation, according to the Glen Ellyn Volunteer Fire Company.

  •  

    All 4 Glenbards will graduate same day

    For the first time in recent years, all four Glenbard High School District 87 schools will hold commencement ceremonies on the same day and on their own campuses. The move comes at the request of principals at the schools, who believed it would be best for students and their families if graduation be held on a Friday night — May 31, 2013, officials said.

  •  
    An Antioch Elementary School teacher has been placed on paid administrative leave after being accused of grabbing and bruising a student´s arm, officials said Wednesday.

    Antioch Elementary teacher accused of bruising student’s arm

    An Antioch Elementary School teacher has been placed on paid administrative leave after being accused of grabbing and bruising a student's arm, officials said Wednesday. Antioch School District 34 administrators and Antioch police are investigating the student's complaint.

  •  
    Michael Skala

    New McHenry County Board member to resign from school post

    Huntley Unit District 158 school board President Michael Skala, who was elected to the McHenry County Board last week, decided against holding two offices at the same time so he could see through a long-standing lawsuit about building construction.

  •  
    Eric and Jean Dahl with their children, Gunnar, 8; Andrew, 6; and Julia, 3, at the Les Turner ALS Walk4Life. Friends, family and co-workers will gather Saturday to celebrate Eric’s 41st birthday and raise money to buy the family a customized van.

    Friends stage fundraiser for Wheeling HS grad battling ALS

    Eric Dahl's loyal friends from Wheeling High School and his younger days in Prospect Heights are gathering Saturday for a fundraiser to buy him a customized van to help him get around as he battles ALS. The Goin' Mobile fundraiser takes place 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday at Pinstripes, 7 Oakbrook Center Mall on Illinois Route 83 just north of 22nd Street in Oak Brook.

  •  

    North Aurora murder-suicide case closed

    North Aurora police have closed the investigation in to the Oct. 29 murder-suicide at a supportive living center.

  •  
    Groundcover that fares well in shade can be a colorful alternative to mulch while providing many of the same benefits to your garden. The Morton Arboretum's groundcover garden is full of examples.

    Groundcover can be attractive alternative to mulch

    Sometimes mulch can be a bit too much, our Cathy Maloney says. Mulches retain moisture and restrain weeds and are great for protecting the roots of trees from lawn mower and edger cuts. We're taught that mulch shouldn't be stacked up in a "volcano" mound around the tree base. But, even knowing the benefits and proper application of mulch, aren't there times when mulch is a bit of a mess?

  •  
    This is the cover image of a new historical pictorial book about Des Plaines.

    Des Plaines pictorial history book releasing Nov. 26

    A pictorial history book with more than 200 vintage images of Des Plaines will be released Nov. 26 in time for the holiday shopping season. "It was very interesting to find out how much Des Plaines has changed over the years ... ," said author David Wittingham. "Early Des Plaines was a tourist town. It was a destination."

  •  
    Fremd High School students competed in the Hot Rodders of Tomorrow competition in Las Vegas. In addition to competition, they attended the Specialty Equipment Market Association show and banquet with their sponsor Edelbrock.

    Fremd students in national engine assembly competition

    In a battle between 13 teams from across the country, five Fremd High School students were required to correctly take apart and reassemble a Chevy 350 engine, receiving scholarships for their effort.

  •  

    Church, restaurant join forces to serve Thankgiving dinner to needy

    With the help of local donations, an East Dundee restaurateur is teaming up with an Elgin church to bring free Thanksgiving meals to the northern Fox Valley. Beverardo Sanchez, the owner of the Family Buffet, is working with the Elgin Evangelical Covenant Church to provide 1,000 dinners to the needy on Thanksgiving.

  •  
    A former Grayslake police sergeant could see a significant boost to his pension if a Lake County judge’s ruling is upheld, which could cost taxpayers almost $500,000 more over the next 20 years.

    Pension loophole could mean $500,000 more for ex-Grayslake cop

    A loophole in the state's police pension law could cost Grayslake taxpayers an extra $500,000 over the next 20 years that would benefit just a single former police sergeant. Former Grayslake Police Sgt. Conrad Gutraj is entitled to not just one annual 3 percent cost-of-living pension increase, but two, a Lake County judge has ruled.

  •  
    Jeffrey S. Greer

    Batavia man charged in North Aurora robbery

    A Batavia was being held in the Kane County jail after being charged with robbery at a gas station in North Aurora.

  •  
    Huntley Education Association co-presidents Chris Laird, left, and Julie McLaughlin are applauded as they and other union representatives walk into Huntley Unit District 158 headquarters in Algonquin on Oct. 10 — the last time the two sides met before hammering out a tentative contract Tuesday night.

    Dist. 158 reaches tentative contract agreement

    The Huntley Unit District 158 teachers union and the district's negotiating team have come to terms on a tentative contract agreement. They announced it just hours after the union declared an impasse, though the negotiating session already had been planned.

  •  

    Woman tries to pass $5 bills as $100s in Arlington Heights

    A woman attempted to use $5 bills that had been tampered with to make them look like $100 bills at two stores in Arlington Heights, police said. The trick succeeded at Dollar Tree, 77 W. Rand Road. The trick failed at a Barnes and Noble, 13 W. Rand Road, where the store had received an alert from the regional office.

  •  

    Chicago man faces multiple charges after Des Plaines traffic stop

    A Chicago man faces multiple charges after Des Plaines police found marijuana and a handgun in his car during a traffic stop, police reports said. He's also accused of damaging his jail cell after the arrest.

  •  
    Joe McMahon

    Fewer voter complaints in Kane County compared to 2008

    Officials at the Kane County State's Attorney's Office answered 48 calls on their election hotline last week, most due to polling or registration questions. They also personally visited about half of the county's polling places to ensure thing ran smoothly. In the 2008 election, officials received 120 calls, but most of those were questions for the Aurora Election Commission, which is separate...

  •  

    District 50 kicks off its annual holiday fdood drive

    Woodland Elementary School District 50 will host a Holiday Food Drive to help feed families in the school district through Dec. 13.

  •  

    Truck stolen from Arlington Hts. dealer with aid of key-copying machine

    Two men stole a silver 2005 Dodge Ram pickup truck valued at $22,000 from Sullivan Buick-GMC, 777 W. Dundee Road in Arlington Heights overnight Nov. 8. Dealership officials believe two men who took the truck for a test drive used a hand-held key copying machine to make a generic key.

  •  
    Rita Crundwell, former comptroller of Dixon, pleaded guilty Wednesday to allegations she embezzled more than $50 million from a small city in Illinois to fund a lavish lifestyle that included a nationally known horse-breeding operation.

    Dixon’s ex-comptroller pleads guilty in $53M scam

    A longtime bookkeeper pleaded guilty Wednesday to allegations she embezzled more than $50 million from downstate Dixon to fund a lavish lifestyle that included a nationally known horse-breeding operation. Rita Crundwell, the former comptroller, pleaded guilty to a charge of wire fraud in federal court in Rockford.

  •  
    Sixth-grade science teacher Sharon Page conducts a science game at Emmons School in Antioch. Its teachers have the lowest average salaries among 91 suburban districts reviewed by the Daily Herald.

    Average suburban teacher salaries: from $47,624 to $116,044

    The gap between the suburbs' highest- and lowest-paid teachers is cavernous: Teachers in Maine Township High School District 207 top the list with an average teacher salary of $116,044. But teachers in Emmons Elementary District 33 in far Northwest suburban Antioch average $47,624, according to a Daily Herald study of state school report card data from 91 school districts in the North, Northwest...

  •  
    Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr.

    Mayo: Jackson continues medical treatment

    Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. remains under the care of physicians for bipolar disorder, although he's no longer a patient at Minnesota's Mayo Clinic. The hospital released a statement Wednesday on Jackson's behalf. It reiterates Jackson left Mayo Tuesday and that he continues to cope with Bipolar II. Mayo says Jackson's treatment to manage depression is ongoing.

  •  
    Nick Sauer

    Dist. 220 board seeking new member

    As expected, Barrington Unit District 220 Board Member Nick Sauer resigned his post Tuesday, a week after his election to the District 17 seat on the Lake County Board. The District 220 board is now seeking candidates for appointment to Sauer's vacated position from Dec. 18 through next spring, when it along with three more of the seven seats on the board are up for election.

  •  

    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Two 20-year-olds were arrested on the 1500 block of Brandywyn Court North and charged with two felony counts of burglary and possession and consumption of alcohol by a minor. They reportedly took a navigation system, iPod and charger out of an open garage. Officers found them in a SUV nearby.

  •  
    Mavis Staples

    The Suburbs This Weekend: 1.9-mile maze, hidden gnomes, beers galore, Mavis Staples

    A 1.9-mile maze, hidden gnomes, Mavis Staples and ecclectic American cuisine at a Rosemont restaurant are among events mentioned by Richard Battin and Sean Stangland in this week's The Suburbs This Weekend.

  •  
    Former CIA Director David Petraeus has agreed to testify to Congress about the Sept. 11 attacks on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans.

    Feinstein: Petraeus to testify on Benghazi attacks

    The head of the Senate Intelligence Committee says former CIA Director David Petraeus has agreed to testify to Congress about the Sept. 11 attacks on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans.

  •  
    Former House speaker Nancy Pelosi said Wednesday she will run to keep her job as the Democratic leader in the House.

    Pelosi decides to run again for House leader post

    Former House speaker Nancy Pelosi said Wednesday she will run to keep her job as the Democratic leader in the House after a pair of elections that kept the party in the minority there even as Democrats gained seats in the Senate and a second term for President Barack Obama.

  •  

    3 pilots flying to safety conference die in Miss. crash

    JACKSON, Miss. — Three pilots flying together to a federal safety conference died when their single-engine plane faltered in midair and crashed into a house that went up in flames.The three men had just taken off from Hawkins Field Airport in Jackson on Tuesday when a witness said the Piper PA-32 began “spitting and sputtering.”

  •  

    Israeli defense chief: Rebels take Syrian villages

    JERUSALEM — The Israeli defense minister says “almost all” Syrian villages near the frontier with Israel have fallen into rebel hands.Ehud Barak delivered his assessment Wednesday during a tour of the Israel-held Golan Heights. Barak said: “Almost all of the villages, from the foot of this ridge to the very top, are already in the hands of the Syrian rebels.”

  •  

    Ireland probes death of ill abortion-seeker

    The debate over legalizing abortion in Ireland flared Wednesday after the government confirmed a miscarrying woman suffering from blood poisoning was refused a quick termination of her pregnancy and died in an Irish hospital.

  •  
    A new law expanding Russia’s definition of treason took effect Wednesday — and critics say it’s so vague that the government can now brand anyone who dissents as a traitor. Human rights advocates say the law is part of a widening crackdown on the opposition after President Vladimir Putin began his third presidential term.

    Russia expands treason law, critics fear crackdown

    A new law expanding Russia's definition of treason took effect Wednesday — and critics say it's so vague that the government can now brand anyone who dissents as a traitor. Under the new law, anyone possessing information deemed secret — whether a politician, a journalist, an environmentalist or a union leader — could potentially be jailed for up to 20 years for espionage.

  •  
    Xi Jinping, China’s vice president, raises his hand during the closing session of the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party of China at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012. Xi and Vice Premier Li Keqiang were reappointed to the Chinese Communist Party’s Central Committee, positioning them to take over the top two posts in the world’s second-biggest economy.

    China’s Hu clears way for Xi to take party helm

    President Hu Jintao stepped aside as ruling party leader Wednesday to clear the way for Vice President Xi Jinping to take China's helm as part of only the second orderly transfer of power in 63 years of Communist rule.

  •  
    Jill Kelley leaves her home Tuesday, Nov 13, 2012 in Tampa, Fla. Kelley is identified as the woman who allegedly received harassing emails from Gen. David Petraeus’ paramour, Paula Broadwell. She serves as an unpaid social liaison to MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, where the military’s Central Command and Special Operations Command are located.

    Fla. socialite at center of general’s sex scandal

    When news vans camped outside her stately home, a Florida socialite tied to the Gen. David Petraeus sex scandal fell back on her informal credentials as a social ambassador for Tampa society and top military brass: She asked police for diplomatic protection.

  •  

    Shoot free throws, win turkeys at Lombard event

    In the old days, anyone who wanted a turkey for a Thanksgiving feast had to shoot for it, possibly even with a bow and arrow. This fall, the Lombard Park District is bringing back the concept of shooting for a turkey — but with a different type of shot, a basketball shot.

  •  

    Microsoft's Windows chief leaves in power struggle

    Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer isn't going to let anyone get in his way. Not even his presumed heir apparent, who runs the software maker's Windows empire, can stop Ballmer as he pushes the company in a new direction. That was the underlying message of a power struggle that led to the abrupt departure of Steven Sinofsky, who oversaw the Windows operating system that has been the foundation of...

  •  

    Dawn Patrol: Stabbing murder trial to begin; chickens lose in Palatine

    Trial begins for Cook County man accused of killing wife. Palatine denies chicken coop. Grayslake teachers set strike date. Police ID Reagan rollover victim. Daily Herald employee killed in snow-related crash mourned. Batavia names Lisa Hichens superintendent. Bulls hope Hinrich plays during road trip.

  •  

    Arlington Heights Park District weighs options after election loss

    After residents last week rejected a park district tax increase for the second time this year, Arlington Heights Park District officials are contemplating their options for moving forward. "It's just disappointing because either way the buildings need to be replaced or upgraded whether it's sooner or later. The longer we wait, the more expensive it will be," said Board president Maryfran Leno.

Sports

  •  
    Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te’o is congratulated by teammates Dan Fox and Bennett Jackson, right, after his interception Saturday during the second half of Notre Dame’s 21-6 win over Boston College in Boston. Te’o will play at Notre Dame Stadium for the final time Saturday, giving Fighting Irish fans the chance to celebrate one of the best linebackers in the history of the storied program and thank him for leading the team to one of its best seasons in decades.

    Te’o preparing for Notre Dame’s final home game

    Manti Te'o will play at Notre Dame Stadium for the final time Saturday, giving Fighting Irish fans the chance to celebrate one of the best linebackers in the history of the storied program and thank him for leading the team to one of its best seasons in decades. Expect it to be a memorable moment, but certainly not the end of Te'o's tale at Notre Dame. Not the last time he'll make a big play for the Irish, thump his chest and point to the sky.

  •  
    Wisconsin’s Montee Ball runs 49-yards for a touchdown Saturday during the second half against Indiana in Bloomington. Ball needs two more touchdowns to break the major college record.

    Montee Ball hopes to set TD record at home on Saturday

    Montee Ball is in charge of the entertainment for Wisconsin's senior day. Needing just two touchdowns to become the all-time leader in major college football, the Badgers running back would like nothing more than to get the record Saturday when Wisconsin (7-3, 4-2 Big Ten) hosts unbeaten Ohio State in Ball's final game at Camp Randall Stadium. "It's going to be extra special to do it at home — if it happens," he said.

  •  
    Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly watches from the sideline during overtime of an NCAA college football game against Stanford in South Bend. Kelly says he doesn’t believe third-ranked Notre Dame’s season will be lessened if the Fighting Irish finish the season undefeated and don’t win a national championship.

    Irish’s Kelly says undefeated seasons can’t be diminished

    Coach Brian Kelly says he doesn't believe third-ranked Notre Dame's season will be lessened if the Fighting Irish finish the season undefeated and don't win a national championship. "I would tell our players that everything that was within their control, they handled and that they're champions because of it," Kelly said.

  •  

    Hoosiers expect another top recruiting class

    Devin Davis likes being No. 1. He was the first player to commit to Indiana in this year's recruiting class, the first to send in his national letter-of-intent Wednesday and he hopes to be the first to hang more than one national championship banner during his career in Bloomington.

  •  

    Wednesday’s girls basketball scoreboard
    Here are the results from Wednesday's varsity girls basketball results as reported to the Daily Herald.

  •  

    Rolling Meadows tops Lakes

    Coming off a 77-point performance in its season-opening win against Stevenson on Tuesday, the offense for the Rolling Meadows girls basketball team did not skip a beat in Wednesday's opening-round of the Turkey Thriller. But the Mustangs were talking more about getting the defense up to standard. Junior guard Jackie Kemph scored a team-high 27 points and classmate Alexis Glasgow added 19 in an 85-60 triumph over Lakes.

  •  

    Prairie Ridge pulls away for win at Mundelein

    Sarah LeBeau scored 10 of her 17 points in the third quarter, helping Prairie Ridge’s girls basketball team snap a 26-26 halftime tie en route to a 57-46 win over the host school in the Mundelein Turkey Shootout on Wednesday night.Prairie Ridge, which improved to 3-0 in the tournament, outscored Mundelein 18-6 in the third quarter, as LeBeau hit a pair of 3-pointers.Mundelein’s Becca Woit led all scorers with 18 points, including 12 in the first half. Lauren Rouse and Maggie Mahar added 9 and 8 points, respectively, for the Mustangs, who fell to 0-3.Prairie Ridge also received 13 points from Kailey Aldridge and 10 from Marisa Geistbrein.Highland Park 61, Grant 39: At Mundelein, Lizzy LoGrande and Lena Munzer scored 23 and 20 points, respectively, for the Giants, who improved to 1-2 in the tournament.Grant (1-2) received 7 points apiece from Taylor Rossi and Deanna Rodriguez.Rolling Meadows 85, Lakes 60: At Fremd, the Eagles dropped their season opener to a talented Mustangs squad, despite 27 points from Therese McMahon.Amanda Smith added 13 points for Lakes.Jackie Kemph had 27 points for Rolling Meadows.Antioch 57, Richmond-Burton 45: On Tuesday night, sophomore point guard Paige Gallimore scored a career-high 26 points, dished out 5 assists and collected 5 steals, as the visiting Sequoits won the nonconference season opener.Gallimore, who played on varsity last season, scored 12 points in the fourth quarter to help Antioch build on a lead that was 40-37 after three. Megan Borries added 12 points on four 3-pointers. Gallimore and Rachel Schwabe each hit a pair of 3s, as the Sequoits shot 40 percent from beyond the arc. Alex Fracek and Abbi McIlhany grabbed 6 rebounds each in the win.

  •  

    Streamwood denies Dundee-Crown

    Start fast in both halves and solid play in between. That was the recipe for Streamwood's 52-35 win over Dundee-Crown in first round action at the Dundee-Crown girls Thanksgiving Tournament Wednesday night

  •  
    South Elgin’s Laura McIntosh loses control of the ball under the defense of Hampshire’s Jen Dumoulin and Nikki Dumoulin, right, late in the game Wednesday in Hampshire.

    South Elgin holds off Hampshire

    South Elgin girls basketball coach Tim Prendergast probably won't see a game the rest of the season where his Storm turn it over 23 times, shoot a 32 percent clip from the field and still come out victorious. He also might not get to interrupt Hampshire coach Ed Haugens during his postgame interview insisting Ruth's Chris Steakhouse again, either. Luckily, all smiles came from both coaches, which was a contrast of how the Storm and Whip-Purs played in the season opener for both teams Wednesday night. In South Elgin's 48-40 win at Hampshire in a game that was a part of the Dundee-Crown Thanksgiving tournament, the Storm were the ones who coughed it up less, made more free throws and played better defense.

  •  

    McConnell, Fremd produce winning debut
    All-area guard Ashley McConnell began her fourth season on the Fremd girls varsity basketball team on Wednesday night in the Vikings' gym. It started with a flourish. The defending Mid-Suburban League champs stormed to 15-0 lead in less than three minutes and never looked back in a 59-23 victory over Johnsburg in the opening round of the Turkey Thriller.

  •  
    St. Charles North’s Alex Silverman is pursued by Nequa Valley’s Niki Lazar in the first quarter on Wednesday, November 14.

    Neuqua Valley smothers St. Charles N.

    After losing just 2 seniors to graduation from a team that won 23 games and captured its first regional title since 2006 a year ago, Neuqua Valley girls basketball coach Mike Williams holds high expectations for this season.

  •  
    The Washington Wizards’ Trevor Ariza stops a drive to the basket by the Dallas Mavericks’ Elton Brand Wednesday during the second half in Dallas. The Mavericks won 107-101.

    Kaman 23 points as Mavs beat Wizards 107-101

    Chris Kaman scored 23 points and had eight rebounds in only his second start for the Dallas Mavericks, who held on for a 107-101 victory over the winless Washington Wizards on Wednesday night. O.J. Mayo had 25 points as the Mavericks snapped a three-game losing streak since Kaman's only other start.

  •  
    Grayslake North’s Jordyn Bowen, left, drives on Carmel’s Nicole Bitter during the Mundelein High School Turkey Tournament on Wednesday.

    Defense keys Grayslake North victory

    After three straight victories to begin the season, Grayslake North's girls basketball team won't be sneaking up on teams much longer. But it certainly did so with some success on Wednesday. Jordyn Bowen, one of the Knights' guards, led an opportunistic defense as Grayslake North topped Carmel Catholic 41-28 in Mundelein's Turkey Tournament.

  •  
    Boston Celtics power forward Kevin Garnett battles for a loose ball with Utah Jazz center Al Jefferson Wednesday during the first half in Boston.

    Pierce scores 23 to lead Celtics past Jazz 98-93

    The Boston Celtics like to have a lot of veterans for this very reason. With point guard Rajon Rondo on the bench after injuring his right ankle, Leandro Barbosa sparked a third-quarter run and ran the offense in the fourth as the Celtics held off the Utah Jazz 98-93 on Wednesday night. "That's what we brought him in here for," said Boston captain Paul Pierce, who led the way with 23 points, including a pair of key free throws with 19.5 seconds to play.

  •  
    Memphis Grizzlies center Marc Gasol, left, wraps up Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant, right, as he grabs a rebound Wednesday during the second quarter in Oklahoma City.

    Grizzlies slug out 107-97 win over Thunder

    Rudy Gay scored a season-high 28 points, Zach Randolph added 20 points and 11 rebounds before getting ejected along with Oklahoma City's Kendrick Perkins during a late-game altercation and the Memphis Grizzlies beat the Thunder 107-97 on Wednesday night. Marc Gasol chipped in 14 points as the Grizzlies continued the best start in franchise history by winning their sixth straight game. They took control by outscoring Oklahoma City by 21 in the second quarter, and never gave it up.

  •  

    Crystal Lake S. downs St. Viator

    Depth and multiple players who can score in double figures is a luxury Crystal Lake South girls basketball coach Kyle McCaughn has rarely had in his 11 years as the Gators' head coach. It looks like the Gators will have both those commodoties in 2012-13. Rotating 9 players on a regular basis, the Gators were led by Sara Mickow with 22 points and 12 rebounds and Rachel Rasmussen with 15 points in a 56-45 win over St. Viator Wednesday night in the opening round of the Dundee-Crown Thanksgiving Tournament in Carpentersville.

  •  
    The Detroit Pistons’ Greg Monroe dunks against the Philadelphia 76ers Wednesday during the first half in Philadelphia.

    Pistons get first win of the season

    Winless no more, the Detroit Pistons had good reason to break out the cheers in a locker room celebration. The worst start in franchise history was over. Greg Monroe had 19 points, 18 rebounds and six assists to help the Pistons beat the Philadelphia 76ers 94-76 on Wednesday night.

  •  
    The Minnesota Timberwolves’ Andrei Kirilenko drives on the Charlotte Bobcats’ Brendan Haywood Wednesday during the first half in Minneapolis.

    Walker’s jumper lifts Bobcats over Wolves 89-87

    Kemba Walker's jumper with 0.7 seconds left lifted the Charlotte Bobcats to an 89-87 victory over the Minnesota Timberwolves on Wednesday night. Walker finished with 22 points, five assists and four rebounds, and his 19-footer over the out-stretched arm of Alexey Shved helped the Bobcats to their first three-game winning streak in nearly 20 months.

  •  
    Houston Rockets guard Jeremy Lin reaches for the New Orleans Hornets’ Greivis Vasquez Wednesday during the first half in Houston.

    Harden scores 30, Rockets beat Hornets 100-96

    James Harden scored 30 points, Omer Asik added 15 points and 12 rebounds, and the Houston Rockets held off the New Orleans Hornets 100-96 on Wednesday night. Harden went 10 for 20 from the field but only 1 of 7 from 3-point range. He reached 30 points for the third time in seven games with the Rockets.

  •  
    Alexander Kokorin, of Russia, right, and Geoff Cameron, of the United States, struggle for the ball Wednesday during a friendly between Russia and United States, in Krasnodar, Russia. The game ended in a 2-2 draw.

    Diskerud goal gives US 2-2 tie at Russia

    Mix Diskerud scored his first international goal in the third minute of injury time, giving the United States a 2-2 tie against Russia on Wednesday in an exhibition game at Krasnodar. The 22-year-old, whose mother is from Arizona and who grew up in Norway, was playing just his third game for the U.S. He was a member of the American Olympic team that failed to qualify for the London Games.

  •  
    The Milwaukee Bucks’ Monta Ellis drives on the Indiana Pacers defense Wednesday during the first half in Milwaukee.

    Jennings, Ellis lead Bucks past Pacers 99-85

    Brandon Jennings and Monta Ellis scored 16 points each to help the Milwaukee Bucks cruise to a 99-85 victory over the struggling Indiana Pacers on Wednesday night. Beno Udrih had nine points, 10 assists and six rebounds for the Bucks, who shot 42 percent from the field and improved to 2-2 at home.

  •  

    Groce adds players to speed up Illini

    First-year Illinois coach John Groce announced an inaugural recruiting class Wednesday that he says includes a player at each spot on the floor who can play the up-tempo basketball he likes. "No question, we recruited to our system," Groce said from Hawaii, where Illinois is getting ready for a run of four games. "I felt like one of our primary objectives with this '13 recruiting class was to try and get one at each position in that mold. I think all five of those guys certainly fit that attacking style of play."

  •  

    SIU Edwardsville beats Western Illinois 62-50

    EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. — Jerome Jones scored 26 points to help Southern Illinois-Edwardsville win its home opener, defeating Western Illinois 62-50 Wednesday night.Jones made five of his seven 3-point attempts and led the Cougars (1-1) with six rebounds. His 3-pointer in the opening minute of the second half ignited a 9-0 run that gave Southern Illinois-Edwardsville a 40-28 lead, and eventually the Cougars held a 51-33 advantage.Mark Yelovich added 13 points for the winners.Terell Parks had 18 points and eight rebounds for the Leathernecks (1-1). Ceola Clark was the only other Western Illinois player in double figures, with 15 points.

  •  

    Thorson, Hall make college decisions

    Elgin Community College pitcher Bobby Thorson, a Kaneland High School graduate, signed a National Letter of Intent Wednesday to continue his career at Division I Campbell University in North Carolina.Thorson, who helped Kaneland to a Class 3A state championship will join a Campbell program that broke 10 single-season records last year when it won a program-best 41 games. The Camels finished the season ranked in the national Top 10 in batting average, runs scored, hits, stolen bases, on-base percentage and hit by pitches.Campbell plays in the Big South Conference.Hall to Tusculum: Crystal Lake South senior Tyler Hall, an all-area player last season, has committed to play baseball for Division II Tusculum University in Tennessee. A right-handed pitcher Hall helped the Gators to a Fox Valley Conference Valley Division title and a regional crown last season when he went 8-1 with a 1.89 ERA, 51 strikeouts, 0 walks and 5 complete games. He held opponents to a .201 batting average in 59 innings pitched.“Tyler has worked very hard to make this achievement possible,” said South coach Brian Bogda. “He isn’t the biggest in stature but he works as hard as anybody. I really have appreciated Tyler’s leadership and the way he works with the younger players in our program. I look forward to coaching Tyler this spring and watching him continue to grow as a ballplayer in our program.”

  •  
    Wisconsin head coach Bo Ryan talks with a referee Wednesday during the first half against Florida in Gainesville, Fla.

    No. 10 Florida handles No. 22 Wisconsin 74-56

    Erik Murphy tied a career-high with 24 points just days after dealing with an illness, and No. 10 Florida beat 22nd-ranked Wisconsin 74-56 on Wednesday night. Murphy made all 10 of his shots, including two from 3-point range, as the short-handed Gators enjoyed a double-digit lead most of the night. He also had seven rebounds.

  •  

    49ers QB Smith practices in non-contact jersey

    Alex Smith insists it's too early to guess whether he will return from a concussion in time to start at quarterback in San Francisco's key Monday night NFC showdown against the Bears. The decision is not up to him, anyway. "I feel good, better," Smith said Wednesday in his first comments since the injury. "I'm just going along with the process right now."

  •  

    Elgin holiday tournament field set

    The field has been set for the 38th annual Elgin boys basketball holiday tournament, which will be played at Chesbrough Field House Dec. 26-29. Centennial High School of Las Vegas will return to the tournament this year. Centennial, coached by Elgin High graduate Todd Allen, has two players already committed to Stanford. The Bulldogs played in the Elgin tournament in 2010, when the host Maroons beat them 62-54 in the quarterfinals.

  •  
    Hoffman Estates pitcher Jimmy Ward will extend his baseball career at Evansville next school year.

    Hoffman Estates’ Ward rolls ahead to Evansville

    Jimmy Ward has been playing baseball as long as he can remember. "Probably before I could even walk," said the Hoffman Estates senior pitcher. "The first time I played catch with my father I just sat on the ground and rolled the ball back and forth with him. "Baseball has always been my true love and I have had the aspirations of becoming a Major League baseball player since before I can even remember." Ward had a season to remember as an Mid-Suburban League all-conference junior, compiling a record of 7-3 with an ERA of 2.28and 60 strikeouts in 64.1 innings. His numbers hardly went unnoticed. Ward signed a letter of intent on Wednesday to play Division I baseball for the University of Evansville in Indiana.

  •  

    Buckeyes add recruits Loving, Williams to fold

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio State has signed Marc Loving of Toledo (Ohio) St. John and Kameron “Kam” Williams from Mount St. Joseph’s High School in Baltimore to national letters of intent for the 2013-14 season.Loving, a 6-foot-8-inch, 215-pound forward, was the 2012 Associated Press Division I co-player of the year in the state and preceded his first-team big-school all-state mention with a second-team pick his sophomore season. He averaged 22.5 points, 9 rebounds and 2.7 assists last year.Williams is a 6-2 shooting guard who was MVP of the Baltimore Catholic League last season and also led his AAU squad in scoring with 22.2 points per game.The fourth-ranked Buckeyes have only one senior (center Evan Ravenel) this season.

  •  

    Nebraska’s Miles signs guards to letters of intent

    LINCOLN, Neb. — Nebraska coach Tim Miles has announced the signings of two players to letters of intent.The Cornhuskers on Wednesday signed guards Nick Fuller of Sun Prairie, Wis., and Nathan Hawkins of Garland, Texas.The 6-foot-6 Fuller averaged 23.5 points and 8.2 rebounds for Sun Prairie High School and was named first-team all-state by the Wisconsin Basketball Coaches Association. Fuller is rated by 247Sports as one of the top 150 players in the county and is a consensus three-star recruit by Rivals.com, Scout.com, ESPN Recruiting Nation and 247Sports.com.The 6-5 Hawkins averaged 12.9 points, five rebounds and four assists last year at Rowlett High. He’s a consensus three-star pick by Scout.com, Rivals.com and 247sports.com.

  •  

    Junior college forward to play for DePaul

    Junior college forward Forrest Robinson has signed a letter of intent to play next season at DePaul.The Blue Demons announced Robinson on national basketball signing day Wednesday. Robinson is a 6-10, 230-pound sophomore at South Plains College in Levelland, Texas. He played 16 games his freshman year for North Texas, averaging 1.6 points and 1.2 rebounds.Robinson is from Ranger, Texas.

  •  

    Struggling Lions feeling the pressure

    With their season slipping away, the Detroit Lions return home for a crucial three-game stretch at Ford Field, starting with Sunday's game against Green Bay. Detroit is 4-5 and facing a daunting schedule the rest of the way. Yes, the next three games are at home, starting with Green Bay, but the talented team has taken a step back.

  •  
    New York Mets pitcher R.A. Dickey became the first pitcher who relied predominantly on a knuckleball to win the Cy Young Award, an achievement mentors such as Hall of Famer Phil Niekro are quite proud of.

    Mets’ Dickey, Rays’ Price win Cy Young awards

    David Price of the Tampa Bay Rays and knuckleballer R.A. Dickey of the New York Mets are baseball's Cy Young Award winners. Price barely beat out 2011 winner Justin Verlander for the American League award Wednesday in one of the closest votes ever. Dickey was an easy choice for the NL honor in balloting by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

  •  

    Packers offensive line ready for tough test

    Evan Dietrich-Smith hears all the nice things Aaron Rodgers and Green Bay Packers coach Mike McCarthy are saying about him and does what he always does. He gets back to work. Two years after he was cut by the Packers at the end of training camp and spent most of the season looking for work, Dietrich-Smith has become indispensable in Green Bay.

  •  

    NHL, players’ association not talking

    Now the NHL and the locked-out players' association aren't even talking by phone. With the lockout about to enter its third month, communications between the fighting sides have come to a halt with no clear sign of what the next step will be or when it will be taken. "No, we have not communicated today," NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly told The Associated Press on Wednesday in an email. "No meetings scheduled, and no plans to meet."

  •  
    Quarterback Josh McCown, here working against the Minnesota Vikings last January, is back with the Bears after spending the season coaching high school football.

    Well-rested McCown ready to help Bears

    Just like last season, quarterback Josh McCown has been summoned to Halas Hall late in the season following an injury to starter Jay Cutler. The 33-year-old veteran, who is behind top backup Jason Campbell on the depth chart, believes he's better prepared this time around if the Bears need him to play.

  •  
    Bears head coach Lovie Smith says Jay Cutler is improving, but he won’t practice or play until doctors say he’s completely healed and ready.

    Smith: Cutler improving, but no timetable for return

    Jay Cutler continues to undergo the evaluation process following his concussion last Sunday night. His condition wasn't updated on Wednesday, other than Bears coach Lovie Smith saying the quarterback was "getting better." It seems unlikely that Cutler will play Monday night against the San Francisco 49ers.

  •  
    Caterham F1 team technician Barry Mines checks tire pressures at the Circuit of the Americas racetrack in Austin, Texas, on Wednesday.

    Formula One is back in the U.S., but can it last?

    Formula One, the world's most popular motor sport, is trying once again to conquer its final frontier: the United States. This time, the Europeans aim to make it stick. The glitzy sport with ultrafast cars and a flair for the exotic has landed deep in the heart of Texas.

  •  
    New York Jets quarterback Tim Tebow heads off the field Sunday after the Jets lost to the Seattle Seahawks in Seattle. The Seahawks won 28-7. An angry Rex Ryan addressed his New York Jets players for some anonymous quotes ripping Tebow in a newspaper report, calling the comments “a cowardly thing.”

    Jets’ Ryan angered by anonymous rips of Tebow

    Rex Ryan doesn't mind his New York Jets players saying what's on their minds. Just as long as they put their names to their comments. An angry Ryan addressed his team Wednesday for some anonymous quotes by players and members of the organization ripping backup quarterback Tim Tebow in a newspaper report. "If you're not going to put your name to it, I think that's about as cowardly of a thing there is," Ryan said.

  •  
    Los Angeles Angels outfielder Torii Hunter, shown dropping his bat after he hit a two-run home run against Seattle, has agreed to a two-year deal with the Detroit Tigers, according to sources.

    Torii Hunter agrees to join Tigers, AP source says

    Free agent outfielder Torii Hunter has agreed to a two-year deal with Detroit, giving the Tigers a capable corner outfielder coming off an impressive season at age 37. A person with knowledge of the negotiations, speaking on condition of anonymity Wednesday because no announcement had been made, said the deal was pending a physical. Hunter hit a career-best .313 last season for the Los Angeles Angels with 16 home runs and 92 RBIs.

  •  
    Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger is sacked by Kansas City Chiefs outside linebacker Tamba Hali Monday during the third quarter in Pittsburgh. Roethlisberger will not play against the Ravens on Sunday.

    Roethlisberger has rib injury too, out vs. Ravens

    Ben Roethlisberger's sprained right shoulder is just the start of his problems. The Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback said Wednesday he also dislocated a rib while getting sacked in the third quarter of Monday night's win against Kansas City. Roethlisberger sprained the SC joint in his shoulder on the play but says the rib issue is a bigger concern.

  •  
    This photo combo made from file photos shows Miami Marlins players, from left, pitcher Mark Buehrle, shortstop Jose Reyes, and pitcher Josh Johnson. Miami traded the three players to the Toronto Blue Jays, a person familiar with the agreement said Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012. The person confirmed the trade to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the teams weren't officially commenting. The person said the trade sent several of the Blue Jays' best young players to Miami. (AP Photos)

    Marlins’ latest payroll purge prompts fan backlash

    The attendance-challenged Miami Marlins have antagonized fans yet again by deciding a low-budget team is good enough for their new ballpark. A blockbuster trade sending three stars to Toronto could save Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria $150 million, which prompted a backlash from fans angered by the team's latest payroll purge. "Everybody in the world wants to talk about the Marlins and the fact they're now a Triple-A team," said city commissioner Marc Sarnoff, who was an opponent of the ballpark project.

  •  

    Illinois deer harvest tops 41,000

    After an optimistic report from the IDNR a week ago regarding the latest figures for the 2012 archery deer harvest, word now comes from Springfield that the hunt has gotten more challenging with the cold weather, as Mike Jackson reports in this week's outdoor notes and fishing update.

  •  
    Minnesota Vikings quarterback Christian Ponder throws a pass Sunday during the second half against the Detroit Lions in Minneapolis. Ponder’s up-and-down season hasn’t done a thing to shake the organization’s confidence in him, GM Rick Spielman said.

    Vikings GM has ‘100 percent belief’ in QB Ponder

    Christian Ponder's up-and-down performance in his first full season as the Vikings starting quarterback has draped plenty of criticism on his shoulders from the team's demanding fans. It hasn't done a thing to shake the organization's confidence in Ponder. "I know everybody in this organization believes Christian Ponder is our guy," Vikings GM Rick Spielman said on Wednesday.

  •  
    Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick leaves the field after suffering a concussion Sunday during the second quarter against the Dallas Cowboys in Philadelphia. Vick has not been ruled out for Sunday’s game against Washington.

    Vick misses practice as Eagles prep for Redskins

    Eagles quarterback Michael Vick did not practice on Wednesday, but has not yet been ruled out of Sunday's game vs. the Washington Redskins. Vick suffered a concussion in the second quarter of a 38-23 loss to the Dallas Cowboys four days ago.

  •  

    Scouting report: Bulls at Phoenix Suns

    The Suns (4-4) have several newcomers, but holdover Shannon Brown is off to a good start, averaging 14.4 points off the bench. Former Houston PG Goran Dragic leads Phoenix with 16.6 points and 7.5 assists.

  •  

    Local color, and the fishing trip that wasn’t

    A trip to the northwoods of Wisconsin always yields interesting results, even in a the onset of a lousy cold keeps the actual fishing to the bare minimum, as outdoors columnist Mike Jackson shares in this report.

  •  
    Eddie Olczyk

    Hawks extend support for Olcyzyk youth hockey grants

    The Chicago Blackhawks organization will again partner with Blackhawks Charities and hockey analyst Eddie Olczyk to support the Eddie Olczyk Award, which provides grants to help offset the financial burden of youth hockey players and teams in Illinois.

  •  

    Mike North video:

    Cutler-less Bears just doesn't make it.   The Bears need Jay Cutler to win, but if he can't start Monday night, let's give Jason Campbell a chance.

  •  
    Batavia’s Hannah Frazier grabs a Raiders rebound in front of Glenbard South’s Sydney Bauman in the third quarter on Tuesday, November 13.

    Batavia hangs on to defeat Glenbard South

    Batavia got the start it wanted at Glenbard South on Tuesday night. More importantly, Batavia got the finish it needed in a 49-43 nonconference girls basketball victory at Glen Ellyn.

  •  
    Bria Walker of Metea Valley drives around Zoe Swift of Naperville North, left, in girls basketball action on Tuesday in Aurora.

    Metea Valley starts with a bang

    While both coaches felt their defenses indeed played like it was opening night, at least Metea Valley was happy with the offensive performance it recorded in its season debut. The Mustangs opened the new girls basketball campaign with a 58-34 defeat of visiting Naperville North on Tuesday night in Aurora. The Mustangs moved the ball well, scored from the perimeter as well as the post and used an 18-7 outburst in the first quarter to take control from the onset.

  •  
    Duke guard Seth Curry shoots over the defense of Kentucky’s Julius Mays Tuesday during the second half at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. Duke beat Kentucky 75-68.

    Curry scores 23, Duke holds off Kentucky 75-68

    Seth Curry scored 23 points and No. 9 Duke held off a furious comeback by No. 3 Kentucky, beating the defending national champions 75-68 Tuesday night in the first matchup between the storied programs since 2001. Alex Poythress led Kentucky with 20 points, while Nerlens Noel and Goodwin added 16 apiece. All are freshmen, showing this team has plenty of room to grow before tournament time.

Business

  •  
    In his first press confernce since his re-election, President Barack Obama on Wednesday said voters sent a “very clear message” on Election Day that they want both parties work together to cut the budget deficit with a mix of tax increases for the wealthy and cuts in spending.

    Obama presses GOP on taxing rich to avert ‘cliff’

    In a challenge to Republicans, President Barack Obama urged Congress on Wednesday to extend expiring tax cuts immediately for all but the nation's highest income earners as a way to eliminate half of the so-called "fiscal cliff" that threatens to send the economy back into recession.

  •  
    This site plan shows the location of a proposed Walmart super center at the corner of Lake Marian Road and Route 25 in Carpentersville. Village trustees got a look at and discussed the concept plan last week.

    Carpentersville takes peek at Walmart site plan

    Carpentersville trustees got a glimpse at a preliminary concept plan that details Wal-Mart's plans for a super center in the village. The 180,000-square-foot store, scheduled for a 2015 grand opening, is slated to go on 26.3 acres just north of the Meadowdale Shopping Center. A new road will be built to ease traffic.

  •  
    National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Chair Deborah Hersman speaks at a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington on Wednesday, regarding the NTSB’s 2013 “Most Wanted List” of transportation challenges.

    NTSB urges safety technologies be made standard

    The government should require automakers to make the latest collision prevention technologies standard equipment on all new cars and trucks, a move that could reduce fatal highway accidents by more than half, federal accident investigators said Wednesday.

  •  
    U.S. stocks fell, sending the Dow Jones Industrial Average to the lowest level since June, as concern about the budget debate in Washington and an Israeli air strike erased an early rally led by technology shares.

    Stocks slide as impasse over budget deficit looms

    Investors drew little hope Wednesday for a quick compromise in U.S. budget talks after President Barack Obama insisted that higher taxes on wealthy Americans would have to be part of any deal.

  •  
    ile- This Aug. 4, 2010 file photo shows President Barack Obama standing with AFL-CIO Presidet Richard Trumka after he spoke about jobs and the economy at the AFL-CIO Executive Council in Washington.

    Obama pressing business and labor on fiscal cliff

    President Barack Obama is lobbying business and labor groups to support his plan to avoid an impending fiscal cliff, telling the two sides he remains committed to requiring the wealthy to pay more in taxes.

  •  
    A subsidiary of the nation’s second-largest cigarette maker Reynolds American Inc. is funding a national recycling program to reward do-gooders for cleaning up tobacco waste and turn cigarette butts into pellets used to make items such as plastic shipping pallets, railroad ties and park benches.

    Reynolds subsidiary funding cigarette recycling

    A subsidiary of the nation's second-largest cigarette maker Reynolds American Inc. is funding a national recycling program to reward do-gooders for cleaning up tobacco waste and turn cigarette butts into pellets used to make items such as plastic shipping pallets, railroad ties and park benches.

  •  
    Wall Street will likely be pleased to learn that the Federal Reserve appears likely to launch a new bond buying program in December.

    Fed minutes suggest new bond-buying plan likely

    The Federal Reserve is signaling that it will likely launch a new bond buying program in December to try to spur job growth.

  •  
    New England Compounding Center President, co-owner, and Director of Pharmacy Barry Cadden declines to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012, before the House Energy subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations hearing on the Fungal Meningitis Outbreak. Cadden did not testify and chose to take the fifth amendment.

    Owner of meningitis-linked pharmacy takes Fifth

    owner and director of the specialty pharmacy tied to a deadly meningitis outbreak declined to testify Wednesday morning before a congressional committee investigating the matter. Barry Cadden, co-founder of the New England Compound Center, told lawmakers he would use his Fifth Amendment right to not answer questions in order to avoid self-incrimination.

  •  

    NTSB lists most-wanted safety improvements

    What’s on the National Transportation Safety Board’s annual list of its 10 most-wanted safety improvements released Wednesday? Recommendations include requiring collision-prevention technologies as standard equipment on all cars and trucks, eliminating the use of cellphones and other distracting technologies by operators of all kinds of transportation, and improving the safety of interstate bus operations.VEHICLE COLLISION PREVENTIONThe National Highway Traffic Safety Administration should require manufacturers to include an array of collision-prevention technologies on all new cars and trucks. That includes lane departure warning, forward-collision warning, adaptive cruise control, automatic braking and electronic stability control.OPERATOR DISTRACTIONSStates and regulators should ban nonessential use of cellphones and other distracting devices by operators of cars, trucks, buses, planes, trains and vessels. Companies should develop and vigorously enforce policies to eliminate distractions to their operators. Device manufacturers should assist by developing technology that disables devices when they’re within reach of operators. SUBSTANCE-IMPAIRED DRIVINGA comprehensive solution is required. Technology such as ignition interlocks and continuous alcohol-monitoring devices can prevent impaired drivers from getting behind the wheel. Developing new technology that can quickly and effectively test drivers for drugs is critical.AIRPORT RUNWAYSUse technologies that provide pilots with better situational awareness such as cockpit “moving maps” — computer screens that show the movements of other planes and equipment on runways and tarmacs. Runway status lights that show pilots when a runway is available can help, too. Air traffic controllers can provide pilots with more information such as maximum winds that may be encountered on takeoff or landing.GENERAL AVIATIONWhile the number of airline accidents has dropped, the board continues to investigate about 1,500 accidents a year involving mostly private pilots. Efforts should be made to improve pilot knowledge, skills and recurrent flight training. Knowledge tests and flight reviews should test awareness of weather, use of instruments and use of more sophisticated computerized cockpit displays.INTERCITY BUSESBus companies should do more to make sure their drivers are qualified. Drivers should have regular medical exams by authorized doctors. New bus companies should be required to demonstrate their fitness before the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration grants them authority to operate.AGING TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTUREThe government doesn’t provide sufficient inspector guidance for the owners and inspectors of the nation’s 600,000 bridges. The Federal Highway Administration should ensure bridge inspector training is comprehensive and consistent across the country so that no issues are overlooked. There should be a national inspection standard that raises the bar for bridge and roadway integrity.PIPELINESThe government should improve its oversight of the pipeline industry. Pipeline operators should be routinely evaluated according to effective performance-based standards. Federal and state oversight agencies should work together to identify deficiencies. There should be drug and alcohol testing of employees when an accident occurs. POSITIVE TRAIN CONTROLRailroads and other train operators should put train control systems in place that slow or stop a train that doesn’t obey signaling systems. Congress ordered the systems be put in place by 2015, but 10,000 miles of track were exempted from the mandate. FIRE PREVENTION AND SUPPRESSION

  •  
    A woman shops for groceries by flashlight in the Tribeca neighborhood of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Wholesale prices fell in October as a big drop in gasoline and other energy prices offset a rise in the cost of food. Wholesale prices dipped 0.2 percent last month, the Labor Department said Wednesday, Nov. 14. 2012. It was the first decline since May and followed big gains of 1.1 percent in September and 1.7 percent in August, increases that had been driven by spikes in energy.

    U.S. wholesale prices fell 0.2 percent in October

    Wholesale prices fell in October as a big drop in gasoline and other energy prices offset a rise in the cost of food. Wholesale prices dipped 0.2 percent last month, the Labor Department said Wednesday. It was the first decline since May and followed big gains of 1.1 percent in September and 1.7 percent in August, increases that had been driven by spikes in energy.

  •  

    Liberal group outlines substantial Medicare cuts

    Trying to prevent a raid on health care programs in upcoming budget talks, a think tank close to the White House on Wednesday released a plan for significant savings, mostly from Medicare. Medicaid and the new health care law are largely spared from cuts in the blueprint from the liberal-leaning Center for American Progress. Instead, it targets Medicare service providers.

  •  
    U.S. businesses increased their stockpiles in September, further evidence that economic growth was stronger over the summer than first thought. The Commerce Department said Wednesday that inventories grew 0.7 percent in September, after a 0.6 percent increase in August.

    U.S. business stockpiles grow 0.7 pct. in September

    U.S. businesses increased their stockpiles in September, further evidence that economic growth was stronger over the summer than first thought. The Commerce Department said Wednesday that inventories grew 0.7 percent in September, after a 0.6 percent increase in August. Companies typically increase their stockpiles when they anticipate sales will rise in coming months.

  •  
    Americans cut back sharply on spending at retail businesses in October, an indication that some may still be cautious about the economy. Superstorm Sandy may have slowed business at the end of the month.

    U.S. retail sales drop 0.3 percent in October

    Americans cut back on spending at retail businesses in October, an indication that some remain cautious about the economic outlook. Superstorm Sandy also depressed car sales and slowed business in the Northeast at the end of the month. The Commerce Department said Wednesday that sales dropped 0.3 percent after three months of gains. Auto sales fell 1.5 percent, the most in more than a year.

  •  
    A protester is held by riot police during clashes in a general strike in Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012. Spain’s General Workers’ Union said the nationwide stoppage, the second this year, was being observed by nearly all workers in the automobile, energy, shipbuilding and constructions industries.

    Europe’s workers stage austerity protests

    Workers across the European Union sought to present a united front against rampant unemployment and government spending cuts Wednesday with a string of strikes and demonstrations across the region. However, while austerity-hit countries such as Spain and Portugal saw a high turnout of striking workers, wealthier countries like Germany and Denmark experienced only piecemeal action.

  •  

    Toyota recalls vehicles for steering, pump defects

    Toyota Motor Corp. is recalling 2.77 million vehicles around the world for a water pump problem and a steering shaft defect that may result in faulty steering — the latest in a spate of quality woes for Japan's top automaker. No accidents have been reported related to these two problems announced Wednesday, according to Toyota.

  •  
    Survey results released Wednesday by Fidelity Investments found sharply conflicting expectations between older parents and their adult children.

    Survey: Families at odds over financial planning

    Thanksgiving could be an opportune time to talk turkey about family finances. Survey results released Wednesday by Fidelity Investments found sharply conflicting expectations between older parents and their adult children. They were frequently at odds when asked privately about such hard-to-discuss topics as elder care, retirement security and inheritance.

  •  

    Markets roiled by Greek bailout delay

    Financial markets focused their attention on the future of Greece on Tuesday as the country's creditors failed to agree on giving it the next installment of its rescue loans.Greece's fellow euro partners gave it a couple more years to meet its economic targets but remain at odds with the International Monetary Fund over how to make the country's debt manageable over the longer-term. They need to agree on that before they can release the (euro) 31.5 billion ($40 billion).

  •  

    Oil up slightly as US leaders face fiscal cliff

    The price of oil rose marginally Wednesday as President Barack Obama pushed ahead with talks to try to resolve the impending "fiscal cliff" that could derail the fragile recovery in the world's No. 1 economy.By early afternoon in Europe, benchmark oil for December delivery was up 14 cents to $85.52 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

  •  
    Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer isn't going to let anyone get in his way. Not even his presumed heir apparent, who runs the software maker's Windows empire, can stop Ballmer as he pushes the company in a new direction.

    Microsoft's Windows chief leaves in power struggle

    Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer isn't going to let anyone get in his way. Not even his presumed heir apparent, who runs the software maker's Windows empire, can stop Ballmer as he pushes the company in a new direction.That was the underlying message of a power struggle that led to the abrupt departure of Steven Sinofsky, who oversaw the Windows operating system that has been the foundation of Microsoft's success.

  •  
    This still frame demonstrates the company's new mail subscription service, called Goodies, that lets shoppers discover new foods from the comfort of their homes. The program will officially launch on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012.

    Wal-Mart launches food subscription service

    Wal-Mart Stores Inc. on Wednesday will officially launch a mail subscription service, called Goodies, that lets shoppers discover new foods from the comfort of their homes.For a monthly fee of $7 that includes tax and shipping, customers get a box of five to eight hand-picked, sample-size food items, ranging from organic to ethnic products that are not currently carried on Wal-Mart's shelves.

  •  
    Grayslake’s Piggly Wiggly, in a plaza at Center Street and Atkinson Road, is scheduled to close Dec. 15. Plans call for Farmer’s Market Place to open in the same space April 1.

    New food store to move into Grayslake Piggly Wiggly

    Another grocery store is expected to debut next year in the space where the soon-to-be-shuttered Piggly Wiggly supermarket has been operating on Grayslake's west side. Farmer's Market Place is slated to open April 1. Its owner likened it to Mariano's Fresh Market, Garden Fresh Market and Angelo Caputo's Fresh Markets.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Frugal living: Storing, and re-growing green onions

    Sara Noel's the answer lady when it comes to wondering how to store or even regrow green onions, how to make cupcake cones or ideas for low-cost gifts.

  •  
    The Golden Dragon Acrobats will showcase the ancient art of Chinese acrobatics in a show of skill and beauty at the Raue Center for the Arts in Crystal Lake on Friday, Nov. 16.

    Weekend picks: Golden Dragon Acrobats delight at Raue Center

    What better way to mark the current lunar year of the dragon than with a performance of the talented Golden Dragon Acrobats troupe at the Raue Center for the Arts in Crystal Lake? Rick Ross headlines this year's "WGCI Big Jam 2012" Friday at Allstate Arena in Rosemont. Comedian Drew Carey performs a special standup gig this weekend at Zanies Comedy Club in Rosemont.

  •  
    The Kalua Pork Slider (not the liqueur Kahlua but the Kalua barbecue method of cooking) returns to the Hawaii tasting marketplace at the Epcot International Food & Wine Festival running Sept. 28-Nov. 12 at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (Matt Stroshane, photographer)

    Tips for navigating the tasty world of food festivals

    Food and wine festivals seem to be popping up everywhere from Aspen, Colo. to Portland, Maine. Culinary Adventures columnist Penny Kazmier has been to a few and offers tip for getting the most from these scrumptious events.

  •  
    Broadway veteran Tony Yazbeck will take over the role of Don Lockwood in “Singin’ in the Rain” at Drury Lane Theatre in Oakbrook Terrace. Sean Palmer (“Sex and the City”) is departing the production for surgery.

    Injury forces casting change for Drury Lane’s ‘Singin’ in the Rain’

    Sean Palmer ("Sex and the City") will depart "Singin' in the Rain" at Drury Lane Theatre in Oakbrook Terrace for surgery. The official opening has been pushed back to Friday, Nov. 30, so that Broadway veteran Tony Yazbeck can assume the role of Don Lockwood starting Wednesday, Nov. 21.

  •  
    Christina Aguilera’s “Lotus”

    Aguilera’s ‘Lotus’ is good, but not great

    Christina Aguilera is easily one of contemporary music's best voices. She's got pipes that music-lovers need to hear right now. That's why her fifth album, "Lotus," is somewhat disappointing — not because it isn't good, but because it isn't great.

  •  
    Elizabeth Banks and her husband, Max Handelman, announced the arrival of the couple’s second son, Magnus Mitchell Handelman, who was born via gestational surrogate.

    Elizabeth Banks welcomes 2nd baby to the nest

    Elizabeth Banks has something else to be grateful for this Thanksgiving — she and her husband have welcomed their second child. Banks recently starred in the ensemble comedy "What to Expect When You're Expecting" and announced Wednesday on her website the arrival of Magnus Mitchell Handelman, who was born via gestational surrogate.

  •  
    Too often, it seems, the happy band of Muppets on”Sesame Street” are faced with hairpin detours through the mean streets of politics and scandal. But the show’s producers can take solace in one simple fact: Their target child audience remains blissfully unaware.

    Questions about Elmo young fans won’t be asking

    First, Big Bird became an unwitting player in a presidential debate. Then came word that the actor who plays Elmo would take a leave of absence amid an allegation of sexual impropriety — an accusation that was then withdrawn. "Sesame Street" has faced the sort of spotlight you might expect from "Jersey Shore." But the show's producers can take solace in this: Their target audience remains blissfully unaware that even on "Sesame Street" everything's not always A-OK.

  •  
    Kristen Stewart, left, and Robert Pattinson in a scene from “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2.” The young stars say they are ready to move on now that the five-film project has wrapped up.

    Stewart, Pattinson say farewell to 'Twilight'

    Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson sit side by side on a sofa at the Four Seasons hotel, discussing the end of the five-film project that made them famous and brought them together. "Twilight" rocketed both to superstardom, and their real-life romance only propelled them further. With Friday's release of the final film in the franchise, "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 2," the young actors bid farewell to the worldwide fantasy sensation, but not to the tabloid attention they garner wherever they go.

  •  
    Authorities say Jon Bon Jovi’s 19-year-old daughter, Stephanie Bongiovi, was hospitalized after overdosing on heroin in a dorm at her upstate New York college.

    Bon Jovi daughter overdoses on heroin, faces charges

    on Bon Jovi's 19-year-old daughter was hospitalized and facing drug charges Wednesday after overdosing on heroin in a dorm at her college in upstate New York, authorities said. Stephanie Bongiovi was found unresponsive by an ambulance crew sent to Hamilton College early Wednesday after a report that a female had apparently overdosed in Dunham Hall, the school's largest dorm.

  •  
    Lana Del Rey, “Paradise”

    Lana Del Rey delivers ‘Paradise’ on new EP

    Lana Del Rey's new eight-track EP "Paradise" shows the singer is still in the same emotional flux she was when she released her debut album 10 months ago. She's lamenting the pains of love. Del Rey has an almost affected vulnerability in her voice, at certain points its quivering adds to the gravitas of the lyrics.

  •  
    Riccardo Muti, the master conductor, says he is worried that the stubborn financial crisis in much of the world risks impoverishing not just public coffers, but also the arts.

    CSO conductor warns of recession’s impact

    Riccardo Muti, the master conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, is sounding an ominous note, and it isn't rising from the orchestra pit. The former longtime maestro at Milan's La Scala opera house is worried that the stubborn financial crisis in much of the world risks impoverishing not just public coffers but also the arts, whose budgets, often lean even in good economic times, are among the biggest casualties in many countries.

  •  
    Channing Tatum is People’s Sexiest Man Alive for 2012.

    People magazine names Channing Tatum sexiest man

    Channing Tatum is People magazine's "sexiest man alive" for 2012. The 32-year-old actor says his first thought on hearing the news was: "`Y'all are messing with me."'

  •  
    Keeping the turkey simply flavored is one key to a family-friendly Thanksgiving feast.

    Simple, delicious turkey for a kid-friendly meal

    Balancing a gaggle of little ones with the demands of getting Thanksgiving dinner on the table doesn't mean sacrificing good taste. It just means you need simple recipes that effortlessly deliver stunning results.

  •  
    David Petraeus, the retired four-star general who resigned as director of the CIA after admitting he had an extramarital affair, has landed on his feet with a new gig in “Call of Duty: Black Ops II.”

    Petraeus enlisted for cameo in ‘Call of Duty’ game

    David Petraeus has landed on his feet with a new gig in "Call of Duty: Black Ops II." The retired Army general who stepped down as CIA director last week amid a scandal surrounding his extramarital affair pops up in the highly anticipated Activision Blizzard Inc. first-person shooter game released Tuesday.

  •  
    In a quick turnabout, a man who accused Elmo puppeteer Kevin Clash of having sex with him when he was a teenage boy now says they had a relationship as adults and it was consensual.

    Man recants story of teen sex with Elmo puppeteer

    In a quick turnabout, a man who accused Elmo puppeteer Kevin Clash of having sex with him when he was a teenage boy now says they had a relationship as adults and it was consensual. The man, who has not identified himself, released his statement Tuesday through the Harrisburg, Pa., law firm Andreozzi & Associates. It is not known why he made the accusation.

  •  
    Smart shopping and a host of new products make a gluten-free feast everyone can be thankful for.

    Thankful for a gluten-free feast

    Celebrate Thanksgiving with a feast everyone at the table can enjoy with gluten-free recipes. "It's my feeling that there shouldn't be a difference between (the meal) for the gluten-free guests and the non-gluten-free guests," says Diane Eenigenburg, founder of Lia P Gluten Free, a Westmont-based manufacturer of gluten-free breads and pastries. She also operates Le Petit Bakery, a gluten-free bakeshop in Westmont.

  •  

    Dining events: Get your turkey early

    Throughout November, Pinstripes guests who bowl a turkey — that's three strikes in a row — receive a turkey in return in the form of a complimentary turkey platter for dine-in or carry out.

  •  
    The Green Chili Burger comes stuffed with green chiles and cheese curds at Park Tavern in Rosemont.

    Artisan brews, ecclectic cuisine put Park Tavern on top

    Flanking the quad in Rosemont's MB Financial Park entertainment district, Park Tavern's open room, wonderful service and menu of American favorites and global plates draws dinners and beer enthusiasts from around the suburbs and city and even the country.

  •  

    Book notes: Meet ‘Wimpy Kid’ author at signing event

    Jeff Kinney, author of The New York times best-selling "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" children's series, signs copies of "The Third Wheel," his newest title in the series, at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, at Still Middle School in Aurora. The event is sponsored by Anderson's Bookshop in Naperville.

  •  
    “The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965” by William Manchester and Paul Reid.

    Last volume of Churchill bio highlights finest hours

    The long-awaited third and last volume of William Manchester's masterful biography of Winston Churchill covers the final 25 years of the subject's life — nearly as long as it took to research and write the book. It was worth the wait for the detailed research, sharp analysis and sparkling prose. The focus, of course, is World War II, and the book doubles as a history of the conflict.

  •  
    Benihana’s spiced cranberry mojito is available throughout November.

    Night life events: Benihana gives thanks with new seasonal drink

    Be very thankful for Benihana's Thanksgiving drink. Throughout November, try the spiced cranberry mojito for $9.50. Paint your heart out at Peggy Kinnane's Vino van Gogh event at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20, in Arlington Heights. The event pairs drinks with a step-by-step painting lesson.

  •  

    Gluten Free Turkey Gravy
    Gluten-free Gravy

  •  
    No one will miss pumpkin pie when ginger flan with brandy-soaked cranberries caps the Thanksgiving meal.

    Ginger Flan with Caramelized Oats And Calvados Cranberries
    Ginger Flan

  •  

    Tips for serving up a Thanksgiving feast and family harmony

    Though it seems counterintuitive to bring the kids into the kitchen while you're negotiating stuffing, squash and your mother-in-law's running commentary, giving eager children a job lets them feel like they're part of the action. Hand little ones a potato masher or an eggbeater, older ones an immersion blender, basting brush or rolling pin. All in the name of cutting down on the stress of preparing the Thanksgiving dinner.

  •  
    Keeping the turkey simply flavored is one key to a family-friendly Thanksgiving feast.

    Plain Jane Turkey and Gravy
    Plain Jane Turkey

  •  
    Vegetables, like these brussels sprouts from “Cooking Season by Season” are naturally free of gluten.

    Brussels Sprouts with Chestnuts and Pancetta
    Brussels Sprouts

  •  
    Smart shopping and a host of new products make a gluten-free feast everyone can be thankful for.

    Gluten-Free Stuffing
    Gluten-Free Dressing

  •  
    Those attending this year’s Epcot International Food & Wine Festival got to sample fare like these Kalua Pork Sliders that were featured at the Hawaii tasting marketplace.

    Kalua Pork Sliders with Pineapple Chutney and Spicy Mayonnaise
    Kalua Pork1 boneless pork shoulder, 4-pounds (also called boneless pork butt)Coarse salt, freshly ground black pepper, to taste15 dinner-roll sized Hawaiian style bunsPineapple Chutney1 pound diced pineapple1 large sweet yellow onion, diced½ small red bell pepper, diced small¼ teaspoon hot red pepper flakes1 cup rice vinegar½ cup white vinegar¼ cup brown sugar1 tablespoon minced garlic1 tablespoon finely grated fresh ginger Coarse salt, to tasteSpicy Mayonnaise6 tablespoons mayonnaise2 tablespoons sriracha (hot chili-garlic sauce)2 teaspoons white vinegarCoarse salt, to tasteCut pork into two equal pieces; season with salt and pepper. Place pork in a slow cooker, cover and cook on lowest setting for 8-10 hours, until meat shreds easily with a fork. Remove meat from slow cooker, reserving drippings. Shred meat, adding drippings as needed to moisten.For the chutney: Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan over medium-high heat; bring to a boil. Lower heat to medium-low and simmer until pineapple starts falling apart and most of the liquid has evaporated, about 1½ to 2 hours.For the mayonnaise: Combine all ingredients in a small bowl, stirring until combined.To serve: Cut rolls in half. Place warm pulled pork on bottom of roll. Place chutney on top and drizzle spicy mayo over chutney. Top with second half of roll. Serve warm.Serves 15.From the Hawaii booth at the 2012 WDW Epcot Food & Wine Festival

  •  

    Spiced Cranberry Sauce
    Spiced Cranberry Sauce: France Cevallos

  •  

    Apple Pear Granola Crisp
    Apple Pear Granola Crisp: France Cevallos

  •  
    Coconut milk tames the curry powder and ginger in France Cevallos's Creamy Autumn Carrot Soup.

    Creamy Autumn Carrot Soup
    Creamy Autumn Carrot Soup: France Cevallos

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: Moving past fear on supportive housing

    It's time for an approach to support homes that addresses some residents' concerns and moves beyond them, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  

    The mandate to raise taxes on the “rich”

    Columnist Susan Estrich: Within days of winning the election, President Obama announced that his victory gave him a mandate to raise taxes on the "rich." Come again?

  •  

    GOP’s problems were bigger than just Candy and Sandy

    Columnist Paul Green: Instant pundit analysis suggests the country's changing demographics trumped Mitt Romney's mantra that he could diminish the nation's huge deficit. OK — but in my view other crucial factors were involved in Obama's re-election win.

  •  

    Personal ethics, public trust and Petraeus

    Columnist Michael Gerson: When should you forgive an indispensable leader a fatal flaw?

  •  

    Still the best man for the job

    Columnist Richard Cohen: Now that it has all been done, is there a better man to fill David Petraeus' seat than Petraeus himself? He is blackmail-proof and more than qualified for the job. The United States would not only be getting the best man for the job, but striking a blow against the sexual McCarthyism that has destroyed so many careers and, in wretched silence, has aborted many a political career before it was even announced.

  •  

    The party is what ruined it for Romney

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: Some Republicans stubbornly insist, of course, that the problem was that Mitt Romney wasn't conservative enough. But the real problem is the Republican Party, which would not be recognizable to its patron saint, Ronald Reagan. The party doesn't need a poll or a focus group. It needs a mirror.

  •  

    Cartoons, letters show newspaper bias
    A Lake Villa letter to the editor: The Opinion page in Saturday's Daily Herald had four political cartoons and five letters to the editor that were anti-Obama.

  •  

    Accept reality and move on
    An Antioch letter to the editor: There is no doubt in my mind that The Daily Herald is a Republican newspaper. You made that clear when you supported Romney and now you are clearly upset over the election results.

  •  

    Work for the people, not for a party
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Now it's time to finally begin doing the work that should have started four years ago, and begin to represent the people of this country to solve the problems that face all Americans.

  •  

    Blame climate change for Sandy
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Hurricane Sandy is a terrible example of how climate change makes natural weather storms extreme.

  •  

    The spiritual side of Bulls’ Jim Durham
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: We were shocked and saddened to hear that Jim Durham had died at age 65. The former Chicago Bulls announcer and his wife Helen lived in Glen Ellyn. Helen earned a master's degree at Wheaton College during Jim's tenure with the Bulls.

«Oct

Nov 2012

Dec»
S M T W T F S
28 29 30 31 1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 1