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Daily Archive : Thursday November 8, 2012

News

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    The Fishermen’s Inn in Elburn has new owners, who plan to reopen the restaurant sometime next year.

    Elburn’s Fishermen’s Inn expected to reopen next year

    Dave Heun finds out that the landmark Fishermen's Inn restaurant on Route 47 is expected to reopen in late summer or early fall next year. The iconic restaurant closed in December 2009 because of the down economy, ending 45 years of serving residents in a picturesque location.

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    BlackFinn American Saloon in Naperville.

    Pradel: BlackFinn 'under investigation'

    Naperville Mayor and Liquor Commissioner George Pradel says he expects to deliver a resolution, by next week, to the city's ongoing issues with downtown bar BlackFinn American Saloon. "It's under investigation right now so you need to let it go at that right now. And as soon as something comes out, we'll give it to you,” Pradel said.

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    Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle is setting aside $5 million in the upcoming budget to help finance infrastructure projects in unincorporated areas that will make them more attractive to adjacent municipalities.

    Preckwinkle funds push to eliminate unincorporated areas

    Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle is setting aside $5 million in the upcoming budget to help finance infrastructure projects in unincorporated areas that will make them more attractive to adjacent municipalities. Preckwinkle wants to eliminate unincorporated areas in 10 years.

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    Students head out of Geneva High School Thursday afternoon. Teachers could strike as early as Friday but have not announced if they will do so. The teachers union and the school board met with a federal mediator Thursday afternoon and late into the night.

    Geneva board, teachers break late; no word on strike Friday

    Negotiators for the Geneva Education Association and the Geneva school board met until nearly 11 p.m. Thursday in an effort to avert a teachers strike that could start as early as Friday. But neither side said whether a tentative accord was reached, whether more negotiation is planned or whether a strike would happen today. Sarah Miller, the school board's lawyer, said only that a news release...

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    Illinois is the only state where carrying a concealed weapon is entirely illegal.

    Voters in 10 counties say they want concealed carry

    Residents in some Illinois counties sent a message to lawmakers this week: Give citizens the right to carry concealed weapons. Measures supporting concealed carry were on the ballot Tuesday in at least 10 mostly rural counties — Adams, Bond, Henry, McDonough, Mercer, Randolph, Rock Island, Schuyler, Stephenson and Warren — and passed overwhelmingly in every one.

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    Sex offenders sue over $100 registration fee

    A lawsuit accuses the city of Chicago of unfairly refusing to waive a $100 registration fee for sex offenders who are too poor to pay.The Chicago Sun-Times reports that the federal lawsuit seeks class-action status and an injunction to prevent the city from denying registration to sex offenders who ask for a waiver.

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    Victor Henderson, attorney for Democrat Derrick Smith, left, speaks during a news conference with his client and fellow lawyer Sam Adam Jr., right, on Thursday in Chicago.

    Indicted Democrat ready to get back to work

    An indicted Chicago Democrat who won his seat back despite having been expelled from the Illinois House over bribery allegations said Thursday he's determined to work closely again with legislative colleagues, including those who turned against him. "Individuals, members of the party, tried to defeat me," Derrick Smith said. "But that's all over, that's in the past. Today I stand before you as a...

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    Hinsdale Republican Kirk Dillard said he’s preparing to make another run for Illinois governor in 2014.

    Dillard says he’s running for governor in 2014

    Illinois state Sen. Kirk Dillard says he's preparing to make another run for Illinois governor.

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    Chicago’s Garfield Park Conservatory honored

    Chicago’s Garfield Park Conservatory has received one of the highest honors given to museums and libraries.The conservatory won the National Medal for Museum and Library Service, one of 10 recipients to win the honor this year. The announcement was made Wednesday by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

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    4 teens in custody for Lake Geneva home invasion

    LAKE GENEVA, Wis. — Police say two adults were tied up by four boys who invaded their Lake Geneva home. Authorities say one of the adults was able to flee with two small children and call 911 from a nearby gas station Tuesday night. The second adult was found in the home and was still restrained.

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    Antioch Rescue Squad says it’s making ‘positive changes’ to address problems

    The Antioch Rescue Squad is creating a new employee handbook and forcing members to wear ID cards when on call and undergo harassment training, officials announced this week. The new initiatives are part of several improvements taking place at the troubled rescue squad under new Chief Brian DeKind, officials said in a news release.

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    Dist. 211 will issue $16 million in bonds

    The Palatine-Schaumburg District 211 board unanimously agreed Thursday to issue $16 million in life safety bonds, although some residents questioned the need to borrow money.

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    Batavia begins budget review process

    Batavia aldermen used a budget presentation Thursday to talk about what the city's focus should be and what the future may bring. But they also picked at line items, such as whether the city needs to have a police records technician on duty all day, every day. The government services committee started reviewing the proposed 2013 budget. A formal public hearing will be conducted Nov. 19, and the...

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    June Lynch, 45, is the number one tennis player at Elgin Community College. She picked up a tennis racket for the first time three years ago when she arrived at the community college from China.

    ECC ace proves tennis is a game for life

    Forty-five-year-old June Lynch only has been playing tennis for three years, but don't let her inexeperience fool you. She'll run you ragged with her deft drop shots, powerful groundstrokes and a champion's instinct. And she's now the number one player on ECC's women's tennis team and one of the top players on the community college scene.

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    The U.S. has increasingly employed unmanned drones in its war on terrorism.

    US says Iran fired on drone over Gulf

    An Iranian attack aircraft fired at least twice at an unarmed U.S. drone conducting routine surveillance in international airspace over the Persian Gulf, the Pentagon said Thursday. The aircraft missed and the drone returned to base unharmed.

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    Former Democratic Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, left, and her husband Mark Kelly leave after the sentencing of Jared Loughner on Thursday in Tucson, Ariz.

    Giffords stands by as husband speaks at shooter’s sentencing

    Former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, partially blind, her right arm paralyzed and limp, came face to face Thursday with the man who tried to kill her last year, standing beside her husband as he spoke of her struggles to recover from being shot in the head.

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    Elgin building evacuated after carbon monoxide scare

    Elgin employment office evacuated after carbon monoxide scare

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    Charles Darwin

    Darwin gets 4,000 write-in votes against Georgia congressman

    Charles Darwin earned almost 4,000 write-in votes against a Georgia congressman who denounced evolution and other scientific theories as "lies straight from the pit of hell."

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    Democratic candidate Elizabeth Warren on Tuesday defeated incumbent Republican Sen. Scott Brown for a U.S. Senate seat from Massachusetts.

    Warren’s return to Washington heralds fight with big banks
    Look out, Wall Street: She's baaaack. Elizabeth Warren, the Harvard law professor and self-styled "cop on the beat" who protects consumers from Wall Street, left Washington last year after failing to gain enough Senate support to be confirmed as director of the new consumer financial protection agency she championed. But now she has a seat in the U.S. Senate.

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    Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Missouri Democrat, waves to the crowd as she walks on stage to declare victory over challenger Rep. Todd Akin in the Missouri Senate race in St. Louis on Tuesday. McCaskill will be one of a record 20 women in the next Senate, 17 of them Democrats.

    Election won’t end abortion/contraception debate

    Democrats and liberal advocacy groups have declared victory in what they called a Republican "war on women" and are celebrating the pivotal defeats of some GOP candidates who took rigid stands against abortion. However, the issues in dispute — notably access to contraception and abortion — are far from settled.

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    Joseph Broda

    Lisle mayor seeking re-election

    Saying that he wants to achieve a vision of a bustling downtown, Lisle Mayor Joe Broda will seek a fourth term in the April election. "I'm committed to this job. I want to finish what we've started," he said.

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    Chicago firefighter laid to rest

    Thousands of uniformed firefighters and police officers and scores of friends and family members of Herbert "Herbie" Johnson watched as a fire truck bearing Johnson's casket pulled in front of a church on the city's Southwest Side on Thursday.

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    People wait in line for gasoline in Brooklyn, where gas is still scarce, Thursday. Fuel shortages and distribution delays that led to gas hoarding have prompted New York City and Long Island to initiate an even-odd gas rationing plan which begins Friday.

    NYC, Long Island to ration gas to ease fuel crunch

    With long gas lines persisting more than a week after Superstorm Sandy, New York imposed a gasoline rationing plan Thursday that lets motorists fill up every other day.Police will be at gas stations Friday morning to enforce the new system in New York City and on Long Island.

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    Vincent and Jeanmarie Pina watch as a power truck from Burbank, Calif. passes their still darkened home on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 in Farmingdale, N.Y. The couple said they have remained in their home for 11 days waiting for their lights to come back on.

    Frustration mounts over lingering power outage

    A week and a half after Superstorm Sandy slammed the coast and inflicted tens of billions of dollars in damage, hundreds of thousands of customers in New York and New Jersey are still waiting for the electricity to come back on, and lots of cold and tired people are losing patience.

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    Speaker of the House John Boehner, an Ohio Republican, on Wednesday expressed a willingness to discuss tax hikes.

    Fiscal cliff: Impasse on tax rates is big hurdle

    House Republicans' hard line against higher tax rates for upper-income earners leaves re-elected President Barack Obama with a tough, core decision: Does he pick a fight and risk falling off a "fiscal cliff" or does he rush to compromise and risk alienating liberal Democrats?

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    Now that the election is over, President Barack Obama will revamp his administration for a second term, including changes to his Cabinet.

    Change coming to Obama’s team, just not right away

    Big changes are coming to President Barack Obama's administration — just not right away.

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    Diane Spitaliere and her pet dog Izzie sit last Friday in her car outside her house in Alexandria. Baby boomers, that giant population bubble born between 1946 and 1964, started driving at a young age and became more mobile than any generation before or since.

    Baby boomers will drive transportation changes

    If boomers stop commuting in large numbers, will rush hours ease? As age erodes their driving skills, will there be a greater demand for more public transportation, new business models that cater to the home-bound or automated cars that drive themselves?

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    In the sheer quantity of negative advertising and amount of dollars being spent, 2012 may have marked the birth of an unprecedented era of negative campaigning. However, there’s considerable second-guessing about its effectiveness in the wake of Tuesday’s results.

    GOP groups taking stock after $380 million loss

    Republican-leaning independent groups were supposed to be a key to victory for Mitt Romney. But they ended up being among the big losers of the presidential race, spending an eye-popping $380 million on ads to oust President Barack Obama only to come up woefully short.

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    Elk Grove TV premieres new park district show

    Elk Grove Television Station Channel 6 is adding a new show to its lineup highlighting Elk Grove Park District programs, events, facilities, staff and the parks themselves. "A Walk in the Park" premieres at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15. Channel 6 plans to produce three to four shows a year.

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    Santa Claus leads a parade up and down the wings of Woodfield Mall in Schaumburg after his arrival Thursday to kick off the holiday shopping season.

    Santa arrives at Woodfield Mall

    Santa's magical arrival at Schaumburg's Woodfield Mall Thursday morning kicked off the 2012 holiday season — more than two weeks ahead of Black Friday. The North Pole's most famous resident led children and families on a parade around the mall before returning to the central Grand Court that will serve as his headquarters until his round-the-world trip on Christmas Eve.

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    In this image made from video, Syrian President Bashar Assad speaks with English-language television channel Russia Today recorded at an unknown date in Damascus, Syria.

    Syria’s Assad vows he will never leave country

    Syrian President Bashar Assad vowed defiantly to "live and die" in Syria, saying in an interview broadcast Thursday that he will never flee his country despite the bloody, 19-month-old uprising against him.

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    Syrian opposition members Suheir Atassi, left, and Rima Fleihan attend the meeting Thursday of the General Assembly of the Syrian National Council in Doha, Qatar.

    Women shut out of Syria’s opposition leadership

    Syrian women's marginal role in the SNC is in marked contrast to their active participation in the 19-month-old conflict.

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    This man is a suspect in a bank robbery that occurred at a TCF Bank in Rolling Meadows on Oct. 26. Rolling Meadows police are asking for the public’s help in identifying the man.

    Rolling Meadows robber suspect in other bank robberies

    The Rolling Meadows Police Department has issued two new photos of a person authorities believe robbed a TCF Bank in the city last month. He is a suspect in other bank robberies.

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    Barrington Holiday Wine Walk Nov. 17

    Merchants in downtown Barrington will host a Holiday Wine Walk from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17 to kick off the holiday shopping season and introduce shoppers and visitors to the unique shops and restaurants of the village. The Holiday Wine Walk will offer free wine tastings and other treats. Fifteen shops and five restaurants are participating in the event.

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    A huge screen shows a broadcast of Chinese President Hu Jintao speaking Thursday at the opening session of the 18th Communist Party Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing.

    China congress meets as transfer of power begins

    The congress is a largely ceremonial gathering of 2,200-plus delegates who meet while the real deal-making is done behind-the-scenes by the true power-holders.

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    Free health screening

    Rosalind Franklin University Health System's mobile health unit, Community Care Connection, will be at Central Lake YMCA, 700 Lakeview Parkway, Vernon Hills, on Monday, Nov. 12, from 4 to 6:30 p.m.

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    Mundelein cops want your toys

    Mundelein's police station once again will be a drop off point for the U.S. Marine Corps' Toys for Tots Program.

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    D116 needs a new board member

    Round Lake Area Unit District 116 is seeking a new board member due to the resignation of Michael Eckhardt.

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    Flu shots for food

    "Free Flu Shots for Food" will be offered on Saturday, Nov. 10, and Sunday, Nov. 11, at all three of Advocate Condell's Immediate Care Centers.

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    Mount Prospect man charged with defrauding 93-year-old woman

    A Mount Prospect man has been charged with defrauding a 93-year-old homeowner who hired him to do repairs he did not complete. A Cook County judge set bail at $30,000 for Rocky Reed, 23, who was on bond on November 2011 charges of residential burglary of two Schaumburg seniors.

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    Dick Sayad

    Who will serve as interim Des Plaines mayor?

    As Des Plaines Mayor Marty Moylan prepares to head to Springfield after being elected Tuesday to represent the 55th House District, the city council is faced with the task of picking an alderman to serve as interim mayor until the April municipal election. Moylan said Thursday he will be stepping down in December. The interim mayor would preside over roughly eight City Council meetings until a...

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    This is a culex pipiens mosquito, which is the primary carrier of the West Nile virus.

    Kane West Nile cases hit 12, approach 2007 levels

    A 64-year-old Aurora man is recovering from the West Nile virus, according to the Kane County Health Department. The case marks the 12th this year, which is the highest total since 2007, officals say.

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    Myra Gordon

    Hinsdale nursing assistant charged with theft

    A former nursing assistant accused of stealing a credit card from an elderly dementia patient was released from the DuPage County Jail on Thursday after being charged with aggravated identity theft. Myra Gordon, 33, of Willowbrook, took the card from a patient at Manor Care Health Services in Hinsdale in September and used it to make $585 in purchases, authorities said.

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    Des Plaines collecting supplies for Sandy relief

    The Des Plaines police and fire departments are coordinating a local relief effort to assist those devastated by Hurricane Sandy on the East Coast. As part of the relief effort, dubbed "New York, Des Plaines Has Your Back," the city is collecting items most needed for storm recovery.

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    Frank R. Brunke

    Cops: St. Charles man busted with 15 pounds of pot

    A 39-year-old St. Charles man was arrested Wednesday night and charged with possession with intent to deliver more than 15 pounds of marijuana, according to authorities and court records.

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    Five sisters from the Northwest suburbs — Tina O'Donnell, 42, of Mount Prospect, Lisa Altmeyer, 40, of Elgin, Denise Spallone, 37, of Park Ridge, Nicole Dubak, 35, of Des Plaines, and Joanna Molnar, 32, of Park Ridge — are featured on tonight's episode of “Family Feud” after winning $20,500 in the first round Wednesday. The show, hosted by Steve Harvey, airs at 5 p.m. on WPWR-TV Channel 50. The siblings appear on the show again at 5 p.m. Friday.

    Suburban sisters claim spotlight on 'Family Feud' tonight

    Five sisters from the Northwest suburbs will be featured on Friday's episode of "Family Feud" after winning $20,500 in the first round Wednesday. The show featuring sisters Tina O'Donnel of Mount Prospect, Lisa Altmeyer of Elgin, Denise Spallone of Park Ridge, Nicole Dubak of Des Plaines, and Joanna Molnar of Park Ridge. "It was such an awesome experience," O'Donnell said.

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    Michael Axtell

    Antioch Township man pleads not guilty in death of ex-girlfriend

    Michael Axtell, 41, of Antioch Township pleaded not guilty in Lake County court Thursday to three counts of first degree murder. Axtell is accused of killing Tammy Stone, 40, in early October at the home they shared.

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    George Hogrewe of Hinsdale carries a yellow tag to be attached to a flag at the “Healing Field of Honor” on Thursday at Naperville’s Rotary Hill. The city’s Veterans Day ceremony will be held at 11 a.m. Sunday at the field.

    ‘Healing Field’ inspires, honors veterans in Naperville

    The scene inspires quiet. Reflection. Even as cars whiz past on nearby Aurora Avenue, the rows upon rows of flags at Naperville's "Healing Field of Honor" on Rotary Hill motivate visitors to pause for a moment with their thoughts — thoughts about sacrifice, bravery, honor, veterans. The Healing Field will be on display until Tuesday and will host Naperville's Veterans Day ceremony at 11...

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    Lisle board seat won’t sit empty

    Lisle Mayor Joseph Broda is planning to make his suggestion next month for who should replace former Trustee Joe Schmitt.

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    Pete Campbell

    Glen Ellyn fire chief resigns without explanation

    A 31-year veteran of Glen Ellyn's volunteer fire department has resigned as chief without explanation. Pete Campbell, who served as chief of the Glen Ellyn Volunteer Fire Company since April 2011, recently told members of the company and village officials he was stepping down. An election among the rank-and-file firefighters to pick his replacement is scheduled for Friday.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    David B. Hauge, 47, of South Elgin, was arrested Thursday after a search of his home concluded a yearlong investigation into his possible possession of child pornography, according to a police report.

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    Kevin Wallace, a 20-year resident of the village and former chairman of the Bartlett Chamber of Commerce, is circulating a petition to get his name on the spring ballot for the position of Bartlett village president.

    Former chamber chair running for Bartlett village president

    Kevin Wallace, a member of Bartlett's economic development commission and former chairman of the Bartlett Chamber of Commerce, confirmed Thursday he will be running for village president in the spring. He is the second person to say he wants the position since current village President Michael Airdo announced last week he will not run for a full term.

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    Elzbieta Plackowska

    Prosecutors ready for possible insanity defense in Naperville child slayings

    The prosecution and defense each sought their own psychiatric examinations of Naperville double-murder suspect Elzbieta Plackowska on Thursday, but her attorney said he has no doubt she's mentally fit to stand trial. "She's still obviously very upset," Senior Assistant Public Defender Mike Mara said.

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    An Arlington Heights snowplow is painted to recognize Mayor Arlene Mulder’s 20 years in office.

    Arlington Hts. mayor presides over her final Snow Day

    Snow plows took to the streets on Thursday in Arlington Heights — all 52 of them, as the Public Works Department's held its annual Snow Day to get ready for the upcoming winter. The educational sessions and speakers also included a tribute to retiring Mayor Arlene Mulder -- a mural on one of the plows read: "Thanks for 20 years of being the push behind the plow."

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    Fox Valley police reports
    David B. Hauge, 47, of the 0-99 block of East Sandstone Court in South Elgin, was arrested Thursday after a search of his home concluded a yearlong investigation into his possible possession of child pornography, according to police. Members of the Kane County Sheriff's Office and Geneva Police Department aided South Elgin in the search and incriminating pictures and video, police said. Hauge was...

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    Mount Prospect offering more money for downtown improvements

    In a move to boost downtown restaurant business, the Mount Prospect village board voted Wednesday to dedicate more dollars to its Facade Improvement and Interior Build Out Program. Under the amendment, restaurants would be able to obtain up to $25,000 in matching grants to help fund interior and exterior improvements.

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    Jim Oberweis watches election results Tuesday night at a Geneva restaurant.

    Oberweis plans to focus on business retention to help 25th District

    Newly elected state senator Jim Oberweis reiterated Wednesday that he thinks the best thing he can do for residents of the 25th District is improve the climate for business in the state, saying that would "certainly help" people.

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    ‘Sound of Music’ coming to Wheaton Drama

    The Rodgers and Hammerstein classic, "The Sound of Music" opens Friday, Nov. 9, at Wheaton Drama's Playhouse 111, 111 N. Hale St., Wheaton. “It is a heartwarming story filled with familiar songs that people love to both sing and listen to over and over again,” Director Jim Liesz said. The show includes favorites such as “Do-Re-Mi,” “Climb Ev’ry Mountain,”...

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    “My art is a source of healing,” says Richard Beauvais, a Huey crew chief whose helicopter was shot down in Vietnam and crashed in a rice paddy. Beauvais participates in an art program at the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center in North Chicago.

    Veterans with PTSD find solace in art, music and poetry

    It is a festive and patriotic gathering of veterans who come together to sing, share their art and poetry, and tell jokes. For the men and women who attend this "expressive arts session" every Friday morning at the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center in North Chicago, it is also an important part of their therapy. They assemble to help each other overcome another common enemy:...

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Burglars stole cash and a safe from Chicago Bagel and Bialy in Wheeling for a loss estimated at $6,581. Also in Wheeling, burglars entered a home and stole jewelry and other items valued at estimated at $31,550.

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    Son of Gurnee mayor pleads guilty Thursday to possession of cannabis

    The son of Gurnee Mayor Kristina Kovarik has pleaded guilty in Lake County court to one count of possession of cannabis, prosecutors said Thursday. Jared Kovarik, 19, of the 0 to 100 block of Silo Court in Gurnee, must serve one year on court supervision and pay court costs after pleading guilty to the misdemeanor charge, Lake County Assistant State's Attorney Paul Bishop said.

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    Jose D. Hernandez-Hernandez

    Five pounds of crystal meth confiscated, two arrested in Waukegan

    Two men were arrested by Waukegan police and charged with unlawful posession of a controlled substance after getting busted with 5 pounds of crystal meth.

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    Jeanne Ives

    Wheaton voters may choose Ives replacement

    Now that Jeanne Ives has been elected to the state legislature, it's possible voters in Wheaton will get to choose her replacement on the Wheaton City Council in April. Ives, who defeated Democrat William Adams in the 42nd state House District race Tuesday, said she intends to step down from her position on the city council by Nov. 30, which would allow her seat to be up for election April 9,...

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    Southern Illinois University Professor Jim Garvey, who started a conservation biology course three years ago at SIU, came up with a unique method of teaching it. His combined his science knowledge with his passion for writing to pen a science fiction novel,

    SIU professor uses fiction to teach science

    CARBONDALE — Students in James Garvey’s conservation biology class at SIU often had questions beyond the course material.The professor, who started the course three years ago, came up with a unique method of answering them. He combined his knowledge and experience with science with his personal passion for writing to pen a science fiction novel, “The Platform.”

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    Fishing seen as way to limit Asian carp invasion

    If you can’t beat `em, eat `em. That’s what Illinois environmentalists, researchers and policymakers are saying about Asian carp.A Wednesday meeting focused on innovative solutions to stop the invasive carp, including by heavily fishing waterways and eating them.

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    Illinois launches new Veterans Cash lottery game

    Gov. Pat Quinn has bought $20 worth of Veterans Cash lottery tickets and is calling on others to play the newest edition of the game that benefits military vets in Illinois.Ahead of Veterans Day, the governor helped launch the new game. More than $10 million has been raised for veterans’ organizations since the program started in 2006.

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    Salons, spas raising money for Wis. salon victims

    MILWAUKEE — At least 98 salons, spas and beauty schools in the Milwaukee area and in other states are raising money for the victims of the Wisconsin spa shooting.Radcliffe Haughton shot seven women at the Azana Salon & Spa in Brookfield on Oct. 21. Three died, including his estranged wife, Zina, before Haughton killed himself.

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    Friends thought Indiana teen dead after text hoax

    FISHERS, Ind. — Many friends and classmates of a suburban Indianapolis teenager thought he was dead until he boarded the school bus following a hoax text message apparently sent by whoever had the teen’s missing cellphone.

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    Charges: Investor defrauded burned-down Indiana church

    INDIANAPOLIS — Federal prosecutors have filed fraud charges against an investor who they say misspent nearly $400,000 that leaders of an Indianapolis church gave him as it tried to raise more money to rebuild from a fire.

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    Election Day event helps cleanse campaign rancor

    GOSHEN, Ind. — If this year’s presidential election feels more acrimonious to you, you’re not alone.After months of arguing politics on Facebook and watching endless, angst-ridden campaign commercials on TV, some people have been left with the desire to take a long shower.

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    Indiana woman gets 50-year term in grandson’s death

    SOUTH BEND, Ind. — A South Bend woman has been sentenced to 50 years in prison on child neglect convictions for ignoring the abuse of three grandchildren, including one who died. A St. Joseph County judge ordered the sentence against 53-year-old Dellia Castile during a court hearing Thursday.

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    Endangered peregrine falcon rescued from Wisconsin plant

    OAK CREEK, Wis. — Eclipse, a 3-year-old peregrine falcon, was in trouble.The bird had found its way into a water treatment building at the WE Energies Oak Creek Power Plant. Perched in the building’s rafters, the bird had shown no inclination to fly down and out open doors.

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    Aurelia Lopez, right, comforts her 12-year-old son Alex Fuentes in the emergency room of a public hospital in San Marcos, Guatemala, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012. The boy was injured during a 7.4 magnitude earthquake Wednesday in San Marcos, some 80 miles (130 kilometers) from the epicenter. At least 48 are reported dead and many missing.

    Guatemalans huddle in streets after deadly quake

    Guatemalans fearing aftershocks huddled in the dark and frigid streets of this mountain town wrapped in blankets early Thursday, while others crowded inside its hospital, the only building left with electricity after a powerful earthquake killed at least 48 people and left dozens more missing.

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    Bombings across Afghanistan kill 20 people

    KABUL, Afghanistan — Roadside bombs and a suicide bomber killed 20 people in a spate of attacks across Afghanistan on Thursday, officials said.The deaths came even as armed clashes between insurgents and Afghan security forces have decreased as the fighting season winds down with the advent of cooler weather in the mountainous nation.

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    Suicide bomber kills 3 Pakistani troops in Karachi

    KARACHI, Pakistan — A Taliban suicide bomber rammed a truck packed with explosives into a compound housing a paramilitary force in Pakistan’s largest city on Thursday, killing three officers and wounding 20.

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    Chinese President Hu Jintao, center on the stage, addresses the opening session of the 18th Communist Party Congress held at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012.

    How selection of China’s new leadership works

    China's communist elite are meeting to install a new generation of leaders in a process that is part public show and part backroom politicking.

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    President Barack Obama now has a freer hand to deal with a world of familiar problems in fresh ways. That could mean tougher Iran and Syria policies, or new engagement toward countries such as Cuba and North Korea.

    Obama faces familiar world of problems in 2nd term

    Now that his re-election is secured, President Barack Obama has a freer hand to deal with a world of familiar problems in fresh ways, from toughening America's approach to Iran and Syria while potentially engaging other repressive countries such as Cuba and North Korea and refocusing on moribund Middle East peace efforts.

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    House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, says Republicans are willing to consider some form of higher tax revenue as part of the solution to the “fiscal cliff” problem — but only under what he calls “the right conditions.”

    Obama, GOP leaders lay down markers on budget deal

    Taking little time to celebrate, President Barack Obama is setting out to leverage his re-election into legislative success in an upcoming showdown with congressional Republicans over taxes, deficits and the impending "fiscal cliff." House Speaker John Boehner says Republicans are willing to consider some form of higher tax revenue as part of the solution — but only "under the right...

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    Man to be sentenced for shooting in Tucson that wounded Giffords

    TUCSON, Ariz. — The man who pleaded guilty in the Arizona shooting rampage will be sentenced Thursday for the attack that left six people dead and wounded former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and 12 others.

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    Damon Rasinya carts debris from his family home past the fire-scorched landscape of Breezy Point after a Nor’easter snow, Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 in New York. The beachfront neighborhood was devastated during Superstorm Sandy when a fire pushed by the raging winds destroyed many homes.

    Images: Nor’easter hits the East Coast
    Only a week after Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast, a Nor'easter has slammed into the region again dropping as much as a foot of snow on already hard hit areas.

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    Pingree Grove clerk now appointed position

    The village clerk's job in Pingree Grove is an appointed position, rather than an elected one, now that the village board voted in favor of the change earlier this week.

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    The tufted titmouse has a big-eyed look, black forehead and small crest. As shown in this photo, they hold seeds with their feet and crack them open with the bill.

    Birders know much of their hobby involves watching, waiting

    Patience is a virtue in many aspects of life, but especially for birders. Our Jeff Reiter says his patience paid off big time in October when he spotted a rare-for-this-area tufted titmouse in his backyard.

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    Dawn Patrol: Dist. 300 board’s final offer; DuPage Board recount?

    District 300 board submits final offer to teachers union. Hanover Park OKs video gambling. A DuPage County Board recount could be looming. Quinn vows to work on pensions. Brad Schneider reflects on victory. Aurora approves raises for future mayor, aldermen.

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    Even in defeat, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney gives a thumbs-up before his concession speech Tuesday night in Boston. Many of his most ardent followers aren't as optimistic today.

    End of world? Nirvana? Time to let political anger go

    As Facebook returns to adorable cat photos, inspirational posters and endless updates on fantastic offspring and progress in exercise regimes, what do we do with all that leftover hate and bile? Can you become buddies again with that friend you unfriended because of all those offensive political postings?

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    Kane County can fund pension increases, for now

    Kane County must find $729,000 to fund its 2013 Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund obligations. The county has the cash now, but a growing obligation may put a strain on plans to keep the tax levy flat in coming years.

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    Home school student Sarah Borish, from Naperville, was one of the volunteers from several local organizations who spent Wednesday putting up the flags at Rotary Hill in Naperville. Attendees can honor specific service members by attaching yellow tags to a flag at the display.

    Naperville’s Healing Field of Honor returns

    More than 100 volunteers spent three hours Wednesday planting 2,012 American flags and turning Rotary Hill into Naperville's "Healing Field of Honor" for the first time since 2009. “When you get to the top of the hill and look down the view is absolutely stunning,” said Healing Field Chairman David Wentz. “There are no words to describe it. The view is like standing at...

  •  
    Lauren “Laurie” Nowak, 25, of Bartlett will be the youngest member of the DuPage County Board.

    DuPage's youngest board member promises 'new voice'

    Twenty-five-year-old Lauren "Laurie" Nowak belies the image of a county board member: She's young, female and not a lawyer. After quitting her job as an after school coordinator, the Bartlett resident started campaigning for a seat on the DuPage County Board. On Tuesday, she was rewarded by being one of three Democrats elected to the Republican-dominated board.

  •  
    Chief Deputy Whip Peter Roskam, center, poses a question during a Ways and Means Committee meeting.

    Does Peter Roskam's future include speaker's job?

    Despite a gerrymandered district crafted to favor Democrat challenger Leslie Coolidge, 6th District Congressman Peter Roskam sailed to victory. So — what's next for Roskam, a Wheaton attorney and former state senator who's unobtrusively built up a formidable political resume? “The sky's the limit for Peter Roskam,” said state Sen. Kirk Dillard, a Hinsdale Republican.

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    President Barack Obama walks onstage with first lady Michelle Obama and daughters Malia and Sasha at his Election Night party Wednesday in Chicago.

    GOP tries to regroup after suburbs go for Obama again

    Once might be considered a fluke, but twice is a trend. President Barack Obama's continued election successes in suburbs once fortified by Republicans have many area GOP leaders concerned. Obama carried Cook County and four of the collar counties. “We did put out a strong effort getting information out to people, but it's tough,” said state Rep. Randy Ramey of Carol Stream.

Sports

  •  
    Lake Zurich’s Grant Soucy soars over Rockford Boylan’s DeMarcus Vines during the second quarter of the teams’ Class 7A state semifinal matchup last season in Rockford. This year they’re meeting in the quarterfinals, at 1 p.m. Saturday at Lake Zurich, with both Soucy and Vines again key players for their teams.

    Class 7A: Scouting Rockford Boylan at Lake Zurich

    Here's a look a Saturday's Class 7A state quarterfinal matchup between Rockford Boylan and Lake Zurich.

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    Wisconsin running back Montee Ball runs through the tackle of Purdue defensive back Frankie Williams during the first half in West Lafayette, Ind., earlier this season.

    Wisconsin’s Ball rolling again after a rough start

    That Montee Ball was tough was never a question. Being strong is another matter altogether, however. It's an intrinsic quality you either have or you don't, and there's no way to tell until it's too late. As Ball lay awake over the summer, he wondered why he was being tested. Why several men had chosen to attack the Wisconsin running back as he walked home Aug. 1 after a night out with friends, leaving Ball unconscious and with a concussion after they knocked him to the ground and kicked him in his head and chest.

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    Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck celebrates his touchdown run against the Jacksonville Jaguars Thursday during the second quarter in Jacksonville, Fla.

    Luck runs for 2 TDS, Colts beat Jaguars 27-10

    The Indianapolis Colts became the latest team to hammer the Jacksonville Jaguars at home, winning 27-10 on Thursday night behind two rushing touchdowns from rookie quarterback Andrew Luck. Darius Butler returned an interception for a score as the Colts (6-3) won their fourth consecutive game and snapped a three-game losing streak in the series. The Jaguars (1-8) have lost six straight.

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    Bartlett’s Nick Andreucetti, left, and Chris Janssen combine to stop Loyola Academy receiver Joe Joyce during the Ramblers’ 31-7 victory last Saturday.

    Class 8A quarterfinal: Palatine at Loyola

    Here's a look at Saturday's Class 8A football state quarterfinal contest between visiting Palatine and Loyola.

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    Porter Ontko of Benet runs the ball during the Oswego at Benet football sectional game in Lisle Friday.

    Scouting this weekend’s DuPage County football games
    Previews of the football state quarterfinal games in the DuPage County coverage area

  •  
    DePaul’s Cleveland Melvin is the top returning scorer in the Big East this season.

    Can Purnell turnaround DePaul in Year 3?

    Year 3 of the Oliver Purnell Era is about to begin and DePaul insists it's ready to jump out of the Big East men's basketball cellar even if it was picked to finish 13th after going 12-19 overall last season and 3-15 in the conference.

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    Marshall hoping his success opens doors for others

    Brandon Marshall is on pace to establish franchise records in most major receiving categories, but he's hoping his success will create opportunities for others in the offense.

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    Bulls forward Carlos Boozer shoots over Oklahoma City Thunder guard Kevin Martin (23) as Thabo Sefolosha (2) watches Thursday during the first half at the United Center.

    Durant helps Thunder edge Bulls 97-91

    Kevin Durant scored eight of his 24 points in the fourth quarter and the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the Bulls 97-91 on Thursday night. Durant iced the game with an off-balance jumper off one foot with 35.1 seconds to play.

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    The Thunder’s Russell Westbrook was unable to practice with the Bulls’ Derrick Rose in the off-season for the first time in four years because Rose was rehabbing his injured knee.

    Thunder’s Westbrook missed workouts with Rose

    Oklahoma City guard Russell Westbrook had a summer tradition of working out in Southern California with Derrick Rose. Westbrook had to go it alone this year, since Rose is recovering from ACL surgery.

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    Bulls forward Carlos Boozer shoots over Oklahoma City Thunder guard Kevin Martin (23) as Thabo Sefolosha (2) watches Thursday during the first half at the United Center.

    Thunder’s stars too much for Bulls
    Corny as it sounds, this was a chance for the Bulls to rise to the occasion without Derrick Rose. They started 3-1 this season, but hadn't yet played a top-level team. Oklahoma City delivered the star power, with Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook providing the toughest defensive challenge to date.

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    Lake Zurich football captains Jerry Bauer and Grant Soucy lean on a cinder block structure in the North end zone of the Bears’ stadium. The cinder blocks symbolize the wins in the season, while each player gets his own individual brick in the structure.

    Building a powerhouse, brick by brick, at Lake Zurich

    Lake Zurich football team's pyramid tradition, a symbolic structure of its goals for the season, sets it apart as the Bears have established themselves as Lake County's top playoff team in recent seasons.

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    Maddie Haggerty of St. Francis volleyball.

    St. Francis has that family feeling

    Peg Kopec is going for her ninth state volleyball title at St. Francis this weekend, but she had another number on her mind Thursday. Six. As in Kopec's current Spartans have six sisters who have older sisters who played for Kopec. Or, in the case of the Haggertys, have a sister on the team. Even for a program steeped in tradition like St. Francis, that's a lot of familial love.

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    Becca Shearer of St. Francis fires now past Frankie Taylor of Marian Central during girls volleyball action in Wheaton, Wednesday.

    Scouting this weekend’s state volleyball tournament
    Taking a look at DuPage County's matchups at the state girls volleyball tournament this weekend.

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    Boras: Dodgers 'bought store,' Mets 'in freezer'

    With baseball awash in record revenue as the signing season starts, Scott Boras compares the habits of teams to families sifting through supermarket shelves. At the winter meetings in Dallas last year, the agent had this to say of the financially troubled Los Angeles Dodgers and New York Mets: "Normally, they're in the steaks section, and I found them in the fruits-and-nuts category a lot."

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    Attention playoff participants: Make sure you enjoy the ride

    Teams that are left playing volleyball and football at this point of the season are all the best of the best. For those involved with deep postseason runs, make sure to take a step back and simply enjoy the playoff experience.

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    Palatine’s Cam Kuksa runs in a fourth-quarter touchdown to put the Pirates up 42-7 in Class 8A second-round play Saturday against Schaumburg. Palatine travels to Loyola for a noon kickoff Saturday in the Class 8A semifinals.

    Healthy Bobbit, Kuksa have Palatine right on track

    Injuries to Palatine's Jesse Bobbit and Cam Kuksa, both senior receivers and safeties, threw a bit of a wrinkle into the Pirates' season. But heading into Saturday's matchup against Loyola, both are healthy and hoping to help extend Palatine's impressive season.

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    NHL, union to meet Friday for 4th straight day

    The best that can be said about the ongoing NHL labor negotiations is that they are still going, and will continue for at least a fourth straight day. The league and the locked-out players' association got back together Thursday and accomplished enough over five-plus hours to make plans to meet again Friday.

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    Libertyville’s Julia Smagacz, left, celebrates with Kristen Webb during the Wildcats’ sectional title victory over Palatine at Fremd High School.

    Libertyville knows its place

    Libertyville's girls volleyball team didn't always know the finer details of reaching the state finals, but in the end the Wildcats certainly figured an efficient way to get there. Libertyville meets Benet in a Class 4A match Friday at Redbird Arena in Normal scheduled to start at 8:55 p.m.

  •  
    Bears middle linebacker Brian Urlacher yells while watching from the bench Sunday during the fourth quarter against the Tennessee Titans on in Nashville, Tenn. Urlacher scored a touchdown on a pass interception as the Bears beat the Titans 51-20.

    Bears’ defense playing well as a unit

    Despite a defense liberally sprinkled with star power, the group's mantra all season has been: The star of the defense is the defense. No player is bigger than he team. That philosophy has worked so well this season that the Bears are No. 2 in the NFL is fewest points allowed.

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    Gloucester edges Harper in national tourney

    The Harper College women's soccer team suffered a 2-1 loss to Gloucester County College, N.J. (16-2-0) in the opening round of the NJCAA Division III women's soccer national tournament on Thursday.

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    Senior Kyle Matthiesen (51) had been a big part of the Cary-Grove offensive line this season.

    Cary-Grove’s ‘O’ line gets the job done

    Don't judge Cary-Grove's offensive linemen unless you've blocked 2.13 miles in their shoes. That is the distance senior linemen Kyle Matthiesen (6-foot-3, 212 pounds), Greer Bozeman (5-11, 195) and Gunnar Halverson (6-1, 213) and sophomores Michael Gomez (5-11, 273) and Trevor Ruhland (6-4, 268) have helped Cary-Grove ball carriers cover thus far.

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    Girls swimming: Fox Valley sectional scouting

    The Jacobs/Hampshire co-op girls swimming team won the recent Fox Valley Conference championship by working together. "We don't have that one superstar on the team," first-year coach Young Le says. "We try and swim together as a team in order to get the most points. At the conference meet, we swam as a team and won." The Golden Eagles will look to continue that success at Saturday's St. Charles North sectional where berths in next weekend's state finals in Evanston will be on the line.

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    Bucs quarterback Josh Freeman has 16 TD passes and just 5 interceptions on the season.

    Some below-the radar players who are worth a shot

    John Dietz gives fantasy football owners some off-the-beaten path names that may help struggling teams make a push for the playoffs.

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    Michigan State starting its season in Germany

    Having started last season on an aircraft carrier, Michigan State has gone abroad this year and will open against the University of Connecticut in an Air Base hangar in Germany that usually houses fighter jets. Both teams are staying at the sprawling Ramstein Air Base in southwestern Germany and that's where the Armed Forces Classic will be played, with the tip-off around midnight Friday local time.

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    Minnesota looking for Mo-Mentum from Walker

    Trevor Mbakwe's return from a knee injury has received plenty of attention and is considered the key to Minnesota's hopes of returning to the NCAA tournament this year. The Golden Gophers will likely need a little Mo-mentum from a less heralded comeback to get there as well.

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    Hoosiers’ Zeller eager for 2nd college season

    Cody Zeller was the biggest reason Indiana spent last season rebounding instead of rebuilding. This time around, he could be the difference between winning a national championship and simply being another good college team. "It is pretty neat to see all that stuff, but it doesn't really matter too much," Zeller said when asked about Indiana being ranked No. 1 heading into a season for the first time in 33 years. "If the awards come at the end of the year, then I'll be pretty excited."

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    Nebraska’s Jamal Turner, right, catches the game-winning touchdown pass against Michigan State’s Mitchell White with seconds remaining in the fourth quarter Saturday in East Lansing, Mich. Nebraska won 28-24.

    Huskers’ Turner feels like ‘new man’ after 1st TD

    All it took was one catch to change Jamal Turner's outlook. Before he scored the game-winning touchdown with six seconds left against Michigan State last week, Turner had been worried about the direction of his football career at Nebraska. "I feel like a new man," Turner said. "I feel like a way better wide receiver. I feel the team looks at me differently. When we need a big play, they look at me to make it because of that one touchdown."

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    Indiana wide receiver Cody Latimer and wide receiver Kofi Hughes celebrate Latimer’s touchdown catch against Iowa Saturday during in Bloomington, Ind. Indiana won 24-21.

    Hoosiers ex-coach Mallory relishing Indiana’s improvement

    Few people are enjoying what could be Indiana's breakthrough football season more than former coach Bill Mallory. Mallory finished his career in 1996 as the Hoosiers' winningest coach and still lives in Bloomington. "I do believe," Mallory said this week. "I've got a great passion for this school and this program. I definitely want to see it succeed and feel very strong it's going to."

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    Penn State quarterback Matthew McGloin looks to pass during the first quarter against Temple in State College, Pa., earlier this season.

    Confident McGloin blossoms at QB for Penn State

    The Big Ten's top passer may not have the strongest arm in the league or the quickest feet for a quarterback. But Penn State's Matt McGloin is proof that a strong work ethic and an innate desire to succeed can help make up for any other shortcomings. Saturday's game at No. 18 Nebraska (7-2, 4-1) may feature two of the league's top quarterbacks, but McGloin isn't worried about any statistical competitions with Cornhuskers star Taylor Martinez.

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    Mike North video: Controversy at USC with Lane Kiffin

    USC has been accused of deflating footballs during their game against Oregon. Lane Kiffin, head coach, also had some issues about players switching numbers. Maybe it's time for him to leave USC and coaching all together.

Business

  •  
    Jacquelin Johnson, center, and fiancé Mike Pohl, right, both St. Viator High School grads, enjoy some of the winnings from Kenmore’s online show, “Bridal Wave.”

    More will shop online, use smartphones this holiday season

    More of you are expected to do your holiday shopping online and more will be using your smartphones to do it, according to a survey by Deloitte Consulting LLP. This holiday season, 44 percent of the respondents are expected to shop online, mostly for the convenience, find better prices and free shipping, among other reasons. That's slightly higher than the 43 percent last year and 34 percent in 2010, said Tom Compernolle, principal at Deloitte Consulting.

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    Illinois hospital tax break costs $10 million

    A little-noticed tax break for investor-owned hospitals that was tucked into a deal last spring aimed at saving the Illinois Medicaid program from collapse will cost the cash-strapped state at least $10 million a year in lost revenue, according to an analysis by The Associated Press.

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    Bill Zars/bzars@dailyherald.com Maureen Kmieciak, left, with Speedpro Imaging of Gurnee and event coordinator Rashaan Tobin with Events of Radiance chat at the Daily Herald Business Ledger Northwest Hospitality Expo at the Meadows Club in Rolling Meadows.

    Expo showcases suburban hospitality industry

    All the essentials for planning the perfect business event were on display Thursday at the second annual Northwest Chicago Hospitality Expo.

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    Wendy’s push to remake itself as a higher-end hamburger chain reflects the growing popularity of chains such as Chipotle and Panera, which offer better quality food for slightly higher prices.

    Wendy’s sales climb amid transformation push

    Wendy's push to remake itself as a higher-end hamburger chain is starting to pay off, with a key sales figure rising for the sixth straight quarter.

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    Steven Lesnik

    Career Education to cut 900 jobs, close 23 campuses

    Career Education announced that it is cutting 900 jobs and closing 23 campuses due to declining enrollment.The Schaumburg-based for-profit education provider reported the cuts when it released its dismal third-quarter loss of $33.1 million.

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    U.S. stocks declined, extending losses since the re-election of President Barack Obama and sending the Dow Jones Industrial Average to the lowest level since July, amid concern about Greece’s financial aid payment.

    Stocks slide on Wall Street, extending sell-off

    Stocks slid on Wall Street Thursday, a day after the Dow Jones industrial average logged its biggest one-day drop of the year, as investors fretted about the potential for gridlock in Washington.

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    Crews work to repair downed wires Thursday in Eatontown, N.J., after a nor’easter brought high winds and dumped as much as a foot of snow overnight in the region pounded by Superstorm Sandy last week.

    Cuomo: NY superstorm damage could total $33 billion

    Damage in New York state from Superstorm Sandy could total $33 billion when all is said and done, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday as the state began cleaning up from a nor'easter that dumped snow, brought down power lines and left hundreds of thousands of new customers in darkness.

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS Twitter mistakenly reset the passwords of many of its users, it admitted Thursday.

    Twitter mistakenly resets passwords of some users

    Twitter says it mistakenly reset the passwords of some users as part of a routine security check-up. Thursday's mix-up triggered warnings on technology blogs and in tweets that the online messaging service had been attacked by computer hackers.

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    Chicago-based United Airlines’ flights were on-time 82 percent of the time in September.

    More flights arriving late, American is most tardy

    Dragged down by problems at American Airlines, U.S. carriers operated fewer flights on time in September than a year ago. The Transportation Department said Thursday that 83.3 percent of all flights were on time.

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    JPMorgan Chase & Co., the biggest U.S. bank, reached a settlement with regulators to resolve claims tied to its home-loan business and said it would buy back as much as $3 billion of shares.

    JPMorgan gets Fed OK to restart start buybacks

    JPMorgan Chase said Thursday that it has won approval from the Federal Reserve to start buying back its own stock. The bank suspended the plan in May, after it revealed a surprise trading loss that grew to more than $6 billion.

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    Oak Brook-based McDonald’s Corp. said Thursday that a key sales figure fell for the first time in nearly a decade in October, as it faced intensifying competition and a challenging economy.

    McDonald’s sales drop for first time since 2003

    McDonald's Corp. is having a tough time stomaching the competition. The world's biggest hamburger chain said Thursday that a key sales figure fell for the first time in nearly a decade in October.

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    Major airlines have scratched about 600 flights around the U.S. Thursday, according to flight tracking service FlightAware after the second major storm in little more than a week.

    Flight cancellations still piling up in New York

    Air travel in the New York area still isn't back to normal after the second major storm in little more than a week. Major airlines have scratched about 600 flights around the U.S. Thursday, according to flight tracking service FlightAware. The majority of those are in the New York area, although airports in Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and elsewhere are affected.

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    Wis.-based Krones to pay $15M in Le-Nature’s case

    A Wisconsin bottling equipment firm has agreed to pay a $15 million penalty to avoid prosecution for its alleged role in the massive accounting fraud involving defunct western Pennsylvania soft-drink maker, Le-Nature’s.Officials with Krones Inc., in Franklin, Wis., say they plan to release a statement later Thursday.Federal prosecutors in Pittsburgh say the penalty will resolve allegations that Krones helped Le-Nature’s officials to deceive lenders about the cost of bottling equipment the soft-drink company financed. Authorities say Krones must also repay lenders who lost money, meaning the non-prosecution agreement will cost Krones about $125 million total.Le-Nature’s founder Gregory Podlucky is serving a 20-year sentence for masterminding an accounting scheme in which the company fraudulently obtained $875 million in credit and equipment leases before creditors forced Le-Nature’s into bankruptcy in 2006.

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    The number of people seeking unemployment benefits fell last week by 8,000 to a seasonally adjusted 355,000, a possible sign of a healing job market. But officials cautioned that the figures were distorted by Superstorm Sandy.

    Weekly U.S. jobless claims fall to 355K last week

    The number of people seeking unemployment benefits fell last week by 8,000 to a seasonally adjusted 355,000, a possible sign of a healing job market. But officials cautioned that the figures were distorted by Superstorm Sandy. The Labor Department said Thursday that the four-week average of applications, a less volatile measure, rose by 3,250 to 370,500.

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    The U.S. trade deficit declined to the lowest level in almost two years as exports rose to a record high, a gain that is not expected to last given the global economic slowdown.

    U.S. trade deficit narrows to $41.5 billion

    The U.S. trade deficit declined to the lowest level in almost two years as exports rose to a record high, a gain that is not expected to last given the global economic slowdown. The trade deficit narrowed to $41.5 billion in September, the Commerce Department said Thursday. That is 5.1 percent below the August deficit and the smallest imbalance since December 2010.

  •  
    News Corp.’s Fox Broadcasting unit lost its bid to block Dish Network Corp.’s ad-free primetime television service and its so-called AutoHop features before a copyright-infringement lawsuit has been resolved.

    Fox loses bid to block Dish’s AutoHop ad-skipping

    News Corp.'s Fox Broadcasting unit lost its bid to block Dish Network Corp.'s ad-free primetime television service and its so-called AutoHop features before a copyright-infringement lawsuit has been resolved. "We are disappointed the court erred in finding that Fox's damages were not suitable for a preliminary injunction," Fox said in a statement.

  •  

    Hyundai faces U.S. lawsuits for overstate fuel efficiency

    Hyundai Motor Co. and Kia Motors Corp. face consumer lawsuits in the U.S. after the Korean carmakers admitted they overstated the fuel efficiency of their latest models. A Hyundai owner and a Kia owner filed a complaint Nov. 2 in federal court

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    Mining company: Gold field 58% larger

    A Canadian-based mining company said Thursday that reserves at the major gold field it is developing in Kyrgyzstan are 58 percent larger than previously believed. The announcement by Centerra Gold comes as a much-needed boost for the Central Asian nation, whose tiny economy has floundered in recent years.Kumtor goldmine accounts for about 12 percent of the economy.

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    People, some in danger of being evicted from their homes for not being able to keep up with mortgage payments, camp outside a Bankia bank in Madrid, Wednesday Nov. 7, 2012. One in four people in Spain are now unemployed as the economic crisis tightens its grip. The government is under pressure to seek aid to ease debts while the country sinks into its second recession in three years. The main banners read: “Rescue people, Bankia is ours - your houses are ours too, Stop evictions.”

    Spain sells $6 billion debt

    Spain sold 4.76 billion euros ($6.06 billion) of debt, including the longest-maturity security it has auctioned in more than a year, even as weak demand prompted a slump in prices after the sale.

  •  
    A Southern California insurance broker has pleaded not guilty to federal charges that he defrauded Tom Hanks and musician Andy Summers, a former member of The Police.

    Insurance broker charged with defrauding Tom Hanks

    A Southern California insurance broker has pleaded not guilty to federal charges that he defrauded Tom Hanks and musician Andy Summers, a former member of The Police.

  •  
    Petrol bombs thrown by protesters explode near riot police in front of the parliament during clashes in Athens, Wednesday Nov. 7, 2012. Greeceís fragile coalition government faces its toughest test so far when lawmakers vote later Wednesday on new painful austerity measures demanded to keep the country afloat, on the second day of a nationwide general strike. The 13.5 billion euro ($17.3 billion) package is expected to scrape through Parliament, following a hasty one-day debate.

    Greek unemployment hits 25.4 percent

    Greece's statistics agency says unemployment rose to 25.4 percent in August, increasing from 24.8 percent in July as the country struggles through a deep recession. The numbers mark a significant leap from the 18.4 percent jobless rate in the same month last year. More than 1.2 million people in this country of barely 10 million are now unemployed, the statistics agency said Thursday.

  •  

    U.K. strips G4S of jail contract after Olympics security debacle

    The U.K. government stripped G4S Plc of its contract to run a prison and the company failed to win further jail contracts it bid for, following criticism of its shortcomings in providing security for the London Olympics.

  •  
    New Jerseyans with homes swamped and blacked out by Hurricane Sandy face another hardship: a cutoff of Cristal champagne, Grey Goose vodka and an herbal brew called Kamasutra, “the natural spirit of seduction.”

    Cristal, Grey Goose supply drying up in NJ

    New Jerseyans with homes swamped and blacked out by Hurricane Sandy face another hardship: a cutoff of Cristal champagne, Grey Goose vodka and an herbal brew called Kamasutra, "the natural spirit of seduction." The exclusive New Jersey distributor of those and other liquors, Fedway Associates Inc., was still cleaning up after a 10-foot surge of Hackensack River floodwater inundated its Kearny warehouse last week, according to its Facebook page. Losses will be "in the tens of millions," the posting said.

  •  
    Adidas AG, the world’s second-biggest sporting-goods maker, cut its sales forecast for the year on lower sales expectations for its Reebok brand.

    Adidas cuts 2012 sales forecast

    Adidas AG, the world's second-biggest sporting-goods maker, cut its sales forecast for the year on lower sales expectations for its Reebok brand. The retailer now expects sales to rise at a "high-single- digit" rate on a currency-neutral basis, compared with a previous forecast of growth approaching 10 percent.

  •  
    A currency trader reacts in front of screens showing the Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI), center, and foreign exchange rate, right, at the foreign exchange dealing room of the Korea Exchange Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012. South Korea’s Kospi dropped 1.19 percent at 1,914.43.

    Greek vote helps markets calm after turmoil

    Financial markets settled down Thursday after the turmoil of the previous day when concerns over the U.S. fiscal situation combined with renewed worries over the European economy to hammer stocks. But a vote early Thursday by the Greek Parliament to back another round of austerity measures has helped settle the mood ahead of the monthly press conference from European Central Bank President Mario Draghi. Hopes that U.S. politicians may agree a crucial budget deal have also contributed to the more positive tone in markets.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Manager Essence Ashford serves a burger and fries at the Pour House Bar & Grill in East Dundee.

    East Dundee Pour House packs the drinks, music

    While it opened in July, Pour House in East Dundee doesn't seem to have hit its stride yet. Management hopes that word will spread. After all, the bar's large space makes it a good spot for a private party or just a big gathering of friends.

  •  
    Peter Parker (Andrew Garfield) develops special powers in “The Amazing Spider-Man.”

    ‘Amazing Spider-Man’ swings onto DVD

    In "The Amazing Spider-Man." now on DVD, Andrew Garfield takes over the spider suit from Tobey Maguire. Once again, viewers are introduced to Peter Parker, a nerdy high school student who gains special powers when he gets bitten by a radioactive spider.

  •  
    Lady Gaga is donating $1 million to the Red Cross to aid those affected by Superstorm Sandy.

    Lady Gaga donates $1M to Red Cross for Sandy relief

    Lady Gaga is donating $1 million to the Red Cross to aid those affected by Superstorm Sandy. The New York-born singer posted on her blog Wednesday that she is pledging the money on behalf of her parents and sister. She also said she "would not be the woman or artist that I am today" if it weren't for places like the Lower Eastside, Harlem, the Bronx and Brooklyn.

  •  
    Chain-smoking British occult detective John Constantine, long a staple of Vertigo’s “Hellblazer,” is getting what promises to be a duly deserved send off as the title ends at No. 300 in February.

    'Hellblazer’ wraps its run, Constantine continues

    The infernal fire that has blazed beneath cynical detective John Constantine for years is being extinguished. But not for long. The chain-smoking British occult detective, long a staple of Vertigo's "Hellblazer," is getting what promises to be a duly deserved send-off as the title ends at No. 300 in February. But Constantine won't be fading away with the title's end. Instead, the ending is a beginning of sorts for the character.

  •  
    The U.S. President (Daniel Day-Lewis) surveys a Union vs. Confederacy battlefield in Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln."

    Daniel Day-Lewis' performance outshines Spielberg's direction in 'Lincoln'

    It doesn't take long before we realize that Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" isn't the staid Hollywood biography of the Illinois rail splitter we expected it to be. No, Spielberg treats this like an old-fashioned war movie, except this is a war of ideas. It's about strategy, persuasive tactics and bartering for votes as we glimpse the political animal lurking under Lincoln's gentleman facade.

  •  
    Musician Adam Lambert will host and perform at the “VH1 Divas” event in New York.

    Adam Lambert to host ‘VH1 Divas’ show

    "VH1 Divas" will be getting some testosterone this year: Adam Lambert is joining in. Lambert will host and perform at the Dec. 16 event. Miley Cyrus, Demi Lovato, Kelly Rowland, Jordin Sparks and Ciara will also hit the stage at the special honoring dance music and its current and classic divas.

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    Vice President Joe Biden will appear on NBC’s “Parks and Recreation” next week.

    Biden to appear on NBC’s ‘Parks and Recreation’

    Fresh off re-election, Vice President Joe Biden will appear on the NBC sitcom "Parks and Recreation" next Thursday. The vice president's office said Biden taped a cameo appearance back in July. He said Thursday on Twitter that "my whole family loves the show, and I had a great time doing it."

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    Science and cooking intersect at molecular gastronomy, or modernist cuisine. Here a pillow of calcium lactate-infused yogurt sits like a pillow on a bed blackberries.

    Move over Mom: No bat’s wings or witches brew needed to cook up ebidle pillows

    Jerome Gabriels puts on his lab coat and experiments with kitchen science, or what the world's top chefs refer to as molecular gastronomy.

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    Science and cooking intersect at molecular gastronomy, or modernist cuisine. Here a pillow of calcium lactate-infused yogurt sits like a pillow on a bed blackberries.

    Zombie Eyeballs aka Key Lime Pillows on a Berry Bed
    Key Lime Pillows and Berries

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    Legendary supersoldier Master Chief and his AI companion Cortana make a stellar return in “Halo 4.”

    Master Chief returns in stellar 'Halo 4'

    Legendary supersoldier Master Chief and his AI companion Cortana make a stellar return in "Halo 4," an excellent opening installment in "The Reclaimer Trilogy." Boasting arguably the finest art design, graphics and soundscapes of this generation, "Halo 4" picks up several years after "Halo 3." As Master Chief, you'll do battle with a Covenant horde once again and contend with a challenging new enemy in the Prometheans.

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    Court records show a judge in October stripped Ariel Winter’s mother of custody temporarily amid allegations she has been physically and emotionally abusive to the 14-year-old “Modern Family” star.

    Mom of ‘Modern Family’ teen star accused of abuse

    The mother of "Modern Family" star Ariel Winter has temporarily lost custody of the actress amid claims she's been physically and emotionally abusive to the teenager, court records show.

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    Comedian Jerry Seinfeld has added a show in Long Island to his new comedy tour and will donate all proceeds to it and two other performances to Superstorm Sandy relief.

    Jerry Seinfeld reaches out to victims of Sandy

    Jerry Seinfeld has added a show in Long Island to his new comedy tour and will donate all proceeds from it and two other performances to Superstorm Sandy relief. The newly added show will be on Dec. 19 at the NYCB Theater in Westbury.

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    A limousine driver (Edith Scob) calls it a day after some very weird assignments in Leos Carax’s surrealistic cinematic experience “Holy Motors.”

    ‘Holy Motors’ is nonsensical sensory magic

    Dann asks legendary 007 producer Albert "Cubby" Broccoli if novelist Ian Fleming would have approved of the changes he made the writer's literary character. Dann also reviews the parasite horror film "The Bay" and Leos Carax's surrealistic "Holy Motors," plus answers several pieces of mail (some not exactly from fans) and offers up several notes to keep up on Northwest suburban movie news.

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    Canton, a French ginger liqueur, is served in cinnamon tea.

    Pour on the holiday spirit with liquor largesse

    It's no secret that liquor is a simple solution to holiday gift-giving. You don't see a lot of people lining up Dec. 26 to return bottles of 12-year-old Scotch. But let's face it, sticking a ribbon on a generic bottle of booze can come across as a bit uninspired. Here, then, are a few suggestions to avoid the blahs by choosing spirits that are good in the glass, but also do double duty in the kitchen, adding zest to seasonal dishes.

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    64 Chicago-area restaurants designated Michelin Bib Gourmand

    Sixty-four Chicago-area restaurants have been named to Michelin's list of Bib Gourmand eateries exactly one week prior to the launch of the highly anticipated Michelin Guide Chicago 2013.

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    Fiance should put your needs first — and so should you

    After 40 years of an abusive marriage, I finally got my divorce and recently reunited with my first love. We have been together almost a year now and were planning to get married. I'm having second thoughts. He is obsessed with his adult children, who are married with children of their own. If I get sick and need something, he ignores me, but if his son's wife needs money, he can't wait to send it.

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    The debate lingers: protect barbecue or let it grow

    Is barbecue dying? By all appearances, evidence to the contrary abounds. Competitions are bigger than ever. Restaurants continue to open across the country. The down-home food even has its own TV series in TLC's "BBQ Pitmasters." But with all that comes a certain homogenization; is that a spike to the heart of such a fiercely regional American cuisine?

Discuss

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    Editorial: What election does and doesn’t say to Springfield

    A Daily Herald editorial says it is shortsighted to presume that the new additions to the Democratic majorities in the state House and Senate are mere foot soldiers for the entrenched powers in Springfield.

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    Random thoughts as long campaign finally ends

    Columnist Jim Slusher: If everyone is so bitterly outraged by the sleazy innuendo and purposeful distortion of negative political campaigning, why are candidates so quick to embrace it? The obvious answer is that it works. But again, why -- if everyone is so turned off by it?

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    Republicans need to take their party back

    Americans wanted to keep the country they know, and said so Tuesday. Now it’s time for responsible Republicans to take their party back from the fringe that loses them elections. It’s not true that Republicans needed better candidates. They had excellent contenders. The problem was that the electable ones couldn’t leap the lunacy barrier erected by the right wing. They couldn’t clinch nominations. Or they withdrew from races in the face of the party base’s social nastiness, scientific ignorance and fiscal irresponsibility.In Indiana, Republicans had the superb Sen. Richard Lugar — a sure shot for re-election. Lugar was a statesman who refused to transform himself into a right-wing gargoyle during the primary. The party replaced him with a tea-party favorite, who like the Republican loser in the Missouri Senate race, made weird comments about rape during the campaign. In Connecticut, the totally unacceptable Linda McMahon lost her second quest for a U.S. Senate seat after spending $91 million of her own money — but not before having managed to defeat two plausible Republican moderates this year and in 2010. In this round’s Republican primary, the wrestling magnate with a yacht named “Sexy Bitch” swept away the much-respected former Rep. Chris Shays on a tide of cash. Another admired Republican, Jon Huntsman, withdrew from the race for the presidential nomination rather than debase himself with arguments that the Earth was formed 5,000 years ago. The former conservative governor of Utah provided the most noble tweet of the campaign: “I believe in evolution and trust scientists on global warming. Call me crazy.” You knew he couldn’t survive the sort of primary race that included threats against Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke. (“We would treat him pretty ugly down in Texas,” Texas Gov. Rick Perry actually said.) By catering to this mentality but seeming just a bit saner than the others, Mitt Romney won the nomination and lost the election. The morning after, Steve Schmidt, a Republican strategist turned MSNBC commentator, minced no words: “We have given away five U.S. Senate seats over two election cycles by nominating loons. I mean, people who are fundamentally, manifestly unqualified to be in the United States Senate.” Lest we forget, Republicans put out some very strange senatorial candidates two years ago. In Delaware, Christine (“I’m not a witch) O’Donnell lost to the Democrat — after defeating the revered Republican Rep. Mike Castle in the primary. In Nevada, Sharron Angle (“Sharia law” has taken over Dearborn, Mich.) lost to a struggling Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. So entranced was the right wing by its own propaganda that it persisted in framing Republican Sen. Scott Brown’s surprising 2010 win in Massachusetts as local hostility to Obamacare. Brown got away with promising to help defeat the Affordable Care Act only because the electorate already had a state version of it. His luck ran out on Tuesday. In olden days, when moderate Republicans freely roamed New England, Brown would have enjoyed stronger odds for re-election. And in nearby Maine, Republican survivor Olympia Snowe would have probably gone back to the Senate had she not retired, exhausted by attacks from the right. The Tea Party didn’t build this alone. It had help from the punditry-industrial-complex — the radio mouths and book-peddling professionals who make a fine living telling the troops that they’re always right and they’re always winning. Republican analyst Schmidt also said on Wednesday that the likes of Donald Trump and Rush Limbaugh need to be “shut down.” What he undoubtedly means is that mature Republican leaders should stop trying to ingratiate themselves with the publicity bottom feeders. Conscientious Republicans do want their party back. May they get it. © 2012, Creators Syndicate Inc.

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    Election over, and we’ve saved Big Bird
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: The election has been won for responsible government. The anti-government crowd has been defeated. President Obama will administer a central government for the general welfare of all the people.

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    Election a call for GOP to change
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: The re-election of President Barack Obama may not have been a mandate to the political system or the populous of America. It was however a call for change if the Republican Party is to be relevant as the second party in America.

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    Political ad was abhorrent
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: The paid political advertisement in the Nov. 5 Daily Herald by the Indian Americans for Freedom is a good example of freedom of speech. It is also one of the most disgusting political ads I have ever seen.

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    Enjoy the short reprieve
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Looking back at the election, the really sad thing is that these two sad excuses for political parties have spent over $6 billion on it and we are left with the exact same political team on the field.

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    Some expectations for winner Duckworth
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: I am quite sure she will return back to the taxpayers budget money that is not spent by her office. And Mrs. Duckworth for certain will be as accessible to her district people as her predecessor was with numerous town hall meetings and even have the courtesy to meet one-on-one over a cup of joe.

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    World leaders must act to curb violence
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: In recent months, we have witnessed an upsurge of anger that has swept throughout the Muslim world — in response to extremely crude acts by anti-Islam elements. It is now incumbent upon the world at large to respond

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    Some advice for any elected official
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: :It seems to me that the slogan that could be adapted by both Democrats and Republicans would be: think — first!

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    ‘Free’ contraceptives is a misnomer
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Froma Harrop's column in the Oct. 29 Daily Herald gave me much food for thought. She advocates for free birth control — "Access to birth control doesn't count" — but fails to mention who is going to pay for the "free" birth control.

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    Somebody please explain gas prices
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: Knowing the floor of the stock exchange was closed yesterday I checked some financial data to find that the price of gasoline futures for November delivery had gone up only 6 cents/gallon. So what was the basis of the 20-cent increase by Mobil? Why are these increases left unchecked?

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    Early voting muddles the ID issue
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Although I did not feel discriminated against or suppressed, I'm wondering if I was discriminated against by having to show ID because I decided to vote early? Or, conversely, how is it not discrimination or voter suppression to prohibit someone without ID if they wanted to vote early?

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    Democrats couldn’t win a fair fight
    A Wood Dale letter to the editor: Well, I hope Bill Foster, Brad Schneider, Tom Cullerton, Tammy Duckworth and their ilk are enjoying their ill-gotten gains. Since they could not win a fair fight, the Democrats "redistricted" them into office.

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    GOP sidetracked by abortion issue
    A Villa Park letter to the editor: The bid by Republicans to win a majority voting bloc in the U.S. Senate was seriously curtailed when abortion became an issue. The Republican Party must recognize that many of us who are Republicans are so because we do not want government intrusion into any aspects of our lives.

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    What kind of relief help are we getting?
    A Carol Stream letter to the editor: Regarding Hurricane Sandy, I'd like to see what countries are going to help us.

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