Daily Archive : Saturday November 3, 2012

News

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    David Bogenberger

    Authorities await toxicology results in Palatine teen's death at NIU

    A finding on the cause of death of Palatine student who had started his freshman year at Northern Illinois University awaits the results of toxicology tests. David R. Bogenberger was found dead Friday morning in an off-campus fraternity house.

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    Visitors to the Naperville Art League's Fine Art Center and Gallery can see a range of art by member artists, such as the interactive work by Joe Eddy Brown that the league's Executive Director Debbie Venezia shows.

    Naperville Art League celebrating 50th anniversary

    The Naperville Art League is celebrating its 50th anniversary, having evolved from a small group of founding artists who met in the basement of a local bank to a 250-member league. As executive director of the nonprofit group, Debbie Venezia has an eye toward boosting the gallery's visibility. "We want to be thought of as more progressive and cutting edge," she said. "We want to be exciting and...

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    Cary woman identified as pedestrian struck by train

    Authorities Sunday identified a 35-year-old Cary woman as the person struck and killed by a Metra commuter train near Cary Saturday night. The McHenry County Coroner’s office said Jill Turskey was the person hit by outbound Train 721 on the Union Pacific Northwest Line at about 6:50 p.m. near Northwest Highway and Feinberg Drive.

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    Suspicious package in Huntley investigated

    Huntley police were investigating a suspicious package Saturday evening at Huntley High School.

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    Two taken into custody after shots fired in Warrenville

    Two Aurora men were charged in connection with a report of shots fired early Saturday in Warrenville, according to police. No one was injured.

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    Associated Presss A recently discovered statue in a complex of tombs south of Cairo, Egypt.

    Pharaonic princess’s tomb unearthed near Cairo

    Czech archaeologists have unearthed the 4,500-year-old tomb of a Pharaonic princess south of Cairo, in a finding that suggests other undiscovered tombs may be in the area, an official from Egypt's antiquities ministry said Saturday

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    President Barack Obama holds up a doll bearing his resemblance, which was given to him Saturday by a supporter, at a campaign event at Washington Park in Dubuque, Iowa.

    Stakes high for White House, control of Congress

    Apart from the candidates, divided government — perhaps a politically correct term for dysfunctional government — is on the ballot after a two-year stretch that produced gridlock on many issues and record-low congressional approval ratings.

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    Manuel Guzman displays lighted holiday centerpieces Saturday during the annual Lombard Christmas Mart. Guzman's display was at Sacred Heart Church, one of several Lombard churches participating in the Christmas Mart.

    'Happy crowd' explores Lombard Christmas Mart

    Groups of smiling shoppers browsed for crafty and creative gifts at four churches and three other locations Saturday during the annual Lombard Christmas Mart. "This is a real happy crowd, a happy group of people who come in," said Carol Anderson, one of the organizers of the mart at St. John's Lutheran Church. "Everyone enjoys seeing what's new."

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    Republican U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh, right, and challenger Democrat Tammy Duckworth before a televised debate at the WTTW studios Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    On eve of election, Walsh, Duckworth working feverishly

    Republican Congressman Joe Walsh wraps up his campaign for re-election in the 8th Congressional District with a supporters rally and several suburban stops Saturday while Democrat Tammy Duckworth stops by a Palatine craft fair and several of her volunteer headquarters.

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    Review of Elgin infant’s death could take weeks

    The Illinois Department of Child and Family Services is investigating the death of a 9-month-old Elgin girl who died Friday. The agency is looking into allegations of abuse and neglect against the girl's parents.

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    Regulators close Citizens First National Bank

    Federal regulators closed Citizens First National Bank on Friday, which has branches in Aurora, Plainfield, Huntley and Hampshire.

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    New Jersey state troopers keep order as motorist line up Saturday to purchase gasoline at the Thomas A. Edison service area on the New Jersey Turnpike.

    Coast struggles with lack of fuel

    Mayor Michael Bloomberg said resolving the gas shortages could take days.At a giveaway station in Queens, hundreds of cars stretched more than a dozen blocks, with one tanker filling cars one at a time. A police car pulled alongside one car about 250th in line, and told the driver they hoped there would still be gas by the time he got there.

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    Chicago couple charged with South Barrington theft

    A Chicago woman on probation for theft, who was working for a cleaning company, has been charged with theft after authorities say she stole about $3,000 worth of property from South Barrington homeowners.

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    Even though Mary Barth, the widow of William Barth — one of TriCity Family Services’ Founding Fathers — passed away in a Nashville nursing home seven months ago, she was front and center when the agency honored Carolyn Sprawka of Batavia with the annual Barth Award.

    Mary Barth and her random act of kindness

    Mary Barth was remembered as a very giving woman at the recent Barth Award ceremony hosted by TriCity Family Services.

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    Semitrailer strikes, kills man in Elk Grove Village

    A pedestrian on Elmhurst Road in Elk Grove Village was killed Friday night when a semitrailer struck him, police said. The victim, Jose Resugio Meza-Horatio, 53, of Des Plaines, was struck about 9:30 p.m. by a semitrailer heading south on Elmhurst near Landmeier Road, police said. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

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    Once-and-future bureau cheifs at The Associated Press’ Saigon bureau, from left, George Esper (1973-75), Malcolm Browne (1961-64), George McArthur (1968-69), Edwin Q. White (1965-67), and Richard Pyle (1970-73). White, a Saigon bureau chief for The Associated Press during the U.S. buildup in the Vietnam War, has died at age 90.

    Notable deaths last week
    One night in 1969, as a salvo of Viet Cong rockets exploded in the streets of Saigon, Edwin Q. White paused after typing a dateline on his typewriter to light his pipe and reflect on his belief that as an American journalist, he belonged in Vietnam.To his Associated Press colleagues, it was typical of the reporter-philosopher known as "unflappable Ed," the calmest person in any crisis.

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    Olympic gold medalist Matt Grevers instructs young swimmers on the finer points of the butterfly as he watches a young swimmer during a clinic at Buehler YMCA on Saturday.

    Buehler YMCA shares in Grevers’ Olympic Dream

    Olympic gold medalist Matt Grevers of Lake Forest returned to the suburbs Saturday for a swimming clinic at Buehler YMCA in Palatine co-hosted by his fiancee, NCAA champion Annie Chandler. Their message to an appreciative audience of Olympic swimming hopefuls was simple: Smile.

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    In this 2009 photo, then-Congressman Mark Kirk acknowledges Dupage Congresswoman Judy Biggert as one of his biggest supporters after announcing he is running for the U.S. Senate.

    Kirk stumps for Biggert in new video

    U.S. Senator Mark Kirk has, for the second time in a week, taken to the campaign trail via video to help support a vulnerable colleague. The state's top ranking Republican, speaking from home in Highland Park where he is continuing to recover from an ischemic stroke, described Congresswoman Judy Biggert as an "ultimate suburban mom who should be representing Illinois in Congress next year."

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    Justin Plackowski

    Funeral set for boy stabbed to death in Naperville

    The family of Justin Plackowski has announced funeral services for the Naperville 7-year-old who authorities say was stabbed to death by his mother in a horrific double murder last week. A notice posted on the website of Justin's school, Scott Elementary in Naperville District 203, invited members of the school community to the services saying, "It is the family's hope that you will be able to...

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    A rebel fighter walks Friday among the debris of damaged residential buildings after several days of intense fighting between rebel fighters and the Syrian army in the Karm al-Jebel neighborhood in Aleppo, Syria.

    Syrian tanks enter demilitarized Israeli frontier

    Neighboring countries are dealing with a variety of incidents linked to the conflict — Turkey exchanged artillery fire with Syria for a week last month, while Jordan has seen several shootings at the border and clashes linked to the uprising against President Bashar Assad have broken out in Lebanon.

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    New Jersey state troopers keep order Saturday as motorists line up to purchase gasoline at the Thomas A. Edison service area on the New Jersey Turnpike.

    Christie rations gasoline purchases as Cuomo deploys trucks

    New Jersey Governor Chris Christie ordered rationing of gasoline sales in 12 counties while Governor Andrew Cuomo deployed temporary fuel trucks around New York to help reduce miles-long lines at filling stations.

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    The facade of Flowers of Lisle has changed over the years, but it’s been a mainstay of Main Street for 40 years.

    Flowers of Lisle celebrating 40 years on Main Street

    Bob Kendall began making deliveries for Flowers of Lisle as a teenager in 1972, hoping to earn some money for college. Instead, he went to floral school, became a designer and now owns the business that's celebrating tis 40th anniversary. "Our customers are not strangers," Kendall said. "People feel very comfortable coming in here."

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    Rebels fight Syrian troops over airbase

    BEIRUT — Syrian rebels launched a dawn assault Saturday on a strategic airbase in the north of the country, trying to disrupt strikes by warplanes and helicopters that pound rebel-held towns and give the regime of President Bashar Assad a major edge in the civil war.

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    Romney, Obama look for edge at campaign's end

    Reaching for the finish line, Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama embarked Saturday on the final 72-hour haul of their long, grinding quest for victory, swatting at one another over what should motivate Americans to vote and making closing arguments that offer dueling pictures of what the next four years can and should bring. Romney opened a three-state campaign day in New Hampshire by...

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    Most Americans will be able to get an extra hour of sleep Sunday Nov. 4, 2012 thanks to the annual shift back to standard time. Officially, the change occurs at 2 a.m. Sunday, but most people will set their clocks back before hitting the sack Saturday night.

    Reminder: Time to fall back an hour

    Most Americans will be able to get an extra hour of sleep this weekend thanks to the annual shift back to standard time.

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    Most Americans will be able to get an extra hour of sleep Sunday Nov. 4, 2012 thanks to the annual shift back to standard time. Officially, the change occurs at 2 a.m. Sunday, but most people will set their clocks back before hitting the sack Saturday night.

    Reminder: Time to fall back an hour

    Most Americans will be able to get an extra hour of sleep this weekend thanks to the annual shift back to standard time.

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    Power sputters back after storm; weariness mounts

    NEW YORK — More New Yorkers awoke Saturday morning to power being restored for the first time since Superstorm Sandy pummeled the region, and those whose lights were back on celebrated it, but patience was wearing thin among those in the region who had been without power for most of the week.

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    Obama gets storm update, sends officials to states

    WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama has stopped in at the headquarters of the Federal Emergency Management Agency for an update on the superstorm before getting ready for a full day of campaigning across the country.The briefing included members of his Cabinet and governors who joined in by telephone.

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    With can-do stance on marathon, mayor misreads NYC

    Mayor Michael Bloomberg tried to sell the New York City Marathon as a symbolic victory for the city after a devastating storm, invoking two of the biggest symbols of them all — Rudy Giuliani and 9/11. The former mayor, Bloomberg said, made the right decision by holding the marathon less than two months after the 2001 terror attacks: "It pulled people together, and we have to find some ways...

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    NE Ind. hospital to open autism center in 2013

    HUNTINGTON, Ind. — A new center for children with autism will open next year to meet the needs of patients in northeastern Indiana.Parkview Huntington Hospital's autism treatment center will provide therapeutic and rehabilitation services for children ages 2 to 18, as well as support groups for their families.

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    Ruling against would-be presidential candidate

    CHICAGO — A judge in Chicago has ruled against an Illinois man who filed a lawsuit accusing officials of violating his rights by refusing to put his name on the presidential ballot after he fell short of the 25,000 petition signatures required.And just how short off the mark was Michael W. Hawkins?He was 24,999 signatures short. He had just one.

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    Chicago plans to open outdoor ice rinks Nov. 23

    CHICAGO — The Chicago Park District plans to open its outdoor ice rinks on Nov. 23 — the day after Thanksgiving — if the weather cooperates. Skating season runs through Feb. 24 at most of the rinks.

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    Chicago church to give out 800 frozen chickens

    CHICAGO — A south-side Chicago church will give out frozen chickens to needy families Saturday.The Faith Community of St. Sabina is cooperating with the HEAR Foundation to hand out 800, 10-pound chickens.The Rev. Michael Pfleger (FLAY'-gur) of St. Sabina says the food distribution is a "great blessing" for many families struggling through tough economic times.

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    U of Ill. plans solar-energy complex

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — The University of Illinois plans to build a solar-energy complex that could eventually supply about 2 percent of the campus' power.The university says it would have to spend about $15.5 million on the solar-energy farm over its first 10 years but would then be able to use energy that would all but cost-free.

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    Matt Murphy, left, and David Page.

    Gay marriage divides 27th senate district candidates

    As the race for the 27th senate district heads for Tuesday, Arlington Heights Elementary District 25 school board President David Page is looking to distinguish himself from incumbent Republican Sen. Matt Murphy on social issues, while Murphy said he prefers to focus more on fixing the state's financial woes.

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    Voters can decide to elect Fox River & Countryside trustees

    Taxpayers serviced by the Fox River & Countryside Fire/Rescue District have placed a binding referendum on the ballot that calls for direct election of the district's trustees. A vote in favor of the referendum would strip the incoming Kane County Board chairman of the power to appoint the trustees.

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    Republican Judy Biggert takes on Democrat Bill Foster for the 11th Congressional District seat next week.

    Biggert, Foster have evolving views on gay marriage

    If you haven't been paying attention since the primary race, the candidates in the 11th Congressional District have both altered their views on gay marriage. A look at where they stand now, and why they've changed their thinking.

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    District 73 parents are being asked for their old iPhones and iPods. After being wiped of data and having the SIM card removed, the devices will be loaded with educational apps for the classroom at little or no cost to the district.

    Hawthorn District 73 wants your old iPhone

    Hawthorn Elementary District 73 is asking parents to take their old iPhones out of the drawer and donate them to be repurposed for classroom use. Trevor Hope, coordinator of instructional technology, says popular apps like video editing stations and notepads can be useful to students and teachers.

Sports

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    Naperville North’s Allison Ray leans in to kiss the team’s first place 3A trophy while carrying it with teammate Judy Pendergast during the awards ceremony at the cross country state finals in Peoria on Saturday, November 3.

    Images: Boys and Girls State Cross Country Finals
    Images from the boys and girls state cross country finals at Detweiller Park in Peoria on Saturday, November 3.

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    Saturday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s boys cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's boys cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s girls swimming scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's girls swimming meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    St. Francis answers the bell

    Peg Kopec, wily veteran coach she is, isn’t quick to reveal all her secrets.Asked how she guarded her St. Francis team against emotional letdown Saturday, she simply replied “I think it’s pretty easy.”Whatever was said or done worked. Two days after a marathon win over Joliet Catholic, matched against a Chicago Christian team it already beat twice relatively easy this season, the Spartans weathered an early storm on their opponents’ home court for a 25-22, 25-15 win at the Class 3A Chicago Christian supersectional.

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    Brandon Marshall is tackled by Panthers linebackers Thomas Davis (58) and Luke Kuechly (59) after a reception during the Bears’ victory last week at Soldier Field. Marshall has more receptions (50) and receiving yards (675) than all the other team’s receivers combined.

    Bears must do more than rely on Marshall

    Matt Forte's numbers aren't the only ones that have dipped this season in deference to No. 1 receiver Brandon Marshall. Almost every offensive player has seen his numbers diminish. But everyone agrees that a more balanced attack will serve the Bears better down the road.

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    Laura Stoecker/lstoecker@dailyherald.com Warren's Michelle Klimt in the state cross country 3A final in Peoria on Saturday, November 3.

    Van Vlierbergen, Duzey measure up downstate

    Jacobs sophomore Lauren Van Vlierbergen and Cary-Grove sophomore Talia Duzey both missed qualifying for last year’s cross country state meet. This year both made up for it, as Van Vlierbergen and Duzey were on target at the Class 3A state cross country meet at Detweiller Park in Peoria

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    Daniel Szczepanek, left, and Tony Severini of Warren celebrate after a goal during the Blue Devils’ championship effort against Naperville Central on Saturday night at Lincoln-Way North.

    Warren nets state championship

    All the signs heading into Saturday night’s Class 3A boys soccer state championship match pointed to Naperville Central claiming the title. After the match, though, it was Warren’s players who were pointing their index fingers high in the air, claiming, “We’re No. 1!” A photo session in the goal with the championship trophy capped the celebration for the Blue Devils, who netted their first state title thanks to a 2-1 overtime time victory over Naperville Central at Lincoln-Way North. Nick Wegrzynowicz scored the game-winning goal. Tony Severini scored in regulation for the Blue Devils. Warren (21-5-3) joins Barrington as the only Lake County teams to win a state championship in boys soccer.

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    Tough finish to great Naperville Central season

    Sometimes teams need to be reminded of the great season they’ve had. Saturday night was that time for Naperville Central’s boys soccer team after a 2-1 overtime loss to Warren in the Class 3A championship match.

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    Saturday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Saturday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Kirk Hinrich and Joakim Noah react to a call during the first half of the Bulls’ loss to New Orleans on Saturday.

    No heroes emerge for Bulls in tough loss

    Sure, it was natural to think after the Bulls rolled over Cleveland on Friday, that a visit from New Orleans would result in a big, easy win. Even with No. 1 overall pick Anthony Davis out with a concussion, the Hornets beat the Bulls at their own game, slugging out an 89-82 win on Saturday.

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    Bulls center Joakim Noah (13) yells to his team during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the New Orleans Hornets in Chicago, Saturday, Nov. 3, 2012. The Hornets won 89-82.

    Bulls fans don’t get to see Davis in action

    No. 1 overall draft pick Anthony Davis was forced to skip Saturday’s trip to his hometown. Davis suffered a concussion during Friday’s win over Utah and New Orleans coach Monty Williams wasn't happy with the situation.

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    Aurora Christian heads to quarterfinals

    In the first half of Saturday’s Class 3A second-round playoff game Immaculate Conception held Aurora Christian wide receiver Cory Windle without a catch. In the second half Windle’s 46- and 26-yard touchdown catches made the difference on the scoreboard in No. 4 seed Aurora Christian’s 28-21 victory at Lewis Stadium in Elmhurst.

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    ‘No regrets’ for Glenbard West

    If this was a dream season, Glenbard West never wanted to wake up.When it did end, at least the Hilltoppers went down at their hustling, digging, diving best.Recovering from an inauspicious start, Glenbard West forced a third set before falling to a bigger New Trier team 25-13, 23-25, 25-14 at Saturday’s Class 4A Niles West supersectional.

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    Glenbard West’s Nathan Marcus celebrates a touchdown against Libertyville Saturday.

    Images: Glenbard West vs. Libertyville football
    The Libertyville Wildcats hosted the Glenbard West Hilltoppers for second round Class 7A state football playoff action on Saturday, Nov. 3 in Libertyville.

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    Laura Stoecker/lstoecker@dailyherald.com Lake Zurich's Alex Milner (1949) leads the pack in the state cross country 3A final in Peoria on Saturday, November 3.

    Lake Zurich saves its best for last

    Lake Zurich started the season slowly, but the Bears sure finished the season with a bang. Senior Alex Milner (14:42) and junior Trevor Kuehr (14:46) set the tone by making all-state with 16th- and 20th-place finishes in leading Lake Zurich to fourth place in the team race with 203 points in the Class 3A boys cross country state meet at Detweiller Park.

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    Waubonsie Valley earns rematch with Neuqua Valley

    Heading into Saturday’s second-round Class 8A football playoff showdown at Oak Park-River Forest, the only blemish on Waubonsie Valley’s record was a 35-34 loss in double overtime to Neuqua Valley on Oct. 5. With the opportunity for a rematch against the Wildcats looming large, the Warriors came out and took care of business in impressive fashion on the road, capturing a 28-7 victory over the host Huskies in Oak Park.

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    Daniel Szczepanek and Tony Severini of Warren celebrate after a goal during the Warren vs. Naperville Central Class 3A State Final in Frankfort Saturday.

    Images: 3A State Soccer Finals, Warren defeats Naperville Central
    It took two overtimes, but Warren High School defeated Naperville Central Saturday night to take the Class 3A state soccer title.

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    Palatine's Cam Kuksa runs in a fourth quarter touchdown to make the score 42-7 as Palatine advances to the third round of the Class 8A playoffs with their victory over Schaumburg at Palatine High School on Saturday.

    Images: Schaumburg vs. Palatine, football playoffs
    The Palatine High School football Pirates hosted the Schamburg High School Saxons in a second round palyoff game on Saturday, November 3rd.

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    New Orleans Hornets forward Ryan Anderson, right, and Bulls forward Taj Gibson and guard Kirk Hinrich battle for a rebound Saturday during the first half at the United Center.

    Bulls fall to short-handed Hornets

    Greivis Vasquez scored 18 points and the New Orleans Hornets beat the Bulls 89-82 on Saturday night even though they were missing Anthony Davis. Robin Lopez and Jason Smith scored 16 apiece. Ryan Anderson added 12 points and 13 rebounds, and the Hornets hit 20 of 23 free throws to get the win even though Davis was nursing a mild concussion.

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    Believe it: Libertyville advances to state tourney

    Kristen Webb couldn't believe her eyes, and her Libertyville volleyball teammates could share her excitement. Prairie Ridge's serve was out and, like that, Libertyville was in. The Wildcats' exhausting, 26-24, 25-23 win in Saturday night's Class 4A Hoffman Estates supersectional put them in the state quarterfinals for the first since 2007. Libertyville (34-6) will play defending state champ Benet Academy (37-2) at 9 p.m. Friday at Illinois State University's Redbird Arena in Normal.

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    Palatine’s Tess Wasowicz approaches the finish line in the Class 3A race in Peoria with an 11th-place individual effort.

    Senior Day: Wasowicz, Wolfe and Poplawski excel downstate

    Palatine senior Tess Wasowicz, and Prospect seniors Brooke Wolfe and Lauren Poplawski have all had success at the girls cross country state meet. All three also have had their share of setbacks, but Saturday in the Class 3A championships at Detweiller Park in Peoria, each finished on a high note.

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    Prospect’s Quentin Shaffer approaches the finish line with a second-place effort in the Class 3A race Saturday at Detweiller Park in Peoria.

    Strong finish for Prospect’s Shaffer

    Prospect senior Quentin Shaffer left no doubt that he belongs with the state's elite boys cross country runners at the Class 3A state meet at Detweiller Park on Saturday. The Knights senior surged from behind in the final mile to grab second place in an impressive 14:14 on a cloudy and cool afternoon.

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    Glenbard West’s Nathan Marcus celebrates a touchdown against Libertyville Saturday.

    Familiar sight for Glenbard West: Victory

    It didn't take long for Glenbard West coach Chad Hetlet to acquaint himself with the football facilities at Libertyville High School on Saturday. Technically, it was more of a re-acquaintance. His first job out of college was teaching and coaching at Libertyville. He was a defensive line coach in 1994, the year former Libertyville coach Randy Kuceyeski took over the program. "I also played here at Libertyville growing up," Hetlet said. "I played high school football at Zion-Benton." As Hetlet settled into familiar surroundings, his players quickly made themselves at home, too. In the end zone. The Hilltoppers came up with some big defensive plays, including an interception, and subsequently reeled off two scores within the first seven minutes of their Class 7A second-round tilt against Libertyville. That set the tone for what ultimately went down in the books as a 38-10 victory for Glenbard West, which stays unbeaten at 11-0 and advances to the quarterfinals for the fourth time in five years.

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    Glenbard North’s Justin Jackson celebrates a victory over Stevenson, during second round Class 8A football playoffs.

    Images: Stevenson at Glenbard North playoff football
    Glenbard North High School hosted Stevenson High School Saturday afternoon in Carol Stream for round two of IHSA playoff football.

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    Brian Hernandez, atop Fort Larned, reacts as he crosses the finish line ahead of Mucho Macho Man, with Mike Smith atop, to win the Breeders' Cup Classic at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif.

    9-1 shot Fort Larned wins BC Classic in upset

    Bob Baffert got beat again in the $5 million Breeders' Cup Classic. Bill Mott settled for half of a repeat sweep in the weekend's two biggest races. The Hall of Fame trainers could only wince as 9-1 long shot Fort Larned won North America's richest race on Saturday night, capping a weekend of upsets in the world championships at Santa Anita.

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    Chicago Fire midfielder Alvaro Fernandez, left, and Houston Dynamo midfielder Ricardo Clark (13) battle for the ball Saturday during the first half at Toyota Park.

    Chicago Fire have plenty to do in off-season

    The mood in the Chicago Fire's postgame locker room Wednesday night was one of disappointment and determination. "With every setback there's opportunities," Fire coach Frank Klopas said after Wednesday's loss. "We're going to come back even stronger and work even harder to make sure we're able to take the next step next year." How the Fire will take that next step, and any steps that eventually lead to an MLS Cup, is unclear.

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    Illinois quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase, left, is sacked by Ohio State defensive lineman John Simon Saturday during the first quarter in Columbus, Ohio.

    Another Saturday, another loss for Illini

    Tim Beckman and the Fighting Illini know they would rather be anywhere other than winless and stuck at the bottom of the Big Ten. "Nobody wants to be in this situation but (the seniors) are trying to do whatever they can to get out of (it)," the first-year coach said Saturday night after a 52-22 loss to No. 6 Ohio State.

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    St. Charles North’s Spencer Gray takes 45th place in the state cross country 3A final in Peoria on Saturday, November 3.

    Gray leads St. Charles N. at state

    St. Charles North coach Kevin Harrington realized he needed to catch lightening in a bottle for a second straight weekend.

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    Quinn Baker

    Cary-Grove steamrolls St. Patrick

    Not since Week 3 had fullback Kyle Norberg, quarterback Quinn Baker and running back Ryan Mahoney been on the field running the triple option for Cary-Grove at the same time. A combination of injuries were the primary reason as to why the trio missed 7 weeks of action together, but when all three converge on the field as they did against St. Patrick on Saturday, there's something real special in the air at Cary-Grove and the rest of Class 6A could be in big trouble. In the Trojans's 49-21 steamroll at Cary's Al Bohrer Field in the second round of the Class 6A playoffs, the three-headed monster of Norberg, Mahoney and Baker combined to rush for 446 of Cary-Grove's 497 yards on the ground. Behind 197 yards and 3 touchdowns from Norberg, 161 yards rushing and a touchdown from Baker and 88 yards and a touchdown from Mahoney the Trojans rolled on.

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    Laura Stoecker/lstoecker@dailyherald.com Kaneland's Victoria Clinton is congratulated by teammate Aislinn Losdwig after winning the 2A state cross country final in Peoria on Saturday, November 3.

    Kaneland’s Clinton wins 2A title

    The last 150 meters of the girls state cross country course at Detweiller Park is as imposing as it is unforgiving. But Victoria Clinton had more than enough cushion to conquer the closing stretch of the unnerving finish. The Kaneland sophomore, after creating separation from three fellow competitors of the girls Class 2A state meet Saturday morning, made history by becoming the first athlete, male or female, in school history to claim an individual state championship in the sport with her time of 16 minutes and 56 seconds.

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    Keith Country Day halts Harvest Christian’s run

    One would not have blamed Harvest Christian's girls volleyball fans if they had begun to set their GPS units for Redbird Arena after Game 1 of the Class 1A Lanark Eastland supersectional here Saturday afternoon. Unfortunately for the Lions and their raucous fan contigent, they didn't need directions back to Elgin, but that's where they were headed after another supersectional disappointment. Unable to sustain the momentum of a dominating Game 1 win, Harvest fell to Keith Country Day 18-25, 25-19, 25-18 and missed out on a trip to the IHSA Final Four for the second straight year.

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    Glenbard North’s Dominic Fornino (41) and Andrew Mulshine (44) sack Stevenson quarterback Willie Bourbon during second-round Class 8A playoff action Saturday in Carol Stream.

    Jackson takes his toll as Glenbard North stops Stevenson

    Every carry, every yard, every tick of the clock added a little more pain to Justin Jackson's weary body. It also brought Glenbard North's football team one step closer to the Class 8A quarterfinals. Led by Jackson's 47 carries, 2 catches, nearly an entire game on defense and a punt just for kicks, Glenbard North held off Stevenson's potent passing game in a 23-14 victory Saturday in Carol Stream. The fourth-seeded Panthers (10-1) advance to play at No. 1 Maine South (11-0), a 27-13 winner over Conant, in next week's 8A quarterfinals.

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    A group of Bartlett seniors, including Kevin Kirchhoff (47) gather together following the Hawks’ 31-7 loss to Loyola Academy during Saturday’s Class 8A playoff game at Millennium Field in Streamwood.

    Loyola’s long drives do in Bartlett

    No. 10 Bartlett's defensive game plan against No. 2 Loyola Academy was to eliminate big plays at the expense of allowing multiple short-yardage passes. The Ramblers said no problem. Senior quarterback Peter Pujals patiently dissected the Bartlett defense by completing 31 of 45 pass attempts for 267 yards as the Ramblers manufactured six separate drives of 12 or more plays to post a 31-7 victory in a Class 8A second-round playoff matchup at Millennium Field in Streamwood Saturday afternoon.

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    Nebraska receiver Jamal Turner catches the game-winning touchdown pass against Michigan State's Mitchell White with seconds remaining Saturday in the fourth quarter in East Lansing, Mich. Nebraska won 28-24.

    Nebraska beats Michigan St 28-24 on last-second TD

    Taylor Martinez lofted a pass up the right sideline toward Kenny Bell. Darqueze Dennard was back in coverage, the ball fell incomplete — and a flag was thrown for pass interference. "The only thing I can tell you is he was holding my left arm down," Bell said. "Was I expecting a flag? No, just because we don't get too many flags that often."

  •  

    Playoff win’s a thing of beauty for Lake Zurich

    After thinking about it for a moment or two, Lake Zurich coach Dave Proffitt decided it was neither an ugly win nor an ugly performance by his Bears team in their Class 7A second-round playoff contest Saturday at No. 3 seed Rockton Hononegah. The visiting sixth-seeded Bears survived a stretch in the second half in which they lost 2 fumbles and had a punt snapped over the punter's head. Only a couple of first downs, too, for Lake Zurich in that stretch. But hey, style points don't count in the playoffs, right? All the second-half mishaps were smoothed over by an unrelenting Bears defense as Lake Zurich held off the Indians 17-6 to advance into the state quarterfinals for the sixth time in the last seven years.

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    Brandon Bishop of Kaneland weeps after his teams loss during the Kaneland vs Lincoln-Way West game in New Lenox Saturday.

    Lincoln-Way West bottles up Kaneland

    The last thing Kaneland wanted to be in the second round of the Class 5A playoffs Saturday at Lincoln-Way West was one-dimensional. Knights coach Tom Fedderly said before the game the key would be which team does a better job mixing up its offense. The last thing he wanted to see was an early deficit and a running game that couldn't move the chains, but that's exactly what happened. Lincoln-Way West jumped on the Knights midway through the first quarter, then unleashed its pass rush the rest of the way. The Warriors built a 31-0 lead, and two Knights touchdowns in the final 2:06 weren't nearly enough to save Kaneland's season in a 31-15 loss.

  •  
    Notre Dame quarterback Everett Golson celebrates Saturday after scoring the game-winning touchdown in the third overtime against Pittsburgh in South Bend, Ind. The Irish defeated Pittsburgh 29-26 in triple overtime.

    Golson leads No. 4 Irish to overtime win over Pitt

    Down 20-6 in the fourth quarter, Notre Dame was going to need some big plays and a little luck to stay undefeated and keep its national title hopes alive. It got just enough of both. Everett Golson scored on a quarterback sneak in the third overtime as the fourth-ranked Fighting Irish came back from a 14-point deficit and beat Pittsburgh 26-23. "We overcame a lot tonight. We overcame some uncharacteristic mistakes," coach Brian Kelly said.

  •  
    In happier times, Blackhawks center Jonathan Toews is presented the Stanley Cup by NHL commissioner Gary Bettman after the Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup in 2010.

    Does Bettman really care about NHL?

    Once again, Gary Bettman has let a few NHL owners shut down a $3 billion business that has never been in better shape. I asked an NHL executive last week how many owners we’re talking about here, and he said he thought the number was between six and eight. Let’s call it eight, for the sake of argument.

  •  
    Penn State wide receiver Allen Robinson makes a catch against Purdue cornerback Ricardo Allen Saturday during the first half in West Lafayette, Ind.

    Penn State rolls to 34-9 victory over Purdue

    Matt McGloin passed for 321 yards and two touchdowns to help Penn State defeat Purdue 34-9 on Saturday. Brandon Moseby-Felder had six catches for 129 yards, Zach Zwinak ran for 134 yards and Michael Zordich ran for two touchdowns for the Nittany Lions (6-3, 4-1 Big Ten), who bounced back from a loss to Ohio State.

  •  
    Cam Kuksa produces a fourth-quarter touchdown to put Palatine ahead 42-7 as the Pirates topped Schaumburg to earn a spot in the Class 8A state quarterifnals.

    Complete effort powers Palatine

    Palatine's offense is potent enough by itself, but when its defense is forcing turnovers to give the Pirates short fields to work with, it just plain seems unfair. Palatine forced 4 first half turnovers, all of which led to touchdowns, as the No. 3 seed Pirates rolled to a 42-14 win over No. 6 Schaumburg in the second round of the Class 8A playoffs at Chic Anderson Stadium on Saturday afternoon. The win gave Palatine (10-1) its first 10-win season since the 1997 squad went 11-1, and it sets up a quarterfinal matchup on Saturday at No. 2 Loyola, a 31-7 winner over Bartlett. The Pirates and Ramblers met in the quarterfinals in 2010, with Loyola winning 14-0.

  •  
    @$ID/[No paragraph style]:Steve Lundy/slundy@dailyherald.com Bears quarterback Jay Cutler has had success in the fourth quarter this season, but the Bears have started slow in most games and struggled on first downs this season.

    Bears must improve on first down

    No team has been worse offensively than the Bears on first down. They're averaging a league-low 4.19 yards but have still managed to convert a respectable 40 percent of their third-down opportunities.

  •  
    Indiana running back Stephen Houston is wrapped up by Iowa cornerback Micah Hyde Saturday in Bloomington, Ind.

    Coffman leads Indiana past Big Ten foe Iowa 24-21

    Cameron Coffman threw for 315 yards on 21 of 33 passing and three touchdowns to lead Indiana on Saturday to a 24-21 win over Big Ten foe Iowa.

  •  

    Northern Illinois easily beats Massachusetts 63-0

    Jordan Lynch threw for two touchdowns and ran for another, Matt McIntosh threw for one and ran for two and Northern Illinois coasted in its defeat of winless Massachusetts 63-0 Saturday afternoon.

  •  

    Wheaton Academy earns fourth place at state

    Wheaton Academy turned a difficult start of the season into a berth in this weekend's Class 2A finals. The Warriors were 6-5 on Sept. 15, but went 14-1 to earn the first trip to state in school history. On Saturday the Warriors faced the tough task of trying to rebound from Friday's semifinal loss to Peoria Notre Dame, which was settled on penalty kicks, and take on a St. Viator team that handed them their final loss of the regular season, 3-2 on Sept. 29.

  •  
    Bartlett’s Nick Garcia, left, and Kyle Garcia hug as they walk off the field following their loss to Loyola Academy during Saturday’s 8A playoff game at Millennium Field in Streamwood.

    Images: Bartlett vs. Loyola football
    The Bartlett Hawks hosted Loyola in round two of the IHSA football playoffs Saturday at Millenium Field in Streamwood.

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    Glenbard South’s Wold first at state

    John Wold had his fair share of able-bodied company Saturday morning at Detweiller Park. Still, the Glenbard South runner swept the Class 2A boys cross country state tournament series uninterrupted with a brilliant closing stretch.

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    Conant bows out at Maine South

    It wasn't the finish it had hoped for, but Conant still walked off the field proudly after the Cougars dropped a second-round 8A playoff game to top-seeded Maine South 27-13 Saturday in Park Ridge. "I am very disappointed," said Tim Manczko, who scored 2 touchdowns and had 9 catches for 115 yards. "Give Maine South credit. We just couldn't finish." Conant coach Bill Modelski, whose Cougars finished the season with a 7-4 record, was pleased his team's effort on Saturday. "Our kids believed," Modelski said. "We told them that they had to believe if we were to have a chance, and that wasn't the issue. I am proud of them. We just made a couple mistakes and it hurt us."

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    Benet earns return trip to Normal

    After falling behind early in both games, Benet answered with identical 8-1 scoring runs at the midpoint of each to post a 25-20, 25-20 win over Edwardsville to capture the Class 4A Normal West supersectional on Saturday afternoon. Benet (38-2) will continue its quest for a second straight Class 4A title on Friday night back in Normal at Illinois State University's Redbird Arena. The Redwings hope to become the first team in history to win back-to-back titles since the four-class system was adopted in 2007.

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    St. Viator goes out on a winning note

    Nobody dreams about playing in the third-place match. But both St. Viator and Wheaton Academy sure played like there was plenty at stake Saturday morning. Goals on both sides of the half from Nick Winter and Kevin Klinkenberg lifted the Lions past the Warriors 2-1 and helped erase a disappointing first day at the Class 2A boys soccer state tournament.

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    Stevenson comes close with big finish

    By Karl Milkereit's calculations, his Stevenson Patriots faced an uphill battle for the North Suburban Conference swimming crown on Saturday afternoon. His Stevenson team was 28 points behind conference leader Lake Forest entering the meet at Vernon Hills. But when the foursome of Cheryl Xiang, Riley Kirby, Julia Wawer and Madison Blaydes took top honors in the 400 freestyle relay, the Pats had chopped deep into the Lake Forest lead. It was almost enough. Lake Forest won the NSC Meet, maybe by a half a stroke. The Scouts (344.5) left the pool just ahead of the Pats (344). Morgan Dickson led Libertyville to third (164). "We had an unbelievable performance,'' Milkereit said. "We were 28 points down and we battled back. Losing by a half of a point stings a little but it was still a pretty special performance."

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    With the official New York City Marathon canceled the night before, a team of runners take a break Saturday after running the marathon route to the opposite side of the Queensboro Bridge in New York. From left are Fumi Ishigaki; Tomoaki Ishigaki; Jacqueline Mark and Yuki Kaneshige.

    NYC Marathon runners fill unexpected free time

    Whether from Europe, South America or elsewhere, runners in the canceled New York City Marathons shared the same sentiment. Sympathy for the victims of Superstorm Sandy. Understanding of why city officials canceled Sunday's race. But bitterness that the decision was made Friday instead of earlier in the week, before they boarded planes.

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    The Dallas Mavericks’ O.J. Mayo, center, is fouled by Los Angeles Lakers guard Steve Nash Tuesday during the second half in Los Angeles. The Mavericks won 99-91.

    Lakers guard Nash has small left leg fracture, out another week

    Steve Nash has a small fracture in his left leg and will be out of the Los Angeles Lakers' lineup for at least another week.

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    Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel runs past Mississippi State defensive lineman Kaleb Eulls and other defenders for a touchdown Saturday during the second quarter in Starkville, Miss.

    No. 16 Texas A&M beats No. 17 Miss St 38-13

    Johnny Manziel threw for 311 yards and ran for 129 yards and two touchdowns, leading No. 16 Texas A&M to an easy 38-13 victory over No. 17 Mississippi State on Saturday. Manziel, a redshirt freshman, completed 30 of 36 passes. He ran for a 37-yard touchdown in the second quarter that helped the Aggies build a 31-0 lead by early in the second half.

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    Florida quarterback Jeff Driskel scrambles with the ball as Missouri defensive lineman Kony Ealy tries to stop him Satudray during the first half.

    No. 8 Florida avoids scare, beats Missouri 14-7

    Florida has reason to celebrate, although it's not enough to elicit much reaction from coach Will Muschamp or his players. Mike Gillislee took a screen pass and went 45 yards for a touchdown, and the No. 8 Gators used stifling defense to stave off Southeastern Conference newcomer Missouri 14-7 on Saturday.

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    Michigan's A.J. Williams, second form left second, hoists running back Thomas Rawls (38) after Rawls scored a touchdown Saturday against Minnesota during the second quarter in Minneapolis. Michigan's Stephen Hopkins (33) and Joey Burzynski (56) join the celebration.

    Gardner sparks Michigan in 35-13 win at Minnesota

    Denard Robinson wasn't ready to play after all, and Michigan never missed him. Devin Gardner returned to his original position and put the Wolverines' offense back on track. Gardner threw two touchdown passes and ran for another score after being told right before the game he was starting at quarterback, leading Michigan past Minnesota 35-13 on Saturday.

  •  

    Severe weather delays Iowa-Indiana kickoff

    The kickoff of Saturday's Iowa-Indiana Big Ten game has been delayed because of severe weather around Bloomington. The game was originally scheduled to begin at 2:30 p.m. EDT, but has been pushed back to 3:42 p.m.

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    NHL labor talks resume after more than 2 weeks off

    After more than two weeks apart and the hockey season hanging in the balance, the NHL and the players' association are returning to the bargaining table Saturday after more than two weeks off. The hope of a full season being played is already gone, and so is the popular New Year's Day Winter Classic. If real progress isn't made soon, the NHL could be looking at its second lost campaign since 2004.

Business

  •  
    The Apple Inc. iPad mini is seen in this undated handout photo released to the media on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012. The device boasts a 7.9-inch screen diagonally, compared with the 9.7-inch screen of the current iPad.

    iPad Mini is thin, light but at a price

    See, here's the thing about the new iPad mini. It's an iPad, only... smaller. Beyond that, there may not be much more to say about the latest addition to Apple's tablet family. Apple's most important products created their own markets: People didn't know they wanted or needed an iPhone until Steve Jobs & Co. showed it to them. The iPad mini, by contrast, is an attempt to follow competitors rather than find a new audience.

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    Jesus Martinez, right, holds his belongings stored in a bag Saturday as a group of volunteers walk toward homes to help residents clean up in Staten Island, N.Y.

    New Yorkers seek ways to help

    New Yorkers are supplementing the much larger-scale efforts by relief agencies like the American Red Cross and religious-affiliated organizations like the Southern Baptist Disaster Relief, the Catholic Charities of New York or the United Methodist Committee on Relief.

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    An indoor marijuana growing operation was photpgraphed after being raided by police. Fed up with the proliferation of industrial-scale indoor growing operations taking over homes in residential neighborhoods, city leaders are asking voters to to adopt a stiff new tax on excessive electricity use designed to drive large-scale growers out of town.

    Pot town pushes back against industrial growers

    "Our hope is to drive the large-scale growing operations out of town," said Shane Brinton, a city councilman and vice mayor.

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    Tracks of a roller coaster sit in the sand Friday at an amusement park in Keansburg, New Jersey.

    Will Jersey shore ever be the same?

    Associated PressSEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. (AP) — It is one of the icons of America, the backdrop to a thousand stories — the place where Tony Soprano's nightmares unfolded, where Nucky Thompson built his "Boardwalk Empire", where Snooki and The Situation brought reality TV to the ocean's edge and where Springsteen conjured a world of love and loss and cars and carnival lights and a girl named, incongruously, Sandy.But after the storm of the same name passed through this week, the seaside towns of the Jersey Shore, a place that popular culture has picked to exude Americanness, have been upended, and some of the boardwalks have been pushed into the sea. And those who live there, those who spent their childhood weekends there and those who experience its stories from afar are asking different versions of the same question: What happens now?"This is just a heartbreaking experience seeing all these places we love that are just decimated," said Jen Miller, a blogger about the Jersey shore who lives in the Philadelphia area. "It's just what you do every summer: you go `down the shore.' "The pictures are awful; my heart breaks looking at them," she said. "I run on all these boardwalks. I go over that bridge between Belmar and Avon. It's one of those things you think will always be there. And now it's not."All along the state's 127-mile coastline, the storm wrecked communities rich and poor, from multi-million-dollar homes in Bay Head and Mantoloking to blue-collar bayfront bungalows. Boardwalks were trashed, a roller coaster dumped into the ocean. The worst damage was nearest the ocean, but winds and water wrecked homes several miles inland as well. Damage assessments were still being made, but thousands of homes were affected."Who ever thought they'd see a roller coaster in Seaside Heights in the ocean?" Christie asked. He vowed to help rebuild the shore, while cautioning it might not look exactly the same.For many people, the Jersey shore is much more than a place; it's an identity, a brand, an attity-toode. It's the place where New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie got into it with a heckler last summer while eating an ice cream cone while out for a stroll with his family.It's also the economic engine that powers New Jersey's $35.5 billion tourism industry. The real Jersey shore is the setting for MTV's "Jersey Shore" reality show about a group of foul-mouthed, horny, hard-partying 20-somethings, which has enshrined big hair, fist-pumping and phrases like "Come at me, bro" as part of Jersey pop culture.A young Jon Bon Jovi shot one of his first music videos atop a rest room pavilion on the Seaside Heights boardwalk in 1985, across from the Sand Tropez clothing stand and Lucky Leo's arcade; Richie Sambora played the guitar solo to "In And Out Of Love" in a Seaside Heights lifeboat."It's gone," Bon Jovi said on NBC's "Today" show, hours before he and Springsteen were to headline a televised concert Friday to raise money for storm victims. "The entire Jersey Shore that I knew is gone."That Jersey shore is a blend of competing aromas: the fried dough of zeppoles just before the powdered sugar goes on, the extra garlic on pizza slices, the salty spray coming off the ocean, and the smell of the chemical protectants they spray on pier pilings to insulate them from water damage.It's where the click of spinning prize wheels, carnival barkers' shouts and the "pop" of breaking water balloon games compete for attention with boom-box rap, pop and heavy metal from strolling or skateboarding teens."When you're a teenager and you get your driver's license, the first thing you do is get in the car and drive down to Seaside Heights," said Marilou Halvorsen, a lifelong shore resident who until recently worked for the company that owned the now-wrecked Casino Pier in Seaside, where the remains of a roller coaster sit half-submerged in the ocean.

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    Smart Spending: Strategies for finding hot toys

    While there's no breakout hot toy for Christmas this year — so far — as parents know, that doesn't mean the most popular presents will be easy to find. Here are some strategies to make sure that whatever toy your child wants, from the latest Monster High doll or robotic Furby pet to the child-size LeapPad Explorer, is under the tree — without having to pay exorbitantly on eBay or elsewhere.

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    In this January 2009 photo, people watch during the inauguration of a new $550 million wind farm project in La Ventosa, Mexico, located on the narrow isthmus between the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean. Mexican President Felipe Calderon has made the inauguration of wind parks one of the main focuses of his administration’s ambitious pledge to cut Mexico’s carbon emissions by 30 percent by 2020, and once again Tuesday as he has done before, he stopped in the state of Oaxaca to inaugurate a new clutch of wind turbines.

    Indigenous vs. multinationals in Mexico wind power

    Mexico is putting up wind power turbines at a breakneck pace and the expansion is pitting energy companies against the Indians who live in one of the windiest spots in the world.

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    This NOAA satellite image taken Tuesday shows superstorm Sandy slowly moving westward while weakening across southern Pennsylvania. As people post updates to friends and family, relay emergency information and lighten the mood with humor, it’s clear that discussing natural disasters on social media has become as much a part of the experience as stocking up on bread and batteries.

    Facebook, Twitter abuzz with hurricane chatter

    Whether you call it Frankenstorm, Stormpocalypse or simply Hurricane Sandy, the giant weather system barreling into the East Coast is a favorite topic of conversation on social media from Facebook to Twitter. As people post updates to friends and family, relay emergency information and lighten the mood with humor, it's clear that discussing natural disasters on social media has become as much a part of the experience as stocking up on bread and batteries.

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    In this Friday, Oct. 19, 2012, photo, Indonesian youths browse at an internet cafe in Jakarta, Indonesia. There are growing numbers of incidents involving internet social media networks being used as a mean for children trafficking in Indonesia, at least eight reported this month alone of young girls being abducted and enslaved by men who approached them randomly on Facebook, raising concerns that the overall number of trafficked children remains grossly underestimated in the sprawling archipelago of 240 million.

    Facebook used to kidnap, traffic Indonesian girls

    When a 14-year-old girl received a Facebook friend request from an older man she didn't know, she accepted it out of curiosity. It's a click she will forever regret, leading to a brutal story that has repeated itself as sexual predators find new ways to exploit Indonesia's growing obsession with social media.

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    U.S. use of Vietnam website ‘under review’

    The State Department said Wednesday it is reviewing a U.S. Embassy's use of a wildly popular Vietnamese website laden with suspected pirated music and Hollywood movies to promote American values, including respect for intellectual property rights. Spokesman Mark Toner said the Hanoi embassy's social media account with Zing.vn was created to reach out to Vietnamese youth in a restricted environment but that concerns about digital piracy on the site had prompted it to reconsider.

  •  
    Google is adding a few more gadgets, including the Nexus 10 tablet, to holiday shopping lists. The devices announced Monday include the latest in Google’s line of Nexus smartphones and a larger version of the 7-inch tablet that the company began selling in July under the Nexus brand.

    Holiday gadgets: Microsoft phones, Google gadgets

    Microsoft launched its new Windows phone system and Google unveiled new devices under its Nexus brand. Both part of an effort to grab more of consumers' holiday-shopping dollars. Last week, Microsoft started selling its Windows 8 operating system and Surface tablet computer. Apple announced new iPads and Mac computers. Samsung launched a giant smartphone.

  •  
    Steve Ballmer, chief executive officer of Microsoft Corp., speaks at an event to unveil Windows Phone 8 software in San Francisco, California. If Windows’ new interface takes off, it will be a boon for users, programmers and for the tech industry as a whole. It will make for better, faster, safer computers, and probably ones that last longer, too. But that’s a big if.

    Windows 8 is beginning to look a lot like Apple

    Microsoft's main goal in building Windows 8 was flexibility — the operating system is meant to run on traditional PCs, touchscreen tablets and a new class of in-between "hybrid" devices — picture an iPad with a slide-out keyboard. The trouble for Microsoft is that Windows 8's new programming model is pretty similar to Apple's model — it limits what apps can do, and it requires apps to go through Microsoft's built-in Windows Store.

  •  
    Joe Belfiore, vice president at Microsoft Corp., left, listens to actress Jessica Alba speak Monday at an event to unveil Windows Phone 8 software in San Francisco, California.

    Microsoft: Windows Phone to catch up in apps

    Microsoft launched a new version of its Windows Phone software with broad support from smartphone makers, cellphone carriers and app developers as the software company tries to position new Windows gadgets as strong alternatives to Apple and Android devices.The company also promised to address one of the chief shortcomings with Windows Phone: the dearth of third-party applications relative to offerings for Apple's iPhone and devices running Google's Android system.

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    RIM says its new BlackBerry phone in testing

    BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion said Wednesday that its much-delayed new smartphones are now being tested by 50 wireless carriers around the world. The Canadian company called it a key step as it prepares to launch the new BlackBerry 10 software and phones in the first quarter of next year.

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    PayPal to cut 325 full-time jobs

    PayPal is cutting 325 full-time jobs to streamline its business and speed up product development amid intense competition from plucky startups and established companies such as Google. The company also is ending jobs with about 120 independent contractors worldwide.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Tourists take pictures at the site of the Giza Pyramids in Egypt during a partial solar eclipse. Solar eclipses typically attract tourists who travel around the world to remote places to witness the celestial phenomenon.

    Tourists head to Australia for solar eclipse

    Shortly after dawn on Wednesday, Nov. 14, the temperature will drop slightly in northern Australia and the sky will grow darker as the moon begins to pass in front of the sun. Weather permitting, travelers will see a black disk with the sun's glowing corona stretching beyond it. "Totality" — the darkness resulting from a total eclipse of the sun — will last just over two minutes. More than 50,000 tourists are expected to travel to Australia to see the eclipse.

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    In this image released by NASA on Tuesday Oct. 30, 2012 shows a scoop of Martian soil collected by the NASA’s Curiosity rover. An analysis of the soil released Tuesday reveals it contains similar minerals found on Hawaii’s Mauna Kea. Curiosity landed on Mars in August on a two-year mission to study whether the environment was habitable.

    How NASA talks to its rover on Mars

    How, exactly, does information flow between NASA and its correspondent on Mars? Earthbound engineers exchange messages with Curiosity on a set daily schedule. Actually, "daily" isn't quite accurate. Mars takes about 37 minutes longer than Earth to complete a rotation, so astronomers refer to a Martian day as a "sol" for the sake of clarity.

  •  
    President Barack Obama walks from the White House to Marine One, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Washington, en route to Andrews Air Force Base, Md., and on to Atlantic City, N.J., to view storm damage.

    Obama’s iPod a bit like his electorate — varied

    President Barack Obama's iPod could pass for a voter outreach tool. During an interview with a radio station in Cincinnati, Obama said he has "a pretty good mix." "I've got old school — Stevie Wonder, James Brown. I've got Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan," he said.

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    In this October 2012 photo, professor at the Mariachi School Ollin Yoliztli, Eduardo Sanchez Ortiz, practices as he waits for clients at Plaza Garibaldi in Mexico City. The new mariachi school in Mexico City is seeking to revive a music that’s lost ground over the years. The school, whose name means life and movement in indigenous Nahautl, teaches folk bands how to play professionally while grooming a new generation of songwriters and composers.

    Mexico City school seeks to dignify mariachi music

    A new mariachi school in Mexico City is seeking to revive a music that has lost ground over the years and that sometimes seems relegated to commercial jingles and elevator Muzak. Called the Mariachi School Ollin Yoliztli, meaning life and movement in indigenous Nahautl, the school teaches folk bands how to play professionally while grooming a new generation of songwriters and composers.

  •  
    Owen Wilson and Rachel McAdam star in Woody Allen’s whimiscal comedy “Midnight in Paris.” The author’s literary estate is suing Sony Pictures Classics for using a paraphrase of the line in the 2011 film. Wilson slightly misquoted the line from Faulkner’s “Requiem for a Nun.” He said, “The past is not dead! Actually, it’s not even past.”

    Faulkner estate sues over quotes in movie, ad

    William Faulkner wrote that the past is never dead. His heirs say their copyright to that phrase is very much alive. The author's literary estate is suing Sony Pictures Classics for using a paraphrase of that line in Woody Allen's 2011 film, "Midnight in Paris." "This is a frivolous lawsuit, and we are confident we will prevail in defending it," a Sony Pictures spokeswoman said in a written statement.

  •  
    “The Voice,” featuring mentors Blake Shelton, left, Christina Aguilera, Cee Lo Green and Adam Levine, is a big reason why NBC has made a comeback in the TV ratings this season. New entertainment chief Bob Greenblatt’s baby-steps strategy of using the successful competition “The Voice” as its centerpiece has helped NBC stand as the only one of the four big broadcasters to have a larger prime-time audience than it had last fall.

    NBC ratings finally back on track

    During NBC's slow slide to near-irrelevancy in prime time over the past decade, a succession of entertainment executives sat in boardrooms plotting comeback moves that didn't work. It's still early, but NBC seems finally to have hit upon a plan that is moving things in the right direction.

  •  
    In this photo taken Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012, a model displays an outfit by British designer Matthew Williamson in Lagos, Nigeria. Some international high-end fashion buyers are looking beyond Nigeria’s bleak headlines to uncover the next big new thing, fun and glamour through its use of print and color, characteristics which have come to define the vibrant local fashion scene.

    European fashion buyers look to Nigeria

    There have been steady efforts to turn Lagos,Nigeria, a city with a fearsome reputation, into a fashion destination. They reached new heights at the MTN Lagos Fashion & Design Week that ran from Oct. 24-27 and drew European high-fashion brands such as the United Kingdom's Selfridges & Co. and Munich-based MyTheresa.com to Nigeria for the first time.

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    This Oct. 24, 2012 photo shows Ilaria Venturini Fendi, a member of the famous fashion family, posing with bags from her Carmina Campus fashion project that produces bags from repurposed materials in Dallas. The bags shown are made of garbage bags and soda cans.

    Young Fendi branches out with recycled material

    Ilaria Venturini Fendi has translated the same attention to detail and craftsmanship she learned working over the years in her famous family's Italian fashion business to her own line of bags that feature repurposed items including everything from old light switch plates to leather seats from cars once used in crash tests. "What I did was simply to add my already existing know-how I had from my family to my new vision of the fashion industry," she said.

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    This image released by Bravo shows celebrity chef Emeril Lagasse during a casting episode of “Top Chef Seattle,” in Las Vegas. The new season premieres Nov. 7 on Bravo. Lagasse says more than a dozen chefs from across the country are heading to New Orleans Friday to serve up some of their favorite dishes using or inspired by boudin, a pork and rice sausage common in Louisiana cuisine. Chefs from afar will be joined by more than two dozen locals for a “Boudin and Beer” street party.

    TV chef Emeril talks boudin, beer and New Orleans

    Chefs from San Francisco and elsewhere will be joined Friday by more than two dozen chefs from New Orleans for Emeril Lagasse's "Boudin and Beer" street party with live music and Louisiana-brewed Abita beer.

  •  
    Alex Mathew, left, and Nic McAdams load a jack-o’-lantern onto the trebuchet during a previous pumpkin launch at Century Park in Vernon Hills.

    Weekend picks: See those pumpkins fly!

    See how physics and pumpkins combine (especially when hurled by trebuchets!) at two weekend events: The Pumpkin Launch at Century Park Sled Hill in Vernon Hills and the Annual Pumpkin Drop at Keith Mione Community Park in Mundelein. The Indigo Girls bring their literate folk-rock to the Paramount Theatre in Aurora Saturday. Opposites attract in Neil Simon's “The Odd Couple,” now in previews at the Northlight Theatre in Skokie.

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    People watch as a woman gets a fish pedicure in Sunny Beach, Bulgaria.

    Ancient ruins, fast cars a blur in Bulgaria

    A visit to Bulgaria can alternately feel like taking like a step back in time and witnessing a society that has modernized at warp speed. Mules and Ferraris share the freeways. Near a store selling Prada and Versace clothes, old women peddle handmade crocheted doilies and embroidered tablecloths. Dilapidated Soviet-style apartment buildings teem with people, as does a sparkling new shopping mall.

  •  
    People gather on Bondi Beach in Sydney, Australia. Bondi is the best-known Sydney beach, attracting surfers, sunbathers and more than a few local eccentrics.

    Free things to do in pricey Sydney

    Ahh, Sydney. The stunning sand and surf. The weird and wonderful wildlife. The positively eye-popping prices. With Sydney consistently ranked among the most expensive cities in the world, and the Australian dollar at near-record highs, overseas tourists on a budget might find themselves sweating even more than usual under the blistering Aussie sun. But no worries, there are plenty of fabulous things to do in Sydney for free.

  •  
    The Dunton Manor House is on the market for the first time in more than 45 years.

    After 45 years, Dunton Manor House again on the market

    Up for sale for the first time in more than 45 years, the Dunton Manor House holds timeless craftsmanship. Built in 1869 by James Dunton, son of Asa Dunton, founder of Arlington Heights, the home was built with grand style and ornately-carved woodwork, both inside and out.

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    The federal sales tax excluson on home sales still in effect

    A rumor is being spread that there will be a 3.8 percent tax on homes sold in the year 2013 to finance the Obamacare program. However, this belief is false.

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    Borrowers often blindsided at different stages of lending process

    [No Paragraph Style]NewsShopping for the best deal on a home loan has many pitfalls, but by far the most daunting is that lenders will not commit to the prices they quote to shopping borrowers. While borrowers seldom realize it when they begin the process, the fact is that they are forced to select loan providers without knowing the exact price they will pay.

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    Do’s and don’ts for insulating an attic

    Q. I just got a bid for insulation of my 824-square-foot attic for $1,200. That seems pretty high. The contractor would blow in cellulose insulation.

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    This modern-day makeover boldly moves into today, while tipping its hat to yesteryear. (SHNS photo courtesy HGTV)

    Grandma’s dated family room shines after makeover

    Dana has fond memories of her grandmother's house and the time she spent there as a child. Years later, she and her husband, Simon, bought the house and faced a dilemma: How could they renovate what was a distinctly dated family room, while still preserving Dana's precious memories of Grandma?

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    Builder Gary Levitas of Northfield Group is developing the second phase of Millbrook Pointe in Wheeling.

    Builder focuses on value in a tight market

    Gary Levitas, president and founder of the Wheeling-based Northfield Group, loves dealing with people. He enjoys the fact that he and his wife, Marina, work together in the sales office of their Millbrook Pointe row house community in Wheeling.

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    Boards can borrow fundso cover maintenance issues

    Q. Our not for profit homeowners association has an unexpected maintenance issue, and we do not have enough funds on hand to cover the expense. One of the owners in the association has offered to lend the association the funds. Is this permitted?

Discuss

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    The Romney myth about helping Detroit

    Columnist Froma Harrop: Of Mitt Romney's many costume changes, the new Superman outfit portraying him as the would-be savior of the American auto industry wins for most imaginative. Understood: His infamous "Let Detroit Go Bankrupt" op-ed has proved a great inconvenience to winning votes in the industrial Midwest. But continually insisting that one didn't say what one said is severely not honest.

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    Proud to have worked for McGovern
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: I am so honored to have campaigned for this decent, humble, well-educated human being. The man was on the truthful side of history. In retrospect, my heart feels good to have made such a decision.

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    Ignore electoral count and go to the polls
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: The winner of the 2012 presidential election will be similarly weakened if he doesn't win the popular vote as well as the Electoral College vote. Every American should vote, even those who live in a state whose Electoral College votes are already almost sure to be awarded to a particular candidate.

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    Think of the benefits of frequent elections
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: The post office becomes solvent, all the money being spent on election campaigning trickles down to the rest of the country, and we all lose some weight due to the number of interruptions we experience during meal time answering robocalls. I think it would work.

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    Offenders’ families unfairly punished
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: Starting Jan. 1, anyone living in the home of a sex offender cannot participate in Halloween. This law takes away the rights of people who have done nothing wrong.

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    Diplomacy with Iran urgently needed
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: War is not the answer to the conflict between the U.S. and Iran. While watching the debate I was glad to hear talk about peaceful resolution of the conflict between the U.S. and Iran,

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    Electoral change would be long in coming
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: Ultimately the electoral vote would more clearly represent the people's vote. The problem is, it will take either a constitutional amendment, or every state would need to modify their own constitutions. I guess this won't happen in my lifetime

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    Hit-and-run no way to show welcome
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: I would like to offer a sarcastic thank you to the young woman in a gray Toyota who welcomed me to Illinois by rear-ending my car and driving away in Mundelein on the afternoon of Oct. 18.

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    Love the sinner, hate the sin
    A Geneva letter to the editor: Don't condemn homosexuals but help and support them to get the help they need if they so desire, to be accepted as people created in God's image who are loved and valued by Him, but don't change our society for them. We are to love and value them, but not the activity they engage in.

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    Maybe it was all a joke
    A Winfield letter to the editor: What is with showing two boys being crowned king and queen of homecoming? Front page yet. That is stooping pretty low if you ask me.

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