Daily Archive : Friday November 2, 2012

News

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    Jeanette Sipek, Chicago Manager of Jenny Yoo, speaks about the versatility of some of their bridesmaid dress during the wedding planning boot camp at Danada House in Wheaton.

    Engaged couples attend wedding ‘boot camp’ in Wheaton

    Prospective brides, grooms and in-laws got a lesson in building the wedding of their dreams while navigating the hidden costs that come with such an event at a wedding planning “boot camp” Sunday afternoon in Wheaton.

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    Brian Hill/bhill@dailyherald.com Sonia Albarran of Elgin tries to comfort her son Xavier Marques, 2, while visiting Santa during the Elgin Home for the Holidays, event Saturday at the Gail Borden Public Library in Elgin.

    Elgin nonprofits bring it Home for the Holidays

    Nonprofit organizations from across Elgin joined forces Saturday for the annual Home for the Holidays extravaganza to promote upcoming holiday activities, attractions and events.About 14 organizations and dozens of craft stalls filled to foyer of Gail Borden Library.

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    Tim and Donna O’Connor of Wheeling make boxes that are to be loaded with holiday meals as more than 100 employees from Jewel-Osco volunteer Saturday at the Northern Illinois Food Bank in Geneva. The event was one of the first in a six-week program during which the food bank will pack more than 30,000 holiday meals for the less fortunate.

    Food bank volunteers begin holiday meal preparation

    A busy assembly line buzzed Saturday morning inside the Northern Illinois Food Bank's warehouse in Geneva as more than 100 volunteers prepared some of the first holiday meal boxes of the season. "The purpose is to put together boxes of food for our families in need," said Julie Yurko, vice president of philanthropy and communications for the food bank. "At this time, we know our families are...

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    David R. Bogenberger

    Palatine grad found dead at NIU fraternity

    A 19-year-old Palatine teen who just started his freshman year at Northern Illinois University was found dead in an off-campus fraternity house Friday morning, authorities said. David R. Bogenberger, who graduated from Palatine High School in June, was found unresponsive in a bed at the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity at 10:14 a.m.

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    High winds blow sea foam onto Jeanette’s Pier in Nags Head, N.C., on Sunday as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy, later downgraded to a massive storm, move into the area.

    Poll Vault: Have you ever been in a natural disaster?

    Have you ever been in a hurricane or another natural disaster, such as a tornado, a flood or an earthquake? Let's hear your experiences.

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    A girl named Lucy pauses during a moment of silence during a vigil Friday night for 5-year-old Olivia Dworakowski at St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church in Naperville.

    Vigil helps classmates mourn 2 slain Naperville children

    Anya Bhamani says she was "book buddies" with 5-year-old Olivia Dworakowski at Brookdale Elementary School in Naperville. But Tuesday was the last time she would see Olivia at school. That night, authorities say, she was stabbed to death in her Naperville home by Elzbieta Plackowska. Anya and her family joined more than 100 others in a candlelight vigil. The vigil, Anya says, "helped with my...

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    Metea Valley High School student Devin Meadows was killed Oct. 23 when a car he was riding in went out of control and smashed into a house’s garage on the 2700 block of Hamman Way in Aurora.

    15-year-old driver charged with reckless homicide

    The 15-year-old driver in the Oct. 23 crash that killed Metea Valley High School sophomore Devin Meadows has been charged as an adult with reckless homicide. Logan Krogman of Aurora turned himself in after being charged with the felony. "At 15 years old, Logan Krogman had no business being behind the wheel of a car," DuPage County State's Attorney Robert Berlin said in a statement.

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    Angy Rivera, who lives in the Queens borough of New York, uses a megaphone during an immigrant rights rally in New York. At marches in Washington and rallies in New York, sometimes outside Immigration and Customs Enforcement offices, Rivera has urged other undocumented youth to “come out” too, as she embraced her newfound sense of identity and community.

    Young immigrant, newly fearless, ponders future

    Angy Rivera is special. "Angy is our rock star," jokes a friend, Melissa Garcia Velez. In the past two years, Rivera has become one of the most visible leaders in a nationwide movement of young people brought here illegally as children and fighting for the right to stay.

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    Vice President Joe Biden could be a Senate selection in the event of a tie.

    One scenario has Rommney-Biden as winning ticket

    On Jan. 20, Mitt Romney takes the presidential oath of office. Standing close by is his new vice president, Joe Biden. Highly unlikely though that outcome may be, it's possible under the complex U.S. system for selecting presidents. A 269- 269 tie between Romney and Barack Obama in the Electoral College, the body set up to formally choose the president, would trigger fallback mechanisms that...

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    Regulators raise concern about nuclear plant’s flood plan

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Friday that it has asked Exelon Generation to address concerns over how the company would handle a catastrophic flood at the Dresden Nuclear Station in northern Illinois, after recent inspections indicated potential problems.

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    D300 contract talks to go on despite ‘fruitless’ meetings

    Negotiations between the Community Unit District 300 school board and its teachers union, LEAD300, are continuing but representatives on both sides say recent talks have been fruitless. Yet, neither side has declared an impasse and the two sides are set to meet again Wednesday. The school board will meet in closed session Monday to determine if there's any more space for movement, while the...

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    Elgin police say they found 43 dead and decaying animals in this van parked outside a home in the 200 block of Villa Street. William Tinkler, 60, who lives there, later arrested on related animal cruelty charges.

    Elgin animal hoarder to undergo mental evaluation

    William Tinkler, the Elgin man who police say stashed more than 40 animals in a van in his yard, will undergo a physical and mental evaluation to determine whether he's fit to stand trial on misdemeanor animal cruelty charges.

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    President Barack Obama speaks Thursday during a campaign eventat the Cheyenne Sports Complex in Las Vegas.

    A final factcheck as election looms

    In campaign speeches that serve as closing arguments, President Barack Obama and Republican rival Mitt Romney are still at it. Romney is still misrepresenting the impact of Obama's health care law on your wallet. Obama is still masking the sticker shock of his plan to tax the rich.

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    Peter A. Surges

    Streamwood man charged with stalking young girl

    A Cook County judge set bail at $300,000 Friday for a 53-year-old Streamwood man and former elementary school lunchroom supervisor who police say stalked a minor female for about two years. If Peter Surges bosts his $30,000 bail he will be fitted with a GPS device and is prohibited from having unsupervised contact with any child under age 18.

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    House of Hope in Barrington expands

    House of Hope Resale, 200 N. Hough St. in downtown Barrington, will open its doors Wednesday, Nov. 7 to a completely transformed space. "Not only is it the kick-off of our annual Holiday Premiere, but we are also premiering our newly-expanded store," said store manager Caryn Habley.

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    Algonquin cop retires after threat allegations

    An Algonquin police officer retired Friday after having been placed on paid leave when a Crystal Lake woman accused him of threatening behavior. Officer Nicholas Corso, a 20-year-veteran of the department, had been placed on paid leave Oct. 16 when Elizabeth Weaver was granted an order of protection against Corso. "I decided to retire today because of the system where we are living under, where...

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    Geneva Methodist church offers Election Day Holy Communion

    The United Methodist Church of Geneva will join churches nationwide in conducting special worship services, including Holy Communion, on Election Day. The aim is to encourage unity among believers who hold different political views.

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    FDIC seizes Illinois bank

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. on Friday seized Heritage Bank of Florida, based in Lutz, Fla., and Citizens First National Bank, based in Princeton, Ill.

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    Daniel Baker

    Closing arguments done, Baker trial verdict Monday

    Daniel Baker's first-degree murder trial isn't a question of "whodunit," as defense attorney Ed Genson put it Friday during his closing argument. Rather, the case centers around whether the Deerfield man, who suffers from multiple mental disorders, was legally insane at the time he allegedly bludgeoned his girlfriend's mother, Marina Aksman, to death in her Vernon Hills home on April 1, 2010.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Two Elgin teenagers have been arrested for what police say was their role Thursday in stealing 1,660 pounds of steel from Amtec Precision Products, an Elgin business in the 1800 block of Holmes Road, reports said. Adarion A. Machone, 19, of the 0-99 block of Creekside Circle and Leon A. Banks, 18, of the 1700 block of Devonshire Court, were each charged with theft. Banks faces an additional...

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    Dan Patlak Republican candidate for Cook Board of Review 1st District.

    Suburban property tax appeals board seat at stake

    Incumbent Republican Dan Patlak is defending his seat on the Cook County Board of Review against Democrat Casey Griffin. The post is one of three on the board and Patlak is currently the only Republican on the board. His campaign focuses on his experience in real estate and property tax assessment. Griffin wants to make the office more transparent and user-friendly.

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    3 options in play for raising Aurora mayor’s pay

    Three aldermen with three different ideas about how much the Aurora mayor should be paid are working to formulate a recommendation to the full city council before a Nov. 8 deadline. The subcommittee, featuring aldermen Rick Mervine, Rick Lawrence and Scheketa Hart-Burns, was formed to examine possible raises for the mayor and aldermen after the April 9 election.

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    Judge Judith M. Brawka is the new chief judge of the 16th Judicial Circuit.

    Brawka first female chief judge of 16th Circuit

    Circuit Judge Judith Brawka is named chief judge of the 16th Judicial Circuit. She starts Saturday, and is the first woman to hold the position. "I've been dedicated to the Kane (judicial) system" throughout her career, making it her top priority, Brawka said. "I intend to be that way as chief judge too."

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    Naperville officials want to close bar on Black Wednesday

    If police and several city council members have their way, one of downtown Naperville's most notorious watering holes may be left out of the most intoxicating day of the year. Mayor George Pradel, who also serves as the city's liquor commissioner, said he will meet Monday with police Chief Bob Marshall, a city attorney and Black Finn general manager Lenny Skorcz to discuss several violent fights...

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    No special prosecutor, McHenry County judge says

    McHenry County Judge Thomas Meyer denied a request to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate a misconduct claim made by a sheriff's department sergeant against undersheriff Andrew Zinke.

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    A mini-golf course on the boardwalk in Point Pleasant Beach N.J., was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy.

    A state-by-state look at superstorm’s effects

    The massive storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy slammed into the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, killing at least 96 people in the United States. Power outages now stand at more than 3.6 million homes and businesses, down from a peak of 8.5 million. Here’s a snapshot of what is happening, state by state.CONNECTICUT

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    Grants awarded for innovative programs in District 70

    Twenty-two Libertyville Elementary District 70 teachers have been awarded Partners for Excellence in Education grant monies this year to enhance education through innovative and creative new programs in their classrooms.Sixteen grants totaling more than $5,606 were awarded to progressive teachers in five schools. There were 20 applications for the grants.

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    Ryan Auvil and his brother Nick shovel snow in the driveway of their house Thursday, to get their car out after the recent storm left 3 feet of snow in Aurora, W.Va., with more snow in the forecast.

    Appalachian Trail hiker trapped by snow is rescued

    A man trying to hike the entire 2,180 miles of the Appalachian Trail was rescued Friday after calling 911 to say he didn't think he'd be able to make it out of a section in Tennessee because he was blocked by snowdrifts up to 5 feet high.

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    Donald Berthiaume

    Wauconda firefighter charged with sexual abuse involving child

    A veteran firefighter from Wauconda is free on bond after being charged with two counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse, authorities said Friday. Donald Berthiaume, 41, of the 2500 Block of Fish Hook Way, was arrested Wednesday for having inappropriate sexual contact in 2005 with someone who was under the age of 13 at the time, Lake County Sheriff's officials said. Berthiaume has been placed...

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    Warren Bands craft fair

    The 18th Annual Warren High School Craft Fair, hosted by the Warren High School Band Boosters, is Saturday, Nov. 3, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the school's Almond Road campus, 34090 Almond Road, Gurnee.

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    Rail crossing work delayed

    Repairs to a Mundelein railroad crossing have been delayed until 2013, so a closure planned for Wednesday will not be necessary, Lake County officials said.

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    Auditions for classic musical comedy

    Auditions for teen actors for the musical comedy, "You're a Good Man Charlie Brown" will be from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Improv Playhouse Studio 116 W. Lake St.,

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    Preview new museum home

    The Lake County Discovery Museum will host its annual fundraising event from 4:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, at its future home.

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    Lluvia Chavarria

    Round Lake High pupils see problems, offer solutions

    Four Round Lake High School students went on a soapbox before elected officials and administrators and touched on issues such as bullying and their school's image. Sophomores Lluvia Chavarria, Alex Munoz, Ariana Melesio and Becky Guo made the presentations as members of the Schuler Scholar program and a summer writing workshop called Project Soapbox. The program is operated by the privately...

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    Christian clergymen hold candles Friday inside the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, in Jerusalem’s Old City.

    Holy Sepulchre bank account blocked for water bill

    A clergyman from the church built on the site where Jesus Christ is said to have been crucified said Friday that its bank account has been frozen as the result of a long-standing dispute with an Israeli water company.

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    Gossip causes far more harm than good

    Admit it, we all like to gossip occasionally. But our Ken Potts says it's a slippery slope because gossip usually does far more harm than it does good.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Andy McCuen, 25, of Downers Grove, was charged with unlawful use of a weapon at 2:12 a.m. Sunday in a parking lot in the 0-99 block of North River Lane, according to a police report. Police say he had a switchblade knife. He was also charged with urinating in public.

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    Israeli women work at Tikkun Olam medical cannabis farm Thursday, near the northern Israeli city of Safed, Israel.

    Israel pushing ahead in medical marijuana industry

    Israel's Health Ministry is considering the distribution of medical marijuana through pharmacies beginning next year, a step taken by only a few countries, including Holland, which has traditionally led the way in Europe in legalizing medical uses of the drug.

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    Remains of pigeon found carrying WWII message

    Experts say the skeletal remains of a pigeon discovered in the chimney of a house in southern England carried a mysterious, long-forgotten message from World War II.

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    Frangerato Salvador, 8, dressed as a Katarina, stands beside her brother’s grave Thursday, marking the Day of the Dead holiday at the cemetery in San Gregorio, Mexico. The holiday honors the dead on Nov. 1, coinciding with All Saints Day and All Souls’ Day on Nov. 2.

    Flowers, ritual, horse race mark Day of the Dead

    Food played a big role in Bolivia where many people celebrated the "return" of loved ones with full tables.

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    Magnitude-6.4 quake shakes Philippines

    A magnitude-6.4 earthquake rattled the Philippine island of Mindano early Saturday morning, the U.S. Geological Survey reported.

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    Jack Partelow

    New Metra chairman faces funding gap, regional rivalry

    Brad O'Halloran from the South suburbs is the new head of Metra's board and Naperville's Jack Partelow as vice chair. The two were named Friday, ending a city v. suburbs split over board leadership.

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    G. Gordon Liddy, a Watergate conspirator, arriving at Baltimore’s federal courthouse.

    Judge orders some Watergate records unsealed

    Some documents sealed in the 1970s as part of the court case against seven men involved in the Watergate burglary must be released, a federal judge in Washington says.

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    David Harris, left, opposes Curt Renz for the 53rd District House seat.

    53rd District candidates running frugal campaigns this time

    What a difference two years make. When Republican David Harris defeated one-term incumbent Mark Walker for a seat in the Illinois House two years ago, the campaigns spent a combined $1 million. This year Harris has raised well under $50,000, and his opponent, Democrat Curt Renz, not a penny.

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    Elzbieta Plackowska

    Naperville mom charged in child slayings asks for new judge

    Attorneys for a Naperville baby sitter accused in the horrific stabbing deaths of two children, including her 7-year-old son, petitioned a court Friday to have her case transferred to another judge. Elzbieta Plackowska, 40, also has requested a Polish interpreter to assist her in court.

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    Michael A. Kainz

    Driver pleads guilty to marijuana charge in fatal Addison crash

    A Hillside man pleaded guilty Friday to driving under the influence of marijuana in a November 2010 crash that killed 46-year-old motorcyclist from Itasca. Michael Kainz, 22, of the 300 block of Buckthorn Lane, faces up to 14 years but also could receive probation.

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    Christopher Wallin, left, and Michael Small, right, firefighters with Glenside Fire Protection District, accept Awards of Valor from The Hundred Club of DuPage on Tuesday.

    DuPage club honors police, firefighters for acts of valor

    Four Westmont cops who disarmed a gunman and two Glenside firefighters who raced into a burning house twice to rescue victims were honored this week for their acts of bravery. "These honorees have shown exemplary valor and we are honored to share their stories and recognize them as heroes in our communities," said Lisa Savegnago, president of The Hundred Club of DuPage, which handed out Awards of...

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    Kindergarten students dance to “Dance Your Sillies Out” as their teacher Tim Gapp plays guitar at North Barrington Elementary School. Gapp has been teaching kindergarten classes at the Barrington District 220 school for more than 20 years and is retiring in 2015.

    North Barrington teacher instructs, nurtures his young students

    North Barrington Elementary kindergarten teacher Tim Gapp uses whatever works to get his students off to a good start in school, even if that means singing and playing the guitar. "I love working with kids. Always have. My mom always told me that I was going to be a teacher,"Gapp said.

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    District 214 discusses summer school costs

    Summer school could cost students in Northwest Suburban High School District 214 more in 2013, officials said. The District 214 school board discussed options for summer school, including a possible tuition increase for summer 2013 courses at its meeting on Thursday night.

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    Military museum to open in Des Plaines

    A museum honoring veterans of all branches and featuring military memorabilia from all eras opens this month in Des Plaines. A joint project of the Des Plaines Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2992 and Oakton Place, the museum will be located on the first floor of Oakton Pavillion, 1660 Oakton Place in Des Plaines.

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    Learn how 19th-century farmers raised livestock

    Autumn on a farm is not only when crops are harvested, but also an important time in the raising of livestock. The Schaumburg Park District's annual "From Hog House to Smokehouse" program, sponsored by Whole Foods Market, will show visitors how and why from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 4, at Spring Valley's Volkening Heritage Farm, 201 S. Plum Grove Road in Schaumburg.

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    Members of the Palatine Park District Tiger Sharks swim team wear “Stepp Up” T-shirts in memory of former teammate, Ben Stepp.

    Palatine Park District swimmers ‘Stepp Up’ to remember teammate

    The tight-knit Palatine Park District Tiger Sharks swim team is making sure the memory of one of its lost aquatic family members isn't soon forgotten. Last weekend, the team kicked off the long and arduous swim season by wearing "Stepp Up" T-shirts to honor and remember former teammate Ben Stepp, who died Aug. 26 in a tragic accident.

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    In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, photo, a man looks at documents at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. The graffiti reads, “no God but God,” “ God is great,” and “Muhammad is the Prophet.” CIA security officers went to the aid of State Department staff less than 25 minutes after they got the first call for help during the attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, U.S. intelligence officials said Thursday.

    U.S. officials counter reports on Benghazi attacks

    Just days before the presidential election, U.S. officials are striking back at allegations they failed to respond quickly or efficiently against the deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, detailing for the first time a broad CIA rescue effort.

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    A sign reminds citizens to vote early at the Murray City Hall in Murray, Utah Thursday November 1, 2012.

    Campaigns lawyered up for election overtime chance

    Legions of lawyers are ready to enter the fray in case Election Day turns on a legal challenge. One nightmare scenario would be for the results in a battleground state like Florida or Ohio to be too close to call, with thousands of absentee or provisional ballots yet to be counted.

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    Syria rebels said to kill captured troops

    BEIRUT — A new video appears to show Syrian rebels killing a group of captured soldiers, spraying them with bullets as they lay on the ground. Human rights groups on Friday warned that the gunmen may have committed a war crime.

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    Space center workers carry a banner while walking behind the shuttle Atlantis as it makes its way to the Visitor Complex at the Kennedy Space Center, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Atlantis began its slow journey to retirement Friday, riding atop 76-wheeled platform on the 10-mile trek to the Kennedy Space Center’s main tourist stop. Friday’s event marked the true end to the 30-year shuttle program.

    Final 10-mile trek for space shuttle Atlantis

    Trailed by a solemn entourage of astronauts and shuttle workers, Atlantis began its slow journey to retirement Friday, the last space shuttle to fly in orbit and the last to leave NASA's nest. Atlantis emerged just before dawn from the massive Vehicle Assembly Building and, riding atop 76-wheeled platform, began the 10-mile trek to the Kennedy Space Center's main tourist stop.

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    Chief trainer Kim Jong-gab touches the mouth of Koshik, a 22-year-old Asian elephant, at the Everland amusement park in Yongin, South Korea, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012. Koshik uses his trunk to pick up not only food but also human vocabulary. He can reproduce five Korean words by tucking his trunk inside his mouth to modulate sound.

    Elephant in S. Korean zoo imitates human speech

    An elephant in a South Korean zoo is not just using his trunk to pick up not only food, but also to imitate human vocabulary. An international team of scientists confirmed Friday what the Everland Zoo has been saying for years: Their 5.5-ton Asian elephant can reproduce five Korean words by tucking his trunk inside his mouth to modulate sound.

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    Brooke Clarkin tries to salvage some personal items from her mother’s home in Staten Island, New York, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. Her mother’s home was not only flooded to the ceiling, but was swept off its foundation and was carried to the other side of the street. The National Guard and federal emergency management officials will deliver 1 million meals and bottled water to New York areas hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy.

    Isolated NYC borough says help is slow after Sandy

    Residents and public officials say help has been frustratingly slow to arrive on stricken Staten Island, where 19 have been killed — nearly half the death toll of all of New York City. Garbage is piling up, a stench hangs in the air and mud-caked mattresses and couches line the streets. Residents are sifting through the remains of their homes, searching for anything that can be salvaged.

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    The Coast Guard is investigating the sinking of a tall ship off the coast of North Carolina during Hurricane Sandy.

    Coast Guard probing cause of tall ship’s sinking

    ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. — The Coast Guard is investigating the sinking of a tall ship off the coast of North Carolina during Hurricane Sandy.Rear Adm. Steven Ratti said Friday the review will focus on what caused the sinking of the HMS Bounty off Cape Hatteras.

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    Erin Merryn of Schaumburg, winner of the Daily Herald Person of the Year contest, published two books on child sexual abuse and worked to pass Erin’s Law in Illinois.

    Schaumburg woman among Glamour’s Women of the Year

    Talk about being in some esteemed company. Schaumburg’s Erin Merryn, whose mission to educate children about sexual abuse has been gaining nationwide momentum, will join the likes of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, actress Selena Gomez and “Girls” creator and star Lena Dunham as recipients of Glamour magazine’s Women of the Year.

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    President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event at the University of Colorado - Boulder, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, in Boulder, Colo.

    Romney, Obama each get something in jobs report

    President Barack Obama and Republican rival Mitt Romney each got something Friday out of the final snapshot of the nation's economy heading into Election Day, with more job creation and an uptick in unemployment. That data fresh in hand, both candidates were plunging into a hectic pace of campaigning.

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    Gary Grasso, left, gets instructions on the workings of the polling place’s single electronic voting machine from election judge John Michalski, right. during the 2010 election.

    Illinois AG reminds voters of some basic rights

    Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan is reminding voters of some basic rights ahead of Tuesday's election.Madigan says voters have the right to vote if they are in line when the polls close at 7 p.m.If a voter makes a mistake or spoils a paper ballot and the voter hasn't cast the ballot, the voter has the right to a replacement ballot.

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    Richard and Trish Weiss, stand outside a room where they placed a small doll, a request they heard from an electronic voice phenomenon event, where they are continuing their work to rehab the former Illinois Asylum for The Incurable Insane, a mental hospital located in Bartonville Richard said that sometimes they come in and the dolls arms are raised.

    Former asylum open for tours

    After more than three years of seeking approval for abatement funds, 32 days of cleanup and plenty of personal sacrifice, developer Richard Weiss has opened the Bowen Building of the former Peoria State Hospital for tours.The building - which once was called the Illinois Asylum for the Incurable Insane - is open to the public on Fridays and Saturdays year-round.

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    Gov. Quinn pleased with ISFA director choice

    A spokeswoman says Gov. Pat Quinn is ready to move forward after a spat with Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel over the executive director of a sports facility board. The Illinois Sports Facilities Authority chose Kelly Kraft on Thursday. She’s Quinn’s chief spokeswoman and had the Chicago Democrat’s full backing. But Emanuel had publicly questioned her candidacy and her experience.

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    Crime commission expands hunt for heroin dealers

    The Illinois State Crime Commission says it's partnering with Will County prosecutors to begin offering cash rewards for information on heroin dealers who sell to minors.Officials say the commission will offer $1,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of anyone who provides heroin to a juvenile in Will County.

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    Former Chicago alderman to head state department

    A former Chicago alderman and former journalist and philanthropist have been appointed to Illinois state positions.Gov. Pat Quinn announced Thursday that former Chicago Alderman Manny Flores will be secretary of the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation.

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    Man with ammo detained at Sikh temple

    A police report says Oak Creek officers detained a man at the Sikh temple where six people were killed in August and found he had ammunition and notebook references to a mass shooting. Sikh members summoned police last Sunday when the man visited the temple with a backpack. The man told officers he wanted to pray with the Sikhs and was writing a book.

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    Bloomington man gets 42 years for assaulting girls

    A judge has sentenced a 40-year-old Bloomington man to 42 years in prison for sexually assaulting two young girls.The (Bloomington) Pantagraph reports that John E. Smith was sentenced Thursday after being convicted in August of predatory criminal sexual assault of two girls under 12 years old.

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    Winners of bias lawsuit among firefighter grads

    When nearly 100 new Chicago firefighters crossed the stage Thursday to shake Mayor Rahm Emanuel's hand during their graduation, most of them did so after waiting — and fighting — for almost two decades to join the Chicago Fire Department.

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    Purdue gets $6M for robotic grape, apple pruning

    Purdue University scientists are using $6 million in funding to develop robotic technology that can tackle the laborious task of pruning vineyards and apple orchards.Associate horticulture professor Peter Hirst is leading the project to develop and improve machines that use cameras and robotic arms to prune grapevines and apple trees. Purdue computer engineering researchers will help develop the...

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    Dawn Patrol: Cook of the Year crowned; Judson lays off 21

    A Carpentersville resident who teaches at Schaumburg High School won our second annual Cook of the Year contest. Judson University lays off 21 staff members. And a heroin dealer gets 10 years for trying to sell the drug near an Elgin park.

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    Think warm thoughts of things that make you grateful

    As the colder November temperatures leave a chill in the air, let's take the challenge to spend our November days thinking on all we have to be grateful for, columnist Annettee Budzban says.

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    This photo was taken at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle. The bridge and fall colors came together to create a surreal scene.

    Images: Photo Contest Finalists
    Each week you submit your favorite photo. We pick the best of the bunch and select 12 finlaists. Here are the finalists for the week of October 29th.

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    Carrie Underwood performs onstage at the 46th Annual Country Music Awards at the Bridgestone Arena on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, in Nashville, Tenn.

    Images: 46th Annual Country Music Association Awards
    The 46th annual Country Music Association awards ceremony took place Thursday at the Bridgestone Arena in Nashville. Nominees for the 2012 awards include Kenny Chesney, Tim McGraw, Toby Keith, Jason Aldean, Kelly Clarkson, Miranda Lambert, Eli Young Band, Zac Brown Band, Lee Brice, Brantley Gilbert, Eric Church and many more.

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    Michael Pennisi of Carpentersville is named Cook of the year 2012 after winning the Cook of the Week Challenge Cook-off with his dish Salmon Saute with spicy sweet potatoes and brussels slaw.

    Images: Cook of the Week Challenge Finals
    Michael Pennisi of Carpentersville, who teaches at Schaumburg High, was named winner among four suburban cooks on Thursday night in a cook-off for the title Daily Herald Cook of the Year 2012. They had one hour to prepare a dish using the "secret ingredients' -- salmon, pomegranates, Brussels sprouts and Greek yogurt.

Sports

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    Wheaton North’s Lataye Smith celebrates with his teammates in the four quarter with only seconds left as the Falcons top Prospect in the second round of the Class 7A playoffs Friday night in Mt. Prospect.

    Peltz drives Wheaton North past Prospect

    John Peltz led Wheaton North on a fourth-quarter drive as the Falcons earned a 14-7 victory at Prospect in the Class 7A playoffs Friday night.

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    Paul Michna/pmichna@dailyherald.com JT Crosby of Benet celebrates a touchdown during the Oswego at Benet football sectional game in Lisle Friday.

    Benet takes its time

    After an unrecognizable 24 minutes of play, the real Benet football team finally stood up in the second half. The Redwings dominated the final 24 minutes en route to a 28-13 victory over Oswego in the second round of the Class 7A playoffs Friday at Benedictine University in Lisle. Second-seeded Benet (10-1) will play in its first quarterfinal game since 2003 when it travels to play No. 8 Downers Grove North (7-4), a 29-13 winner over Thornton.

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    Rhattigan, Neuqua steam past Bolingbrook

    Neuqua Valley rode a "Train" through Bolingbrook on Friday. That is, the player coach Bill Ellinghaus calls the "Train," tailback Joey Rhattigan, helped deliver a historic 44-33 Wildcats victory over the defending Class 8A state champion Raiders in the second round of the playoffs.

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    Painful exit for as Grant as Crystal Lake Central moves on

    Crystal Lake Central advanced at Grant's expense in the Class 6A state playoffs as an injury-plagued year provided one more very painful moment for the Bulldogs in a 30-13 decision.

  •  
    Lakes running-back Direll Clark is pulled down by a host of Lake Forest defenders Friday night in round two of the Class 6A playoffs in Lake Forest.

    Lake Forest stops Lakes

    In an emotional, dramatic finish, Lakes missed a 43-yard field goal with just six seconds remaining that would have not only matched a Lake Forest field goal made just 59 seconds earlier but also ensured a win and a trip to the quarterfinals. The attempt by Lakes senior Brandon Brumm had so much leg that it hit the scoreboard, but it sailed wide left, just a smidge outside the upright, to preserve a 23-21 victory for host Lake Forest.

  •  
    Wheaton North’s Lataye Smith celebrates with his teammates in the fourth quarter with only seconds left to beat Prospect.

    Images: Wheaton North vs. Prospect, playoff football
    The Prospect High School Knights football team hosted and lost 14-7 to the Falcons of Wheaton North High School Friday in Mount Prospect in a second round football playoff game.

  •  
    Porter Ontko of Benet runs the ball.

    Images: Oswego at Benet second round playoff football
    Benet hosted and won 28-13 over Oswego Friday night at Benedictine University in Lisle for a second round game in playoff football.

  •  
    Lakes running-back Direll Clark is pulled down by two Lake Forest defenders late in the fourth quarter.

    Images: Lake Forest vs. Lakes football
    The Lake Forest Scouts hosted and beat the Lakes Eagles 23-21 for the second round of the Class 6A state football playoffs on Friday, Nov. 2 in Lake Forest.

  •  
    Carlos Marmol celebrates their 5-3 win over the New York Mets after a baseball game, Tuesday, June 26, 2012, in Chicago.

    AP source: Cubs-Angels trade falls apart

    The Cubs told closer Carlos Marmol the proposed trade to send him to the Los Angeles Angels for pitcher Dan Haren has fallen apart, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press. The person spoke Friday night on condition of anonymity because the trade did not get completed.

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    Wolves double up on IceHogs

    Six players scored for the Chicago Wolves in their 6-3 victory over the host Rockford IceHogs.

  •  
    Richard Hamilton shoots over Cleveland’s Daniel Gibson during the third quarter of the Bulls’ victory Friday night in Cleveland.

    Thibodeau sees plenty of flaws in Bulls’ win

    Coach Tom Thibodeau had several complaints after the game, but the Bulls cruised to an easy 115-86 victory at Cleveland on Friday. The Bulls knocked down 11 of their first 14 shots and never looked back.

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    Naperville Central’s Pat Flynn, (5), is congratulated by teammates Jay Tegge (3), Jordi Heeneman (9), and Sam Reskala (7), after scoring the first goal against Stevenson, during the boys 3A state semifinal soccer match held at Lincoln-Way North High School.

    Naperville Central rolls past Stevenson

    It didn't take long for Naperville Central's Pat Flynn to score during Friday night's Class 3A semifinal against Stevenson at Lincoln-Way North in Frankfort. Apparently things don't change even when the stakes are at their highest.

  •  
    Houston Rockets shooting guard James Harden drives against Atlanta Hawks point guard Jeff Teague, right, Friday during the second half in Atlanta. Houston won 109-102.

    Harden has 45, Rockets beat Hawks 109-102

    The Houston Rockets are winning with James Harden performing like the team's new franchise player. The Atlanta Hawks struggled in the start of their new era without their longtime franchise player. Harden continued to shine at the start of his Houston career, scoring a career-high 45 points to lead the Rockets to a 109-102 victory over the Hawks on Friday night.

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    Oklahoma City Thunder forward Serge Ibaka celebrates Friday after a basket by a teammate in the second quarter against the Portland Trail Blazers in Oklahoma City.

    Thunder beat Blazers 106-92 in home opener

    Russell Westbrook scored 32 points, Kevin Durant had 23 points and 17 rebounds and the Oklahoma City Thunder beat the Portland Trail Blazers 106-92 on Friday night to win their fourth straight home opener. Kevin Martin, taking over James Harden's role as the top-scoring bench player, added 19 points as Oklahoma City pulled away in the fourth quarter.

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    Chicago Bulls' Carlos Boozer dunks against the Cleveland Cavaliers in the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

    Hamilton, Boozer lead Bulls past Cavaliers 115-86

    Cavaliers coach Byron Scott got right to the point after watching the Bulls dismantle his team Friday night. "That's what you call a good, old-fashioned butt-whipping," he said following the Bulls' 115-86 win. No one would argue with Scott's assessment. The Bulls dominated from start to finish and is 2-0 for the first time since the 2002-03 season despite playing without star point guard Derrick Rose.

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    Warren’s Karl Bappert (22) celebrates his first-half goal against Sandburg during the Class 3A boys soccer state semifinals Friday at Lincoln-Way North High School.

    Warren earns title shot

    Warren's boys soccer team has earned a shot at the Class 3A state championship. The Blue Devils handled Sandburg 3-0 in the second semifinal Friday night at Lincoln-Way North High School. Karl Bappert, Timmy Pieper and Sean Kirwan all scored for the Blue Devils. Pieper, Daniel Szczepanek and Nick Wegrzynowicz each had assists. Warren (20-5-3) will take on Naperville Central (23-1), a 3-0 winn against Stevenson, in the title game 7 p.m. Saturday at Lincoln-Way North. Stevenson will meet Sandburg in the third-place game at 5 p.m.

  •  
    No. 10 seed Bartlett and Aaron Everson (27) will have to have a big game today when the Hawks take on No. 2 seed Loyola Academy in the second round of the Class 8A playoffs at Millennium Field in Streamwood.

    Loyola presents Bartlett quite a challenge

    The Bartlett defense registered its second shutout of the season last week in a 14-0 victory at Leyden, but the Hawks' second-round playoff opponent presents a far greater challenge. No. 2 Loyola Academy (9-1), the 2011 state runner-up to Bolingbrook, brings an offense averaging 36.6 points and 354.6 yards per game to Millennium Field for a Class 8A matchup against No. 10 Bartlett (7-3) today at 1:30 p.m.

  •  

    Harper wrestlers hit the mats at Loras

    There are still plenty of questions to be answered for Harper wrestling coach Dan Loprieno heading into today's Loras Open. "We lost a lot of talent," Loprieno said of last year's Harper team that finished eighth nationally. The Hawks return three sophomores who were 1 victory away from placing at last year's NJCAA national champioinships: Conor Infelise (McHenry, 133), Josh Tardy (Naperville Central, 141) and Donnie Simpson (Romeoville, 149).

  •  
    Jockey Mike Smith and Royal Delta led all the way Friday to win Breeders’ Cup Ladies’ Classic at Santa Anita.

    Couple of favorites come through in Ladies’ Classic

    Royal Delta led all the way in winning the $2 million Ladies' Classic by 1½ lengths on Friday at Santa Anita, making the defending champion the only favorite to win on an upset-filled opening day of the Breeders' Cup.

  •  
    Cary-Grove’s Kyle Norberg (44) will be focused on hanging onto the football Saturday when the Trojans host St. Patrick in a Class 6A playoff game.

    Healthy Cary-Grove gears up for St. Pat’s

    Securing the football will be a top priority when No. 8 St Patrick (7-3) visits No. 1 Cary-Grove (10-0) in a Class 6A second-round playoff game Saturday at 1 p.m. Both teams specialize in take-aways. Cary-Grove has forced 26 turnovers. The opportunistic Shamrocks have forced 31. "That's the old Bears strategy of getting turnovers, getting the ball back," St. Patrick coach Dan Galante said. "If we can take away possessions and keep their offense off the field, that's a positive." St. Patrick rode its ball-hawking strategy to third place in the East Suburban Catholic Conference behind Benet Academy and Marist. The Shamrocks defeated Benet 17-16 in Week 3, handing the Redwings their only loss. They are tasked with limiting the Trojans' flexbone option offense, directed by senior quarterback Quinn Baker.

  •  
    Jackson Owens of St. Viator reacts after a would-be goal was disallowed due to an off-sides call during the Lions’ loss to Urbana in the Class 2A state semifinals on Friday in Frankfort.

    St. Viator misses out on title game

    Dreams of returning to the Class 2A boys soccer state championship game came to an end Friday afternoon in Frankfort for St. Viator, which fell 2-1 to Urbana in semifinal action. The Lions (20-4-3) will meet Wheaton Academy, which lost 2-1 in a shootout to Peoria Notre Dame, in Saturday's 11 a.m. third-place contest.

  •  
    Kaneland’s Jesse Balluff, pictured hurdling a would-be Morris tackler last month, will be a key part of the Knights’ game plan at Lincoln-Way West Saturday.

    Scouting this weekend’s Tri-Cities football games
    A preview of second-round football playoff games for the Tri-Cities coverage area.

  •  
    Buddy Bell, right, talks with ex-White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen, center. Bell was promoted to vice president/assistant GM by the Sox on Friday.

    Bell excited about being named Sox assistant GM

    When Kenny Williams took over as White Sox general manager following the 2000 season, he brought in Roland Hemond as a special assistant. Last Friday, assistant general manager Rick Hahn replaced Williams, who was promoted to president of baseball operations. A week later, Hahn announced Buddy Bell has been promoted to vice president/assistant GM.

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    Illini’s Birks happy she redshirted last year

    Redshirt freshman and former Lyons star Jocelynn Birks is trying to keep the Illinois volleyball team competitive and relevant in a brutally tough Big Ten Conference.

  •  
    Harvest Christian Academy and 6-2 junior Sydney Doby will take on Keith Country Day of Rockford at 3 p.m. Saturday in the Class 1A Lanark Eastland supersectional.

    Harvest Christian ready to take next step

    One thing the Harvest Christian girls volleyball team won't be Saturday afternoon is caught off guard. Playing against IHSA competition for the fisrt time last season, the Lions traveled to River Ridge a year ago to play Dakota in a Class 1A supersectional and suffered through some stage fright in losing one game short of making it to Redbird Arena and the IHSA Final Four. Saturday, Harvest takes on Keith Country Day of Rockford at 3 p.m. in the Lanark Eastland supersectional with a trip to the Final Four on the line.

  •  
    Driver Jimmie Johnson smiles as he talks with crew members in the garage Friday before a practice for Sunday’s NASCAR Sprint Cup Series AAA Texas 500 auto race at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas.

    Cup leader Jimmy Johnson on Texas pole, Keselowski 8th

    Jimmie Johnson finished his qualifying run at Texas with the fastest lap on the day, then stayed in his car while waiting to see if anybody would knock him off the pole. When the Sprint Cup points leader finally climbed out of the cockpit of his No. 48 Lowe's Chevrolet more than 30 minutes later Friday, after Brad Keselowski and the rest of the field failed to top his lap of 191.076 mph, he was the polesitter for the second week in a row.

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    A man leaves the media center for the New York City Marathon Friday in New York's Central Park. The race has been canceled.

    New York Marathon canceled as city recovers from storm

    The New York City Marathon was canceled Friday by Mayor Michael Bloomberg after mounting criticism that it was wrong to hold the race while the region is still recovering from Superstorm Sandy. With people in storm-ravaged areas shivering without electricity and the death toll in New York City at more than 40, many residents recoiled at the prospect of police officers being assigned to protect Sunday's race.

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    Wheaton Academy reacts as they miss a goal during penalty kicks during their loss in overtime to Peoria Notre Dame in Class 2A boys soccer state semifinals on Friday in Frankfort.

    Wheaton Academy falls in PKs

    Spencer Graf gave Wheaton Academy every opportunity to advance to its first state soccer championship match Friday afternoon. Unfortunately for the senior goalkeeper and his Warriors teammates, however, Justin Buck was even better for Peoria Notre Dame.

  •  
    Tennessee Titans running back Chris Johnson has rushed for at least 90 yards in four of his last five games, but he’ll be facing the NFL’s No. 1 defense against the run when the Titans play the Bears on Sunday.

    Bears defense looks to slow Johnson’s progress

    The Bears' defense will be focused Sunday on Titans running back Chris Johnson, who got off to a brutal start this season but has flashed his big-play ability repeatedly in the past month.

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    Michigan State players celebrate after defeating Wisconsin 16-13 Saturday. Michigan State can spoil Nebraska’s Big Ten championship hopes with a victory Saturday.

    No. 21 Nebraska still has tests to pass

    For the Nebraska Cornhuskers, November is shaping up like one big obstacle course. After beating Michigan last weekend, 21st-ranked Nebraska can wrap up a spot in the Big Ten title game with four more wins — but it won't be easy. First up is a major test at Michigan State on Saturday. "My message to the team is you get what you earn in this world. They are not going to give you anything," Cornhuskers coach Bo Pelini said.

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    The Cubs picked up Colorado Rockies righthander Zach Putnam off waivers on Friday. This photo is from a spring training workout last February.

    Cubs claim Rockies pitcher Putnam

    The Cubs claimed right-handed pitcher Zach Putnam off waivers from the Colorado Rockies on Friday. Putnam, 25, is 19-12 with 26 saves and a 3.90 ERA (128 ER/295.2 IP) in 171 career minor league games, all but 15 as a reliever.

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    Alabama coach Nick Saban runs off the field Saturday following a win over Mississippi State at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Ala.

    Alabama-LSU: Another showdown in epic rivalry

    OK, so maybe it's not the Game of the Century. No disputing it's the game of the year. Nothing new about that. Alabama-LSU has undoubtedly become the greatest rivalry in college football, supplanting Michigan-Ohio State, Florida-Florida State and any of those other annual showdowns with historic overtones.

  •  
    The NHL has canceled the 2013 Winter Classic at Michigan Stadium. The signature event between the Detroit Red Wings and Toronto Maple Leafs, is the latest casualty from the labor dispute that has put the season on hold, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press on Friday.

    NHL cancels Winter Classic at Big House

    The National Hockey League has canceled the Winter Classic scheduled for Jan. 1 at Michigan Stadium between Detroit and Toronto, the latest casualty in the lockout. The league said Friday that it would schedule the next Winter Classic at the Big House, which holds more than 100,000 people and had been expected to set a record for attendance at a hockey game.

  •  
    Illinois quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase drops back to pass Saturday during the second half against Indiana in Champaign. Illinois will try to break their five-game losing streak on the road Saturday against Ohio State.

    Stakes dramatically different for Buckeyes, Illini

    To outside observers, it looks like a mismatch. No. 6 Ohio State is 10-0, can clinch a share of the title in its Big Ten division and can keep alive any flickering hopes of being the last unbeaten standing when the final poll votes are cast. Illinois (2-6) has lost its last five games and in conference play is 0-4 this year with a 10-game losing skid. With problems on both sides of the ball, the Illini are four-touchdown underdogs.

  •  
    Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te’ocelebrates with teammate Stephon Tuitt Satrday after an interception against Oklahoma during the fourth quarter in Norman, Okla.

    No. 4 Notre Dame tries to keep its focus vs. Pitt

    Fourth-ranked Notre Dame and Pittsburgh are looking to avoid distractions on Saturday. The Fighting Irish (8-0) tried all week to distance themselves from talk about possibly playing for their first national championship since 1988. They skipped discussions about how the 2002 team stumbled at this same point.

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    Scouting report: Bulls at Cavaliers

    The Bulls are 7-0 against Cleveland since LeBron James left. They won last year's three meetings by an average of 31 points. The Cavs opened the season with a 94-84 win over Washington on Tuesday.

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    The Scorecard has cornerback Charles Tillman as the Bears’ MVP for the first half of the season.

    Why even bother with an NFL trade deadline?

    Spellman's Scorecard takes a look at the goofy NFL trade deadline, who might be the Bears MVP at the midway point of the season and much, much more.

  •  
    The Bulls struggled to put away the Sacramento Kings in Wednesday's season opener, but they still won the game and there's nothing ugly about a win, says Mike North.

    There’s nothing ugly about winning games

    The Chicago Bulls still can win without Derrick Rose, and who cares if the wins aren't pretty. Mike North believes they still have a chance to succeed this season. Ray Allen was snubbed by Kevin Garnett at the the season opener between Miami and Boston, and North enjoyed the political incorrectness of it all.

Business

  •  
    Dundee Automotive owner Randy Klemm, far right, looks on in September as excavators dig up the parking lot next to his shop to see what might be causing two parking lots to cave in. Steve Komarchuk, owner of Arthur Popp Excavators in West Dundee, believes the village of East Dundee is responsible because a water main broke. Komarchuk is seen here operating the backhoe. His brother Mike is in the blue hat.

    Excavator blames E. Dundee for sinking parking lot

    The village of East Dundee is to blame for a business being in danger of going under, quite literally, a local excavator says. And while Dundee Automotive owner Randy Klemm wants the village to pay for the damage his business has sustained from a water main that had collapsed under his parking lot, causing the lot to break up and sink, Village Manager Bob Skurla said he needs Klemm to put it in writing. "I've got to have a starting point," Skurla said. "The ball is in his court to get me something."

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    Bill Zars/bzars@dailyherald.com There’s a move to organize the parking and valet attendants at Rivers Casino in Des Plaines with support from the city’s mayor.

    Some Rivers Casino employees might form union

    Parking lot and valet employees at the Rivers Casino in Des Plaines have asked Des Plaines Mayor Marty Moylan to support their efforts to collectively bargain, and he has agreed. "I believe that the people have a right to organize," Moylan said.

  •  
    Green Mountain Power trucks line up Thursday to leave for Connecticut, in Rutland, Vt., to help with recovery efforts due to the damage caused by Superstorm Sandy. After Tropical Storm Irene caused widespread flooding in Vermont in 2011, volunteers and money poured in from around the country to help with the recovery. Now Vermont is returning the favor.

    Stocks fall as Sandy’s toll is tallied

    Waterlogged from Superstorm Sandy and unmoved by a solid October jobs report, U.S. stocks fell sharply Friday. The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 139 points as details about the storm's costs began to trickle out.Verizon Communications, whose downtown Manhattan facilities are still without power, said the storm would have a "significant" effect on its fourth-quarter earnings. Verizon said it could not yet estimate the cost of the storm, which downed cell towers across the region. Its stock fell 62 cents to $44.52.

  •  

    Berkshire Hathaway buying Oriental Trading

    arren Buffett will soon be prepared to throw a giant party for almost any occasion now that his Berkshire Hathaway is buying Oriental Trading Co. The deal announced Friday will give Buffett ready access to Oriental Trading's catalog of more than 40,000 party supplies, arts, crafts, toys and other trinkets.

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    Commuting bicyclists at a stoplight Friday watch a large crowd of people waiting to board special buses into Manhattan near a bus pickup area in Brooklyn.

    When working from home goes wrong

    Nearly every office dweller fantasizes about the joys of working from home: Dressing in PJs instead of suits. Eating from the fridge and not the vending machine. Listening to birds chirp instead of the boss bark. But Superstorm Sandy has created legions of people who can't wait to get back to the office.

  •  
    New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie tries to comfort Alice Cimillo Thursday and other Moonachie, N.J. residents whose homes were damaged by Superstorm Sandy, during a tour of the flood-ravaged area.

    Jersey casinos reopen after 5-day shutdown

    All but two casinos in Atlantic City planned to be back in business Friday after getting the green light from Gov. Chris Christie to reopen.

  •  
    People withdraw money Friday from a mobile ATM machine set up in a van in Hoboken, N.J. The mobile ATM gives residents a chance to get cash in Hoboken, which is still blacked out following Superstorm Sandy.

    Corporations just beginning to tally Sandy’s costs

    Corporate America is just starting to add up its losses from Superstorm Sandy, expected to be one of the most expensive storms in U.S. history. Delta Air Lines and Verizon were two of the first major companies to formally indicate the obvious, saying Friday that they will lose money because of the storm.

  •  
    Cars wait for gas in a line that stretches Friday about one and a half miles in Brooklyn. Superstorm Sandy damaged ports that accept fuel tankers and flooded underground equipment that sends fuel through pipelines.

    Gasoline tankers wait outside New York harbor

    Phillips 66 and Hess Corp.'s New Jersey refineries remained shut today, four days after superstorm Sandy struck the East Coast. Delays to shipping along the Atlantic Coast spurred more oil-product cargoes from the Gulf of Mexico.

  •  

    Ralph Lauren 2Q net income falls

    Ralph Lauren says reduced wholesale shipments to Europe and a tax cost drove its fiscal second-quarter net income down by 8 percent and lowered its revenue expectations for the year amid a global slowdown.

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    Verizon says Sandy effects could be ‘significant’

    Verizon says the effects of Superstorm Sandy on its fourth-quarter earnings could be "significant."

  •  

    Priceline rises as profit tops estimates on European sales

    Priceline.com Inc., the most valuable online-travel agency, rose the most in two years after reporting profit that topped analysts' estimates as consumers flocked to the site, assuaging concerns that Europe's financial crisis would crimp demand.

  •  

    Washington Post reports profit gain as TV division sales grow

    Washington Post Co., the media company partly owned by billionaire Warren Buffett, reported a rise in third-quarter profit on improved revenue from its broadcast and cable television divisions.Excluding items such as restructuring expenses, income from continuing operations rose 23 percent to $50.4 million, or $6.79 a share, from $40.9 million, or $5.18 a share, a year earlier, the company said today in a statement. Operating revenue was little changed at $1.01 billion.Broadcast and cable television revenue helped make up for sluggish results at its other businesses, the company said. Its education unit has come under government scrutiny — along with the rest of the for-profit education industry — and faces increasing regulation. The Washington Post newspaper also is struggling to retain readers and hasn’t capitalized on digital subscription programs that have benefited other major newspapers, including The New York Times.Operating revenue at the broadcasting division jumped 44 percent to $106.4 million as the Olympics and election season boosted demand for advertising. The cable business climbed 6 percent to $199.6 million, the Washington-based company said.Washington Post has moved to diversify its business beyond education and media to include health care. The company agreed last month to acquire a majority interest in Celtic Healthcare Inc., a provider of health care and hospice services in the Northeastern and mid-Atlantic. The move is in keeping with the company’s strategy of operating a “diverse group of businesses,” Chief Executive Officer Donald E. Graham said at the time.Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc. is the company’s largest shareholder, with a 28 percent stake, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Washington Post shares rose 1.8 percent to $339.45 yesterday at the close in New York. The stock has declined 9.9 percent this year.

  •  

    Delta says Sandy cut revenue by $45 million

    NEW YORK — Delta Air Lines says Superstorm Sandy cut its revenue by $45 million last month as it was forced to cancel more than 3,500 flights. The Atlanta company, the world’s second-largest airline after United, said its October profit was reduced by about $20 million. Delta Air Lines Inc. said that it was operating a near-full schedule at New York’s JFK and Newark Liberty in New Jersey. But on Thursday it ran at only 80 percent at LaGuardia, which sustained the heaviest flooding and damage. It expects to run a full LaGuardia schedule Friday.Superstorm Sandy hit the New York area Monday night. As of Thursday, airlines had canceled more than 20,000 flights because of the storm.Delta expects the storm will have less of an impact on its operations this month.

  •  

    Sears names exec to lead grocery, drug and pharmacy unit

    Sears Holdings said Ryan Vero will join the company as senior vice president and president of the company's Grocery, Drug and Pharmacy division.

  •  

    Lower production, prices hurt Chevron 3Q profit

    Chevron Corp. said Friday its third-quarter net income fell 33 percent as production declined and it sold oil and gas at lower prices.

  •  
    A judge in Ireland on Friday Nov. 2, 2012 ordered bankrupt tycoon Sean Quinn, center, jailed for nine weeks for failing to observe orders to stop placing foreign property assets beyond the reach of creditors. Quinn — Ireland’s richest man until 2008 — faces financial ruin because of his reckless gamble that year on Anglo Irish Bank. The Dublin lender was the biggest financier of Ireland’s runaway property market, a boom that imploded in 2009.

    Judge orders Irish tycoon jailed for contempt

    Bankrupt tycoon Sean Quinn, once Ireland's richest man and a celebrated self-made billionaire, was sent to jail for nine weeks Friday after a judge found him guilty of stripping foreign assets from his crumbling business empire in violation of court orders.

  •  

    Middleby acquires Nieco Corp.

    Elgin-based company The Middleby Corp. announced the acquisition of Nieco Corp., a manufacturer of automatic broilers for the commercial food service industry.

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    U.S. factory orders rise 4.8 percent in September

    U.S. companies boosted their orders for manufactured goods by the largest amount in 18 months in September, but companies remained cautious in ordering goods that signal plans to expand and modernize.

  •  

    CCH executives honored as most powerful women in accounting

    CCH executives Teresa Mackintosh, CPA and Tracy Mortenson, CPA, JD, have been recognized nationally as among the most powerful women in the accounting profession by the American Society of Women Accountants and The CPA Practice Advisor. The “Most Powerful Women in Accounting” recognizes 25 women who are making the greatest impact on the tax and accounting profession. An independent panel of accounting professionals selected the finalists based on their contributions to the accounting profession; initiativesand actions they have started that made a difference within their organization; their personal leadership; community involvement; and mentorship of future women leaders.Mackintosh is executive vice president & general manager of tax and Mortenson is director of electronic publishing development with Riverwoods-based CCH, a Wolters Kluwer business that is a global provider of tax, accounting and audit information, software and services. Both have worked in the profession for their entire careers, first as practitioners, and then in serving the profession.“I congratulate all of the women who were recognized with this award, and I’m thrilled that two CCH leaders received the honor,” said Karen Abramson, CCH President & CEO. “At CCH, our commitment is to make our customers lives better, and both Teresa and Tracy are absolutely dedicated to achieving this as they drive information and technology solutions to help our customers advance. We’re proud to have them on our team.”Mackintosh heads the company’s largest business unit, serving tax professionals with innovative, customer-focused solutions — including new cloud and mobile solutions. She leads tax product development, tax technology, product management and sales operations. Mortenson leads electronic publishing development for CCH. She has been a driving force behind the powerful IntelliConnect research platform and the popular new CCH Mobile supporting the way professionals want to work today, with access to information and tools anywhere, anytime.The first awards were presented at the 2012 American Society of Women Accountants Conference in San Diego and are currently featured in the November issue of The CPA Practice Advisor, which includes profiles and interviews with all of the winners, including CCH’s Mackintosh and Mortenson.

  •  

    Crabtree Holdings to acquire MTL Equity Products

    Oak Brook-based Crabtree Holdings LLC said it will acquire MTL Holdings Inc. through a stock purchase agreement. Terms of the agreement were not announced.MTL Equity Products, Inc., a holding company in the Mutual Trust Financial Group, is a securities broker-dealer and investment adviser that has served clients for more than 25 years. Subject to regulatory approval, the transaction is expected to be completed at the end of the year, after which MTL will be renamed Brooklight Place Securities Inc.“The core business of Mutual Trust is life insurance sold through MTL Insurance Company, and this agreement enables us to sharpen our focus on our life insurance operations,” said Steve Batza, FSA, MAA, CLU, CHFC, president and chief executive officer of MTLHI. “We are pleased to be working with Crabtree Holdings in this transaction. Their industry experience and managerial expertise will help ensure continued high-quality support for MTLEP’s representatives and their customers.”

  •  

    KONE ranked as one of the world’s most innovative companies
    For the second year running, elevator and escalator manufacturer KONE has been ranked among the top 50 most innovative companies in the world by the U.S.-based business magazine Forbes.

  •  

    United gets 787 certification, sets first comercial flight Sunday
    United Airlines said it has received Federal Aviation Administration certification for its new Boeing 787 Dreamliner, and will begin flying the passenger jet Sunday morning from Houston to O'Hare International Airport.

  •  
    A sign attracts jobseekers during a job fair at the Marriott Hotel in Colonie, N.Y.

    U.S. economy adds 171K jobs; rate rises to 7.9 pct.

    U.S. employers added 171,000 jobs in October, and hiring was stronger in August and September than first thought. The unemployment rate inched up to 7.9 percent from 7.8 percent in September. The Labor Department's last look at hiring before Tuesday's election sketched a picture of a job market that's gradually gaining momentum after nearly stalling in the spring.

  •  

    Restoration raises $123.9 million, pricing IPO at top of range

    Restoration Hardware Holdings Inc., the seller of leather couches and tables made of salvaged wood, raised $123.9 million, pricing its initial public offering at the top of the proposed range.

  •  

    With offices out, NY Daily News keeps publishing

    The Daily News got its Plan A and its Plan B eviscerated by Hurricane Sandy. The storm knocked out of commission the newspaper's Manhattan main office and the place where it planned to work during emergencies — its Jersey City, N.J., printing plant. Help from other news outlets let the Daily News keep publishing its daily print edition and its frequently updated website throughout Monday's storm. On Thursday evening, a Daily News editor said the newspaper would resume printing at the Jersey City plant.

  •  
    As temperatures begin to drop, people wait in line to fill containers with gas at a Shell gasoline filling station Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, in Keyport, N.J. In parts of New York and New Jersey, drivers lined up Thursday for hours at gas stations that were struggling to stay supplied. The power outages and flooding caused by Superstorm Sandy have forced many gas stations to close and disrupted the flow of fuel from refineries to those stations that are open.

    Lines at East Coast gas stations steam commuters

    Cabdriver Harum Prince joined a nearly mile-long line for gasoline early Friday in Manhattan after already spending three hours in a similar queue in the Bronx — only to have the station run out of gas when it was almost his turn. Superstorm Sandy damaged ports that accept fuel tankers and flooded underground equipment that sends fuel through pipelines. Without power, fuel terminals can't pump gasoline onto tanker trucks, and gas stations can't pump fuel into customers' cars.

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    Awards: Reflejos wins bilingual honor
    Reflejos Bilingual Journal, published by Arlington Heights-based Paddock Publications Inc., garnered five José Martí Awards during the 30th anniversary convention of the National Association of Hispanic Publications Inc. in San Diego. The awards are the oldest and the largest Hispanic media awards within the United States. The awards signified Reflejos as a competitor on a major scale along with other top publications nationwide, said Linda Siete, Reflejos’ manager of sales and operations.“As I look at the specific editions and content that we are recognized for it confirms the niche we have created as a lifestyle publication, the Going Green Energy Savings edition was packed with information our community might not get all in one helping, or may need to search various outlets to get. We pack it all together as a full resource, said Siete.Reflejos’ College Guides, with education a No. 1 priority for the community, have opened a dialogue for colleges and the community, and offer direction and resources, she said.“Our motto has always been to motivate, educate and inspire through the written word — these awards show that we are delivering on that motto, Siete said.Among the awards given was a second place, or the Silver Award, for most outstanding weekly bilingual publication in the nation. Reflejos’ lifestyle, entertainment and education sections, which serve as resource guides to the bilingual and Latino community in the eight-county suburban area, “helped set them apart this year from other Spanish-language publications nationwide,” according to the panel of judges.The awards that the publication garnered are: Ÿ Gold Award —  Outstanding Lifestyle Edition — “Going Green Energy Savings,” a special edition sponsored by ComEd. Ÿ Silver Award — Outstanding Weekly Bilingual Publication — over 30,000 in distribution.Ÿ Silver Award — Outstanding Publication website.Ÿ Silver Award  —  Outstanding Special Section — “2011 College Guide Part I” and “College Guide Part II.” Ÿ Bronze Award —  Outstanding Entertainment Section — “Mango,” a monthly entertainment guide. “It is very fulfilling to have won, especially the Outstanding Weekly Bilingual Publication Silver Award because that places us as the second best bilingual publication in the country,” said Marco Ortiz, Reflejos’ content editor.Now a part of the Daily Herald Media Group and the largest and longest-running Latino publication in Chicago’s suburbs, Reflejos reaches more than 230,000 suburban Latino readers and has a bilingual format.

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    Steve Wozniak, right, inventor of the Apple I and Apple II computer and co-founder of Apple Computer with the late Steve Jobs, talks with Brett Schockley, Avaya senior vice president and general manager of applications and emerging technologies, at the Avaya Evolutions conference Thursday at the Schaumburg Convention Center.

    Wozniak talks about early days with Apple, Jobs

    Kukec's eBuzz column features Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, who talks about the early days of Apple and his relationship with Steve Job, during a technology conference Thursday in Schaumburg.

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    2013 Hyundai Elantra GT. Hyundai and Kia overstated the gas mileage on most of their models from the past three years in an embarrassing blunder that could bring sanctions from the U.S. government and millions of dollars in payments to car owners.

    EPA finds Hyundai, Kia overstated gas mileage

    Hyundai and Kia overstated the gas mileage on most of their models from the past three years in an embarrassing blunder that could bring sanctions from the U.S. government and millions of dollars in payments to car owners.

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    A tanker truck passes in the background as two gas stations on the same street show different prices in Houston. Eight oil refineries refineries that make up about 8 percent of U.S. refining capacity sit in the area hit by Hurricane Sandy.

    Ol prices fall amid subdued demand after storm

    Expectations that demand for crude would likely be subdued in the aftermath of the massive storm that slammed into the U.S. East Coast earlier this week caused oil prices to sag on Friday.Benchmark crude for December delivery fell 90 cents at late afternoon Bangkok time to $86.19 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

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    Sand fills the streets in the wake of superstorm Sandy, along the central Jersey Shore, N.J.

    Power, transit outages will increase Sandy’s costs

    Widespread power outages and subway shutdowns may wind up making Superstorm Sandy the second most expensive storm in U.S. history, according to the forecasting firm Eqecat. That would rank it right behind Hurricane Katrina.Eqecat said Thursday that the damage from the storm will likely be far worse than it previously predicted, largely a result of Sandy hitting the most densely populated area in the country.

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    An investor gestures as he monitors the stock prices at a private securities company Thursday in Shanghai, China.

    Markets in wait and see mode ahead of U.S. jobs data

    Stock markets were flat Friday ahead of key U.S. jobs figures that could have a major impact on the country's presidential campaign. The euro, meanwhile, slid heavily after figures pointed to a deeper than anticipated recession in the 17-country eurozone and fears grew of a political crisis in Greece.With the election on Tuesday, the nonfarm payrolls data could swing the votes of those undecided whether to give President Barack Obama another term or support Mitt Romney. In an election as tight as this one, that could be crucial.

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    The letter “M” is hung on the exterior of The Saddle Room, an off-track betting parlor and restaurant in Hoffman Estates that opens today.

    The Saddle Room lives up to its name in Hoffman Estates

    Hoffman Estates' newest restaurant truly lives up to its name. With two off-track betting rooms, an exterior made of weathered wood from 15 old barns, walls adorned with large prints of horse-themed newspaper articles and more than 40 historic saddles on display, The Saddle Room at 2559 Pratum Ave. is ready to run this Friday.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Brenen Hornstein, 17, and sister Baily, 15, with Colombian au pair Gaby Ibarra at the Hornstein home in Elk Grove Village.

    Au pairs offer families affordable, flexible child care

    Au pairs are becoming an increasingly popular option for suburban parents, especially those with more than two children, who want an inexpensive caregiver to provide help beyond typical workweek hours.

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    A governor’s son (Robert Redford) runs for the senate against an unbeatable incumbent in “The Candidate.”

    12 elect-ifying films for the campaign season

    You're in luck, election junkies, because Hollywood has produced some humdingers when it comes to election movies. They come in all varieties: comedies, parodies, serious dramas and documentaries. Here are 12 suggestions on how to feed your election obsession. You won't find "Black Sheep" (David Spade tries to keep idiot Chris Farley from blowing his father's election). We have standards.

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    Dorothy Hamill, seen here during the 1976 Olympics, will be part of the Stars on Ice Tour that comes to the Allstate Arena March 8.

    Dorothy Hamill to skate in Rosemont

    More than three decades after capturing hearts and Olympic gold, skating star Dorothy Hamill will return to the ice as part of the 2012-13 Stars on Ice Tour, which includes a stop in Rosemont.

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    Wright-designed Arizona home to be preserved

    A Frank Lloyd Wright-designed house in Phoenix that had been slated for demolition will apparently survive under a new owner. Wright designed the home for his son, David, and daughter-in-law, Gladys, who died in 1997 and 2008, respectively.

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    Lucy Liu stars as a madame in a village rocked by violence in “The Man With the Iron Fists.”

    'Iron Fists' pounds out the martial arts cliches

    Zap! Pow! Wham! The opening credits of RZA's "The Man With the Iron Fists" set the tone for the wild and sometimes splattery proceedings. This is the sort of film where the main characters are defined first and foremost by what type of weaponry they favor, and very few minutes go by without some sort of combat.

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    Lee DeWyze goes back to his roots with second album.

    DeWyze sees silver lining: ‘Idol’ winner’s new album more folk-rock

    With his new album, "American Idol" winner Lee DeWyze is moving past the frantic, highly-produced phase and back into his folk-rock roots. He's resolute about the down times, which included a single that failed to chart and being dropped by his post-Idol label. "I look at it as a step in my career, and if it hadn't been for that, I probably wouldn't have made the album I made now," he says.

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    Mary J. Blige, HBO joining Sandy benefit concert

    NEW YORK — Mary J. Blige and HBO are joining NBC and its benefit concert Friday for Superstorm Sandy victims.The telethon is scheduled to air at 7 p.m. Central, with Bruce Springsteen, Jon Bon Jovi, Billy Joel, Sting and others performing to benefit the American Red Cross and its disaster relief efforts.Blige was a late addition to the guest list. Actor James Gandolfini and comic Jon Stewart, who are both heavily identified with New Jersey, will also participate. The brunt of the storm hit New Jersey and the New York metropolitan area.NBC and its cable affiliates, including E!, USA, CNBC and MSNBC, are all airing it. HBO, Discovery Fit & Health and Velocity have also signed on.

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    Meek Mill’s “Dreams and Nightmares”

    Meek Mill doesn’t tap into talents enough

    The hype machine around Meek Mill has been humming since the rapper signed with Rick Ross' Maybach Music Group imprint last year. On his debut, "Dreams & Nightmares," Mill shows great potential as a storyteller, but his lyrical flow is not consistent, ultimately setting back the 14-track album.

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    Eating out: Pizza showdown in Palatine Nov. 4

    Who makes Palatine's best pizza? Decide for yourself from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 4, at the annual pizza showdown hosted by the Palatine Jaycees. More than 20 Palatine-area pizza restaurants, including Artistic Cuisine, Papa Saverios, Slice of Chicago, Pizza Bella and Vini's Pizza, will put their pies and reputations on the line.

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    Jennifer Lawrence plays Katniss Everdeen in “The Hunger Games.” Lionsgate announced Thursday that “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” filmmaker Francis Lawrence would also direct “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part One” and “Part Two.”

    Francis Lawrence to direct ‘Hunger Games’ sequels

    The odds are ever in Francis Lawrence's favor. Lionsgate announced Thursday that "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire" filmmaker will also direct "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part One" and "Part Two."

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    A New Mexico police report says Gene Hackman had given clothes, money and rides to a homeless man he slapped this week after the man became aggressive toward the Oscar-winning actor and his wife. The Santa Fe New Mexican reports Hackman and his wife told officers they had helped 63-year-old Bruce Becker for several years.

    Police: Hackman knew homeless man he slapped in N.M.

    Actor Gene Hackman had given clothes, money and rides to a homeless man whom he slapped this week after the man became aggressive toward the Oscar-winning actor and his wife, according to a police report detailing the incident in Santa Fe, N.M. Police say Hackman acted in self-defense and no charges have been filed.

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    R&B singer Chris Brown reacts in court for a probation progress report hearing in Los Angeles Thursday. Brown remains on supervised probation for felony assault for an attack on Rihanna in 2009. He is scheduled to return to court Jan. 17.

    Chris Brown to stay on supervised probation

    A judge on Thursday ordered Chris Brown to remain on supervised probation and make another court appearance after he completes an overseas tour.

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    A Spaten Oktoberfest beer is poured at ThreeB in Geneva.

    ThreeB’s trifecta: Beer, burgers and sports

    Opened by brothers Gus and Alex Pagonis in July in Monterey Place's former space in Geneva, ThreeB stands for brothers, beer and burgers. Luckily you don't have to be family to take advantage of the latter two. Burgers are the most popular item at ThreeB, especially on Tuesday when they’re half price. The bar’s beer selection changes seasonally, with eight on tap and 40 bottles.

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    what’s new
    Here's what's happening on the Chicago area theater scene this week.

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    Scotty McCreery juggles his performing career with college these days.

    Scotty McCreery juggling music, math class

    As it turns out, Scotty McCreery can have it all. The platinum-selling teen and former "American Idol" champ began his freshman year at North Carolina State University recently and he's managed to work out a schedule that allows him to balance his college education with his country music education. “Going to (N.C.) State, it gives me a chance to have a little bit of a home base, to have a little bit of normalcy — whatever normal is,” McCreery said.

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    “Astray” by Emma Donoghue

    ‘Room’ author imagines snippets of history

    How do you follow up an international best-seller like "Room"? With a collection of short stories inspired by snippets of history, naturally. "Astray" is obviously not a book Irish-Canadian author Emma Donoghue wrote to build on the audience she gained from "Room." But it is a book that shows her confidence as a writer, bringing to life the characters that piqued her interest in everything from 19th-century letters to a line in a New York newspaper in 1735.

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    “There's this wild thing that's been going on at the show where the fans just start chanting my name and I don't know how to deal with that yet,” guitarist Gary Clark Jr. says.

    Gary Clark Jr. opens his mind to the possibilities

    Guitarist Gary Clark Jr. had to learn how to trust someone else to record his major label debut. When noted producer Mike Elizondo signed on to help with "Blak and Blu," out last week, Clark was more than a little leery. "I'm very sensitive," Clark said, chuckling. "I like to hold onto what I do ... So I was a bit worried going in, you know? Having not known him, what is this cat gonna do to my songs? They're good as is. But I let it go."

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    Deposit should be returned if property is misrepresented

    Q. We bought a home in Virginia but did not actually see it during the escrow because we are serving in the military. The house was listed as 2300 square feet, 4 bedrooms, and with "lake view." During the escrow, we learned that the house is only 2000 square feet, one of the bedrooms was added to the building without a permit.

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    Malbecs continue to reach new heights

    Argentina's malbecs may very well be the best value in red wine available today.What makes them so good? The Andes Mountains are the main factor.

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    Friendship Park is located in the Renaissance neighborhood in Carol Stream.

    Neighborhood focus looks at Renaissance in Carol Stream

    Fourteen years ago, Shannon and Brian Murphy purchased a two-story home in the Renaissance subdivision where they've enjoy the family-oriented and kid-friendly neighborhood in Carol Stream. Renaissance is our featured Neighborhood of the Week.

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    “Why Have Kids? A New Mom Explores the Truth About Parenting and Happiness” by Jessica Valenti, performed in audio by Emily Beresford (New Harvest, 2012), $23, 179 pages, (Brilliance Audio), $29.99, five CDs.

    Author suggests realistic ideals for parenthood

    Yes, you love your kids. But would you choose parenthood again if you had a second chance? That's one of the intriguing questions in "Why Have Kids?" by Jessica Valenti. Valenti believes parenting "needs a paradigm shift." The ideal that's been long-touted is nowhere near reality and "that disconnect is making us miserable."

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    Get your fireplace in shape before winter

    Even with all of the current options, many of us still use a wood-burning fireplace. It adds ambience and warmth to a home. It's very important that you perform regular maintenance to ensure that it is operating safely. Here are some things to take care of BEFORE you use it again this year.

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    With just a bit of planning and effort, the winter landscape can be unique and interesting.

    Plant selection is key to a dazzling winter garden

    When it comes to garden design, the vibrant colors of spring and summer are the first things we consider. After all, that's when we use our gardens the most. But with just a bit of planning and effort, the winter landscape can be unique and interesting, too. The key is diversity. A variety of textures, colors and forms will take a winter landscape from dull to dazzling.

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    Scripps Howard News Service Photos This bedroom and its en suite bath are truly a stunning combination of serenity and luxury.

    Designing a couple’s luxurious bedroom getaway

    Lesley and John moved into their house six months ago with their blended family. The bungalow is a busy place with four kids in residence. Unfortunately, all of those kids reside right beside Lesley and John's bedroom.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Close the Latino ‘achievement gap’

    Some suburban schools are working to overcome an "achievement gap" between Hispanic students and other suburban students. A Daily Herald editorial agrees with suburban educators who say working to improve the education of the growing Hispanic population is vitally important to our economy.

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    Romney endorsement disappointing
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: It is with profound disappointment that I read the Daily Herald's endorsement of Governor Romney for president.

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    Secede from the state of Chicago
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: Does it seem like we live in the state of Chicago instead of the state of Illinois?

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    What is Antioch supervisor up to?
    An Antioch letter to the editor: The Antioch Township supervisor also served as president of the beleaguered Antioch Rescue Squad (ARS). The Antioch Township supervisor appoints the board members of the First Fire Protection District of Antioch Township.

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    Thanks for help with food drive
    A Wauconda letter to the editor: A big thank you to all the volunteers and all the citizens of Wauconda and Island Lake who so generously donated to our Make A Difference Day Food Drive.

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    Nerheim has right ideas, background
    What I know to be true about Mike Nerheim: He believes politics have no place in the Lake County State’s Attorney’s Office, that the state’s attorney’s office should reflect impartiality toward all people, across all party lines, and be committed to justice, fairness and fighting public corruption. Mike will introduce an Alternative Prosecution Program for first-time, non-violent offenders, giving people a second chance. Mike has extensive trial experience on both sides of the law, with the ability to ensure fairness, integrity and justice. He’s licensed to practice in both federal and state courts, is a current faculty member of Columbia College, lectures on the laws of “evidence” in both criminal and civil cases, and DNA. He has experience handling complex civil litigation and municipal law as a prosecutor with traffic, violence, felony, drugs, domestic misdemeanor and juvenile. He’s been appointed by the courts to investigate post-conviction issues to protect indigent defendants’ constitutional rights and as conflict counsel for indigent defendants. Mike is a longstanding Teen Court Judge in Warren Township, V.P. of Lake County Bar Foundation, Advisory Council member for Staben House (transitional housing for homeless women and children), an attorney for the Police Commission, partner in law firm and a judge for college/university mock trial tournaments. The Chicago Tribune and The Daily Herald endorsed Mike. He has endorsements of federal, state and local law enforcement, including Lake County Sheriff, FOP Waukegan Lodge 5, Waukegan Police Benevolent and Protective Association, Lake County Sheriff’s FOP Lodge 66, Waukegan Firefighters IAFF Local 473, the United Hellenic Voters of America and many well-known and highly respected attorneys, retired judges, etc. He will bring real change, by preventing wrongful convictions, eradicating the threat of gangs, guns and drugs in our communities.Mike Nerheim is the clear choice for state’s attorney of Lake County.Pam Pavlik Grayslake

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    Vote yes on pension question
    A letter to the editor: The Northwest Municipal Conference, a regional council of government representing 41 municipalities and one township with a population of over 1.3 million Illinois residents, urges voters to vote "yes" for this important constitutional amendment.

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    Trump busted on China
    A Fox Lake letter to the editor: I just finished watching a clip of Donald Trump on David Letterman implying that he and Mitt Romney are vehemently against the amount of business China receives from the US.

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    More to a president than business success
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: While I believe the Herald was well intentioned in its endorsement of Mitt Romney, I believe that endorsement was fundamentally flawed.

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    Misleading ads against Sente
    A Vernon Hills letter to the editor: Politicians have long thrown mud at each other and the history of negative campaigning reaches back to the earliest days of this nation. Even today, rumor and gossip feed a press and public hungry for scandalous tales while candidates and their supporters seemingly can't resist the siren's call of attack ads. That does not make it right.

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    Mathias dedicated to making a difference
    A Lincolnshire letter to the editor: With the election just days away, it is vital that we work to put the right people in office. One of those right people at the state level is Sid Mathias

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    Get rid of 29 percenters
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: Percentages have been in the news quite a bit lately, but here is one that has not been addressed, the 29 percenters.

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    Third party is not throwing vote away
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: If this election cycle can teach us anything, it is that there is no desire for third parties. No desire for a different ideology in a game that is focused on only one victor and two parties.

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    Mathias has broad realm of experience
    A Lincolnshire letter to the editor: I have known Sid Mathias, District 59 candidate for state representative, for over 20 years, but due to redistricting, this is the first time I have been able to vote for him.

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    Judge candidate known for service
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: Judge Daniel Shanes represents exactly what we all want and deserve from our local Lake County judges.

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    Romney builds campaign on lies
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: Iit was with great disappointment that I read your endorsement of Willard Romney.

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    Don’t let government control religion
    A Lake Zurich letter to the editor: In 2002 Joe Scheidler, Founder of Pro Life Action League, was found guilty under the civil provisions of the RICO, a law designed to combat organized crime. The case was brought forward by the NOW organization to the Supreme Court.

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    Think long-term and short on transportation
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: I've long felt that transportation is a key issue which impacts our daily lives and will continue to do so in the future. Unfortunately, the issue seems to always be crowded out by other important issues.

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    8th District voters face crucial test
    An Ingleside letter to the editor: On Tuesday, Nov. 6, we shall see a test. Question 1 is whether the gerrymandered 8th District will succeed in a win for the Democrats of "Madiganistan

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    Tea Party has it all backwards
    A Lake Zurich letter to the editor: This country is upside down. The more money you make, the less percentage you pay in taxes. No other country has that distinction

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    Shanes has qualities of excellent judge
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: With all the other contested races on the ballot this November, you may feel that it is difficult to get excited about a judicial race

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    What’s extreme about Tea Party?
    A Gurnee letter to the editor: Who are the real extremists? Knowing the media portrays the Tea Party as being extreme, I decided to see for myself

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    Libya failure proves Obama incompetence
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: How tragic that the four Americans in The American Embassy in Libya had to lose their lives because of the incompetence of the current president and his administration.

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    Go outside to fix prosecutor’s office
    A Lake County letter to the editor: We are former prosecutors in Lake County who believe that your analysis of the race for state's attorney was superficial and incorrect.

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    State reps can’t protect federal programs
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: In a recent mail piece, state Rep. Sid Mathias' opponent claims she will protect Social Security and Medicare.

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    Obama should release transcripts
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: Five million dollars for charity and all President Obama has to do is release his college applications and transcripts.

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    Mathias “gets it” on state budget
    A Vernon Hills letter to the editor: I know you are just as tired as I am of seeing our hard-earned money get wasted in Springfield. Many state representatives have no problem spending our tax dollars on more government programs.

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    Don’t accept the lunacy of candidates
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: Think of it: Shall we try to spend $2 trillion dollars more on the military — which the military hasn't said they needed — and at the same time, reduce the tax on the upper 1 percent income earners?

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    Drowning in today’s sad state of affairs
    A Wauconda letter to the editor: As an elderly senior, I'm running out of coping skills. I once thought of myself as an educated middle-class citizen. No longer. Why? health/illness costs.

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    Choose prosecutor who stuck with the office
    A Waukegan letter to the editor: Like many in the legal community, I know Mike Nerheim and Chris Kennedy. It is their path since leaving the office that sets Mike apart from Chris and makes him the only choice for state's attorney.

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    Township assessor is always helpful
    A Lincolnshire letter to the editor: I am writing this letter to praise the assessor's office in Buffalo Grove.

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    Obama plan will never work
    A Wauconda letter to the editor: I read the fence post article by Ginny Applegren where she says that Mitt Romney "doesn't love America" because Bain outsourced jobs to China. Something tells me that she may be just a little hypocritical.

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    Wauconda needs Lake Michigan water
    A Wauconda letter to the editor: Residents of Wauconda are being asked on the current general election ballot to approve up to $41 million in general obligation bonds for improvements necessary to bring Lake Michigan water to our community. I'm writing to urge you to vote yes.

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    On technical factors, Romney won debates
    A Lake Zurich letter to the editor: During the first debate our class was assigned for homework to watch for nonverbal faults pertaining to each candidate.

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    Sente is not true independent
    A Green Oaks letter to the editor: In Melody McGraw's October 26 letter to the editor, she claims that Carol Sente stood up to her own party leadership in Springfield. Nothing could be further from the truth.

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    Prosecutor hopeful can beat adversity
    A Deer Park letter to the editor: My wife and I have known Chris Kennedy for more than 10 years. Besides being a steady friend, we're impressed by Chris's ability to manage times of adversity with both energy and good judgment.

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    Let kids pay for lake water?
    A Wauconda letter to the editor: I agree Wauconda needs Lake Michigan water. Wauconda is now over $28 million in the hole so another $40 million doesn't mean too much. Let our kids pay for it.

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    Representatives saved business
    An Antioch letter to the editor: I am president of a company in northern Lake County. My business had an issue with a state of Illinois agency. They were threatening to close the doors of my business. I did not know where to turn.

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    Mathias has right ideas on transportation
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: More mass transit efforts are what we need and that is why I support state Rep. Sid Mathias.

  •  

    Prosecutor’s office needs clean sweep
    A Chicago letter to the editor: Your endorsement of Michael Nerheim rather than Chris Kennedy for state's attorney of Lake County misses the essential reason why a complete change is needed at the top of that office.

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    Vote Republican to counter Madigan
    A Long Grove letter to the editor: Mike Madigan is pouring millions of dollars into Democrat races throughout the state to keep his position as Illinois House Speaker.

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    Time for new ideas in clerk’s office
    A Roselle letter to the editor: On Oct. 27, a Fence Post letter cited incorrect information about Ralph Scalise who is running against incumbent Chris Kachiroubas for DuPage Circuit Court Clerk.

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    Anti-video gambling vote solves nothing
    A Winfield letter to the editor: Winfield's government has a revenue problem. This summer citizens heard about disbanding police, unfunded pensions and crumbling infrastructure. No problems or solutions are free from controversy. Paying for government means spending less, taxing more or growing.

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    Estrich shows shallowness again
    A Lombard letter to the editor: Susan Estrich has done it again. In her Oct. 19 column, "Why the need for binders of women'?", she again demonstrates the shallowness of her analytical ability by coming away from the second presidential debate focusing on the fact that Mitt Romney "was proud to discover that, yes, indeed, there were whole binders of qualified women."

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    Can’t believe some buy Obama’s lies
    A Roselle letter to the editor: Just read some of the letters responding to your endorsement of Mitt Romney for president. I cannot believe there are so many ignorant people still buying Obama's lies.

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    Prediction: Romney with 51 percent
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: The Obama administration never thought it'd be this close this close to Election Day. Arrogance, poor first debate planning and smug liberalism will do that to you.

  •  

    Roskam’s curious epiphany: poverty
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: A very curious email arrived from my Sixth District Congressman Peter Roskam. It was titled: "Looking back: jobs down, poverty up over last 4 years." What was curious and stunning, was that Congressman Roskam even mentioned the word "poverty."

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    Why is she running as a Democrat?
    A Warrenville letter to the editor: In his endorsement of a Democrat for DuPage Forest Preserve District District 6, Roger Kotecki noted her dedication to the preservation of natural areas and her business experience. That made me wonder, then, why is she running as a Democrat?

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    Anderson favors reproductive rights
    A Woodstock letter to the editor: Women's reproductive and health care rights are under attack by state and national GOP legislators. In the newly-drawn Congressional District 14, Democratic candidate Dennis Anderson has spent his career as a leader for effective health care programs, including one for rural mammographies and another for chronic disease.

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    Beaubien not so independent
    A Cary letter to the editor: I feel if Dee Beaubien is an independent she should support all Illinois residents in being able to show their independence - through an open primary - when it is time to vote.

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    Tea Party setting us back 250 years
    A Huntley letter to the editor: It took a long time, a great number of beatings, murders and eventually compromises to get our country to where were just 10 years ago.

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    Pierog for 25th Senate
    An Elburn letter to the editor: Illinois faces many tough decisions — balancing its budget, pension reform, encouraging economic growth among them. That's why I'm supporting Corinne Pierog to serve us in Springfield from the 25th Senate District.

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    Dalton has experience, temperament to be judge
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Fairness — that quality that we all look for in judges — can only come from jurists who are both experienced in the intricacies of the law and intelligent enough to apply their knowledge to the specifics of a given case. The sustained attentive excellence of John Dalton's career so far has convinced me that he is the best choice for Kane County Resident Judge, 2nd Subcircuit.

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    Walters a logical choice for judge
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Simply put, most of us are challenged by some of the positions requesting our votes in the next election. However, our votes to confirm the Supreme Court's unanimous decision to appoint John Walters as 16th Circuit Court Judge is completely logical.

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    Leave religion out of governance
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Joe Biden and Paul Ryan crystallized the essential point of the abortion debate. Joe Biden's church teaches that life begins at conception, and he accepts this teaching in his private life, for himself. Joe Biden does not believe he has the right to martial the forces of government to coerce others — who do not share his religious convictions — to live their lives as though they did.

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    Respect the office of president
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: In my lifetime I have never seen such blatant disrespect for the person holding the highest office in the nation, and I have been around a long time. It's one thing when ordinary citizens express their displeasure with the president, but when Republican politicians and officials demonstrate such disrespect, it is unacceptable.

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    President should have voted by mail
    A Palatine letter to the editor: The president made history by being the first president to vote early. Was it worth the high cost of Air Force One to fly to Chicago plus the cost of extra security and closed highways born by Chicago and Illinois taxpayers?

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    Endorsement was disappointing
    A Des Plains letter to the editor: In my mind President Obama is the better man. He fights for what I believe. He won't increase the defense budget, he wants to help educate people providing skills to put them into the workforce; he gives tax credits to companies who do not send jobs overseas; he fights for children and early childhood programs, for woman's choice and for gays to marry and for health care.

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    Better off now? Not even close
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: I thought I would take this opportunity to publicly express how fortunate I am to be living in a Democratic-controlled state where I can benefit from the desires of the president to be looking out for the middle class. How fortunate I am that my property tax has only increased $3,000 over the past three years.

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    Obama has tried to reach out
    A Hoffman Estates letter to the editor: Health care reform has been attempted for the benefit of U.S. citizens since at least the days of Harry Truman. If this issue was not brought forth by Mr. Obama, who then and when?

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    Endorsement shows paper is balanced
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: Over the years I have been aware of the paper's liberal leanings, but there has always been balance. And the fact that the Herald endorsed Mitt Romney for president confirmed the integrity of that balance.

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    Ultrasound is proof of a life in womb
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: I realize there are many people who view abortion as an individual's personal choice, but as a man who only just days ago saw my child's face in an ultrasound, there is absolutely no debate with the fact that a human being is developing in my wife's womb right now.

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    Remember there are 3rd party candidates
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: I realize that a two-party system is seemingly embedded when it comes to media attention, but I am quite fed up with that mentality.

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    Binders are for staying organized
    An Inverness letter to the editor: I am amazed that a person of such high intelligence like Susan Estrich stoops to such depths to appeal to voters. She and others take a positive event like offering important positions to women and try to turn attention to these "binders."

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    We need jobs; end of discussion
    A Prospect Heights letter to the editor: Will social issues put food on the table and pay the bills? No, I don't think so. Only a strong economy and a job will accomplish that. Really, what's there to think about on Nov. 6?

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    Politicians shouldn’t get second chances
    A Hoffman Estates letter to the editor: Politicians are the taxpayers' employees. Do you think they deserve a second chance? If so, why are they always given more chances than the average person? When you go to the polls to vote, ask yourself how many second chances you were ever given by an employer?

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    Madigan’s influence on state rep race
    A Naperville letter to the editor: I have read the campaign fliers being mailed to the voters in the 84th State Representative District concerning Pat Fee's positions on families, Social Security, prescriptions, health hazards, guns and tax cuts for the "rich and famous." None of these accusations could be further from the truth.

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    Determine success by level of campaign
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: If President Obama's present term of office would have been successful his second term would have been a forgone conclusion. He would not have had any need to campaign for votes.

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