SCGT

Daily Archive : Monday October 29, 2012

News

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    Alain Marginean of Chicago snaps photos of the massive waves that came ashore Tuesday morning on North Avenue Beach in Chicago. Waves as high as 20 feet pounded the city’s lakefront Tuesday, an artifact of the superstorm that’s devastated parts of the East Coast.

    Sandy drives massive waves onto Chicago’s lakefront

    The superstorm hundreds of miles to the east brought spectacular waves and whipping winds to Chicago’s lakefront Tuesday, turning popular beaches into desolate stretches of sand. Just a handful of photo enthusiasts and curious spectators dotted the landscape, at times narrowly avoiding violent spray from the nearly 20-foot waves crashing on the soaked pavement.

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    Water reaches the street level of the Battery Park Underpass, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York.

    Water, fire, destruction: NYC after the superstorm

    The massive storm that pummeled the East killed 10 people in New York City, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Tuesday, but he offered no firm timeline on when power would be restored to hundreds of thousands of people or when the city's flooded subway system would be running again. "This was a devastating storm, maybe the worst that we have ever experienced," he said.

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    The village and Vernon Hills Park District have reached a tentative agreement to buy the Central Lake YMCA building.

    Vernon Hills Park District reaches tentative deal to buy YMCA

    The Vernon Hills Park District has reached an agreement in principle to buy the Central Lake YMCA, which had been scheduled to close on Oct. 31. Pending approval, the facilities would remain open as is until the park district closes on the property and begins providing those services no later than Jan. 1.

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    John J. Kasik

    Angry parent accused of threatening to kill Lisle volleyball coach

    After his daughter was benched at a regional match, a Lisle man threatened to kill a high school volleyball coach and rape the coach's family members, prosecutors said Monday. John Kasik, 61, also is accused of battering the Lisle Senior High School athletic director during a confrontation at school offices.

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    Eagle Scout candidate Ben Shirmer, right, and Brian McKenna.

    Rolling Meadows parks leader is Scouting’s go-to guy

    If you work on an Eagle Scout project with Brian McKenna, the emphasis is on the word "work." McKenna, superintendent of parks for the Rolling Meadows Park District, teams Eagle candidates with jobs the park district needs done, and supervises. "I knew it would be a lot of work," says Scout Conor Thomas, "but I think Eagle Scout projects should be hard work."

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    Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill.

    Invasive species experts to meet in La Crosse

    Experts will be gathering in La Crosse this week to share the latest information on invasive species. The Upper Midwest Invasive Species Conference runs Monday through Wednesday. Attendees will learn the latest on Asian carp, emerald ash borer, and other invasive species threats.

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    This NOAA satellite image taken Monday, Oct. 29, at 10:45 AM EDT shows Hurricane Sandy approaching the Mid-Atlantic region with clouds extending across much of the Northeast quarter of the U.S. with heavy rains from the Mid-Atlantic to the Ohio Valley and Great Lakes and snow falling in the southern portions of West Virginia. Cloudiness and rain showers can be found across the Upper and Mid Mississippi Valleys.

    Chicago braces for high winds, waves

    Emergency officials in Chicago are asking residents to prepare for high winds, high waves and possible flooding along Lake Michigan as Hurricane Sandy approaches the East Coast. Chicago's Office of Emergency Management and Communications told residents Monday afternoon that they should "stay away from the lakefront for the next two days." The National Weather Service has issued flood warnings for...

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    An independent arbitrator has ruled that Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn has taken the necessary steps and may proceed with closing seven correctional facilities -- including the high-security prison at Tamms.

    Arbitrator: Illinois governor may close prisons

    An independent arbitrator has ruled that Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn has taken the necessary steps and may proceed with closing seven correctional facilities -- including the high-security prison at Tamms. The union representing correctional workers released arbitrator Steven Bierig’s decision Monday. The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees planned to ask a judge in...

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    North Central College’s next president, Troy Hammond, left, was welcomed to campus Monday. He officially takes over for retiring Harold “Hal” Wilde on Jan. 1.

    Troy Hammond ‘just what the doctor ordered’ for North Central

    Troy Hammond was named the next president of North Central College on Friday. But for many on the Naperville campus, the appointment didn't become official until Monday when it was endorsed by the school's current president, Harold "Hal" Wilde. Wilde, who is ending his 22-year tenure with the college at the end of year, was one of several officials to welcome Hammond and his family to the college...

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    Travelers wait for their luggage at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport as a live update on Hurricane Sandy is broadcast, Monday.

    O’Hare delays could continue beyond Sandy

    East Coast travelers find themselves stranded in Chicago thanks to Sandy's beatdown. While the Midwest is spared the killer storm, related high winds could delay flights. "It's been a comedy of errors," said Craig Taylor of Boston, laughing, as he tried to figure out his next step from O'Hare International Airport Monday.

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    Republican Judy Biggert, left, opposes Democrat Bill Foster in the 11th congressional district for the 2012 General Election.

    Audience grills 11th District candidates on immigration

    The Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights hosts a roundtable in Joliet and Bill Foster, candidate for the 11th Congressional District, discusses issues affecting middle class families and immigration policy.

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    A woman reacts to waves crashing over a seawall in Narragansett, R.I., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.

    Images: Sandy Pounds the East Coast
    The superstorm Sandy impacted the East Coast of the United States on Monday, flooding into Atlantic and New York Cities. In an attempt to lessen damage from saltwater to the subway system and the electrical network beneath the city's financial district, power was cut to about 6,500 customers in lower Manhattan. But a far wider swath of the city was hit with blackouts caused by flooding and...

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    Bears offensive lineman Gabe Carimi poses with Brandon Pettry, 13, and his sister Alexandra, 15, the children of murder victim William Christopher Pettry.

    These Bears are true monsters of the Midway

    Several Bears players worked Monday night as actors at the Realm of Terror Haunted House in Round Lake Beach to raise money for the family of William Christopher Pettry of Lake Villa Township. Pettry was killed while in Jacksonville, Fla., to watch the Bears play the Jaguars a few weeks ago.

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    President Barack Obama speaks in the White House Briefing Room in Washington Monday after returning to the White House from a campaign stop in Florida to monitor Hurricane Sandy.

    A week to go: Sandy disrupts presidential campaign

    Eight days before the election, President Barack Obama switched from campaigner to hands-on commander of the federal response to Superstorm Sandy as it barreled across the Eastern Seaboard. Republican Mitt Romney scaled back his appearances and urged supporters to "do your very best" in donating to relief efforts.

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    Elgin woman suffers minor injuries in mobile home fire

    An Elgin woman suffered minor injuries when authorities said she set fire to her mobile home. Officers and firefighters were dispatched at about 3 p.m. Monday to the residence on the 800 block of Jan Marie Lane on reports the woman was suicidal and threatening to start a fire., Elgin Police Sgt. Ed Cummings said.

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    W. Lee Palmer Jr.

    Dist. 116 to recruit minority teachers

    Round Lake Area Unit District 116 has plans to seek more Hispanic and black teachers in an effort to better match the student population. District 116 board members heard a report on the plan at a meeting Monday night.

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    The Coast Guard has rescued 14 members of the crew forced to abandon the tall ship HMS Bounty caught in Hurricane Sandy off the North Carolina Outer Banks.

    Hurricane claims famous tall ship off NC coast

    The Coast Guard rescued 14 members of a crew forced to abandon the tall ship HMS Bounty caught in Hurricane Sandy off the North Carolina Outer Banks and continued the search Monday for two other crew members. Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class Brandyn Hill said the crew members were rescued by two Coast Guard helicopters around 6:30 a.m. Monday.

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    Chicago surpasses 2011 total for homicides

    With two months left in 2012, Chicago has surpassed the number of homicides it had for all of last year. The 436th homicide this year came Monday with the shooting of 33-year-old Carlos Alexander in South Chicago.

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    Toni Preckwinkle

    Preckwinkle raises tax threshold for business purchases

    County Board President Toni Preckwinkle wants to raise the threshold for a proposed 1.25 percent tax on goods purchased by county business owners from outside the county's borders. Initially, the first $2,500 worth of purchases on office supplies, equipment, and other items was exempt from the tax. However, on Monday Preckwinkle announced she now proposes exempting the first $3,500 of such...

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    Superstorm Sandy takes aim at Atlantic coast

    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — Stripped of hurricane status but every bit as dangerous, the weather monster known as Sandy wheeled toward the New Jersey and Delaware coast Monday after washing away part of the Atlantic City boardwalk, putting the presidential campaign on hold and threatening to cripple Wall Street and the New York subway system with an epic surge of seawater.

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    Suburban businesses, charities send help to hurricane area

    Suburban businesses and charities are preparing to send people and supplies to areas along the East Coast in the path of Hurricane Sandy.

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    Hanover Park police say two men, one armed with a crow bar, robbed a convenience store Saturday, Oct. 27.

    Hanover Park police seek robbers

    Hanover Park police are seeking two men who committed armed robbery about 3:55 a.m. Saturday at a convenience store on the 5500 block of County Farm Road.

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    Early voting a big hit in Kane County, Aurora

    The time period for early voting is five days shorter than it was in 2008, but tallies so far in Kane County show that this election could rival the early voting record set in November 2008 of about 56,000. As of early Monday, at least 23,289 people had voted in Kane County and Aurora. Early voting ends Saturday for the Nov. 6 election.

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    Guilty verdict in first Illinois trial broadcast live

    Jurors in Kankakee have found a 20-year-old man guilty of murder in the first trial in Illinois to feature live, gavel-to-gavel television coverage.

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    Ruling doesn’t settle prison closure issue

    Gov. Pat Quinn's administration and the union representing correctional workers filed dueling court pleas Monday over a ruling allowing the state to proceed with prison closures, actions that promise to prolong the struggle over whether penitentiaries can shut their doors to save money while keeping a crowded penal system safe.

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    Republican Jackie Burleson, left, opposes Democrat Rita Mayfield in the 60th State House District for the 2012 General Election.

    In 60th House race, Rita Mayfield outraising Jackie Burleson

    Democratic state Rep. Rita Mayfield has vastly outraised Republican challenger Jackie Burleson in the race for the 60th District seat, state records show.

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    Ladislav Fromelius

    Naperville man, 73, gets probation for soliciting executor’s beating

    A 73-year-old Naperville man was sentenced Monday to two years of probation for soliciting the beating of an estate executor in a feud over a $100,000 inheritance. Ladislav Fromelius had faced up to five years in prison after pleading guilty to solicitation of armed violence.

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    Florida company acquires Hoffman Plaza

    Sterling Organization, a Florida-based real estate investment company, has acquired Hoffman Plaza for nearly $14.2 million. The plaza, located near the intersection of Golf and Roselle roads, is anchored by a Jewel-Osco.

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    Nov. 9 could be Geneva teachers’ strike date

    Geneva teachers could strike as soon as Nov. 9, having given the school board notice Friday. Negotiations on a new contract won't resume until Nov. 6, according to the school district.

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    Trick or treat on MainStreet

    The annual Trick or Treat on MainStreet in downtown Libertyville will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31

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    Watch pumpkins soar in Mundelein

    Pumpkins will be soaring, rolling and being composted from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 4 at the Mundelein Park Districts annual Pumpkin Drop. The free event is at Keith Mione Community Park. 1401 N. Midlothian Road.

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    Win $500 in Lakemoor logo design contest

    The village of Lakemoor is sponsoring a contest to create a new town logo and motto. The selected designs will be used to promote a new community image, assist in the recruitment of new businesses and development, and used on the village's letterhead, business cards, maps, etc.

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    Route 176 work to take longer

    Roadwork on Route 176 in Island Lake is taking longer than expected, and the project will be delayed until at least after the winter months, officials said.

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    Teens charged with sex abuse on Barrington school bus

    Barrington police have charged two boys, 13 and 14, as juveniles in connection with allegations of criminal sexual abuse that occurred Oct. 5 on a school bus. The two boys are middle school students in Barrington Unit District 220, district spokesman Jeff Arnett said Monday.

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    Fox Valley-area police reports
    Elias A. Camarena, 22, of the 1000 block of Birchdale Drive in Elgin, appeared in bond court Monday on a felony charge of possession of marijuana with the intent to deliver and two misdemeanor charges of possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia, according to court documents. Camarena was arrested after a traffic stop at about 8:30 p.m. Sunday, when officers found about 21...

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    Maggie Auger and Kevin Smith

    Smith challenges Auger for Kane County Board Dist. 23 spot

    Political newcomer Kevin Smith, a Democrat, is taking on Republican incumbent Maggie Auger in the newly drawn 23rd Kane County Board District. While Auger is touting her two years of experience on the board and legal background in a pitch for re-election, Smith is hoping voters want to try someone new.

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    Republican Sidney Mathias, left, opposes Democrat Carol Sente in the 59th State House District for the 2012 General Election.

    Sente, Mathias cite records on budget, financial issues

    In the state's only race pitting incumbent legislator against incumbent legislator, both state Rep. Sidney Mathias and Rep. Carol Sente are touting their efforts in Springfield to put Illinois back on solid financial footing. Sente, a Democrat from Vernon Hills, cites her sponsorship of Illinois' Budgeting for Outcomes Law while Mathias, a Buffalo Grove Republican, notes his efforts to...

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    Democrat Melinda Bush, left, opposes Republican Joe Neal in the 31st state Senate district.

    Political parties see opportunity, pour money into open state Senate 31 race

    With the seat open, the 31st state Senate race to replace Republican Suzi Schmidt has drawn great interest from the respective parties. Between them, Democrat Melinda Bush and Republican Joe Neal have raised more than $1 million. "This is a targeted race," said Kent Redfield, professor emeritus of political science at the University of Illinois Springfield. "The legislative leaders ... have taken...

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    Passengers wait for their flight at LaGuardia airport in New York Sunday. Hurricane Sandy grounded thousands of flights in the U.S. northeast Monday.

    Hurricane Sandy grounds thousands of flights

    Hurricane Sandy grounded thousands of flights in the U.S. northeast Monday and upended travel plans across the globe, stranding passengers from Hong Kong to Europe. The massive storm threatens to bring a near halt to air travel for at least two days in a key region for both domestic and international flights.

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    Prison for Streamwood man who admitted to molesting a girl

    A Cook County judge sentenced a 46-year-old Streamwood man to three years in prison in exchange for his guilty pleas to sexually abusing a young girl. Efrain Toro was also ordered to pay more than $2,000 in fines and to register as a sex offender.

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    DuPage Democratic group withholds some endorsements

    When the Democratic Women of DuPage County announced their candidate endorsements this fall for the Nov. 6 election, something was conspicuously missing: endorsements for several Democrats on the DuPage County Board. While the group did endorse four of 10 candidates, President Julia Beckman said the others didn't turn in key questionnaires.

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    Tri-Cities-area police reports
    Mamie L. Courtney, 46, of Aurora was charged at 5:30 a.m. Oct. 23 with felony aggravated assault and domestic battery, according to a sheriff's report. She is accused of trying to hit a man along Plain Avenue near Aurora with her vehicle.

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    Geneva School District 304 employees Brian Bastin, left, and Don Letterer unload a truck full of donated food pantry items as middle school pastor Grant Diamond takes a box off the truck Monday morning at First Baptist Church in Geneva. As part of Red Ribbon Week last week, all six District 304 elementary schools collected the items as part of a “Stuff the Truck” campaign to benefit the pantry. Bastin and Letterer are from Geneva and Batavia, respectively, and Diamond lives in Geneva.

    District 304 elementary schools help ‘Stuff the Truck’

    The six Geneva School District 304 elementary schools collected items for the First Baptist food pantry duirng last week's Red Ribbon Week, and the goods were delivered Monday.

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    California men sentenced for delivering 170 pounds of pot to Waukegan

    Two men who were arrested after flying nearly 170 pounds of cannabis from California to Waukegan are headed to prison, a Lake County judge ruled Monday. The pilot, Michael Fejer, 28, was sentenced to six years in prison and his brother, Nicholas, 24, was sentenced to four years in prison. Both pleaded guilty to possession of marijuana with intent to deliver in June 2011.

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    Chicago demolishing 200th ‘dangerous’ building

    The city of Chicago is demolishing the 200th building deemed dangerous under a program that targets vacant structures used by gangs. In a statement Monday, Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced the demolishing of a building in the city's Roseland neighborhood on the South Side.

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    Interactive maps finds flu shot clinics citywide

    A new mapping tool could make finding locations to get flu shots more convenient for Chicago residents. The Chicago Department of Public Health and a local web developer have launched a new interactive web map that pinpoints citywide flu shot clinics and their hours of operation.

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    Republican Steve Newton, left, and Democrat Tom Rudd are running for Lake County coroner.

    Newton leads Rudd in campaign cash in Lake County coroner’s race

    Steve Newton, the Republican candidate for Lake County coroner, has received financial support from several local funeral homes, campaign disclosure reports show. "They recognize that I'm the right guy for the job," Newton said. In stark contrast, Democratic rival Tom Rudd has reported receiving only one donation of $500 or more, records show.

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    Illinois had fewer deer-related crashes in 2011

    There were six deer-related fatal accidents in Illinois during 2011. That's down from 10 in 2010. There were 613 injuries during 2011, down from 634 in 2010.

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    Debra Shore

    Are Cook suburbs shut out on water commission?

    Only one candidate for the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District is from the suburbs - the rest are from Chicago. And some say it might be fairer to create a representative by population system.

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    Walter L. Cook, Chief Executive Officer, Mt. Prospect Park District

    Longtime Mt. Prospect Park District CEO retiring

    Walter L. Cook, the chief executive officer of the Mount Prospect Park District, will resign early next year, ending a 32-year career that included two decades as the agency's top administrator. Cook's resignation effective March 29 was formally accepted last week by the district's board of commissioners, which now will establish a hiring committee to search for his successor.

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    Naperville Park District is continuing to use grant money to fund improvements to Meadow Glens Park.

    Improvements continue at Naperville’s Meadow Glens Park

    New recreation amenities and improvements at Naperville Park District's Meadow Glens Park now are visible as work at the site continues this fall.

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    Naperville firefighters probing cause of house blaze

    Naperville firefighters are trying to determine what sparked a blaze that caused roughly $375,000 damage when it swept through a house early Sunday morning on the 200 block of Willoway Drive. No one was home at the time of the blaze and no injuries were reported.

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    Ray Campbell of Glen Ellyn, who uses paratransit, speaks to RTA Chairman John S. Gates Jr. after his public apology this week for earlier remarks referring to paratransit as “federally mandated limousine service.”

    Paratransit advocates still seething over 'limo' comment

    Thanks to the binders full of emails I received on paratransit, I'm turning the column over to you today. But that's not the only hot transportation topic this week. We've also got some feisty comments on red-light cameras, plus IDOT explains why work on Butterfield Road is taking soooooo long. To recap, Regional Transportation Authority Chairman John Gates apologized Wednesday for comments he...

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    Dundee Township to try for electric aggregation

    This election cycle, Dundee Township residents will have an opportunity to see lower electricity bills by voting yes for electric aggregation.Dundee Township has devised a ballot question that every voter living in Dundee Township will see on the upcoming ballot. A "yes" vote would let township leaders negotiate for lower electric rates for people living in unincorporated Dundee Township.

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    Peter Jackson and his wife, Ellen, of Arlington Heights, hold a picture of their 18-year-old daughter Emily, who died after taking a single OxyContin pill. The couple have urged federal authorities for tighter restrictions on such opioid painkillers.

    The dangers of pain pills

    Peter Jackson of Arlington Heights, who heads the national group, Advocates for the Reform of Prescription Opioids, is trying to convince the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to crackdown on prescription pain killers. "We want to make sure the medicine is marketed, prescribed and used in a (scientific) evidence-based way," Jackson said. "There is a myth that it's bad people out there who are...

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    Adrienne Cragnotti, 46, a self-employed photographer with her long-time boyfriend, Mike, an unemployed copy editor, in Chicago. Cragnotti makes about $2,000 a month from photography (though she puts half of it back into the business) and $1,100 a month in rental income from a house in Los Angeles that she bought in 2000 and has been renting out for the last three years.

    Mood of the Nation: Struggling yet still hopeful

    On the eve of the 2012 elections, The Associated Press interviewed dozens of Americans to try to gauge the economic mood of the nation. People were asked about jobs, housing, gas prices, retirement and other issues. Among them were a Chicago couple: Adrienne Cragnotti, 46, and Mike Eiler, 41. She’s a self-employed photographer; he’s an unemployed former copy editor. Despite career setbacks and a...

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    Cal Sutter

    Comedy show benefits South Elgin cancer charity

    Cal’s Angels, a South Elgin foundation dedicated to providing financial assistance to kids fighting cancer and their families, is hoping big names in Chicago comedy will help bring its mission to a wider audience. Cal's Angels will get all the door proceeds from the Fab Four of Chicago Comedy’s 30th anniversary show at Zanie’s Comedy Club Nov. 18 in Rosemont.

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    Algerian Foreign Minister Mourad Medelci, center, greets U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, upon her arrival at Houari Boumediene Airport, in Algiers, Algeria, Monday. Clinton is on a five-day trip overseas to increase pressure on Mali’s al-Qaida-linked rebels and help Balkan nations end long-simmering ethnic and political disagreements.

    U.S. seeks Algeria’s support in possible Mali move

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton sought Algeria's assistance on Monday for any future military intervention in Mali, pressing the North African nation to provide intelligence — if not boots on the ground to help rout the al-Qaida-linked militants across its southern border.

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    A slideshow of Saanvi Venna plays in the lobby of the Boyd-Horrox Funeral Home in Norristown, Pa., as Subash Karra sits nearby Sunday during a viewing for the 10-month-old girl, who was found dead after being kidnapped last week from her home in a Philadelphia suburb. Saanvi’s grandmother was also killed.

    Father of slain Pa. baby urges faith in humanity

    The father of a suburban Philadelphia baby killed along with her grandmother in an apparent botched ransom scheme says those tragic deaths should not diminish supporters' faith in humanity.

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    Louise Pardee calls fellow senior citizens from a Shoreview, Minn, phone bank to urge them to vote against a proposed constitutional ban on gay marriage on Minnesota’s statewide ballot next month. The phone bank was sponsored by Minnesotans United for All Families, the campaign trying to defeat the amendment.

    On Minn. gay marriage vote, seniors a tough crowd

    Minnesota is one of four states with gay marriage on the November ballot, and gay rights supporters hope this is the year they finally get a win after defeats in 32 previous state votes on the definition of marriage. But the outcome may depend on winning over some senior citizens, who vote in high numbers and have been a key factor in the decisions in the other states, including socially liberal...

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    Judge in Whitey Bulger case refuses to step aside

    The federal judge presiding over the trial of Boston mobster James "Whitey" Bulger has refused a defense lawyer's request to step down. U.S. District Judge Richard Stearns says in a three-page decision issued Sunday that a motion by Bulger's lead attorney last week seeking the judge's recusal "raises no new issues of material fact or law."

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    The Edward Foundation raised a record $640,000 at its 22nd annual gala, “The Big Gig: Bella Italia,” to support programs at Edward Hospital in Naperville.

    Edward Foundation gala raises record $640,000

    The Edward Foundation raised a record $640,000 at its 22nd annual gala, "The Big Gig: Bella Italia." Nearly 700 people attended the fundraiser for Edward Hospital programs and services.

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    Bottles of wine are seen on hand at the Decatur Area Arts Council in Decatur for the new series called “Cocktails and Creations” that encourages adult participants to bring drinks to class. The program combines the elements of food and drink with creating a piece of art in a relaxed atmosphere.

    Art class comes with a little twist

    DECATUR — It’s hard to know exactly what kind of cocktail goes best with a particular piece of art.Is a Manhattan too brusque and bold for the soothing colors of pastel portraiture?Would a zippy Tom Collins be overshadowed while making Japanese kokeshi dolls?What, if anything, goes with absinthe?

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    Fire spree hits Indianapolis neighborhood

    A family of five had to flee their home to safety in what was among three house fires within blocks of each other in a few hours' time on the east side of Indianapolis.Fire officials say two of the blazes were in vacant houses, but the family's house had heavy flames at its front when crews arrived about 2:45 a.m. Monday.

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    Officer recalls Sikh temple shooting

    The Oak Creek police officer who survived 14 gunshots from the gunman who went on a fatal rampage at the Sikh temple says he thought of his training as the assailant kept shooting him — "in a high-risk incident, I will survive."

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    Blinker ruling could mean Indiana police changes

    Some authorities say Indiana police departments will have to make changes to how officers conduct traffic stops after a court threw out a marijuana possession conviction against a driver.The state appeals court ruled that Kokomo police didn't have grounds to stop the driver simply for not turning while his turn signal was blinking.

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    Likelihood of hitting a deer increases in Wis.

    The odds of your vehicle colliding with a deer on Wisconsin roadways are on the rise. An annual report from State Farm Insurance says the odds have increased to 1 in 79 this year, compared to 1 in 88 last year.

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    Marjory Lewe-Brady

    West Chicago educator wins award for community-school partnerships

    West Chicago Elementary District 33's Marjory Lewe-Brady has received a Community School Leadership Award sponsored by the Illinois Federation for Community Schools.

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    Rebel fighters belonging to the Liwa Al-Tawhid group keep an eye over their enemy’s position as they prepare to open fire as mortar explosions and gunshots are heard in the nearby battlefield in the Karm al-Jabel neighborhood of Aleppo, Syria. Syria’s air force fired missiles and dropped barrel bombs on rebel strongholds while opposition fighters attacked regime positions, flouting a U.N.-backed cease-fire that was supposed to quiet fighting over a long holiday weekend but never took hold.

    Syrian warplanes heavily bombard Damascus area

    Syrian warplanes heavily bombarded rebel targets in the suburbs of Damascus on Monday in what activists said was one of the most intense air raid campaigns around the capital since the uprising began 19 months ago. A government official said a car bomb killed 10 people on the outskirts of the city.

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    Muslim women gather at the Thae-Chaung refugee camp in Sittwe, Rakhine State, western Myanmar, Monday. Myanmar’s government said Monday it has boosted security in the western state hit by ethnic and sectarian unrest as the number of displaced rose to 28,000 people, mostly Muslims.

    Survivors criticize Myanmar gov’t over clashes

    SITTWE, Myanmar — Survivors of ethnic clashes in western Myanmar lashed out at the government Monday for failing to prevent violence between Muslims and Buddhists that has displaced more than 28,000 people over the last week.

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    This file image made from video released by the Israeli Defense Forces shows the downing of a drone that entered Israeli airspace in southern Israel. Iran has images of sensitive Israeli military bases taken by a drone that was launched by Lebanon’s Hezbollah movement and downed by Israel earlier this month, a senior Iranian lawmaker claimed Monday.

    Report: Iran has drone pictures of Israeli bases

    Iran has images of sensitive Israeli military bases taken by a drone that was launched by Lebanon's Hezbollah movement and downed by Israel earlier this month, a senior Iranian lawmaker claimed Monday in the latest boast from Tehran about purported advances in the capabilities of its unmanned aircraft.

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    Mass. shuts down another compounding pharmacy

    Massachusetts shut down another compounding pharmacy over sterility concerns after a surprise inspection prompted by the nationwide meningitis outbreak linked to a different company, state officials have said.

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    Sand bags protect an entrance of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.

    A state-by-state look at the East Coast superstorm

    Hurricane Sandy is churning off the East Coast and is expected to join up with two other weather systems to create a huge and problematic storm affecting 50 million people. Here's a snapshot of what is happening or expected, state by state.

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    Ocean water rolls over state highway NC 12 in Buxton, N.C., on Hatteras Island at dawn on Sunday as Hurricane Sandy works its way north, battering the U.S. East Coast.

    Dawn Patrol: Eastern superstorm cancels, delays O’Hare flights

    East Coast 'Frankenstorm' cancels flights at O'Hare. Advocate for Northwest suburban children dies. Police investigating fatal crash near Gurnee. Bears pull out the win. Giants win the World Series.

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    Jessica Ospina, left, and Allison Kane of Virginia Beach, Va., lean into the strong wind and rain off the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge tunnel in Virginia Beach, as Hurricane Sandy works its way north, battering the U.S. East Coast.

    Weekend in Review: Fire victim tells; super storm coming
    What you may have missed this weekend: Lombard fire victim trying to heal; Walsh sees himself as 'average Joe'; Duckworth touts personal experience; suburban companies send help to East Coast; Waukegan man killed in Gurnee area crash; hundreds of birds taken from Aurora home; Geneva teachers given strike notice; Bears deliver when it matters most in victory over Panthers; and NHL closer to...

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    The old house and barn on what is known as the Whippoorwill Farm north of Route 60 in Mettawa will be demolished. Proposals to convert the site into a Mettawa village hall proved too expensive, officials say.

    Historic estate in Mettawa to be demolished

    The country home known as Whippoorwill Farm is symbolic of the era of gentleman’s estates, lively fox hunts and the equestrian pursuits of the well-to-do. But the compound just north of Route 60 in Mettawa has been empty since its last occupant died nearly two years ago. And without another viable or cost-effective use, the familiar sprawling home and barn beyond the stockade fence are...

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    Alex Schultz, 12, of Villa Park takes a look at his bloody face. He said,” I like looking hurt!” Children ages 12 to 19 get zombified by professional makeup artist Daniel Dudych at Helen Plum Library in Lombard Friday. Nearly a dozen children took part in this event.

    Images: The Week In Pictures
    This edition of The Week In Pictures features a variety of photos including several Halloween events.

Sports

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    Elgin native and 1969 Elgin High School graduate Rick Sund, right, poses with NBA Hall of Fame member Dominique Wilkins last year. Sund, who has been an NBA executive for 40 years, will be honored with a special recognition award by the Elgin Sports Hall of Fame Foundation Sunday night at the organization’s annual banquet and induction ceremony in the Heritage Ballroom at The Centre of Elgin.

    Sund to be honored by Elgin Sports Hall of Fame

    When Rick Sund was playing basketball for Bill Chesbrough in the late 1960s, he never dreamed of ending up where he is today. "When I went to Ohio University to start my master's program I was thinking Elgin and Elgin High," Sund says. "I always respected Ches and he was the athletic director at that time. At that time I was thinking more about being an AD. I wasn't thinking pro basketball."

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    Coach Tom Thibodeau and the Bulls open their season Wednesday night against Sacramento at the United Center.

    Hinrich plans on making Bulls opener

    The Bulls won't be complately at full strength until Derrick Rose returns from a knee injury a few months from now. But they should be as healthy as possible for Wednesday's season opener. Kirk Hinrich (groin strain) practiced Monday and expects to be ready to face Sacramento.

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    Minnesota defensive back Michael Carter intercepts a pass intended for Purdue wide receiver Gary Bush in the second half of Saturday’s game in Minneapolis. Purdue has lost four straight Big Ten games, including Saturday’s 44-28 setback at Minnesota.

    Purdue AD issues statement on football program

    Purdue athletic director Morgan Burke is looking for a strong finish after the school's football team got off to a disappointing start. He issued a one-paragraph written statement on Monday acknowledging that even though this season's results have not matched the university's high expectations, he hoped to see stronger performances as the Boilermakers fight to become bowl-eligible over the last four regular-season games.

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    Benet celebrates defeating Naperville Central 2-0, during the girls Class 4A regional final in Naperville, Thursday.

    Scouting this week’s DuPage County volleyball sectionals
    Previews of the volleyball sectionals around DuPage County.

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    Players get to see how badly fans miss hockey

    By all accounts, Friday's "Champs for Charity" game at Allstate Arena featuring many members of the 2010 Stanley Cup champion Blackhawks was a rousing success.

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    Seattle Sounders FC midfielder Osvaldo Alonso, center, and Los Angeles Galaxy forward Edson Buddle battle for the ball as midfielder Brad Evans watches during the first half of their MLS soccer match, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, in Carson, Calif.

    Time for Fire to forget last 5 games

    Jesse Marsch and Evan Whitfield know a thing or two about the MLS Cup playoffs. The former Chicago Fire players know that even the last team into the playoffs can win it all, and it has.

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    San Francisco 49ers wide receiver Michael Crabtree scores a touchdown against the Arizona Cardinals during the first half Monday in Glendale, Ariz.

    49ers flatten Arizona 24-3

    On an almost perfect Monday night for Alex Smith, the San Francisco 49ers flexed their NFC West dominance with a 24-3 pounding of the Arizona Cardinals. Smith completed 18 of 19 passes for 232 yards and three touchdowns — two to Michael Crabtree and one to Randy Moss — to help San Francisco (6-2) open a two-game lead in the division and send Arizona (4-4) to its fourth straight loss.

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    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (6) is sacked by Carolina Panthers defensive end Greg Hardy (76) during Sunday’s game at Soldier Field in Chicago.

    Bears’ offense continues to struggle

    It's debatable whether Sunday's victory over Carolina was aesthetic, but there's no denying the Bears' offense has not been a thing of beauty through seven games. The Bears are 30th in sacks allowed and passing yards, 28th in yards per pass play and 26th in total yards and interception percentage.

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    Former Libertyville football head coach Randy Kuceyeski, here celebrating at playoff victory against Prospect, is headed for the Lake County High Schools Sports Hall of Fame.

    Ryan Scholarship Fund banquet slated for Thursday

    The College of Lake County Foundation's 24th Keith Ryan Scholarship Fund and Sports Banquet will be held Thursday at Midlane Golf Resort in Wadsworth. The banquet will recognize 12 new inductees into the Lake County High Schools Sports Hall of Fame and three CLC scholarship recipients — Elizabeth Gutierrez, Joshua May and Francisco Rivera.

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    Sidney Santos during the Geneva Vikings girls basketball team practice Monday.

    Geneva, Santos glad to be back on the court

    One would be hard-pressed to find anyone who enjoyed the first day of high school girls basketball practice more than Geneva's Sidney Santos did Monday afternoon.

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    Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton (1) fumbles into the air as he is sacked by Chicago’s Julius Peppers and Henry Melton during Sunday’s game at Soldier Field in Chicago. The Panthers recovered.

    Tillman’s takeway ability is contagious

    Five Bears have at least 2 interceptions and four defenders have scored touchdowns, but there's one player whose contributions are unique to the NFL's highest-scoring defense.

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    Bulls guard Nate Robinson, left, guards Indiana’s D.J. Augustin during a preseason game. Robinson is excited to be playing for the Bulls, saying it’s a priviledge to put on the same uniform that Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen donned.

    Bulls’ Rose won’t be seen all the time

    Everyone knows Derrick Rose is busy recovering from ACL surgery. The injured superstar may not spend much time watching from the bench when the Bulls open the regular season later this week.

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    Minnesota head coach Tubby Smith has every starter returning from a squad that was runner-up in the NIT last spring to finish 23-15.

    Gophers aim for breakthrough season under Smith

    Minnesota coach Tubby Smith has yet to win an NCAA tournament game since his celebrated arrival at the school five years ago. This season will give him as good of a chance as any.

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    Michigan State coach Tom Izzo notched his 400th career win last season, as well as another Big Ten title and a conference tournament championship. The Spartans hope to build on that success this year.

    Izzo fired up about 14th-ranked Spartans

    Despite losing All-American forward Draymond Green, the 14th-ranked Michigan State Spartans are deep and talented. "We have a chance to put together a pretty good team," Coach Tom Izzo said, sounding perhaps as optimistic as he has before a season in years.

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    Michigan guards Trey Burke, left, and Tim Hardaway Jr. will be back for the 2012-13 season.

    High hopes for 5th-ranked Michigan

    Coach John Beilein is entering his sixth season with Michigan. And what a campaign it could be. His Wolverines are coming off a Big Ten championship and start 2012-13 ranked fifth in the country.

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    With star guard Derrick Rose sidelined to start the season, the Bulls’ season doesn’t hold much meaning.

    Bulls’ season a snore without Rose

    When Derrick Rose returns to the Bulls it will make for a very exciting day. But that day, unfortunately, is a long way off.

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    Boys soccer / Supersectional scouting

    Here's a look at some of Tuesday's boys soccer supersectional matchups, including St. Viator against East Moline United, St. Charles East against Warren and Stevenson against Glenbrook North.

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    Hoffman Estates product Altrese Hawkins is under consideration for national honors in a standout senior volleyball season at Memphis.

    Prospect’s Stokes earns his spot in ITCCCA Hall

    Michael Stokes' record as Prospect's boys cross country coach speaks for itself. And soon enough, Stokes will speak as a hall of famer. Stokes will be inducted into the Illinois Track and Cross Country Coaches Association Hall of Fame at the ITCCCA Clinic on Jan. 12 at Oak Park-River Forest High School.

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    Girls volleyball / Scouting Fremd sectional

    Here's a preview of the Femd Class 4A girls volleyball sectional featuring Hersey, Stevenson, Libertyville and Palatine.

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    Illinois quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase drops back to pass during the second half Saturday against Indiana in Champaign. The Illini haven’t won a Big Ten game all season.

    Illinois learning lessons it would rather skip

    First-year coach Tim Beckman says he's learning from the football season that's quickly getting away from Illinois. "You learn how to take defeats," Beckman said Monday, two days after falling to Indiana 31-17 in the team's fifth-straight defeat. "I hate losing, but it's just how to react to the players after continued defeats, I think is very important."

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    Wisconsin’s Ben Brust, right, makes a steal from Northwestern’s Drew Crowford during the first half of a Jan. 18 game last season in Madison, Wis. Brust will share the point guard position with sophomore Traevon Jackson and redshirt freshman George Marshall this year.

    Big holes for Badgers as basketball season approaches

    Entering his 41st year of coaching, Wisconsin coach Bo Ryan said he doesn't get nervous, alarmed or excited when people use the word "replace" when referring to his basketball team. "It is amazing how young men step up," Ryan said. "I have all the faith in the world that that is going to happen with this group." They are going to have to: The 23rd-ranked Badgers do have some holes to fill.

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    Penn State’s Tim Frazier drives past Illinois guard Tracy Abrams during the first half of a Jan. 19, 2012, game in State College, Pa. Frazier led the Big Ten in assists (6.2 per game) and finishing second in scoring (18.8 points) and steals (2.4) last season.

    Frazier gets new running mate in Penn State backcourt

    How the Nittany Lions' new, potentially explosive backcourt, navigates the treacherous Big Ten could go a long way toward determining whether coach Patrick Chambers' rebuilding project can take another step forward in his second year in Happy Valley.

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    New facilities give hope to new Nebraska’s coach

    First-year coach Tim Miles will try to turn around a long-languishing Nebraska men's basketball program that hasn't won a share of a conference championship since 1950, made it to the NCAA tournament since 1998 or had a winning conference record since 1999. Patience will be required.

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    Ohio State’s Lenzelle Smith, top, shoots between Indiana’s Tom Pritchard, left, and Kory Barnett during the second half of a game Jan. 15, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio. Smith is one of three returning starters for the Buckeyes.

    With 3 starters back, Buckeyes look to be even better

    Maybe the term "senior leadership" doesn't apply at Ohio State, where it seems there's annually a huge turnover of top players yet the Buckeyes and coach Thad Matta just keep chugging right along, racking up 20-win seasons, NCAA tournament appearances and Big Ten titles.

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    Iowa’s Aaron White brings the ball down the court after getting a steal from Chicago State’s D’Jari Nelson during a Nov. 11, 2011, game in Iowa City. White, a sophomore forward, was one of the Big Ten’s biggest surprises last season.

    Optimistic Hawkeyes eager for NCAA tournament bid

    After years of mediocrity, Iowa re-energized its weary fan base last season with 18 wins and a spot in the NIT. The optimistic Hawkeyes are hoping that this will be the year they return to the NCAA tournament and become nationally relevant again.

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    Football / Second-round playoff pairings
    Here are the second-round pairings with game days and times for the IHSA football playoffs.

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    Purdue’s D.J. Byrd and Illinois’ Tracy Abrams struggle for a loose ball in a Feb. 15 game at Assembly Hall in Champaign last season. Byrd, a 6-foot-5, 228-pound senior, is expected to spend most of his time this season at his more natural swing spot.

    Purdue hoping young team keeps success alive

    Matt Painter is starting over at Purdue. The "Baby Boilers" are all grown up and have moved away, so Painter is building this season's hopes around a young, unproven roster, full of talent and eager to prove the doubters wrong.

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    With some good 3-point shooters for support, it won't be easy to keep the Miami Heat and LeBron James from winning a second straight NBA title.

    Mike McGraw’s NBA contenders, pretenders
    Our NBA expert, Mike McGraw, breaks down the contenders and pretenders and offers his rankings for the Eastern and Western conference teams as the regular season begins with three games on Tuesday and nine more on Wednesday, including the Bulls opening at home against Sacramento. Check out where he ranks the Bulls to start the season.

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    Mike North video: Is this the Bears’ year?

    Mike North marvels at the Bears as they maintain a high turnover ratio in the games, picks the top 4 teams and wonders if the Philadelphia Eagles fans still long for Michael Vick.

Business

  •  
    Job seekers gather for employment opportunities at a jobs fair last May in Los Angeles. Hurricane Sandy may delay Friday’s scheduled release of the October jobs report.

    Hurricane Sandy could delay October jobs report

    Hurricane Sandy could complicate Friday’s release of the October jobs report, the final snapshot of employment before the presidential election. U.S. Labor Department officials are still hopeful that they can release the report as scheduled. But they acknowledged that the storm could cause a delay. “Our intention is that Friday will be business as usual regarding the October employment ... report,” says Jennifer Kaplan, a department spokeswoman.

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    Toyota team members work on the final inspection of the Corolla automobile assembly line in Blue Springs, Miss. Toyota and other Japanese auto makers dominated the annual Consumer Reports reliability rankings.

    Toyota on top in latest Consumer Reports survey

    And the winner is ... Japan. Japanese brands took seven of the top 10 spots in Consumer Reports' annual reliability rankings, pushing aside their U.S. and European rivals.

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    The U.S. Supreme Court raised questions about the multibillion-dollar trade in goods outside authorized distribution channels, hearing arguments in the case of a graduate student sued for selling foreign-edition textbooks in the U.S. at discount prices.

    High court hears closely watched copyright case

    Supreme Court justices on Monday weighed copyright protections for publishers, creative artists and manufacturers in a global marketplace in a case that has attracted the interest of Costco, eBay and Google. The outcome has important implications for consumers and multibillion dollar annual sales online and in discount stores.

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    In the last quarter, Chrysler reported net income of $381 million, up 80 percent from $212 million a year earlier.

    Chrysler 3Q profit up 80 percent

    Strong U.S. sales powered Chrysler to a healthy third-quarter profit. The company reported net income of $381 million, up 80 percent from $212 million a year earlier. The profit was due mainly to a 13-percent sales increase in the U.S., where Chrysler does three quarters of its business.

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    A Samsung Electronics Co. Galaxy Nexus smartphone, top, and Galaxy S III smartphone are seen here. Google announced Monday it was debuting the latest in its line of Nexus smartphones and a larger version of the 7-inch Nexus 7 table.

    Google unveils another phone, larger Nexus tablet

    Google is adding a few more gadgets to holiday shopping lists. The devices announced Monday include the latest in Google's line of Nexus smartphones and a larger version of the 7-inch Nexus 7 tablet that the company began selling in July under the Nexus brand.

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    A man passes the front of the New York Stock Exchange. All major U.S. indexes are shut down, Mondaybefore Hurricane Sandy makes landfall.

    All U.S. exchanges will remain closed Tuesday

    U.S. stock trading was canceled for a second day, joining bond markets, as 85-mile-per-hour winds and surging seas from Hurricane Sandy bore down on New York and paralyzed American capital markets.The shutdown was announced by NYSE Euronext in a statement. Earlier, the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association recommended a full market close tomorrow in dollar- denominated fixed-income securities after they shut at noon New York time today.

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    UPS sees delivery of 527 million holiday packages

    UPS expects to deliver 527 million packages between Thanksgiving and Christmas this year, surpassing last year's record high by 10 percent.

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    JPMorgan waives some fees for customers affected by hurricane

    JPMorgan Chase & Co., the biggest U.S. bank by assets, said it is waiving fees for customers in seven states and Washington as Hurricane Sandy approaches.

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    AP survey: Economic ills may defy next president

    Whoever wins the U.S. presidential election will likely struggle to manage the biggest economic threats he'll face.That's the cautionary message that emerges from the latest Associated Press Economy Survey.

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    Pamela Magnuson

    Mount Prospect minister offers couples alternatives

    Kukec's People features Pamela Magnuson, a pagan minister who has a business where she performs marriage, civil union and other ceremonies at her 1928 home in Mount Prospect.

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    Kukec: Local executive sees Dubai as country of contrasts
    Pagan minister Pamela Magnuson and her business as a wedding officiant is looking forward to Dec. 12, 2012. The 12-12-12 date likely will be popular for weddings, civil unions and other types of ceremonies at her Mount Prospect home.“On 11-11-11, I performed three weddings that day and it started it all for me,” she said.Magnuson was ordained in the Universal Life Church in June 2011 and said she is licensed to marry or perform civil unions in Illinois and Wisconsin. She has performed about 150 ceremonies so far this year, either at her home or at the site of the couple’s choosing, she said.And she doesn’t discriminate about their religion, race or sex, and offers to join anyone with a ceremony designed just for them, she said. So she’s gearing up for 12-12-12.“It’s only going to happen once,” she said. “People want unique dates for their special day and I expect to completely book up the date.”Magnuson started uniting couples after she was laid off from an advertising agency. She also worked for a wedding venue, but felt she wanted to offer couples an alternative site, she said.“I thought there was a need in this economy in my local area. Couples needed an inexpensive way to get married and still be romantic and personal. It’s even harder to find a reasonable place to get married when they only have a few guests or want to elope,” she said. Magnuson believes we are all “children of the same universe and all religions or belief systems bring us ultimately to the same creator.” “Even if someone doesn’t have a religion I believe we are all related and I can give them a ceremony that incorporates different wedding traditions that make it meaningful,” she said.Traveling through DubaiAlan Leis, senior vice president at Hazard Young Attea & Associates in Rosemont, and a former District 203 superintendent in Naperville, said this on Facebook during his visit last week to Dubai: “Despite a wonderful and enlightening conference with many well-known educators, Dubai is a city of contrasts. The architecture is a combination of Star Wars and Vegas. Shields on patio so those walking past can’t see us drinking Belgian beer (a Muslim country after all), and the largest shopping mall in the world with dozens of women in abayas (with only eye slits) carrying shopping bags from American stores filled with ‘loot.’”Honored at RutgersGreg Brown, chairman and CEO of Schaumburg-based Motorola Solutions Inc. and a Rutgers alumnus, was inducted to the Rutgers board of governors in New Brunswick, N.J. He succeeds John Russo as a public member of the board of governors appointed by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. He also serves on the Rutgers board of trustees and the Rutgers University Foundation’s board of overseers.Mason nominated at RawlingsAmy Mason,Kane County Cougars director of ticket services and community relations, has been nominated for the Rawlings Woman Executive of the Year award. Mason is the Midwest League’s representative in that category, and was nominated by her peers from other front office staffs throughout the Midwest League.FastTrack

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    Will end-of-year business tax moves matter?

    Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall says to keep in mind that there really is no one-size-fits-all solution to federal tax issues. He suggests that businesses talk to their accountant.

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    “For Lease” signs at the Metropolitan Square Development in Des Plaines are reflective of the problems the center has suffered. A new owner is pushing to fill vacancies.

    New owner, new hope for Des Plaines shopping center

    “For Lease” signs abound in the once-prized crown jewel of Des Plaines' downtown, a stark reminder of the still struggling economy. The new owner of Metropolitan Square, which emerged from foreclosure earlier this year, is trying to generate interest in the property that has seen a growing number of vacancies in recent years.

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    World stocks down, NYSE closes trading floor

    World stock markets fell Monday as a mammoth storm heading toward the eastern U.S. caused the New York Stock Exchange and CME Group to shut trading floors.

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    Storm leads companies to postpone earnings reports

    With Hurricane Sandy bearing down on the East Coast Monday, a number of major U.S. companies have postponed quarterly earnings as financial markets shut down for the first time since 2001. Acorda Therapeutics Inc., Pfizer Inc., Thomson Reuters and NRG Energy Inc. have already delayed earnings reports. Pfizer and NRG Energy made the decision early, as they were not set to report earnings until Tuesday and Wednesday, respectively.

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    Burger King reports 3rd quarter net income drops

    Burger King says its third-quarter net income fell 83 percent as revenue was hurt by the stronger dollar, but adjusted results topped expectations.The No. 2 worldwide fast-food chain says net income fell to $6.6 million, or 2 cents per share. That compares with $38.8 million, or 11 cents per share, last year. Net income excluding one-items totaled 17 cents per share. Analysts expected 15 cents per share.

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    Oil falls as Hurricane Sandy bears down on US

    Oil prices fell Monday as a gargantuan storm headed to the heavily populated U.S. East Coast.Benchmark oil for December delivery was down 75 cents to $85.53 a barrel at late afternoon Bangkok time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract rose 23 cents to end at $86.28 per barrel in New York on Friday.

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    Pearson, Bertelsmann confirm publishing tie-up
    Pearson PLC has confirmed that it will merge its Penguin Books division with Random House, which is owned by German media company Bertelsmann, in a deal that will create the world's largest trade publisher.

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    Layoffs, perks, labor costs trap French govt

    The 35-hour work week? Untouchable. The social safety net? Untrimmable.So how on earth can France's Socialist government keep its promise to make the country, and Europe, more competitive in the global marketplace? Slowly and carefully, President Francois Hollande says."It's not going to be a question of shocking or brutalizing the French economy," Economics Minister Pierre Moscovici said Friday, as the government held meetings on lowering France's labor costs, which are among the world's highest.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Seasonal pumpkin ale holds the key to moist and savory pumpkin bread.

    Pumpkin ale makes quick bread more savory

    Pumpkin can bring more to the fall dessert table than a standard custard pie or overly sweet cake, yet most bakers view this humble squash as a non-contender in the ingredient arena and overlook the culinary possibilities. Admittedly, plain pumpkin purée lacks that spark needed to ignite on our taste buds. But underneath its rough exterior and well, those pesky seeds, hides an ingredient bursting with potential.

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    Even if ex-wife’s actions were wrong, it’s time to move on

    His wife joined a dating service after they signed separation papers, but while they were still living together. Prior to signing papers, they had agreed not to date until they were on their own. Even though they're now divorced, he is livid over the deception. Does he have a right to these feelings?

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    ‘Anderson Live’ to end after 2 seasons

    Anderson Cooper's daytime talk show will be wrapping after two seasons. Warner Bros. said Monday that the marketplace made it increasingly difficult for "Anderson Live" to "break through" to viewers despite format changes.

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    Seasonal pumpkin ale holds the key to moist and savory pumpkin bread.

    Pumpkin Ale Bread
    Pumpkin Ale Bread

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    1969 Ford Boss 302 Mustang

    Trio of classic cars pay tribute to Halloween orange

    No matter the season, classic muscle cars are always easy to fall in love with. For the third straight year at Halloween, we've assembled a group of four-wheeled bruisers, each sporting a paint job drawn straight from the local pumpkin patch.

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    Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day performing at the 2012 iHeartRadio Music Festival in Las Vegas in September. Green Day announced Monday they are canceling the rest of the 2012 club tour.

    Green Day cancels 2012 dates, postpones 2013 start

    Green Day is canceling the rest of its 2012 club schedule and is postponing the start of the 2013 arena tour. Bass player Mike Dirnt says Billie Joe Armstrong's "well-being is our main concern" in the band's decision to clear the schedule through Feb 8.

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    Taylor Swift will co-host the Grammy nominations concert with LL COOL J on Dec. 5, in Nashville, Tenn.

    Taylor Swift to co-host Grammy nominations show

    Taylor Swift will co-host the Grammy nominations television special. Grammy officials say the pop star will join LL Cool J as hosts of the Dec. 5 special, airing live on CBS from Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, Tenn. This is the first year the nominations special has been broadcast from Music City.

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    Work continues on effects of B6 on cancer risk

    Until recently, there has been scant evidence suggesting that taking vitamins would prevent any form of cancer. Recently, there have been several medical studies demonstrating that taking a multivitamin or individual vitamins reduced the risk of developing cancer in both men and women. One recent study showed that higher blood levels of vitamin B6, in postmenopausal women, significantly reduced the risk of developing breast cancer.

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    Flu shot can make a difference in your child's health

    Every fall and winter, parents face the question: Should my child get an influenza (flu) shot? Many parents worry about risks and side effects, and if the shot is really necessary or worthwhile.

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    Police say a security guard at actor Tom Cruise’s house used a stun gun on a would-be prowler.

    Prowler at Cruise’s home turns out to be neighbor

    Police say a security guard at actor Tom Cruise's house used a stun gun on a would-be prowler, but the man turned out to be an intoxicated neighbor who may have mistakenly entered the property.

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    Advanced pushup

    Pushups a great exercise if done properly

    The pushup is one of the most popular exercises due to its simplicity and effectiveness. It can be done literally anywhere with no added equipment. But, as simple as the pushup may seem, many people struggle with the actual movement and have even more trouble maintaining form throughout an entire set. Follow these tips to make sure your form is perfect and the exercise benefits you.

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    Tom Spera’s 1984 Chevrolet Corvette has never seen snow or ice.

    Corvette’s Halloween delivery was a bit of magic

    Copperfield. Houdini. Penn and Teller. All became household names for their magical stage acts, but when it comes to four-wheeled magic, Tom Spera may have them beat. The Chicago-area magician made this 1984 Chevrolet Corvette appear.

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    Johnny Weissmuller, right, played Tarzan and Maureen O’Sullivan was Jane in the 1932 movie “Tarzan the Ape Man.”

    100 years on, still wild about Tarzan

    When historical novelist Robin Maxwell was looking for a book idea a couple of years ago, her husband asked who her new "literary lovers" would be. "Tarzan and Jane!' just blurted out of my mouth," she says, laughing at how forcefully the idea seized her. "It was like lava from a dormant volcano." And so, 100 years after the Lord of the Apes first swung into the world's pop culture window, there is "Jane: The Woman Who Loved Tarzan," a lush, romantic take on the English lord raised by primates — told from Jane's point of view.

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    Aspirin, one of the world’s oldest and cheapest drugs, has shown remarkable promise in treating colon cancer in people with certain genetic mutations that often play a role in the disease.

    Aspirin may help treat some colon cancers

    Aspirin, one of the world's oldest and cheapest drugs, has shown remarkable promise in treating colon cancer in people with mutations in a gene that's thought to play a role in the disease. Among patients with the mutations, those who regularly took aspirin lived longer than those who didn't, a major study found. Five years after their cancers were diagnosed, 97 percent of the aspirin users were still alive versus 74 percent of those not taking the drug.

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    Women at risk opting for preventive mastectomies

    Several weeks ago, Sago, 48, of Scott, Pa. had both breasts removed, even though she has never received a cancer diagnosis — a move she calls "liberating." She's one of a growing number of women at risk for breast cancer who, according to a new state study, are opting for preventive surgery to keep the disease at bay.

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    Sharon King kayaks on Patriot Lake at Shelby Farms in Memphis with her Lab-border-collie mix, Ashok. King said she mostly runs for exercise, but has turned to kayaking to work her upper body and core.

    Mix up your exercise routine with kayaking

    When compared to the legions of runners and cyclists out there, kayaking might seem to be for the odd and the few. But if kayaking is in some way "random" because you need a lake or a river as opposed to the road right outside your house, it also is the tonic to exercise as a mind-numbing routine. "I see machines in a gym as a torture chamber," says 58-year-old Linda Weghorst. For her, kayaking is "the perfect combination of aerobic and anaerobic exercise."

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    Victoria Rust has needles inserted into her arms and other body parts in sessions that last about half an hour; it is estimated that at least a third of U .S. pain centers for children offer acupuncture.

    Acupuncture can ease kids’ pain

    Children and needles may seem an unusual pairing, but doctors say a growing number of families are choosing acupuncture, in which thin needles are inserted into specific points on the body and manipulated by hand or with electrical stimulation with the goal of restoring and maintaining health. It's often performed when standard medicines or therapies don't work, have too many side effects or need a boost.

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    Try a different diet to see if you can clear up skin problems.

    Your health: Attack acne with diet

    Can certain foods give you clearer skin? Glamous suggests so. And learn some tips to help you avoid eating when you aren't hungry.

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    Parents should be wary of having their children drink too much juice, which comes with lots of calories.

    Glass of juice loaded with calories

    The school year is under way, and many parents see no better way to prepare their children for a taxing day of learning than with a large glass of sunshine, also known as orange juice. Not so fast, say nutritionists and obesity experts. That glass of juice — even if it's 100 percent fruit juice — is loaded with unnecessary calories.

  •  
    SHNS PHOTO/THE SACRAMENTO BEE Virginia Bane, 89, was among the first U.S. patients age 75 or older to get a mini-telescope implanted in her eye to treat macular degeneration.

    New hope for macular degeneration patients

    A new, bionic tool for treating macular degeneration has been at the University of California, Davis: a telescope smaller than a pea that's implanted directly into the eye. It's barely detectable at first, but a close look at a patient with the implant reveals a slightly luminescent spot where the pupil would be.

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    Fathers can influence teens’ sexual behavior, studies say

    Fathers' attitudes toward teen sex and the emotional closeness of their relationship with their teens have a sizable influence on their teens' sexual behavior, separate from the influence of moms, a new review of studies suggests. The review showed that dads' attitudes toward teen sexual behavior were linked to the age at which teens first had sex. Teens whose dads approved of adolescent sexual activity tended to start having sex earlier than teens whose dads did not approve, according to studies in the review.

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    Patients should have knowledge of their medical histories when seeing a doctor.

    Do you know your own medical history

    Coming to any health care provider equipped with at least some background knowledge about a medical history can help you get better, more personalized and targeted care, say experts. "Given the fact that a lot of people today don't (have or keep up) with a primary-care provider whose job is to keep track of basic vitals like blood pressure, weight and body mass index, as well as other key information ... it is incumbent on the patient to know these things and to have them at the ready when needed," says primary-care internist Foster Montalbano of Springfield Family Medicine in Alexandria, Va.

Discuss

  •  

    ‘Access’ to birth control doesn’t count

    Columnist Froma Harrop: To obtain the pill, a woman must first visit a doctor and get a prescription. Organized women do what they must. Disorganized women don't get around to it.

  •  

    An appeal to America’s heart

    Columnist Michael Gerson: Paul Ryan's recent speech at Cleveland State University was an important part of the Romney campaign's "go large" strategy — a presentation on political philosophy amid the normal stump speeches. Following a Republican primary season heavy on Tea Party rhetoric and a GOP convention light on substance, Ryan outlined a conservative vision of the common good.

  •  

    Don’t let outside money sway vote
    A Northbrook letter to the editor: Considering the millions of dollars outside organizations are pouring into the 8th District Congressional race to try to get Joe Walsh re-elected, I decided that it would not be inappropriate to put some outside "boots on the ground" -- mine! -- in support of Tammy Duckworth.

  •  

    Judge candidate is the real deal.
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: Every once in a while you meet the real deal, like Judge Daniel B. Shanes.

  •  

    Mathias has earned another tour of duty
    Letter to the editor: Former Buffalo Grove mayor Elliott Hartstein says it never should have come to Sid Mathias and Carol Sente battling for the same House district. But since it has, Mathias has earned the right to remain. "It would be a major mistake to lose a reasonable, moderate voice respected by Republicans and Democrats alike," Hartstein, a Democrat, writes. "We must have such people in both caucuses if we hope to ever come up with bipartisan solutions to the major challenges."

  •  

    Pension amendment far from real reform
    A letter to the editor: Though the amendment is being pitched as the answer to the state's pension crisis, it will have no impact on the underfunding of state pensions, the cause of the pension problem. It is a power grab by the same politicians who caused the problem in the first place.

  •  

    Yes vote would send a message
    A Springfield letter to the editor: Voters have been given an unprecedented opportunity to help control their future tax obligations by voting yes on the pension amendment that will appear on the general election ballot.

  •  

    Parks referendum can be cut further
    Letter to the editor: Bob Ruffatto lays out why he thinks the park district needs to go back to the drawing table on its capital plan. "Rejecting the first referendum saved taxpayers over $14 million of unnecessary principal and interest payments," he writes. "We think more can be saved."

  •  

    We must invest in the park district
    Letter to the editor: Don Cosley is voting "yes" on the Arlington Hts. Park District referendum. "A community cannot afford to stand still," he writes. "We must constantly invest in our infrastructure, if we don't, our community will be a less desirable place to live."

  •  

    Flip-flops? Don ran for PHS barefoot
    Letter to the editor: Don Miller recalls his days as a cross-country runner for Palatine High School -- a "feat" he performed barefoot. "I remember running barefoot in the snow and then hitting the frozen cinder tracks and then looking down at my bleeding feet," he writes. "It was worth it and we had a great team."

  •  

    Cut the budget for Mt. Prospect library
    Letter to the editor: Wade Kiess says the Mt. Prospect library should cut its budget 10 percent, and suggests "library programs should be fee-based like the park district programs."

  •  

    Michelle Mussman is the real deal
    Letter to the editor: Tod Tecktiel of Hoffman Estates has been impressed with Michelle Mussman from when she first ran for state representative. "Michelle Mussman deserves the chance to continue working for us," he writes.

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