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Daily Archive : Monday September 17, 2012

News

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    Dist. 203 admits calendar was a mistake

    Naperville Unit District 203 school board members said Monday they should've better listened to parents, students and school district staff before approving a school calendar that starts earlier than most wanted. And so, it's likely the current starting date of the 2013-2014 school year — Aug. 14 — could be moved to a later date.

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    Rainbow trout fishing season opens Oct. 20 in the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County. The district and the Illinois Department of Natural Resources are stocking three lakes with rainbow trout.

    DuPage preserves preparing for rainbow trout fishing season

    The Forest Preserve District of DuPage County and the Illinois Department of Natural Resources are preparing to stock local lakes in anticipation of the fall rainbow trout fishing season. The season opens at 6 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, in DuPage forest preserves.

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    Russ and Leeann Schweizer with their adopted Guatemalan children Ysabel and Gabriela, right, in their Lakewood home. Russ recently returned from a trip with Living Water International to drill a well in Guatemala.

    McHenry Co. residents help bring clean water to Guatemala

    Friends Brad Simpson of Lake in the Hills and Russ Schweizer of Lakewood were part of a team of volunteers with the Christian-based organization Living Water International. They spent about five days drilling a well for the 700 or so residents of Monte Carlo, in coastal Guatemala.

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    Astronaut Buzz Aldrin on Monday visited the Schaumburg elementary school which was named after him in 1971, telling students they can help achieve feats even greater than his moon landing.

    Aldrin visits Schaumburg students at namesake school

    Buzz Aldrin, now the last living member of the first moon landing, encouraged students at the Schaumburg elementary school named after him that it isn't too late for America to eclipse even the achievements of Apollo 11. "We can do these things, again," he said. "I know, because I'm living proof of being involved in great things."

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    The Lake County zoning board of appeals is scheduled to hold two hearings this week, the first Tuesday, on a request to rezone a 109-acre parcel at Rand and Old McHenry roads near Hawthorn Woods so that it can be developed as a shopping center.

    Dimucci shopping center saga continues

    The continuing saga of the Dimucci family land near Hawthorn Woods will gain another chapter this week as public talks on the matter continue. The Lake County zoning board of appeals will meet at 5 p.m. Tuesday to hear more testimony and comments about the family's request for the land — 109 acres at Rand and Old McHenry roads near Hawthorn Woods — to be rezoned so a shopping center...

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    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney addresses the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Los Angeles, Monday.

    Romney tries to clarify ‘off the cuff’ remarks

    Already scrambling to steady a struggling campaign, Republican Mitt Romney confronted a new headache Monday after a video surfaced showing him telling wealthy donors that almost half of all Americans "believe they are victims" entitled to extensive government support. He added that as a candidate for the White House, "my job is not to worry about those people."

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    Alexander Dambach

    Des Plaines welcomes new economic development director

    Des Plaines welcomed a new community and economic development director Monday night.

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    A group of Mexican federal police stand in front of the prison in Piedras Negras, Mexico, Monday. Authorities say 132 inmates have escaped from this jail in northern Mexico, sparking a search by federal police and soldiers in an area close to the U.S. border.

    Mexico: 132 inmates escape from border prison

    PIEDRAS NEGRAS, Mexico — More than 130 inmates escaped from a prison in northern Mexico through a tunnel on Monday, setting off a search by police and soldiers in an area close to the U.S. border.

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    Affordable housing rules will be key factor in future St. Charles developments

    In hopes of finding a balance between providing affordable housing and being a welcome destination for new development, St. Charles officials are on path to revising rules for approved housing mixes

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    James Linane

    Sleepy Hollow hires interim police chief

    Sleepy Hollow has hired an interim police chief to run its department until it locates a permanent chief. On Monday night, the village board approved the selection of James Linane, Elburn's former police chief and also a former deputy police chief in Carol Stream.

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    Shawn D. Love

    Aurora man charged with attempted murder

    An Aurora man with an extensive criminal history has been charged with attempted murder after running over another man with his vehicle, according to police.

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    Waukegan Animal Control employees capture Burmese python Monday morning after an employee of a business near Waukegan Harbor discovered the 12- to 15-foot animal in a bush.

    Potentially dangerous python captured near Waukegan Harbor

    A worker picking up trash near the Waukegan lakefront stumbled across 12- to 15-foot Burmese python Monday morning, but fortunately the animal was sluggish and easily captured. Wildlife experts said the potentially dangerous snake was seriously injured and was likely kept as a pet at some point.

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    President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event Monday in Cincinnati.

    Obama team tries to lower expectations for debates

    President Barack Obama's re-election campaign doesn't want to talk about what the Democrat is doing to prepare for the fall debates with Republican Mitt Romney. But aides are readily setting expectations — and not surprisingly, they want to keep them low for Obama while raising the stakes for Romney.

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    Online brokerage TD Ameritrade founder Joe Ricketts is putting millions of his own money into a campaign to try and pursuade backers of President Barack Obama to switch to GOP challenger Mitt Romney.

    Ricketts spending millions to urge Obama voters to shift

    Chicago Cubs owner Joe Ricketts will spend $10 million on television ads and voter-outreach efforts to help Republican challenger Mitt Romney defeat President Barack Obama, aides to Ricketts said Monday.

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    Palatine Mariano’s adding parking to meet high demand

    The ongoing demand for parking by both patrons and employees of Mariano's Fresh Market in Palatine soon will be aleviated, at least a bit. The village council Monday approved a plan that will allow the popular grocery store at 545 N. Hicks Road to reconfigure an outlot originally slated to house a small commercial building, as well as add employee spaces in the rear alley.

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    Thomas Durikn, left, attorney for 18-year-old Adel Daoud, and Daoud’s father, Ahmed Daoud, leave a news conference Monday at the federal courthouse in Chicago. Adel Daoud made an initial appearance in court on charges he sought to detonate what he believed to be a car bomb outside a Chicago bar last Friday night.

    Lawyer suggests bomb suspect was improperly lured into act

    An attorney for a West suburban teenager accused of trying to ignite what he thought was a car bomb outside of a Chicago bar said Monday that federal undercover agents may have improperly lured his client into the act. Defense lawyer Thomas Durkin spoke to reporters after 18-year-old Adel Daoud of Hillside made an initial appearance in federal court. Daoud is charged with attempting to use a...

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    Gov. Pat Quinn wants to close Tamms prison and four other correctional centers to save money.

    Analysis: State prison population at all-time high

    he number of inmates locked up in Illinois prisons is at an all-time high, according to an Associated Press analysis, and coincides with Gov. Pat Quinn's administration battle with state employees over closing correctional facilities. The Department of Corrections disputes the AP's findings and says the number is about 100 inmates lower. But the department's own numbers confirm that the prison...

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    Pat and Ralph Cook live across the street from the front gates of Medinah Country Club. They’re fine with the crowds that will come with the Ryder Cup. “If you don’t like the inconvenience, then don’t buy a house across from Medinah Country Club,” Pat Cook said.

    Medinah’s neighbors take Ryder Cup in stride

    Pat and Ralph Cook will have a birds-eye view of the 40,000 or so spectators expected to flock to the Ryder Cup next week. They live across the street from the entrance to Medinah Country Club, but take the expected congestion in good spirits. "If you don't like the inconvenience, then don't buy a house across from Medinah Country Club" Pat says.

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    Lake Zurich board backs ban on gambling

    Lake Zurich's ban on video gambling will continue, the village board decided Monday night. Following impassioned remarks from some area gambling opponents, trustees voted 4-0 to keep video poker and slot machines out of town. Some trustees said they have nothing personally against gambling, but didn't feel it was right for Lake Zurich.

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    Libyan military guards check one of the U.S. Consulate’s burnt buildings in Benghazi, Libya, Friday. The American ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed when a mob of protesters and gunmen overwhelmed the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, setting fire to it.

    Video shows Libyans trying to rescue US ambassador

    Libyans tried to rescue Ambassador Chris Stevens, cheering "God is great" and rushing him to a hospital after they discovered him still clinging to life inside the U.S. Consulate, according to witnesses and a new video that emerged Monday from last week's attack in the city of Benghazi.

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    Judge Robert Janes

    Two longtime Kane County judges to retire

    Kane County Judges Timothy Sheldon of Elgin and Robert Janes of St. Charles will be retiring from the bench in coming months. Sheldon helped create the county's mental health court and has been a judge since 1986. Janes also has handled a variety of assignments.

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    Kevin Grouwinkel

    Former library trustee running for Mt. Prospect village board

    Longtime Mount Prospect resident Kevin Grouwinkel has announced his intention to run for village trustee in April 2013. Grouwinkel is a former Mount Prospect Public Library trustee and former member of the village's safety commission. He is also a 15-year member of the Mount Prospect Lions Club and volunteer for Rainbow Hospice.

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    Tax conviction sends Wheeling business owner to prison

    Zhana Shnaydershteyn, the former owner of Wheeling-based Corporate Staffing and Leasing Services, Inc., has been sentenced to six months in prison on a conviction of failing to pay federal income tax.

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    Teachers cheer during a rally at the Wisconsin state Capitol in Madison on Friday.

    Confusion in wake of Wisconsin union ruling

    Wisconsin school and government employee unions on Monday were considering whether to seek new contract talks after a state court threw out a controversial law that restricts public workers' collective bargaining rights.

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    Chamber hosts estate planning for women session

    The Arlington Heights Chamber of Commerce presents "What Every Woman Should Know," a conversation with attorney Mildred Palmer, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 19 at the Daily Herald, 155. E. Algonquin Road, Arlington Heights.

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    Hoffman Estates to host international food fest

    Hoffman Estates will host an international food tasting festival at the end of October, to both showcase the area's many ethnic restaurants and to celebrate the arrival of Chef Patrick Guat and his culinary students from France. "We just want folks to come out and get an awareness of what's around the corner," said Director of Tourism Linda Scheck.

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    A bear cub nicknamed Boo Boo is examined Aug. 28 by Idaho officials after he was found by firefighters trying to escape a wildfire near Salmon, Idaho.

    Burned bear cub moved to Idaho wildlife sanctuary

    A bear cub rescued from a fire in the Idaho backcountry after suffering second-degree burns on all four of its paws has been moved to a wildlife sanctuary and is expected to make a full recovery, officials said Monday.

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    Mei Xiang, the female giant panda at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, has given birth to a cub following five consecutive pseudopregnancies in as many years.

    A cub is born to giant panda at National Zoo

    A giant panda at Washington's zoo surprised scientists and zookeepers by becoming a mom again after years of failed pregnancies.

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    No charges in crash that sent SUV into salon

    No charges will be filed in connection with a crash last week in which an SUV smashed through the window of a Wheeling beauty salon, injuring one employee, Wheeling Police Deputy Chief John Teevans said Monday.

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    ECC partners with Roosevelt to simplify student transfers

    Elgin Community College has entered a partnership with Roosevelt University that will make it easier for students to transfer to the four-year institution.

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    Basith Meer of Lincolnshire takes the Oath of Allegiance during a naturalization ceremony Monday at the Round Lake Beach Cultural & Civic Center. Mano a Mano Family Resource Center in partnership with the Round Lake Area Public Library hosted the event.

    Years of waiting ends in citizenship for 100 representing 33 countries

    They have been in the United States awhile, but Monday marked an important new day for 100 people gathered at the Round Lake Beach Cultural & Civic Center. Representing 33 countries, the candidates, as they are known, realized their dreams of becoming naturalized U.S. citizens.

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    From left, Dan Strandjord, Erica Wijenayaka and Ron Low, were among a group protesting the American Academy of Pediatrics’ stance on circumcision at the association’s Elk Grove Village headquarters Monday morning.

    Group protests pediatrics organization’s stance on circumcision

    A group of local protesters called on the American Academy of Pediatrics to retract a recent statement supportive of infant male circumcision in front of the group's Elk Grove Village headquarters Monday. While the statement doesn't recommend circumcision, it claims that its potential benefits outweigh the risks of harm.

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    District 95 Foundation fun run Sept. 30

    The Lake Zurich-based District 95 Educational Foundation will sponsor its second annual fun run. at 9 a.m. Sept. 30, with registration beginning at 7:30 a.m. The event takes place at Heritage Oaks Park and the Hawthorn Woods Country Club neighborhood.

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    Harvesting the Spirit benefit for Lambs Farm Oct. 13

    Harvesting the Spirit, the annual benefit for Lambs Farm, will be held from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13 at the Winter Garden at the Chicago Public Library. The event at the Harold Washington Library Center will raise money for Lambs Farm's programs for men and women with developmental disabilities. Reservations are $300 each.

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    Veterans receive winter coats as part of the Stand Down organized by the Veteran’s Assistance Commission of Lake County. High school football fans attending five upcoming games in Lake County and Palatine again are being asked this year to donate coats for veterans in need.

    High school football fans asked to help veterans keep warm

    High school football fans are being asked to help veterans fight the winter chill by donating coats at five upcoming games. The effort is in advance of the annual Stand Down on Oct. 16, organized by the Veteran's Assistance Commission of Lake County."There is more of an awareness of the issue of veterans now not being able to get jobs, not being able to take care of their families," said Jon...

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    Huntley principal says dress up, within reason

    Huntley High School students say a long-standing tradition during Homecoming Week has been banned. They say the senior class is no longer allowed to wear their own outfits during the week and have been told they will be barred from attending the Homecoming Dance if they do so. The principal, however, calls it a rumor that's gotten twisted.

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    Elgin man files federal discrimination lawsuit, wants job back

    An Elgin man is suing his former employer, alleging he was discriminated against and ultimately fired as a probation officer with the Illinois 16th Judicial Circuit because he's a 61-year-old, disabled black man.

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    Bolingbrook man on bond for robbery charged with taking iPhone

    A Bolingbrook man who authorities say has three misdemeanors and one felony pending in Rolling Meadows Third Municipal District has picked up another charge. Hoffman Estates police charged Clifton Stump, 24, with theft after they say he took an iPhone from another man on Aug. 29.

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    Christopher Peralta

    20 years for second person guilty in Elgin backpack murder

    An 18-year-old from Elgin was sentenced to 20 years in prison Monday after pleading guilty to his involvement in the murder of a teen over a backpack. Christopher Peralta was set to go on trial for the spring 2010 stabbing death of Edgar Guerra-Guzman, 16, of Larkin High School. A co-defendant, who actually stabbed the victim, is serving a 25-year term.

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    U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin

    Durbin: Republicans will keep majority in House, Dems in Senate

    Illinois' senior U.S. senator says it's likely the U.S. House and Senate majorities will change little after the Nov. 6 election. "I think it's likely we'll see an outcome similar to what we have today," Sen. Dick Durbin, of Springfield, said Monday.

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    Patricia Mackie of Bolingbrook watches as her daughter, Delilah, works the crane at the DuPage Children’s Museum to load luggage and freight.

    New train exhibit steams into DuPage Children’s Museum

    A new model train exhibit unveiled Monday at the DuPage Children's Museum in Naperville proves to be even more kid-friendly than the old one. And the best news? Youngsters will have a whole year to check it out.

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    Meryl Streep

    Streep coming to Bloomingdale for epilepsy fundraiser

    Actress Meryl Streep will come to Hilton Indian Lakes Resort in Bloomingdale to speak at a charity gala for The Charlie Foundation to Cure Pediatric Epilepsy. Streep has been involved with the group that was founded by her friend, comedy director Jim Abrahams, after his son Charlie suffered from the illness.

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    Seniors in Illinois reminded to get flu shots

    September is Healthy Aging Month, and John Holton, director for the Illinois Department on Aging, says it's a good time for older adults to take preventative health measures. Holton says seniors, especially those with chronic health conditions, are at increased risk for flu.

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    Illinois Senate Republican leader Christine Radogno and Illinois House Republican leader Tom Cross speak with the Daily Herald Editorial Board.

    GOP says Medicaid cuts are too slow

    Top Illinois Republicans on Monday criticized Gov. Pat Quinn for not yet taking away state health care help from people who are ineligible, but the governor's office says that process is well under way.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    About $150 of damage was caused when someone in a black pickup truck intentionally drove through a front lawn in the 200 block of Sandholm Court at about 4:35 a.m. Tuesday, according to a Geneva police report.

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    Staff changes up for vote in Wauconda

    The Wauconda village board will meet Tuesday to name Zaida Torres the town's interim administrator. Torres will replace Dave Geary, who resigned last month to become business manager for the Wauconda Fire Protection District.

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    Rauschenberger at GOP breakfast in Schaumburg

    Retired Illinois state Sen. Steve Rauschenberger will be the guest speaker at the Schaumburg Township Republican Organization's next monthly breakfast meeting at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 22 at Chandler's Chophouse, 401 N. Roselle Road in Schaumburg. Other speakers include current Republican candidates Cary Collins, running for the 22nd District state Senate seat, and Ramiro Juarez, running for...

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    Maggie Daley, right, and daughter Nora Conroy in 2006

    Mexican art museum to honor Maggie Daley

    The National Museum of Mexican Art plans an exhibit honoring late Chicago first lady Maggie Daley. The museum exhibit "Maggie Daley: A Tribute by Chicago's Youth" opens Oct. 5 and runs through Feb. 17.

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    Round Lake Beach man dies after tree limb crushes him

    A 53-year-old man helping to cut down a tree in Round Lake Beach was killed over the weekend when a falling limb hit him in the head and torso, authorities said. Florencia Vega, of Round Lake Beach, was pronounced dead at the scene at 3 p.m. Saturday following the accident, said Lake County Coroner Artis Yancey.

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    Chicago, Springfield to share $8M transit grant

    Transit systems in Chicago and Springfield will share nearly $8 million in federal money to pay for environmental improvements. The CTA will receive $4.7 million to replace conventional diesel buses with larger, diesel-electric hybrid buses. Springfield will receive more than $3 million to buy compressed natural gas buses.

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    Chloe Lukasiak and her mom, Christi, from Lifetime’s reality TV show “Dance Moms” take part in a question-and-answer session with students at the Dance Project dance studio in Hoffman Estates. The mother-daughter duo visited the studio Saturday.

    ‘Dance Moms’ stars visit Hoffman Estates studio

    The Dance Project dance studio in Hoffman Estates hosted a mother-daughter duo from the Lifetime show "Dance Moms" on Saturday. 11-year-old Chloe Lukasiak danced with more than 60 local students and later participated in a Q & A session and signed autographs with her mom, Christi.

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    Family searches for man who disappeared from train

    The family of a retired California man who disappeared from an Amtrak train somewhere between Denver and Chicago last week is searching for him in Nebraska.It's not clear where 69-year-old Charlie Dowd left the train, but family members are focusing their initial efforts in Omaha and Lincoln because of unconfirmed reports that an Amtrak conductor may have talked to the retired firefighter Friday...

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    Gov. Pat Quinn

    GOP says Quinn is delaying checks of Medicaid eligibility

    Republican leaders accuse the Quinn administration of dragging its feet on a new effort to make sure Medicaid goes only to people who qualify. But they also acknowledge the governor has hit a key target date.

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    Smaller, more subdued groups of teachers picket Monday outside Morgan Park High School in Chicago as a strike by Chicago Teachers Union members heads into its second week.

    Emanuel: Court must end teachers strike

    Mayor Rahm Emanuel asked a state court Monday to force Chicago school teachers back to work and end a weeklong strike he calls illegal. The union immediately condemned the move as an act of vindictiveness by a "bullying" mayor. The request argues that the labor action is illegal because state law bars the union from striking on anything but economic issues, and that the work stoppage is focused...

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    Mackenzie Kamysz is visited by the newly-released monarch butterfly.

    Monarchs capture the imagination of 7th-grade science class

    Nancy Gottung opened her seventh-grade science class last week with this rather unusual request: "Raise your hands if you want to have honey put on your nose — for the butterfly to land on it." Gottung has taught science at St. James School in Arlington Heights for five years, but this was the first time she and her students raised monarch butterflies, carefully observing their various life...

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    Sen. Mark Kirk has been absent from Washington for eight months while recovering from a stroke.

    In Iran sanctions legislation, a glimpse at Kirk's work from home

    While U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk of Highland Park is recovering from a stoke suffered in January and unable to cast votes on the Senate floor, his work on recent Iran sanctions legislation sheds light on his strategy for keeping involved from afar. The Highland Park Republican was ranked late last month by Foreign Policy magazine as the 26th most powerful Republican in the nation on foreign policy.

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    Jeffrey H. Beard

    Glen Ellyn suspect nabbed after home invasion, shooting

    A Wheaton man suspected of invading a Glen Ellyn home and threatening two people at gunpoint was taken into custody after police zapped him with a stun gun as he tried to flee, authorities said Monday. Jeffrey Beard, 64, of the 1400 block of Avery Avenue, is being held on $1 million bail.

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    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is reshaping his campaign in an effort to present to voters more than criticism of the Obama administration.

    Obama takes on China as Romney shifts strategy

    Appealing to Rust Belt voters, President Barack Obama announced a new trade enforcement action against China on Monday, while Republican challenger Mitt Romney planned a greater emphasis on policy details that distinguish him from Obama to stop the incumbent's election momentum.

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    Fereidoun Abbasi Davani, Iran’s Vice President and Head of Atomic Energy Organization, delivers a speech at the general conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, at the International Center, in Vienna, Austria, Monday.

    Iran nuke chief harshly criticizes atomic agency

    Iran's nuclear chief said Monday that "terrorists and saboteurs" might have infiltrated the International Atomic Energy Agency in an effort to derail his nation's atomic program, in an unprecedentedly harsh attack on the integrity of the U.N. organization.

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    Photographer, filmmaker, and Elgin Community College alumnus Sandro Miller will showcase his work this fall at the college´s Spartan Drive Campus, 1700 Spartan Drive, Elgin. His one-person show will be held from Tuesday, Oct. 2, through Saturday, Nov. 3, in Safety-Kleen Gallery One located in Building H, the ECC Arts Center.

    Distinguished ECC alum returns with one-person show

    Photographer, filmmaker, and Elgin Community College alumnus Sandro Miller will showcase his work this fall at the college's Spartan Drive Campus, 1700 Spartan Drive, Elgin. His one-person show will be held from Tuesday, Oct. 2, through Saturday, Nov. 3. An opening reception will take place from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, in the gallery.

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    Round Lake Beach man dies in tree-cutting accident

    A 53-year-old man helping to cut down a tree in Round Lake Beach was killed over the weekend when a falling limb hit him in the head and torso, authorities said. Florencia Vega, of Round Lake Beach, was pronounced dead at the scene at 3 p.m. Saturday following the accident, said Lake County Coroner Artis Yancey.

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    Sara Emerson's house on South California Avenue in Posen is just a stone's throw from the Tri-State Tollway. It's slated to be acquired as part of interchange construction.

    Tollway growth leaves homeowners in bad spot

    It's bad to live in a neighborhood targeted for a construction project. It's even worse when you have to negotiate prices at a time when the housing market's shot. There's a sadness around the neighborhood where the Illinois tollway is building an interchange with the Tri-State and I-57. ”I don't know what I'm going to do or where I'm going to go,” said resident Sara Emerson.

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    The McHenry Outdoor Theater will hold a fundraiser Oct. 5 and 6 to help pay for a new digital projection system. Its owner believes “sooner or later” the theater will have to go digital to stay in business.

    McHenry drive-in holding fundraiser to go digital

    The McHenry Outdoor Theater has been in existence since the 1940s, and its new owner hopes it can carry on into the future by converting from film to digital. So it's fitting that one of the movies that will be shown during a fundraiser this fall to help pay for the theater's digital conversion will be "Back to the Future."

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    Algonquin resident Glenn Schilke takes a couple photos at the construction site after a groundbreaking ceremony for Algonquin’s western bypass. Schilke’s home on Route 31 will be spared now that the project to alleviate downtown congestion is going around the downtown area and not through it.

    Officials celebrate Algonquin bypass

    Federal, state and local officials gathered to officially break ground on the Algonquin Bypass construction project which, has been decades in the making. The new road project will create a bypass around downtown Algonquin and, village officials hope, bring a more downtown feel to Main Street again.

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    North Aurora Police Deputy Chief David Fisher

    Two deputy chiefs designated

    The North Aurora Police Department has reorganized its command staff, and will have two deputy chiefs.

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    League of Women Voters wants to register voters

    Kane County League of Women Voters has scheduled several dates to register voters for the November election.

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    East Dundee’s village hall, police station and fire department are all squeezed onto the same block downtown. If the fire district wins voter approval to build a new station farther east, the village would contribute to its construction and then revamp the old fire station into a more modern police station and village hall.

    E. Dundee may give $2 million to help offset fire referendum

    East Dundee officials are partnering with the local fire district to lessen the impact of an upcoming referendum for a $5.5 million fire station. They also say a positive vote would pave the way for a renovated police station and village hall.

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    College of DuPage began branding and marketing the chaparral logo a few years ago at places such as the football stadium. Now, the college is getting an 8-foot statue of a chaparral to continue that effort.

    COD commissions sculpture of chaparral mascot

    A fine-feathered piece of College of DuPage school spirit will be cemented into history next year. More accurately, it's getting bronzed. The college is hiring an Omaha-based sculptor to create an 8-foot bronze depiction of a chaparral. COD officials say the chaparral, also known as a roadrunner, creates a unifying spirit on campus and helps in the school's marketing efforts.

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    Voters in Winfield and Wood Dale soon will get to share their opinion on whether video gambling machines should be allowed in their towns. Video gambling is among a variety of topics that will appear on Nov. 6 ballots throughout DuPage County.

    Array of questions on DuPage County ballots

    From term limits to video gambling to whether corporations are people, voters throughout DuPage County will be asked to weigh in on a wide range of topics during the upcoming election. Local government entities — either by choice or compelled by citizen petition drives — have put nearly two dozen questions on various Nov. 6 ballots.

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    2 Wash. state teenage boys die after hiking fall

    Two teenage boys died Sunday during a hike in the mountains east of Seattle after falling from rocks near a water fall. A group of four teenage boys had gone hiking to Otter Falls when two of them climbed the rocks near the falls but fell about 100 feet, the King County Sheriff's office said Monday.

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    Protestors chant during an Occupy Wall Street march Monday in New York. About a dozen protestors were arrested Monday after sitting on the sidewalk.

    Occupy Wall Street protesters march near Wall St.

    Occupy Wall Street protesters have been marching in small groups around Manhattan's financial district to mark the anniversary of the grass-roots movement. About a dozen were arrested Monday after sitting on the sidewalk.

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    Calif. DNA collection from arrestees challenged

    Technological advances in genetic research and computers in recent years have turned solving "cold cases" into near-routine police work. But on Wednesday, the American Civil Liberties Union will argue before a federal appellate court in San Francisco that California's DNA collection efforts have become unconstitutionally aggressive and that the spike in hits comes at the expense of civil...

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    Inmate seeking sex change eligible for legal fees

    A federal judge who ruled that a Massachusetts prison inmate is eligible for a state-funded sex change operation has determined that the inmate is also eligible for public reimbursement of legal fees.

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    NATO force: 1 wounded in latest insider attack

    An Afghan soldier turned his weapon on a vehicle he believed was driven by NATO soldiers on a shared base in the south, slightly wounding a foreign civilian worker, officials said Monday. It was the latest in a string of insider attacks by Afghan forces against their international allies.

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    Officer shot in temple rampage attends fundraiser
    The police officer shot 15 times during a deadly rampage at the Sikh (seek) temple in Oak Creek makes his first public appearance at a community fundraiser.

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    Autopsy shows inmate had flesh-eating bacteria

    An autopsy shows that a Dixon Correctional Center inmate died of blood poisoning and a rare flesh-eating disease.

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    Delta makes emergency landing near Green Bay

    Officials at an airport near Green Bay say a Delta flight made an emergency landing after smoke filled the airplane's cabin.

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    Afghan police stand by burning tires during a protest Monday in Kabul, Afghanistan. Hundreds of Afghans burned cars and threw rocks at a U.S. military base as a demonstration against an anti-Islam film that ridicules the Prophet Muhammad turned violent in the Afghan capital early Monday.

    Violent clashes over anti-Islam film continue in 3 nations

    Hundreds of protesters demonstrating against an anti-Islam film torched a press club and a government building in northwest Pakistan on Monday, sparking clashes with police that left at least one person dead. Demonstrations also turned violent outside a U.S. military base in Afghanistan and the U.S. Embassy in Indonesia.

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    Fereidoun Abbasi Davani, Iran’s Vice President and Head of Atomic Energy Organization, delivers a speech at the general conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, Monday.

    Iran nuke chief harshly criticizes atomic agency

    VIENNA — Iran’s nuclear chief warned Monday that “terrorists and saboteurs” might have infiltrated the International Atomic Energy Agency in an effort to derail his country’s atomic program, in an unprecedentedly harsh attack on the integrity of the U.N. organization and its probe of allegations that Tehran might be striving to make nuclear arms.

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    Chinese policemen huddle near the Chengdu Intermediate People’s Court, where Wang Lijun will be tried on Tuesday, in Chengdu in southwest China’s Sichuan province Monday. At the height of his career, Wang led a police crackdown on the violent underworld in a sprawling metropolis. Now the former police chief is in the hands of the opaque Chinese justice he once brandished against others.

    Secret hearing Monday for police chief scandal in China

    China opened the trial for an ex-police chief at the center of the country's worst political scandal in decades, unexpectedly staging a closed-door hearing Monday, a day earlier than publicly announced. Authorities justified the closed proceedings by saying state secrets were being discussed in the trial of Wang Lijun, who is charged with defection, abuse of power and other crimes.

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    Sept. 21 is the second of two “Tomato Daze,” when shoppers can purchase 10 pounds of certified organic, on-site grown red slicer and heirloom tomatoes for $20, at the Prairie Crossing Farmers Market, held from 4-7 p.m. Fridays through Sept. 28 at Station Square, 970 Harris Road, Grayslake.

    Paririe Crossing Farmers Market offers local tomatoes and meat in Grayslake

    The Prairie Crossing Farmers Market runs from 4-7 p.m. on Friday afternoons through Sept. 28 at Station Square, 970 Harris Road. Sept. 21 is the second of two "Tomato Daze" at the Farmers Market. Shoppers can purchase 10 pounds of delicious red slicer and heirloom tomatoes for only $20 (while supplies last). All tomatoes are certified organic, and are grown on-site at the Prairie Crossing...

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    A freed Myanmar political prisoner, right, is welcomed by his friend as he comes out of Insein prison in Yangon, Myanmar, in January. Myanmar’s government said Monday it has granted amnesties for 514 prisoners, including some foreigners, on humanitarian grounds.

    New Myanmar amnesty includes political prisoners

    Myanmar announced on Monday that it is releasing 514 prisoners under an amnesty, including some foreigners and political detainees. The announcement came the same day that Human Rights Watch urged Myanmar's government to immediately release all remaining political prisoners and lift travel and other restrictions on those who have already been freed.

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    Steve Zukerman interviews Nelson Price about the history of the Dunham house and the area around it for the documentary film project. The Dunham house in Kempton, Ind., is the subject of a documentary film project about President Barack Obama’s ancestral roots in Indiana.

    Obama’s ancestral home in Indiana subject of documentary

    Indiana history buff Nelson Price relaxes in the sunny former master bedroom's sitting room of Obama's forefathers, looking out on the acres of land that once belonged to them. The author of Indiana history books and a local radio host, Price has followed the story of this house closely since he first invited the owner, Shawn Christopher Clements, to speak on his show.

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    Lebanon demands explanation from Iran over troops

    Lebanese President Michel Suleiman has asked for official clarifications from Iran over statements by a senior commander that they have military advisers in Lebanon.

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    Syrian jets hit Lebanese territory near border

    Missiles fired by Syrian warplanes hit Lebanese territory Monday in one of the most serious cross-border violations since Syria's crisis began 18 months ago, security officials in Beirut and Lebanese state media said.

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    Dad of R.I. club fire victim wants memorial at site

    The father of one of those who died in the Station Nightclub fire is calling on Rhode Island to take the land on which the nightclub sat by eminent domain for a memorial. Dave Kane tells WPRI-TV he's upset over plans to put a memorial for fire victims on another site.

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    The asphalt in front of Dundee Automotive has buckled more than five inches in the last few days. Employees spray painted the crack when it was even.

    Weekend in Review: Sinkhole in E. Dundee; NHL lockout

    What you may have missed this weekend: "American Idol" picks its last two judges; NHL begins lockout; Rosemont's athletic training facility nearly done; health clinic plan for Dist. 116 high school creates a stir; sinkhole threatens E. Dundee business; Fox Valley Marathon has record-breaking day; Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel seeks court order to end strike; good day for Cubs' Rizzo; Sox ride...

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    Dawn Patrol: Chicago teachers strike goes on; mayor seeks injunction

    Chicago teachers strike to continue today; Mayor Emanuel calls for injunction. Warrenville fire under investigation. Longtime Wheaton teacher dies at 84. Sox' last game against Tigers today.

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    Drive-in’s big metal speakers aren’t going away

    Though the Cascade Drive-In Theater in West Chicago may be undergoing a switch from film to digital projection, there's still some old technology that is staying put: namely, the theater's in-car speakers. Scattered about the drive-in's lot, the nostalgic relics are rare today, even among remaining drive-ins.

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    James LeRoy, 6, of Kankakee and Mason Broski, 6, of Hobart, Indiana battle it out during the Revolutionary War Re-enactment weekend at Cantigny Park in Wheaton, Sunday.

    Images: The Week In Pictures
    This edition of The Week In Pictures features 9/11 memorials, festivals, a Revolutionary War re-enactment, and people with underwear on their heads.

Sports

  •  

    Understanding the Ryder Cup format
    Here is a glance at the format for the 39th Ryder Cup at Medinah Country Club. There will be a total of 28 matches played in three different forms of match play golf: Foursome, Four-Ball and Single matches.

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    Rachal to start at left guard for Bears vs. Rams

    The Bears will start Chilo Rachal at left guard Sunday in place of Chris Spencer, after the offensive line allowed 7 sacks vs. the Packers last week.

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    Falcons strong safety William Moore sacks Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning in the second half Monday in Atlanta.

    Falcons beat mistake-prone Broncos 27-21

    Peyton Manning kept throwing up wobbly passes. The Atlanta Falcons kept picking them off. Matt Ryan and the Falcons built a big lead and held on for a 27-21 victory over the Denver Broncos on Monday night, an erratic effort by Manning that showed his comeback in the Mile High City is still a work in progress.

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    Monday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Monday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Monday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Philadelphia Phillies starting pitcher Cliff Lee was in control Monday night, issuing just one walk in a victory over the New York Mets.

    Lee strikes out 10 as Phillies top Mets 3-1

    Cliff Lee struck out 10 while outdueling Cy Young contender R.A. Dickey, and the Phillies regained their winning touch by beating the New York Mets 3-1 Monday night.

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    Atlanta’s Dan Uggla hits a three-run home run during the first inning Monday in Miami.

    Uggla homers in Braves’ 7-5 win over Marlins

    Dan Uggla got Atlanta started with his bat. His glove helped finish off his former club. Uggla hit a three-run home run in the first inning and sprawled to snare a ground ball that ended a Miami threat in the eighth, Martin Prado tied a career best with four hits and the Braves beat the Marlins 7-5 on Monday night.

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    Boston’s Jacoby Ellsbury, right, high-fives teammate Pedro Ciriaco after the Red Sox defeated the Tampa Bay Rays 5-2 on Monday in St. Petersburg, Fla.

    Ellsbury leads Red Sox over sliding Rays 5-2

    Jacoby Ellsbury homered and drove in three runs, Aaron Cook stopped his five-game losing streak and the Boston Red Sox beat the Tampa Bay Rays 5-2 on Monday night.

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    MLB investigating homophobic slur

    Major League Baseball is checking reports that Toronto Blue Jays shortstop Yunel Escobar played Saturday's game against Boston wearing eye-black displaying a homophobic slur written in Spanish.

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    St. Charles E. blows out Belvidere

    St. Charles East had trouble finding the back of the net for the first nine minutes of Monday's St. Charles East tournament opener against Belvidere. The Saints certainly didn't have any difficulties soon after that. Andrew Shone led the way with three first-half goals and six other Saints scored in a lopsided 9-0 victory.

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    Boys soccer/Fox Valley roundup

    Larkin 4, St. Charles North 2: Larkin got goals from four different players to win this Upstate Eight River game. Erik Rodriguez, Matthias Warren, Diego Ramirez and Tony Hernandez each scored for the Royals (9-2, 3-0). Albair Dominguez made 12 saves in goal.Marian Central 1, Hampshire 0: Andrew Peterson had 6 saves and Cesar Esparza stopped 3 shots but Hampshire (2-6-1) couldn’t find the back of the net in this nonconference loss.

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    Girls volleyball/Fox Valley roundup

    Hannah McGlone had 8 kills and 2 blocks Monday to lead Streamwood’s girls volleyball team to a 25-17, 25-16 Upstate Eight River win over Elgin.Brittany Kemp had 10 assists for the Sabres, while Miranda Shaw served 3 aces and sophomore Tawny Carroll had 3 aces and 12 digs.“The girls came out ready to play tonight,” said Streamwood coach Lisa Vazzana. “They started point-for-point in each game but at around 15 we pulled ahead. Our hits were top-notch and Hannah McGlone was on fire in the front row. Our defense and coverage was also some of the best I’ve seen yet.”Wheaton Academy d. St. Edward: Katie Swanson had 6 kills and 6 digs and Rena Ranallo added 5 kills for St. Edward in a 25-20, 25-16 Suburban Christian loss. Mallory Gross had 11 assists and Allison Kruk added 9 digs for the Green Wave (7-9, 2-2).

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    Sky scouting report
    Sky scout for Tuesday: Sky at Seattle Storm

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    White Sox bullpen really pitches in for win

    With 13 relief pitchers in the bullpen courtesy of the September roster expansion, White Sox manager Robin Ventura has been wearing out a path from the dugout to the pitcher's mound lately.

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    White Sox scouting report
    Scouting report: White Sox vs. Kansas City Royals

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    St. Charles North’s Jordyn McFarlane won Monday at the Elgin Country Club girls golf invitational with a score of 38.

    McFarlane, St. Charles North nab Elgin CC titles

    St. Charles North senior Jordyn McFarlane has been practicing a bit extra lately on her putting game. That extra practice paid off for McFarlane Monday when she used just 17 putts to shoot a 2-over par 38 and win the individual championship of the Elgin Country Club Invitational. McFarlane's round also contributed to the North Stars shooting a 168 to run away with the team trophy. Geneva (193) and Jacobs (201) were a distant second and third, respectively.

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    Sydney Dusel of Naperville Central took part in the Metea Valley girls diving invitational Saturday.

    Naperville Central loaded with diving talent

    Naperville Central first-year diving coach David Likar is impressed by the tremendous amount of talent he has on his Redhawks team.

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    WW South junior Keisha Clousing is mixing a USTA tournament schedule with her high school schedule.

    Benet’s Comerford hits milestone

    For the Benet girls tennis team it was a 5-0 victory to maintain its undefeated record and move it to 10-0 for the season.

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    Coach Mark Buesing’s Libertyville boys cross country team looked beyond its immediate surroundings to help support disadvantaged youth by donating to By The Hand.

    Libertyville’s boys cross country team lends a Hand

    In addition to all the time they work on conditioning to run in meets every week, Libertyville's boys cross country runners also spend some important hours away from the sport. They have once again donated to "By The Hand," a Chicago charity that works with disadvantaged youth. The Wildcats followed an eight-year tradition and this time raised $2,000 for the charity.

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    With both sides silent, NHL players hold informal practice

    With NHL players unable to use team facilities, it was up to Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews to organize Monday's informal practice that included paying for ice time at Johnny's Ice House West. "It's like pulling teeth trying to collect 10 bucks from everybody," Toews joked. Welcome to another NHL lockout.

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    White Sox right fielder Alex Rios pats center fielder Dewayne Wise on the back after Monday’s victory over the Detroit Tigers at U.S. Cellular Field.

    For White Sox, the defense never rests

    Fielding separates the White Sox and Tigers in the American League Central race like a couple hundred horsepower separates a Ferrari from a Focus. The Sox catch the ball routinely and throw it accurately. The Tigers, well, not so much. Defense isn't a sexy aspect of the game. Chicks dig the longball and the pitchers who make TV commercials saying as much.

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    Detroit Tigers second baseman Omar Infante tries to complete the double play forcing White Sox outfielder Alex Rios out at second during Monday’s fifth inning at U.S. Cellular Field. Rios foiled the double play, allowing Adam Dunn and Paul Konerko to score off a fielders choice hit by Dayan Viciedo.

    Rios’ slide boosts White Sox’ lead to 3 games

    It was only fitting that, in the biggest game of the long season, the White Sox' best all-around player came through again. Written off as a bum in 2011, Alex Rios came back with a vengeance this year and has kept the Sox in first place with a consistent combination of solid hitting, defense and speed. In Monday's 5-4 makeup victory over the Tigers at U.S. Cellular Field, Rios showed off yet another skill: toughness.

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    Bears defensive back D.J. Moore, who played with Jay Cutler at Vanderbilt, says the Bears quarterback was wrong to challenge and shove a teammate on the sideline. He also said the fiery QB always has been that way.

    Teammate criticizes Cutler, says QB was wrong

    Bears cornerback D.J. Moore was critical of quarterback Jay Cutler's behavior toward teammates during Thursday night's loss to the Packers in Green Bay. "I think it's just wrong," said Moore, who also played with Cutler at Vanderbilt.

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    Dayan Viciedo hits into a two-run fielder’s choice, scoring Adam Dunn and Paul Konerko, after Detroit Tigers second baseman Omar Infante was unable to turn the double play in Monday’s fifth inning at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Sox now three games ahead of Detroit

    Omar Infante's throwing error on a potential double play helped Chicago scored two runs in the fifth inning Monday and the White Sox beat the Detroit Tigers 5-4 in a pivotal makeup game. Chicago increased its lead in the AL Central to three games.

  •  
    It took more than its historic clubhouse for Medinah Country Club to land the 2012 Ryder Cup. Its rich tradition of hosting top golf events and the enthusiastic support from Medinah's members were key factors.

    Why Medinah and Ryder Cup are a perfect match

    What is it about Medinah Country Club that has continued to lure the biggest of the big events like next the Ryder Cup?It's more than just the gorgeous layout. A lot more.It's the infrastructure. It's the location. And perhaps most important, it's the determined Medinah membership that continues to push to host top-flight events that has led us to this point.

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    If NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said they got it right to end labor strife 2005, why is there another lockout now?

    NHL fans want hockey, not Bettman’s promise

    Just seven years ago, Gary Bettman promised hockey fans that the pain of missing an entire season was worth it to guarantee economic stability and heightened competitive balance. Now he says that CBA isn't worth the paper it's printed on.

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    Mike North video: Is New York’s image changing?

    According to Mike North, it seems the New York city persona is changing. From Mayor Bloomberg limiting the sale of big gulps to people crying foul because Giants' quarterback Eli Manning went to take a knee to end the game when Tampa Bay Buccaneers weren't quite ready to call it quit, New York is changing.

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    Blackhawks announce plans during lockout

    On the first full day of the NHL lockout Sunday, the Blackhawks postponed Saturday's training-camp festival. The event will be rescheduled if there is a training camp, and all tickets will be honored, according to the club. The Hawks also sent an email to season-ticket holders outlining their plan for canceled games, if it comes to that.

  •  
    Cubs prospect Jorge Soler has the build and swing of a power hitter, says Len Kasper after watching Soler take batting practice at Wrigley Field.

    Positives are there for Cubs’ future

    Jorge Soler showed a quick, very powerful swing in his batting practice session at Wrigley Field. Soler has the build and swing of a power hitter, something the Cubs definitely could use down the road.

Business

  •  

    Demolition of historic Wheeling building delayed

    A Milwaukee Avenue building won a reprieve from the wrecking ball Monday night when a Wheeling trustee pointed out its historical significance.

  •  
    Russ Wasendorf, Sr., CEO of Peregrine Financial Group, Inc., pleaded guilty Monday to carrying out a 20-year fraud that duped investors and transformed his image from a highly-regarded businessman to one of Iowa’s most notorious corporate criminals.

    Peregrine CEO pleads guilty to cheating investors

    Peregrine Financial Group CEO Russ Wasendorf Sr. pleaded guilty Monday to carrying out a 20-year fraud that duped investors and transformed his image from a highly-regarded businessman to one of Iowa's most notorious corporate criminals.

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    Protestors and police face off during an Occupy Wall Street march Monday in New York. More than 100 Occupy Wall Street protestors were arrested during marches and demonstrations around New York’s financial district on the anniversary of the grass-roots movement.

    Over 100 Occupy Wall Street arrests in NYC

    Police say more than 100 people have been arrested as Occupy Wall Street protesters march in small groups around Manhattan's financial district to mark the anniversary of the grass-roots movement.

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    U.S. stocks fell, pulling the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index down from the highest level since 2007, as European finance chiefs deadlocked at debt-crisis talks and New York-area manufacturing slumped.

    US stocks slip; Apple hits new high

    After surging over four days to near pre-recession highs, stocks slipped further from that goal Monday following a new sign of a slowdown in the U.S. economy and worries over Europe's struggle to keep its currency union intact.

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    GOP Presidential candidate Mitt Romney spoke at Acme Industries in Elk Grove Village in August.

    Suburban CEOs, business owners back Romney

    If the number of chief executive officers and business owners who contribute directly to the presidential races are any indication of a winner, GOP candidate Mitt Romney would grab the lead, at least in the Chicago suburbs. Leaders of suburban businesses who contributed to presidential campaigns favored Romney with $209,454 compared to $85,530 for President Barack Obama, according to figures obtained from the Federal Elections Commission.

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    Local business leaders part of political process

    We take a look at which local CEOS are heavy contributors to the Obama or Romney presidential campaigns. This one is a sidebar on business leaders who are delegates to the conventions

  •  
    Gap Inc. also operates stores under Old Navy, Banana Republic as well as under Piperlime.

    Gap names Rebekka Bay as head of global design

    Gap Inc. has tapped Rebekka Bay as creative director and executive vice president for global design, effective Oct. 1.

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    AT&T Inc., the largest U.S. phone company, said customers ordered a record number of the Apple Inc. iPhone 5.

    AT&T says preorders of iPhone 5 surpass those of previous models

    AT&T Inc., the largest U.S. phone company, said customers ordered a record number of the Apple Inc. iPhone 5.AT&T subscribers ordered more of the new smartphone model than any previous iPhone both on its first day of preorders and during the weekend, the carrier said in a statement today, without providing details.

  •  
    Supporters of President Barack Obama’s health care law outside the Supreme Court in Washington after the court’s ruling was announced. Americaís health care system is unsustainable. Itís not one problem, but three combined: high cost, uneven quality and millions uninsured. Major changes will keep coming. Every family will be affected.

    WHY IT MATTERS: Health care

    America's health care system is unsustainable. It's not one problem, but three combined: high cost, uneven quality and millions uninsured. Major changes will keep coming. Every family will be affected. President Barack Obama's health care law will extend coverage to 30 million uninsured and keep the basic design of Medicare and Medicaid the same. Mitt Romney would repeal Obama's health care overhaul; what parts he'd replace have yet to be spelled out.

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    Fitch cuts Navistar ratings on cash flow worries

    Fitch Ratings on Monday cut its issuer default ratings for Lisle-based Navistar International Corp. and its financing subsidiary another notch deeper into non-investment grade status, citing the increasing risk surrounding the company's cash flow. Fitch lowered the ratings to "CCC" from "B-." The outlook is negative.

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    Ikea CEO to step down next year

    Ikea says CEO Mikael Ohlsson will retire next year after 34 years of working for the world's largest furniture retailer.The Swedish company announced Monday that Ohlsson, who has been chief executive since 2009, will be replaced in September 2013 by Peter Agnefjall, who has temporarily been appointed vice president of the group until he takes over the top post.

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    Federal judge delays Google case pending appeal

    A federal appeals judge in New York has agreed to delay a court challenge to Google Inc.'s plans to create the world's largest digital library while the court considers whether authors should receive class status.The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan issued a one-page order Monday. The case is stalled while the court considers an appeal by Google.

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    Long flight delays soar in July

    The number of long delays in July involving planes stuck on airport tarmacs was more than the previous eight months combined, the government said Monday. Twenty eight planes were stuck on the ground at U.S. airports for more than three hours that month, the height of the summer travel season. Eighteen of those planes were operated by U.S. carriers.

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    Rush Luangsuwan and his wife, Jennifer Mawdsley, both of Woodridge, get ready for a double-feature at the Cascade Drive-In Theater in West Chicago.

    Nostalgic drive-ins must go digital, too

    At the Cascade Drive-In movie theater in West Chicago, nostalgia abounds. But as one of the few remaining drive-ins, it's also finding new ways to adapt. And it likely has to, if it wants to survive. Cascade owner Jeff Kohlberg recently decided the 51-year-old theater will convert this fall from showing movies on old 35-millimeter film to new digital equipment. Without it, the theater would have to close, he said.

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    Iqbal Arshad

    An inside look at how Libertyville engineers designed latest Razrs

    KukeIqbal Arshad knows about that "aha moment," when something just feels right. ---- The senior vice president of global product development at Motorola Mobility felt that moment when he first held the prototype of Droid Razr M, the latest in a line of ultrathin Android smartphones produced after the legendary clamshell Razr.

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    People shop at a vegetable market in Mumbai, India, Monday, Sept. 17, 2012. India’s central bank, Reserve Bank of India, on Monday cut the cash reserve ratio as it tries to

    India central bank cuts cash reserve ratio
    India's central bank Monday cut the cash reserve ratio as it tries to kick-start flagging growth and welcomed government efforts to open Asia's third-largest economy to more foreign investment.The Reserve Bank of India said the share of deposits that banks must keep with it as reserves was cut by a quarter percentage point to 4.5 percent, injecting about 170 billion rupees ($3.2 billion) into the banking system.

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    So much for silence from telemarketers at the cherished dinner hour, or any other hour of the day. Complaints to the government are up sharply about unwanted phone solicitations, raising questions about how well the federal “do-not-call” registry is working.

    Complaints about automated calls up sharply

    So much for silence from telemarketers at the cherished dinner hour, or any other hour of the day.Complaints to the government are up sharply about unwanted phone solicitations, raising questions about how well the federal "do-not-call" registry is working. The biggest category of complaint: those annoying prerecorded pitches called robocalls that hawk everything from lower credit card interest rates to new windows for your home.

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    A Chinese policeman directs traffic at a road junction in Chengdu in southwest China’s Sichuan province Monday.

    China files trade case against Washington

    China has filed a trade case challenging U.S. anti-dumping measures against a wide range of Chinese goods including kitchen appliances, magnets and paper.The Chinese government said it filed the case Monday with the World Trade Organization in Geneva. That came after news reports said the Obama administration will file its own WTO case this week accusing Beijing of improperly subsidizing exports of autos and auto parts.

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    Russia to sell $5.7 billion stake in Sberbank

    Russia's Central Bank says it will sell part of its majority stake in the state-controlled Sberbank in a move that could raise some $5.7 billion.The Central Bank said in a statement Monday that it will sell 7.6 percent of its stock. That will reduce its share, held on behalf of the government, to 50 percent plus one share.

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    Merkel insists bank supervision must not be rushed
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel is digging in her heels on plans for a new European banking supervisor, insisting that they must not be rushed and that she has no intention of considering joint European deposit insurance.

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    Global markets slip as Fed-driven euphoria fades
    Global stock markets were muted Monday as the boost faded from the Federal Reserve's announcement last week of new measures to energize the U.S. economy. Signs that European governments will take longer than expected to agree the details and set up their banking supervisor also weighed on sentiment.

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    Oil hangs near $99 a barrel in Asia
    Oil traded near $99 a barrel Monday in Asia, largely holding on to gains after the Federal Reserve last week announced new steps to boost the U.S. economy.Benchmark crude for October delivery was down 20 cents at $98.80 a barrel at midafternoon Bangkok time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract on Friday traded above $100 for the first time since May before closing up 69 cents at $99 in New York.

  •  
    Photo courtesy of Dan Ablan Dan Ablan, co-owner of Ablan Gallery Portrait Design in Hawthorn Woods, won a photography award for this images he combined, one of a high school senior and another of a street in Chicago.

    Photographer builds, grows business in Lake County
    Dan Ablan, owner of Ablan Gallery Portrait Design in Hawthorn Woods, started taking pictures at the age of 13. He now runs a business with his wife and has written photography books.

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    How to ‘SCORE’ advice from experienced mentors

    What business owners often are looking for is "an accountability partner, someone they can talk to ... who will hold their feet to the fire," Small Business Columnist found. He looks at an organization that can help.

  •  
    The face of Northwest Community Hospital has changed greatly since the 1950s.

    Hospital CEO: Emphasis shifting to outpatient care

    Northwest Community Healthcare's outpatient services will continue to grow even as the need for hospital beds shrinks, says CEO Bruce Crowther. Last week, NCH announced it will open four new outpatient facilities, while cutting 110 jobs at Northwest Community Hospital. . “We’re really just re-sizing to the demand for beds that we have today," he said.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    On homes and real estate: Siblings may squabble over inherited land

    Q. I (along with two brothers) have inherited property from my father (deceased in 1957). My older brother has lived there the past 45 years and built some buildings. Now that she has been deceased for a year, the two brothers not living on the property would like to have our inheritance to do as we please.

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    Take sensible precautions as a pet owner

    Q. My children want a pet, but I'm worried a pet could make my kids sick. Should I bring a pet into the home?

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    Practicing tai chi may promote a longer life

    It is a well-known fact that exercise is beneficial for health, but can exercise help you live longer? Some preliminary research suggests that the practice of tai chi may affect our very DNA promoting longer life. Tai chi like movements have been practiced for over a thousand years. There are many styles of tai chi and, today, it is practiced by millions of people around the world. Although tai chi does have pugilistic applications, most practice tai chi as a way of staying healthy and physically fit.

  •  
    Executive chef Anthony Belter plates his dish at Impecca Restaurant in Roselle.

    Dish-washing stint whetted appetite for fine dining

    Anthony Belter leans on his fine-dining French training to create a menu at Impecca Restaurant in Roselle that combines classic Italian cuisine with European techniques and modern flavors. The chef, who lives in Rolling Meadows, features items like prosciutto and melon pizza and a polenta Bolognese. But what some diners seem happier about is what some of his dishes don't include: gluten.

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    Impeccca Restaurant Chef Anthony Belter tops pan-seared white fish with quick-cooked bruschetta.

    Mediterranean White Fish
    Mediterranean White Fish: Chef Anthony Belter

  •  

    Child care duties are crimping this retiree’s plans

    This couple is retired and have a great relationship when traveling. But, the wife spends a lot of time caring for her stepdaughter's 5-year-old son when they're home. The husband feels left out and resentful. What to do?

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    Carly Rae Jepsen's “Kiss”

    Carly Rae Jepsen's album 'Kiss' is sweet

    The challenge for Carly Rae Jepsen following the monster success of "Call Me Maybe" was to steer clear of one-hit wonder status. She did that with another pop smash, the anthem "Good Time," and Jepsen shows she has even more hits on her second album, "Kiss." The Canadian singer delivers what fans are probably looking for: More effervescent pop, unencumbered by a plot too thick or societal issues too weighty.

  •  
    Stephen Colbert, host of “The Colbert Report” on Comedy Central, will be a guest host on “Good Morning America” for Robin Roberts, who is scheduled to undergo a bone-marrow transplant this week.

    Colbert, ‘Modern Family’ cast to guest host ‘GMA’

    Stephen Colbert and the cast of "Modern Family" are next up as "Good Morning America" guest hosts for Robin Roberts, who is scheduled to undergo a bone marrow transplant this week. The surging ABC morning show hasn't missed a beat since Roberts exited on Aug. 30. Tom Cibrowski, the show's senior executive producer, said the schedule of substitutes for Roberts is expected to include Oprah Winfrey, Barbara Walters, Katie Couric and Diane Sawyer.

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    McDonald’s to post calories, test healthier food

    McDonald's will begin posting calorie information on menu boards at its U.S. stores next week. The fast-food restaurant also will test healthier food, such as egg-white breakfast sandwiches, sweet chili chicken wraps and more produce side items, Oak Brook-based McDonald's said. The burger seller is making efforts to improve nutrition and disclose more about its food after being criticized for selling unhealthy items amid a national obesity epidemic.

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    Amanda Bynes gets traffic citation, car towed

    Amanda Bynes had another run-in with the law when she was pulled over for driving on a suspended license by a Southern California airport. Burbank's Bob Hope Airport spokesman Victor Gill says airport police cited the actress and impounded her car Sunday.

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    Chris Brown is scheduled to return to a Los Angeles courtroom on Monday for the first time in more than a year amid questions about his community service.

    Chris Brown to return to court in assault case

    Chris Brown is scheduled to return to a Los Angeles courtroom for the first time in more than a year amid questions about his community service. Brown has completed his terms with praise from a judge, however a prosecutor raised concerns about how many hours he had completed.

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    Country music artist Luke Bryan and The Band Perry’s Kimberly Perry are co-hosts for the three-hour TV special “CMA Music Festival: Country’s Night to Rock” on ABC.

    Luke Bryan, Kimberly Perry co-host CMA Fest special

    Country stars Luke Bryan and The Band Perry's Kimberly Perry are ready to see a week's worth of hard work pay off when "CMA Music Festival: Country's Night to Rock" airs Monday on ABC. They are co-hosts for the three-hour TV special, which highlights the biggest performances and behind-the-scenes moments of CMA Fest. It was filmed June 7-10 in Nashville, Tenn.

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    Marine Sgt. Ron Strang gets up from a chair in the living room of his home in Jefferson Hills, Pa. Strang has received an experimental implant of connective tissue developed from pigs.

    Wounded troops benefit from surprising medical advances

    Scientists are growing ears, bone and skin in the lab, and doctors are planning more face transplants and other extreme plastic surgeries. Around the country, the most advanced medical tools that exist are now being deployed to help America's newest veterans and wounded troops. In Pittsburgh, doctors used an experimental therapy from pig tissue to help regrow part of a thigh muscle that Ron Strang lost in a blast in Afghanistan.

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    Ken Hall was moved to get healthier because his dad got ill, and he’s trying to not let that happen to himself.

    Illness moves family members to exercise

    Ken Hall took his mother to the hospital last year for complications from congestive heart failure and kidney issues. While there, she was diagnosed with diabetes, a disease his father had already been diagnosed with. "It occurred to me that my dad's taking insulin shots twice a day, now she's going to have to start, I'm next," Hall said. "It's like a time bomb."

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    Corn can be healthy for you, if you eat it in moderation with other healthy foods.

    Your health: Pros and cons of corn
    With all the information out there about the starch/grain/vegetable being healthy or not, it can get a bit confusing at times. So website FabFitFun.com tells you what's poppin' and what's not with corn. Also, a balanced breakfast is key to staying on track for the rest of the day and providing you with proper energy.

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    Dumbbell squat

    Tabata can change how you strength train

    Learn about a style of strength training called Tabata. It involves doing short bouts of high-intensity exercises followed by a short recovery period.

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    Dr. Grace Devlin (Jordana Spiro) juggles a medical career with her brother's debt to organized crime in the Chicago-set new Fox drama “The Mob Doctor.”

    Crime makes house calls in Fox's 'Mob Doctor'

    Dr. Grace Devlin cannot escape the reach of the Mafia. Her dad, her brother and now she all have ties that aren't easily broken in the Chicago-based Fox drama "The Mob Doctor," premiering Monday, Sept. 17. Devlin (Jordana Spiro) is a third-year surgical resident who saw her first corpse as a girl. It was her father. He had vague mob ties; her brother's are stronger, and in the pilot, hers become deep.

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    Do recent virus outbreaks signal epidemic of epidemics?

    A hundred times smaller than bacteria, viruses are little more than stripped-down packets of genetic material with some protein padding. By strict definition, they aren't even alive. But viruses are robust and promiscuous in their ability to invade organisms and hijack cellular machinery in order to replicate. The latest virus to seize the country's attention is the mosquito-borne West Nile virus, which usually has little effect on its human hosts but can sometimes be a killer.

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    It’s more exciting to see the pounds falling off. Those on diets often get bored and slip into old habits.

    Lose weight with a lighter approach mentally

    Millions of people lose millions of pounds each year but fail to maintain the healthy lifestyle that lasts for life. Why is that? Perhaps too much focus is put on the weight-loss portion of the equation, rather than the lifestyle changes necessary to achieve long-term success. Watching the numbers drop on the scale is exciting; keeping them down may not be.

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    Christopher Johnson of North Carolina takes the lead during the Waterman’s Paddle for Humanity competition on the Potomac River in Washington, D.C.

    Paddleboarding beginning to make waves

    Stand-up paddleboarding, called SUP for short, was invented in Hawaii by surfers looking for a way to keep up their training on days with disappointing waves. Over the past decade, it's won over a much wider following as word has spread that a wide, stable board and a paddle make it possible to traverse long distances while getting one heck of a core workout. Plus, unlike surfing, practically anybody can do it.

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    In Portland, fluoride debate is ideological clash

    It's a dental story told so often it borders on cliche. When someone moves to Portland from another state, their new dentist takes one look at their excellent teeth and concludes they must have been raised elsewhere. Portland is the largest city in the U.S. that has yet to approve fluoridation to combat tooth decay, a distinction that could change at Wednesday's city council meeting.

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    Lab tests not always checked before patients get discharged

    Doctors who order tests for hospital patients don't always read the results before the patient is discharged, raising the risk of missing potentially dangerous conditions, an Australian study found. About half of the unread tests were ordered on the day the patient left the hospital, according to research in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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    1972 Dodge Polara

    Officer re-creates 1972 Dodge Polara squad car

    If you were fond of tearing up the roads of the Windy City in the muscle-car years, chances are you would have hit the brakes hard if you saw an imposing patrol car like Greg Reynolds' meticulously recreated 1972 Dodge Polara cruiser. Reynolds, a Chicago resident and sergeant in the city's police force, restored his sedan classic to be an authentic duplicate.

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    Feeding the brain can help kids do better in school

    Back-to-school season seems as good a time as any to think about boosting your kids' brain power, not to mention your own. But this year, instead of flashcards and multiplication drills, you might want to focus on the family diet. "The dietary habits of children can impact their energy level, mood and academic performance," says Megan Barna, an outpatient pediatric dietitian at Children's National Medical Center.

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    Low-calorie diet may not translate to longer life

    In a long-awaited study, underfed monkeys didn't have longer life spans, raising doubts that severe calorie restriction could result in extended lives for most animals and possibly humans. In research going back more than 75 years, a sharp reduction in caloric intake has been associated with increased longevity. But those hopes are being dimmed by the results published online by the journal Nature.

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    The Steven Shell cartographer’s desk.

    Studious style: The latest in desks from the furniture market

    It's never too late to be studious. While students' thoughts turn to books, it might be time to rethink your work space whether you are matriculated or still taking graduate classes in the school of life. The best place to start is the desk, the centerpiece for transforming the cerebral into the tangible.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Assessor stipend program fails to make sense

    How many of you get a $3,000 annual bonus for doing your job as expected? A Daily Herald editorial says a deal that does just that for many township assessors in Illinois must be revoked.

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    Editorial: Embracing blessedly imperfect freedom

    A Daily Herald editorial reflects on the freedom that we so often take for granted and the assault on it in protests that seem to spread like wildfire continents away.

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    Lee Hamilton

    We’ll never agree — and that’s fine

    Guest columnist Lee Hamiton: No matter who is in charge, we are unlikely to veer too far left or too far right, because the debate over the proper role of government will remain unsettled. And that's not a bad thing,

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    Prospect Hts. library spending is too high
    Letter to the editor: Margrit Valskis complains that for what she pays in taxes to the Prospect Heights library she could buy 116 books. "This is insane!" she writes.

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    Glacial pace of Quentin Road work just not acceptable
    Letter to the editor: Michael Kloempken of Palatine complains of the the glacial pace of the work on Quentin Road. "I urge you all to ... call the county Highway Department and demand that this project be completed by its Oct. 21st deadline," he writes.

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    Couldn’t Randhurst make up difference?
    Letter to the editor: Rick Meyers raises the question, that with the redevelopment of Randhurst could the Mt. Prospect Village Board hold off on tax increases in hopes that retail sales will make up the necessary gap in revenue?

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    Westlund-Deenihan not running in 2013
    Letter to the editor:hanover Township Trustee Sandra Westlund-Deenihan announces she is not running for re-election in 2013. "It has been an honor to serve as trustee for Hanover Township," she writes. "I've done my best to make sure your taxpayer dollars are spent wisely while also ensuring the programs our residents rely upon are kept intact."

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    Hoffman Estates works; let’s not ‘fix’ it
    Letter to the editor: Dr. Robert Steinberg is pleased with the peace and spirit of the current mayor and village board. "Ever so slowly, the economy is turning around, and with it, a more nimble village seems poised to move forward," he said. "We need to keep our focus, and keep the harmony that allows the real work to be done."

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    No taxation without representation in EG
    Letter to the editor: Gary Parrin of Elk Grove Village argues that no one should be an elected member of a government board they dona't pay taxes to -- as is the case on the Elk Grove Library board. "This is a matter of electoral fairness and taxpayer representation." he argues.

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    Kudos for another great BG Stampede
    Letter to the editor: "My thanks to the Buffalo Grove Park District and the many volunteers who, once again, made the Buffalo Grove Stampede a successful and well organized 5K and 10K walk and run," writes Larry Schneider.

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    Mathias position on pensions needs ink
    Letter to the editor: Debbie Wagner of Arlington Hts. sayss more needs to be written about state Rep. Sidney Mathias's position on fixing the pension system in Illinois. "Let's report what our politicians are really doing and not just offer words on paper," she says.

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    Thanks readers for supporting garage sale
    Letter to the editor: "Thank you, Daily Herald readers, for supporting the eighth annual Truly Priceless Garage Sale," writes Marybeth & Mike Schoenwald of Arlington Heights. "The funds raised will help in the life saving and disaster relief services of ... great charities."

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    No need for park district tax hike
    Letter to the editor: Donald Schmidgall of Arlington Heights says voters need to know about the park district referendum to raise taxes. "There is a need to vote NO' on this referendum in November.," he urges. "It is overtaxation!

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    Board failed us over Lutheran Home
    Letter to the editor: Tammy DeMarco of Arlington Hts. feels the village board deserted her and her neighbors in approving the Lutheran Home expansion project. "Arlington Hts. is supposed to be the city of good neighbors, but it does not appear as though anyone who governs (it) feels obliged to maintain the integrity of the community and protect the interests of those who reside here," she writes.

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    Teacher evaluations not doing the job
    A Chicago letter to the editor: Prior to my son's first parent-teacher conference, the kindergarten teacher sent home a note. To this day I cannot forget the contents of this note. It read, "I am concerned with your son's skills. He does not right well. Please come hear to discuss" (italics added). What kind of evaluation would the union give this teacher?

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    Republicans trying to have it both ways
    A Chicago letter to the editor: Republicans are making an all-out effort to sell the American people on their plans to save Medicare and Social Security. So it's not surprising that they avoid mentioning their long-standing record of opposing these programs and trying to end them.

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    Ask right questions when hiring roofer
    A Hillside letter to the editor: We read recently in this newspaper the report about a roofing contractor arrested. It really shows that homeowners, building owners and managers still need to choose wisely when hiring a roofing or any contractor to work on their building. Easier said than done?

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    Lombard at loggerheads on landing a leader

    "Be professional," a Lombard trustee urged fellow village board members trying to name a temporary successor to the late Village President William Mueller. But their behavior of late has been kind of self-serving, DuPage Editor Jim Davis suggests.

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