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Daily Archive : Sunday September 2, 2012

News

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    Barrington resident Bob Lee, 70, talks bike helmet fashion with two boys at a send-off party for Lee Sunday, before he embarks on the last of a series of bicycle rides around the perimeter of the United States to raise money for cancer research, ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease), and hospice education.

    70-year-old bicyclist leaves Barrington to raise $1 million

    The Barrington-area community gathered Sunday to send off 70-year-old bicyclist Bob Lee on a two monthlong, 2,500-mile Ride for 3 Reasons on the West Coast. He hopes to raise $1 million for an array of charities.

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    Viviette Applewhite, 93, a plaintiff in a lawsuit against Pennsylvania’s tough new voter identification law, speaks in a video played during a news conference in the Pennsylvania state Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa., May 1. A series of ongoing court battles in several vital states may determine over the next several weeks everything from how people cast their votes, when polling locations will be open and what ballots will look like.

    Late court decisions may impact 2012 election

    A series of court battles in several states may determine, over the next several weeks, everything from how people cast their votes, when polling locations will be open and what ballots will look like. Many cases have a partisan bent, with rulings potentially tipping the scales slightly in favor of Democrats or Republicans.

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    Getting a ride in the rain from her sister, M.J. Morris, 6, holds on tight while Alexis, 14, does all the leg work as they venture around deciding what ride looks the coolest during the opening day of Septemberfest in Schaumburg on Saturday.

    Schaumburg Septemberfest draws crowd despite soggy start

    Intermittent rain didn't keep a large crowd from attending Schaumburg's 42nd annual Septemberfest Saturday. The festival will continue 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday and 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday. Major main stage acts are The Family Stone 8:30 p.m. Sunday and 7th Heaven, 7:30 p.m. Monday.

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    Competitive eater Joey Chestnut devours a chicken wing, on his way to eating a record 191 wings in 12 minutes, at the National Buffalo Wing Festival on Sunday in Buffalo, N.Y.

    Chestnut eats record 191 wings in 12 minutes

    Organizers of the National Buffalo Wing Festival say competitive eater Joey Chestnut has devoured a record 191 chicken wings in 12 minutes.

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    Scott Seiler of Boy Scout Troop 671, center, talks to his father, Todd, about the paint as he organizes a face lift of the Kitten Room at the Save-A-Pet Adoption Center in Grayslake Sunday. Scouts and leaders worked together on the room as part of Scott’s Eagle Scout project.

    Eagle Scout renovates Grayslake Save-A-Pet shelter

    An Eagle Scout project will provide better living conditions — and make adoption easier — for kittens who will be residing at Save-A-Pet Adoption Center in Grayslake.This week, Scott Seiler of Gurnee, 14, who belongs to Boy Scout Troop 671, led a group in renovating the Kitten Room.

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    Elgin teen dies in early-morning crash

    An Elgin teen was killed and another was seriously injured in a one-car accident west of Burlington early Sunday morning, Kane County Sheriff's officials reported. Two other teenage boys in the car — the driver and a front seat passenger — walked several miles to the hospital from the accident scene on Plank Road west of Engel Road.

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    Aliyah Starks, 10, of Hoffman Estates sings “Colors of the Wind” from Disney’s “Pocahontas” during the Got Talent competition Sunday.

    Local talent shows off at Summer Sunset Festival

    Singers, dancers, musicians and performers took the stage Sunday during the Lake in the Hills Summer Sunset Festival's Got Talent competition. The contest drew a talent lineup of people ages 4 to 24. "If you're brave enough to come out here, we'll let you onstage," commitee chairwoman Kim Brey said.

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    Fire seriously damaged two houses in Bartlett early Sunday morning.

    2 injured, 2 homes damaged in Bartlett

    A fire in the 400 block of Harbor Terrace in Bartlett early Sunday seriously damaged two homes and sent two people to the hospital, fire officials reported. The residents of one home were awakened by a loud noise just before 3:30 a.m. and discovered the contents of their attached garage was on fire.

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS Penn State football fans surround the Penn State football team as it arrives by bus at Beaver Stadium for the season opener against Ohio in State College, Pa., Saturday.

    As new era begins at Penn State, challenges remain

    Penn State's first game under new coach Bill O'Brien began a new era for one of college football's elite programs, and the Saturday defeat at the hands of an underdog showed the team may face a long season ahead following the overhaul of its coaching staff and the departure of several star players.

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    President Barack Obama waves as he walks on stage during campaign stop on the campus of the University of Colorado in Boulder, Colo., Sunday. Why couldn’t he deliver the change he promised four years ago? The answer depends on what political party one listens to.

    Why didn’t change happen under Obama?

    Why has President Barack Obama fallen so far short of the change he so passionately described as a candidate four years ago? To the partisans on both sides, the answers are simple -- and fundamentally at odds.

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    Actor Clint Eastwood addresses the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., Thursday.

    Obama says he’s a ‘huge Clint Eastwood fan’

    President Barack Obama says he's a "huge Clint Eastwood fan," even in the aftermath of the actor's rambling "invisible Obama" monologue at the GOP convention.

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    Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign event at West York Area High School, Sunday, in York, Pa.

    Obama hits Romney Obamacare slam, says ‘I do care’

    Campaigning their way toward the Democratic National Convention, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden slapped a "Romney doesn't care" label on his rival's health-care views Sunday and said Republicans want to repeal new protections for millions without offering a plan of their own.

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    Joe Samojedny, of Palatine, talks with fellow artists between jam sessions at the 36th Annual Fox Valley Folk Music and Storytelling Festival at Island Park in Geneva Sunday.

    Folk musicians, storytellers entertain crowds in Geneva

    For the past 36 years, the Fox Valley Folk Music and Storytelling Festival has maintained a community feel, an intergenerational appeal, and a regional reputation. "This festival has a much more community, participatory feel than almost any," said Dave Humphreys, founder of Two Way Street Coffee House, a longtime, live folk music venue in Downers Grove.

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    In this March 17, 2005, file photo, Michael Jackson arrives at the Santa Barbara County Courthouse in Santa Maria, Calif. Promoters of Jackson’s planned 2009 comeback, described in emails released Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012, show they feared for the megastar’s stability, saying he was out of shape and often consumed with self-doubt.

    Concert promoters’ email: Michael Jackson ‘is scared to death’

    Promoters of Michael Jackson's planned 2009 comeback described in emails how they feared for the megastar's stability, saying he was out of shape and consumed with self-doubt. The LA Times obtained some 250 pages of messages, most between executives at Anschutz Entertainment Group, which was financing the "This Is It" concerts set for London. "MJ is locked in his room drunk and despondent,"an AEG...

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    Joe Berenyi, of Oswego, has so far won two medals in the London Paralympics Games. In this photo, taken in West Chicago this summer, he was training for the upcoming games. He won a gold in the 3K individual pursuit Friday and won a bronze medal Sunday.

    Oswego Paralympian adds another medal

    Joe Berenyi, a 43-year-old father of three from Oswego, won a second medal Sunday in the cycling competition at the Paralympic Games in London.

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    Jordan Bybee, of Louisville, Kentucky, goes through his routine with his Border Collie, Rambler, during Sunday’s dog disc-catching competition, the Ashley Whippet Invitational, in Naperville. Bybee said works out for at least a half-hour every day with Rambler. The competition was part of Naperville’s Last Fling festival, which continues Monday.

    Disc dogs leap into championships in Naperville

    A dog disc-catching competition, the Ashley Whippet Invitational, is one of the highlights of the Naperville Jaycees' Last Fling festival on Sunday.

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    A member of Italy’s carabinieri instructs new Afghan police recruits as they undergo riot control training on the outskirts of Kabul on Nov. 7, 2010. The U.S. military has suspended training for at least a month of some Afghan forces while the Americans review the process of vetting new recruits.

    US stops training some Afghan forces after attacks

    The U.S. military has halted the training of some Afghan forces while it digs deeper into their background following a surge of attacks by soldiers and police on their international partners, officials said Sunday.

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    Syrian Hamzah Abu Bakri, displays portraits of his brothers who were killed Thursday by government shelling as they stood by their vegetable shop on the outskirts of Aleppo, Syria.

    Activists say 5,000 killed in Syria in August

    Activist groups said Sunday that about 5,000 people were killed in Syria's civil war in August, the highest figure ever reported in more than 17 months of fighting as President Bashar Assad's regime unleashed crushing air power against the revolt for the first time.

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    Eniko Camberis, center, and her sister, Makena, right, try on old-fashioned hats while their mother Susan Camberis, left, takes their picture Sunday during the DuPage County Forest Preserve District’s old-fashioned country fair at Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago. The event gave people the experience of what an 1890s fair would have been like.

    Kline Creek Farm hosts 1890s version of a country fair

    The DuPage County Forest Preserve District held an old-fashioned Country Fair at its Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago. The event included animals, a medicine show and other stuff you might see at a country fair in the 1800s.

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    Police K-9 memorial ceremony

    The public is invited to the first ceremony for the Northern IL Police K-9 Memorial on Sept. 26 at Highland Memorial Park in Libertyville.

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    Reserve sheriff’s deputies wanted in Lake County

    Lake County Sheriff's police are seeking applicants to join the reserve deputies unit.

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    Rev. Sun Myung Moon, center left, and his wife, Hak Ja Han Moon, are introduced during the Affirmation of Vows part of the Interreligious and International Couple’s Blessing and Rededication Ceremony at New York’s Manhattan Center Sept. 14, 2002. About 500-600 couples participated in the New York ceremony and an estimated 21 million couples participated worldwide via a simulcast to 185 countries.

    Beyond weddings and roses: Moon’s US influence

    Rev. Sun Myung Moon's U.S. empire extended far beyond the movement and the Moonies, as Moon's followers were both affectionately and irreverently known. Moon had holdings in media, real estate, universities and even sushi sales.

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    Raises for CLC part-time instructors

    College of Lake County's part-time faculty has a new union contract. CLC board trustees at a recent meeting approved a three-year deal with the adjunct faculty. Officials said the contract was culmination of a negotiation process that began in November 2011.

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    Unification Church leader Rev. Sun Myung Moon speaks during his “Now is God’s Time” rally in New York on June 25, 2005. Moon, self-proclaimed messiah who founded Unification Church, died at age 92, church officials said Monday.

    Unification Church founder Rev. Moon dies at 92

    The Rev. Sun Myung Moon, who died Monday in South Korea, was a self-proclaimed messiah who built a global business empire. He called both North Korean leaders and American presidents his friends, but spent time in prisons in both countries. His followers around the world cherished him, while his detractors accused him of brainwashing recruits and extracting money from worshippers.

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    Different tack taken in heroin death appeal

    A 29-year-old Wauconda woman successfully appealed her drug-induced homicide conviction earlier this year, was awarded a new trial and had her 10-year sentence thrown out. Amanda Coots pleaded guilty last month to involuntary manslaughter in the death of Rustin A. Cawthon and was sentenced to a little more than 7 years in prison.

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    Immigration policy, state rules vex Indiana students

    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Omar Gama hopes to one day be a bank manager or a CEO. His twin brother, Erick, wants to be an interior designer in Chicago.

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    Tina Lamonica was caught on TV collapsing while appearing in a Winnebago County courtroom in early July.

    DuPage County likely next for courtroom cameras

    Since January, five circuit courts serving 13 counties have applied for and received the green light for use of cameras in the courtroom, a dramatic shift in a state that for decades resisted the move. DuPage County likely is next, followed by Cook County. "Our office is in full support of transparency in government," said DuPage County state's attorney spokesman Paul Darrah said.

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    Lou ‘L.D.’ Chukman became a courtroom sketch artist almost by accident 37 years ago. Here is his portrait of Brian Dugan pleading guilty in 2009 to the 1983 murder of Naperville resident Jeanine Nicarico.

    Courtroom artists’ future in peril

    A handful of Chicago-area courtroom artists expect to lose a significant chunk of their livelihood as cameras enter DuPage and Cook county trial courts for the first time in state history. They're disappointed, but not surprised. "Frankly, I'm surprised the 20th Century didn't grab me by the shoulder and said, 'Go back to the 19th Century. We have cameras,'" artist Tom Gianni said.

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    Lawyers weigh in on cameras in the courtroom
    With video and still cameras soon expected in suburban courtrooms, lawyers and judges from across the area weighed with their thoughts. "I don't think cameras will help or hurt my clients in any way. The facts affect my clients, not cameras," one Geneva defense attorney said.

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    Trials in starved teen case to stay in Dane County

    MADISON, Wis. — A Dane County judge has denied a request to move the trials in the case of a 15-year-old Madison girl who was allegedly starved and tortured.The Wisconsin State Journal (http://bit.ly/N41hSe ) reports that Circuit Judge Julie Genovese believes an impartial jury can be found in the county.

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    2 foreign firms among 4 interested in Ind. lottery

    INDIANAPOLIS — Two foreign companies — one based in Australia, the other in the United Kingdom — are among four firms competing for a chance to become the first private manager of Indiana’s lottery.

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    Police computers to help stop distracted driving

    FORT WAYNE, Ind. — Fort Wayne police officers who want to enter data in their in-car computers will have to wait until they stop under new technology designed to prevent distracted driving.

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    Illinois minister sentenced to prison for fraud

    EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill. — A southwestern Illinois minister has been sentenced to more than a year in prison for committing securities fraud in a deal involving a Canadian gold mine.

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    High school coach placed on leave for sex book

    OLYMPIA FIELDS, Ill. — A high school girls basketball coach in suburban Chicago has been placed on administrative leave after writing a self-published book that includes graphic sexual content and an acknowledgement from the author that he has a “weakness for cleavage.”

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    Vowing to “promote Lincoln’s principles and patriotism,” Mickey Straub puts a finishing touch on the 1997 Lincoln he’s driving on his pilgrimage to read the Gettysburg Address on the steps of all 50 state capitols.

    Burr Ridge businessman to preach Lincoln message nationwide

    Local business owner Mickey Straub wants to remind America of Abe Lincoln's legacy. And what better way to do that than to set out in his 1997 Lincoln with the goal of reading the Gettysburg Address on the steps of 50 state capitols in 50 days? "It's an amazing document," Straub says. "The Gettysburg Address is our future."

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    In this Friday, Aug. 31, 2012 photo, emergency personnel work the scene where a teenager headed to a sweet 16 party was killed after he stuck his head out of the emergency hatch of a double-decker bus and hit the underside of a highway overpass, along Interstate 95, in Fort Lee, N.J.

    NY teen killed on party bus mourned

    Mourning the death of a beloved student in a gruesome accident, English teacher Jane Lynch spoke of the 16-year-old in a trembling voice. Friends sent sad Twitter messages expressing their affection for Daniel Fernandez, and hundreds of students gathered Saturday evening for a candlelight vigil at St. Francis Preparatory School in Queens.

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    Archbishop Desmond Tutu in an op-ed piece in the Observer Sunday Sept. 2, 2012 has called for Tony Blair and George Bush to be hauled before an international criminal court and delivered a damning critique of the physical and moral devastation caused by the Iraq war.

    Tutu: Bush, Blair should face trial at the Hague

    LONDON — Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Desmond Tutu called Sunday for Tony Blair and George Bush to face prosecution at the International Criminal Court for their role in the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq

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    Monster truck mishap in Ore. sends 3 to hospital

    HARRISBURG, Ore. — A monster truck lost traction on a dirt Oregon race track Saturday before hitting a barrier and crossing into the spectator area, where three people were injured, authorities said.

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    Pussy Riot: No regrets despite prison sentence

    Jailed Pussy Riot member Nadezhda Tolokonnikova says she regrets nothing about the band's anti-government performance in a cathedral that got them convicted of hooliganism and sentenced to two years behind bars.

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    Freight train cars derail in Chicago, no injuries

    A freight train struck the rear of another freight train in southwest Chicago early Sunday, derailing several rail cars and damaging a third freight train on an adjacent track, authorities said. Local reports said power was briefly knocked out to more than 2,500 people in the neighborhood.

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    Republican Mitt Romney cast President Barack Obama as a failed coach of a struggling team as he sought to capitalize on momentum coming out of his party’s convention. Obama dismissed the GOP gathering as an event suited to the era of black-and-white TV and promised to outline “a better path forward” at the upcoming Democratic convention where he’ll be nominated for a second term.

    Romney, Obama trade jabs as Dem convention looms

    Republican Mitt Romney cast President Barack Obama as a failed coach of a struggling team as he sought to capitalize on momentum coming out of his party’s convention. Obama dismissed the GOP gathering as an event suited to the era of black-and-white TV and promised to outline “a better path forward” at the upcoming Democratic convention where he’ll be nominated for a...

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    Bob Pudell of Medinah, pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church in Roselle, won our Photo Finish contest for August with his inspiring image of the Blue Angels, taken at the Chicago Air Show from the John Hancock Observatory.

    Roselle pastor captures prize for shot of Blue Angels

    When you think about it, it's probably no big surprise Bob Pudell won our August Photo Finish photography contest. Oh, sure, the photo he submitted is really eye-catching. And, yes, it's technically very sound. You can clearly see why our photo staff chose it as the month's top entry. But here's the kicker and there's really no way around it: Bob Pudell is a pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church in...

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    Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and vice presidential running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis. appear at a rally at the Jacksonville Landing, Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012 in Jacksonville, Fla.

    GOP paints a nation on brink, Dems see rebound

    The November election offers the political parties' sharply different visions of the state of America, as well as of the government's role and reach. Republicans envision a smaller government, with fewer social safety net programs, increased defense spending, less regulations and additional tax cuts. Democrats see a government able to lift those who need help and a nation where the wealthier pay...

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    In the cable television news world where provocation is prized, MSNBC’s Chris Matthews took home the trophy from Tampa’s Republican national convention as most over-the-top pundit. Matthews engaged in a bitter verbal brawl on “Morning Joe” with Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus that upset the show’s hosts, accused the GOP of conducting a campaign of race-baiting and suggested Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is not proud of his record in public life.

    Matthews’ contentious week with Republicans

    In the cable television news world where provocation is prized, MSNBC's Chris Matthews took home the trophy from Tampa's Republican national convention as most over-the-top pundit. Matthews engaged in a bitter verbal brawl on "Morning Joe" with Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus that upset the show's hosts, accused the GOP of conducting a campaign of race-baiting and suggested...

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    DNCC CEO Steve Kerrigan, center, talks with guests near the main stage during the public unveiling of Democratic National Convention’s facilities at Time Warner Arena in Charlotte, N.C., Friday, Aug. 31, 2012.

    Obama turns to technology during convention

    When the Democratic Party's national convention opens this week, President Barack Obama's target audience won't be in the crowd. It will be the small sliver of undecided voters in battleground states who will be critical to the outcome of what the polls show is a tight race with two months to go. Obama's campaign will turn to technology to get some of those voters engaged in the convention.

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    President Barack Obama speaks in El Paso, Texas. In Florida, everyone from seniors to young people expressed strong feelings about Medicare -- and the debate over its future. It’s playing out in the presidential campaign as well as House and Senate races that will help determine the balance of power on Capitol Hill.

    In Florida, Medicare is not a senior-only issue

    Voters from seniors to young people are expressing strong feelings about the future of Medicare. The debate is playing out in the presidential campaign as well as House and Senate races that will help determine the balance of power on Capitol Hill. The views expressed in a series of recent interviews with voters in this key battleground state were as varied as the solutions politicians have...

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    Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign stop at the United Auto Workers Local 1714 Union Hall, Friday, Aug. 31, 2012, in Lordstown, Ohio.

    GOP tries to portray Biden as governing liability

    Republicans are trying to undermine Vice President Joe Biden's effectiveness as the Obama campaign's chief surrogate and liaison to white, working-class voters and seniors, influential groups courted aggressively by both parties. With relentless attacks aimed at portraying President Barack Obama's running mate as a governing liability, Republicans hope to raise the stature of GOP vice...

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    Ex-Obama advisers seek health care cost control

    Some of President Barack Obama's former advisers are proposing major changes aimed at controlling health care costs as political uncertainty hovers over his health law. Call it Health Care Overhaul, Version 2.0. Their biggest idea is a first-ever budget for the nation's $2.8-trillion health care system, through negotiated limits on public and private spending in each state.

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    A road sign under the afternoon sun outside Hopkinsville, Ky. When the next total eclipse of the sun darkens skies over parts of the United States on Aug. 21, 2017, the afternoon event will last longer in a rural stretch near Hopkinsville than any place on the planet.

    Small Ky. town focus of eclipse chasers

    A southwestern Kentucky town has hit the astronomical jackpot. When a total eclipse of the sun darkens skies on Aug. 21, 2017, the show will last longer in a stretch of hilly country near Hopkinsville than any place on the planet. It will last two minutes and 40 seconds, not much longer than the Kentucky Derby. But already this town of 32,000 near the Tennessee border is making preparations to...

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    Recent Ohio State University graduate Erik Santamaria sits on a campus library stairway in Columbus, Ohio. He’s 30, between jobs, with $50,000 in student debt, and no clear sense what the future holds. But Erik Santamaria, Ohio-born son of Salvadorans, has a pretty awesome attitude about his country, his life and the world of possibilities. “Maybe things won’t work out the way I want,” he offers. “But, boy, I sure can’t complain about how things have worked out so far.”

    Decade of war, recession leaves voters glum

    For many, these times are a slog. That "shining city on a hill" from political mythology looks more like a huffing climb up a field filled with ticks. Public opinion researchers find handwringing at almost every turn, over a glum and nervous decade defined by terrorism, then war, then recession, then paltry recovery. Still, you aren't seeing pessimism in the season of the political conventions.

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    ICE chief of staff resigns over claims of misconduct

    WASHINGTON — A senior Obama administration political appointee and longtime aide to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano resigned Saturday amid allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior lodged by at least three Immigration and Customs Enforcement employees.

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    Inside Time Warner Cable Arena is seen facilitated for the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.

    Ill. delegates: Same-sex marriage issue will help Obama

    As Illinois Democrats gather in Charlotte this week to nominate President Barack Obama for a second term, a majority of delegates think his announcement in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage was the right one to boost his election chances, a Daily Herald survey shows.

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    Undergraduate Engineering and Michigan Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (M-STEM) Academy members Noelle Hansford, left, and Andrea Case take a nap in the lobby of Bursley Hall on the campus of the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor, Mich. As college students return to campus in the coming weeks, they’ll be showered in the usual handouts of coupons, condoms, and credit cards. But some schools are also giving students what a growing body of research reveals could make a huge difference in their college careers: ear plugs, sleep shades and napping lessons.

    Colleges open their eyes: ZZZs are key to GPA

    College health officials are finally realizing that healthy sleep habits are a potential miracle drug for much of what ails the famously frazzled modern American college student: anxiety, depression, physical health problems and — more than most students realize — academic troubles. Some studies have found students getting adequate sleep average a full letter grade higher than those...

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    Leobardo Moralez of Bensenville is seen by Dr. John Ranieri, left, at the revamped urgent care dental clinic in the DuPage County Health Department building in Wheaton.

    Demand grows for DuPage county urgent care dental clinic

    Demand for DuPage County Health Department's urgent care dental clinic has grown since an expanded floor plan was unveiled in April. Officials say the Wheaton facility is on pace to serve 2,700 clients and provide 6,245 procedures for the year. "We've been busy," said Mila Tsagalis, the department's assistant director of dental health.

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    President Barack Obama, center, walking across the tarmac to greet guest upon his arrival on Air Force One, Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012, at Buckley Air Force Base in Aurora, Colo.

    Will Obama repeat suburban success?

    In 2008, suburban counties that had been solid red for years — reliably voting for Republican presidents in nearly every election — all turned blue, delivering a substantial win for Barack Obama in his home state. Illinois delegates to the Democratic National Convention surveyed by the Daily Herald doubt it will be so easy this year.

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    Amy Calinski

    D300 teacher remembered for her laugh, poise

    Westfield Community School teacher Amy Calinski lost her battle with breast cancer in August. Her friends and relatives remember a passionate teacher who loved to laugh and had a great rapport with students. "She wanted to make a difference in her students' lives," her husband, Dave Calinski, said.

Sports

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    Cougars rally, win in 10

    Trailing 3-0 early, the Kane County Cougars never had the lead until a walk-off hit in the bottom of the 10th carried them to a 5-4 edging of the Peoria Chiefs on Sunday night at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark.

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    Ugly trip doesn’t seal Sox’ fate

    It doesn't look good after a terrible road trip and getting swept in Detroit, but the White Sox are still in first place and control their own fate.

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    Sky plans to build on big win over Sparks

    The Chicago Sky beat the Western Conference powerhouse Los Angeles Sparks 85-74 Sunday in front of 6,197 at Allstate Arena.

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    White Sox scouting report
    Scouting report: White Sox vs. Minnesota Twins

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    He may like his team a lot, but Bears head coach Lovie Smith has to recognize the key issues facing the Bears this season and address them in order to contend for the NFC North title.

    Bears have a few issues to be addressed

    The Bears have put together a team they believe is capable of challenging for the Super Bowl, but there are still many issues that must be addressed before they can realize that potential.

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    Cubs starter Travis Wood exited Sunday’s game with the lead over the Giants, but he ended up with a no-decision.

    No win, but Cubs’ Travis Wood making strides

    Cubs pitcher Travis Wood explained his situation after Sunday's 7-5 loss to the San Francisco Giants at Wrigley Field. "It's definitely been a learning year," the 25-year-old Wood said after working 5 innings and getting no decision, as he gave up 7 hits and 4 runs, 2 earned.

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    Cubs scouting report
    Cubs scouting report

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    The Giants’ Gregor Blanco scores what turned out to be the winning run Sunday on a single by Angel Pagan as Cubs catcher Steve Clevenger looks on in the ninth inning at Wrigley Field.

    Cubs see what a first-place team looks like

    The Cubs are seeing just how far they have yet to go these days. And they'll see some more the rest of this week. The Cubs again were just good enough to lose Sunday, falling 7-5 to the first-place San Francisco Giants as closer Carlos Marmol battled a spate of wildness to give up 2 runs in the ninth as the Giants broke a 5-5 tie.

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    Cubs relief pitcher Carlos Marmol gave up the winning runs Sunday against the San Francisco Giants.

    Cubs’ Marmol gives up game in 9th

    Angel Pagan hit a tiebreaking RBI single in the ninth inning off Carlos Marmol and the NL West-leading San Francisco Giants closed out a successful road trip with a 7-5 win over the Cubs on Sunday at Wrigley Field.

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    Saturday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Friday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s girls swimming scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's girls swimming meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Saturday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s boys cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's boys cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Schaumburg Boomers fan Rich Jarecki of Elk Grove Village enjoys the last home game of the regular season at Boomers Stadium in Schaumburg.

    Schaumburg Boomers’ strong season a good start

    Team owners, village officials and fans agree that the Schaumburg Boomers' inaugural season was a bigger and better first step for the franchise than could have been anticipated during the offseason. But more work lies ahead for the Boomers to become as ingrained a part of the Schaumburg community as they want to be. “We paid our bills and provided a good product," said co-owner Pat Salvi.

Business

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    The involvement of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney at Bain Capital has been a high-profile target of Democrats. They may get some ammunition, now that New York’s attorney general is investigating tax strategies of some of the nation’s largest private equity firms, including Bain.

    Source: NY probing equity firms, including Bain

    New York's attorney general is investigating tax strategies of some of the nation's largest private equity firms, including Bain Capital, founded by Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, an official familiar with the probe said Sunday.

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    A shopper pushes a trolley through the clearance section of a store in Chicago. During the recession, retailers used sales to lure cash-strapped Americans into stores. But that strategy has backfired. It has bred a group of deal junkies that won’t shop unless they see “70 percent” signs or yellow clearance stickers.

    Deal junkies hurt stores’ profits

    During the recession, retailers had more sales to lure cash-strapped Americans into stores. Now, that strategy has backfired. It has bred a group of deal junkies that won't shop unless they see "70 percent" signs or yellow clearance stickers.

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    An oil rig is seen in the Gulf of Mexico near the Chandeleur Islands, off the Southeastern tip of Louisiana. Energy companies have reoccupied many of the production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico that were abandoned in advance of Hurricane Isaac.

    More crews return to rigs after Isaac

    More crews are returning to offshore drilling rigs and production platforms as the weather clears after Isaac.

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick speaks, as Health and Human Services Secretary JudyAnn Bigby listens at right, during a news conference at the Statehouse in Boston, where he spoke about the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to uphold President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul.

    Ex-Obama advisers seek health care cost control

    Some of President Barack Obama's former advisers are proposing major changes aimed at controlling health care costs as political uncertainty hovers over his health law. Call it Health Care Overhaul, Version 2.0.

  •  
    This photo provided by Fabkids.com shows a screenshot from the subscription service website FabKids. A bevy of subscription services with names like FabKids.com and Kiwicrate.com have emerged over the past year that cater to parents who want help keeping their kids dressed and entertained.

    Subscription buying for kids offers no-hassle fun

    Want to cut the time and hassle of shopping for your kids? A bevy of subscription buying services with names like FabKids and Kiwi Crate have emerged over the past year that cater to parents who want help keeping their kids dressed and entertained. Think of it as a modern, kid-friendly spin on the "Beer-of-the-Month Club" model.

  •  
    An effort linking health insurers and the U.S. Postal Service is distributing coupons for healthful food to those who struggle with their weight or diseases.

    Special coupons promote healthy eating

    Cook from scratch. Eat foods in season. Buy locally. That is the conventional wisdom on what Americans must do to become healthier. But that's not always realistic so a company is now trying to nudge us into eating better with coupons.

  •  
    Rick Kimsey stands in front of his franchise, Doctors Express urgent care Facility in Sarasota, Fla. The business came with a concept and a service to sell. All he had to do was get the franchise up and running, and then operate it. However, many first-time buyers like Kimsey are finding it’s harder than they expected to buy and run a franchise.

    Getting a loan to open a franchise getting harder

    When Rick Kimsey decided to start a business, a franchise seemed like the best way to go. Buying a franchise — in his case, a Doctors Express urgent care facility — meant he didn't have to start from square one. But what sounded like a great plan wasn't so easy. Financing for the business was nearly impossible to get in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis and the recession. "The rug was pulled out from under me," Kimsey says. It took more than a year before he was finally able to close the deal.

  •  
    The allure of paying off your mortgage faster than you need to is more emotional than financial. Mortgage debt provides great financial flexibility, and paying it down fast probably isn’t the best way to grow your nest egg.

    Why you shouldn’t pay down your mortgage faster

    The impulse to pay off your mortgage more quickly than you need to is understandable, especially these days. But the allure is more emotional than financial. Mortgage debt provides great financial flexibility, and paying it down fast probably isn't the best way to grow your nest egg. "Generally speaking, there's no advantage to paying down a mortgage earlier than you need to," says Greg McBride, senior financial analyst at Bankrate.com

  •  
    John C. ‘Jack’ Bogle is 83 and outspoken. Over the years, the Vanguard Group founder has frequently criticized the mutual fund industry that he helped nurture. Before retirement, Bogle challenged the industry status quo in the 1970s when Vanguard introduced the first low-cost index funds.

    Bogle: Time to end money-market fund ‘illusion’

    John C. "Jack" Bogle is 83 and outspoken. Over the years, the Vanguard Group founder has frequently criticized the mutual fund industry that he helped nurture. In the 1970s, Bogle challenged the industry status quo when Vanguard introduced the first low-cost index funds. He has clashed with industry leaders — and in some instances Vanguard, today the largest fund company — over such matters as investment tax rates and financial market reform. Then, of course, there's the size of fees that funds charge investors — especially managed funds that, unlike index funds, seek to beat the market rather than match it.

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    Pension investors demand Aetna disclose political cash

    Aetna and 19 other companies are being urged to disclose their contributions to independent political organizations by investors including unions and state pension funds with $922 billion in assets. The New York State Common Retirement Fund and the UAW Retiree Medical Benefits Trust are among 25 investors who demanded to know how Aetna, the third-biggest U.S. health insurer, is wielding its political influence and giving money to advocacy groups such as the American Action Network, an organization opposed to President Obama's policies.

  •  
    If you’re stuckin a rut at work, consider asking for a change in responsibilities, take a lengthy vacation, try working part time from home or reduce your hours.

    Work advice: Out of a work rut, into a financial one?

    Society is straining at the seams with people who have been forced into life on the margins, with few options and fewer resources. And if you think job hunting while you're employed is a drag, imagine what it's like with bills piling up and no health insurance, Karla L. Miller writes in this week's Watercooler work advice column.

  •  

    Ethical companies want ethical workers

    Career Coach columnist Joyce E.A. Russell, an industrial and organizational psychologist, discussed workplace issues in a recent online forum. Here are some questions and answers from the session.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Jay-Z performs at the “Made In America” music festival on Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012, in Philadelphia, PA.

    Jay-Z has Rocky-like moment at Made In America

    Jay-Z's entrance said it all: He bounced up and down on top of the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, mimicking Rocky before he took the stage in front of nearly 50,000. His song "Made In America" played in the background. Jay-Z, like Rocky Balboa, has a rags to riches American dream story, and the 42-year-old entertainer — who grew up in the Brooklyn projects and released his debut in 1996 — shared some of that through songs in his 90-minute set Saturday night at the "Budweiser Made In America" festival.

  •  
    In this Jan. 30, 1995 file photo, Tom Jones, co-host of the American Music Awards, sings “I Wanna Get Back With You” during his performance segment of the telecast at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles. Hal David, the stylish, heartfelt lyricist who teamed with Burt Bacharach on dozens of timeless songs for movies, television and a variety of recording artists in the 1960s and beyond, died Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012. He was 91. David and Bacharach wrote the lyrics for “What’s New Pussycat,” made famous by Jones.

    ‘Raindrops’ lyricist Hal David dies at 91

    Hal David was a man of simple words. A writer by trade — and a journalist by education — David had a knack for encapsulating love, earnestness and a wry sense of humor into a melody that was just a few minutes long. "Wishin' and Hopin'," the 1960s earworm he wrote with Burt Bacharach, was a rhyming how-to for gals looking to snag a man. With a wink, it snagged a new generation of fans when it opened the 1997 Julia Roberts film "My Best Friend's Wedding."

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    This is the fourth year that Steven Larson has led fellow congregants at Covenant Church in Schaumburg in a garden ministry, donating the harvest to the Schaumburg Township Food Pantry.

    Covenant Church members on a mission to grow crops for the hungry

    Members of the Covenant Church of Schaumburg don't mince words. The name for their garden plots says it all: They call it their One Ton Garden. That's how much weight in vegetables they aim to grow each summer and donate to the Schaumburg Township Food Pantry.

  •  

    What beer best fits Labor Day?

    no right-thinking, left-leaning American can deny that beer, having thus fueled the birth of the labor movement, deserves to be honored at this time of year. You needn't be a dialectical materialist to celebrate Labor Day with a cold one; anyone can see that beer and Labor Day weekend go together like thesis and antithesis.

  •  
    Anne Maria Dacyshyn, Global PR Director for Burton, shows Burton’s newest tech apparel collection at the annual SAI Snow Show in Denver. It includes pieces that would look at home on a city street but also work for the slopes. The men’s collection has a waterproof soft-shell hoodie with fleece lining and pants designed with insulation and water-repellant materials, and a technical, high-performance corduroy.

    Newer street looks making their way to ski slopes

    More street styles are making their way on to snow slopes, from longer lengths in women's jackets to high-performance hoodies that could be worn while riding or skiing — or in the city later. Makers of ski pants and jackets also are offering some styles this winter with flaunted opulence but also recycled materials in response to separate trends for outre designs and eco-elegance.

  •  
    In this July 7, 2011 file photo, British author JK Rowling arrives in Trafalgar Square, in central London, for the World Premiere of “Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows: Part 2,” the last film in the series.

    JK Rowling to build Hogwarts-style tree houses

    J.K. Rowling is building two tree houses fit for a wizard. Despite some complaints from neighbors, the City of Edinburgh Council said it has approved the Harry Potter author's application to create the large tree houses in her garden for her children.

  •  
    Priscilla Sutton, curator of the Spare Parts exhibition poses with some of the art work that has been all based on artists using prosthetic limbs that will be included in the show, at her home in London.

    Artists turn old prosthetic limbs into artworks

    Prosthetics can change the life of an amputee. But when an old limb no longer fits or just gets worn out, it can be hard to part ways. Priscilla Sutton has a solution: turn these "pre-loved" limbs into artwork. The Australian curator came up with "Spare Parts London," an exhibition of altered prosthetics. "I thought it was a bit crazy to keep hoarding my legs," she said.

  •  

    Yoko Ono, son launch anti-fracking coalition in NY

    Yoko Ono and her son, Sean Lennon, launched a coalition of artists, musicians and filmmakers who oppose hydraulic fracturing in New York state.

  •  

    After driver retires, car gets worse fuel milage

    Q. I have a 1994 Dodge Spirit and for years I got 20 to 22 miles per gallon. I retired in June last year, and since then the mileage keeps going down. I know no longer driving 28 miles a day to work will drop the fuel mileage a little, but it is now down to 17 mpg.

  •  
    Just because your grill is able to crank out 60,000 BTUs doesn’t mean you should let it. That’s because the key to great grilling actually isn’t intense heat, but something far more nuanced called indirect heat.

    The secret to great grilling is indirect heat

    If you want to master the art of grilling, you need to accept the idea that more heat isn't necessarily better heat. In other words, just because your grill is able to crank out 60,000 BTUs doesn't mean you should let it. That's because the key to great grilling actually isn't intense heat, but something far more nuanced called indirect heat. In fact, when I'm grilling, I use indirect heat at least 80 percent of the time.

  •  
    See jugglers and more at the old-fashioned Country Fair at Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago.

    Sunday picks: Fun awaits at fests all over the suburbs

    Be wowed by the acrobatic juggling of the Amazing Budabi Brothers at the 1890s Country Fair at Kline Creek Farm in West Chicago. Enjoy all the merrymaking the Bristol Renaissance Faire has to offer one last time this season. Plus, don't miss the Fox Valley Folk and Storytelling Festival in Geneva or the Lake in the Hills Summer Sunset Festival. Finish out the weekend with Toby Keith's Overdrive Tour at First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre.

  •  
    People gather around a statue of Andy and Opie Taylor, characters from “The Andy Griffith Show,” at the Andy Griffith Playhouse in Mount Airy, N.C.

    Visitors get a glimpse of small-town Mayberry

    In the town of Mayberry from "The Andy Griffith Show," a small-town sheriff and his trusty deputy always outwitted big-city crooks, and problems never got much bigger than a trigger-happy kid with a slingshot. But while Mayberry was fiction, it was inspired by a real place: Mount Airy, N.C., the late Andy Griffith's hometown. Fans are still coming to Mount Airy, looking for a glimpse of small-town life and the simpler times portrayed on the show.

  •  
    Children can learn all about the harvest at Garfield Park Conservatory's Harvest Days.

    On the road: Harvest Days keeps the kids busy

    Celebrate the harvest season at the historic Garfield Park Conservatory during its Harvest Days festival, which offers tons of family activities. Also coming up is the Chicago Turkish Festival in Daley Plaza and Ferraris in the Loop, where you can see more than 60 high-performance, vintage and newer model Ferraris.

  •  

    Traveling alone doesn't have to be intimidating

    Last week, I received a letter from a recently widowed woman who feels her traveling days are over. "I need to get away," she said. "But I'm afraid to travel alone and have no friends my own age who'll join me. I guess I'm stuck." Not according to my old friend Jean Cowden who has been traveling alone for years.

  •  

    Algae on shingles is homeowners’ nemesis

    Q. I have ugly black streaks/stains on the asphalt shingle roof of my house. They appear on the north side of the roof only, where the sun doesn't hit very much; the south side is fine. Is there a product to remove this stain?

  •  
    Adding a touchless faucet without handles to your kitchen sink may help you “handle” conservation and cleanliness issues in your kitchen.

    Ask the plumber: ‘Touchless’ kitchen faucets add nice touch

    Q. On a recent open-house tour with a friend, I noticed a kitchen sink with a gooseneck-style electronic "touchless" faucet, the kind you see in commercial applications. Why would a home have a second electronic faucet like that on a kitchen sink?

  •  

    Landlord within his rights to crack down on parking space hogs

    Q. We live in a 39-unit apartment complex where there is only one parking space for each unit. The landlord has recently implemented a parking sticker system and numbered the parking spaces to enforce its policy of only one parking space per rental unit. There is nothing in the lease about parking. Is this legal?

  •  
    This house at 313 Perry St. will be on this year’s Historic Elgin House Tour.

    SWAN houses featured in Historic Elgin House Tour

    The South West Area Neighbors portion of Elgin, while full of historic homes, does not have the big, flashy Victorian mansions that older parts of town can boast. But organizers of the Gifford Park Association's 31st annual Historic Elgin House Tour are hoping to change that. The tour features six homes and one church in the SWAN neighborhood.

  •  

    It often makes sense to use smaller, countertop cooking appliances

    Q. I prefer to use the kitchen range/oven for cooking, but heard using small countertop appliances is more efficient. Is this true and is there a simple way to determine which appliances are the best to use?

  •  

    Ignore negativity; you’ll be happy you did

    Lord have mercy! When I was 50 I suddenly realized I didn't care about other people's opinions of me, and now, 10 years later, I am sorry it took me so long. They don't like your house? They don't live there! The car? Are they driving it?

Discuss

  •  
    George LeClaire/gleclaire@dailyherald.com Pall-bearers carry the casket of Lombard Village President William Mueller during the funeral following his death Aug. 18 from complications of the West Nile virus.

    Editorial: Common sense and the West Nile virus

    A Daily Herald editorial says that with the spike in the number of West Nile virus cases reported this year, it's important to take common-sense precautions against it.

  •  

    The elephant in the room

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: Ecosystems thrive and are most productive when there is biodiversity. The same can be said of political parties. An all-white party will not long survive in an environment lacking diversity.

  •  

    Perhaps Obama has something to hide, too
    A Des Plaines letter to the editor: With all this fuss about Mitt Romney's tax returns, it is amazing to me that Barack Obama refuses to turn over his college transcripts and thesis.

  •  

    Compassion should not bankrupt nation
    A Des Plaines letter to the editor: We simply don't see the need to continue food stamps and disability payments for the horrendously high number of people who now get them, such as those who are perfectly able to work and choose not to, and those who spend their food stamp money on lottery tickets and beer.

  •  

    Individualism is overtaking religion
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: I am saddened by a grow­ing number of people who seem to have lost their faith in God. Any defense of biblical values accepted over the past 2,000 years are now under attack by supporters of an idealism which gives rein to a new sense of moral behavior.

  •  

    Officials’ raises are an outrage
    An Antioch letter to the editor: I was outraged about the article on the front page "Officials in 31 townships get automatic raises." This is crazy.

  •  

    Chick-fil-A protest: ‘Enough is enough’
    A Carol Stream letter to the editor: Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day was not an anomaly — it was a line drawn in the sand. Although there are likely a number of reasons why Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day was so successful, I'd like to offer my hypothesis.

  •  

    If you disagree, write your own letter
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: Mr. Reynolds' letter of Aug. 21 complains that letters to the Fence Post have dubious references. I think Mr. Reynolds misses the point.

  •  

    Suspicious of Armstrong ‘evidence’
    A Lombard letter to the editor: The USDA appears to be on a witch hunt against Lance Armstrong, but when Armstrong chooses not to fight, then people call him a cheater. Last I checked, in America you have the right to stay silent and make the courts prove their case.

  •  

    Economy above all else in campaign
    A Huntley letter to the editor: There are many issues in this campaign that have nothing to do with the economy — unemployment, debt, deficit, spiraling entitlement costs and many other important issues — but are being presented as the most important criteria in choosing the next president.

  •  

    Medicare increase was exaggerated
    An Elgin letter to the editor: In the Sunday, Aug. 19, issue of the Daily Herald Mr. Morrissey of Huntley indicated Plan B of Medicare will rise in cost to $247 per person per month in two years from the current $96. As a Medicare recipient also, I decided to make an attempt to verify that information and found Mr. Morrissey's information to be highly inaccurate.

  •  

    Robinson an Obama apologist
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Columnist Eugene Robinson, like most of the media, has a definite political bias. He does have a Obama sticker on his forehead.

  •  

    Court cameras: Crucial but underwhelming?

    Use of still and moving cameras in the courtroom soon will be coming to the suburbs. DuPage County Editor Jim Davis notes there's some potential for new drama, but the cameras more likely will expose how routine and procedural court matters can be.

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