Daily Archive : Saturday August 18, 2012

News

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    Associated Press/Aug. 7, 2012 Men collect parts of a damaged bus, which was hit by a remote control bomb on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan.

    Afghanistan insurgents use Pakistan fertilizer for bombs

    Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan and Pakistan convert the fertilizer into explosive material that is 1.4 times more powerful than TNT.

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    JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.com The Marine Color Guard is ready to present the colors prior to the singing of the National Anthem the Arlington Million at Arlington Park Saturday.

    Arlington Park crowd enjoys Million day

    Thousands of people bustled about Arlington Park racetrack Saturday, waiting for the biggest race of the year, the Arlington Million. Joel Snyder of Vernon Hills, who won $35, admitted he got lucky. "I read an article this morning and his was the only name I remembered," he said of Million winner Little Mike.

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    I-65 fully reopened following fatal crashes

    Indiana State Police have reopened all northbound lanes of Interstate 65 in northern Indiana following a series of crashes that killed one man and injured six other people. Sgt. Dan Leslie of the Lowell post says fog and smoke from a burning dairy barn that reduced visibility along the highway caused three crashes Saturday morning involving about 20 vehicles some 50 miles southeast of Chicago.

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    Miss World winner Yu Wenxia.

    Miss China crowned Miss World
    This is the second time Miss China has been awarded the title. The last time was in 2007.

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    The “Rain Man” statue in downtown Geneva is missing its umbrella.

    Batavia woman wanted what was best for VFW

    Ardath Paris of Batavia died nearly three weeks ago, but it would be a great injustice if I did not share the story of how Ardath's persistence helped shaped my career as a newspaper reporter and editor in this area for the past 35 years.

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    The horses enter the track before the start of the American St. Leger at Arlington Park Saturday.

    Images of pageantry from the Arlington Million
    Images of the pageantry from the Festival of Racing and the 30th running of the Arlington Million at Arlington Park on Saturday, Aug. 18.

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    Little Mike, right, is the Arlington Million winner at Arlington Park Saturday.

    Race Images from the Arlington Million
    Images from the Festival of Racing at Arlington Park on Saturday, Aug. 18, featuring four key races: The American St. Leger, Secretariat Stakes, Bevely D. and the 30th running of the Arlington Million.

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    Sara Kruzan was a teenage prostitute in 1994 when she shot and killed her 33-year-old pimp in the honeymoon suite of the Dynasty Suites Motel in Riverside. The next year, she was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison without parole.

    Many question life sentences for juveniles

    Sara Kruzan was 17 when she was sentenced to die in prison for killing and robbing a pimp in a Riverside motel. Now, at 32, Kruzan has a chance at being freed, along with thousands of other juveniles convicted of murder who were sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

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    Helen Gurley Brown

    Notable deaths last week

    Helen Gurley Brown, the longtime editor of Cosmopolitan magazine and an author who encouraged women not to save it for the wedding night, has died in New Yorkat age 90.

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    President Barack Obama greets supporters during a campaign stop Saturday, in Rochester, N.H.

    Medicare stays focus as Obama, Ryan trade charges

    Who loves Medicare more? President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney's running mate vied for that distinction Saturday as Medicare became the latest flashpoint in a presidential campaign of flying elbows.

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    Signs warn against trespassing onto the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn.

    Intrusion embarrasses ‘Fort Knox of uranium’

    Officials like to refer to the Y-12 National Security Complex as the Fort Knox for highly enriched uranium, which is why an unprecedented incursion by an 82-year-old nun and two fellow protesters has critics mocking the notion that the weapons plant is secure.

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    Lombard Village President Bill Mueller enjoyed working with children as a Cubmaster and in other roles. Here, he cheers on students at Hammerschmidt School as they participated in a jumping jack activity in October 2011.

    Mueller, who ‘cared deeply’ for Lombard, dies at 76

    Longtime Lombard Village President William J. "Bill" Mueller always had his hometown in his heart, on his mind, in his words, and even on his license plate, which simply reads "LOMBARD." Mueller died after contracting West Nile disease during a battle with the cancer multiple myeloma. He was 76. "His license plate says it all. Bill was all about Lombard," said Yvonne Invergo, executive director...

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    Laura Stoecker/lstoecker@dailyherald.com Jason Conn, 17, of Lily Lake performs with local teen band, Keep 7, at South Elgin’s RiverFest Saturday. The group, which has been together about eight months, does covers but also has an original single available on iTunes and an album out as well.

    Local band Keep 7 heats up South Elgin’s Riverfest

    The feeling of a summer festival before the Ferris wheel starts to turn and the smell of deep fried food fills the air is one of anticipation. It's the same feeling you get as a spectator watching Keep 7, a local band that tried to warm up a sparse crowd at South Elgin's Riverfest Saturday.

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    “Elburn Idol” winner overcomes rough start

    Second day of Elburn Days in and around the downtown area and at Lions Park, 500 Filmore St. It starts off with a pancake breakfast at 7 a.m., then a 5K Run and 1-mile Fun Run at 8 a.m. Later on there's all kinds of stuff going on, including craft show, the truck and tractor pull from 11a-4p, carnival at noon, "Elburn Idol" at 1:45 p.m., dance exhibitions, etc. elburnlions.com.

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    Mark David Chapman in 1975

    John Lennon’s killer again up for parole

    fficials say John Lennon's killer, who is up for parole for the seventh time, could have a parole hearing as early as Tuesday.

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    Associated Press U.S. swimmer Diana Nyad will make another attempt to swim across the Florida Straights without the protection of shark cage.

    Nyad back in the water in Cuba-Florida record swim

    Endurance athlete Diana Nyad launched another bid Saturday to set an open-water record by swimming 103 miles (166 kilometers) from Havana to the Florida Keys without a protective shark cage.

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    Crime scene investigators look over an officer’s handgun Saturday after the off-duty Philadelphia police officer was shot and mortally wounded.

    Philly officer fatally shot after finishing shift

    A police officer was shot to death blocks from his precinct house just after he finished his shift early Saturday in what authorities suspect was a street robbery. Police announced rewards totaling $30,000 to help them make an arrest.

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    Daniel White/dwhite@dailyherald.com Priest Walker of Wheaton retrieves his arrows during the DuPage County Forest Preserve’s opening of an upgraded archery range at the Blackwell Forest Preserve.

    Archers, fishers experience new Blackwell amenities at DuPage forest event

    Hundreds of people tried their hand or practiced their skills at archery Saturday at the grand opening of the renovated range at Blackwell Forest Preserve near Warrenville, but Suzy Black of wasn't one of them. Still, Black, of Wheaton, said she was excited to see the facility open because it gives her 11-year-old son, Ray, a convenient place to enjoy a sport he's been practicing for a year.

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    Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow is in charge of the prosectuion team in the Drew Peterson trial. Prosecutors have made a series of blunders that prompted the judge to consider at least three defense motions for a mistrial and has some legal experts wondering just how much trust is left.

    Blunders jeopardize Drew Peterson trial prosecution

    Prosecutors have made a series of blunders that prompted the Drew Peterson trial judge to consider at least three defense motions for a mistrial and that has some legal experts wondering just how much trust is left. "If the jury can't trust the prosecution, everything after that fails," said Daniel Coyne, a professor at Chicago Kent School of Law and a former criminal defense lawyer, adding that...

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    Succession plan means Gron is Lombard president pro tem

    After the death of longtime Lombard Village President William J. "Bill" Mueller, a succession plan kicks in to fill his leadership role. The plan calls for the most senior standing trustee, in this case, District 1 Trustee Greg Gron, to immediately assume the role of president pro tem until a decision can be made at the next village board meeting.

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    Actor Tom Hanks

    Hanks family N.Dakota diner’s surprise guests

    The owner of a diner in North Dakota got a surprise Friday when actor Tom Hanks showed up for an early breakfast.

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    Associated Press/2007 Reynolds Prairie in the Black Hills of South Dakota.

    Sioux tribes upset over sale of sacred site

    The tribes have banded together to try to raise money to buy back as much of the land as they can. But with a week to go until the Aug. 25 auction, they have only about $110,000 committed for property they believe will sell for $6 million to $10 million.

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    Attendees of Kline Creek Farm’s first National Honey Bee Day celebrations will visit the farm’s honey house to learn about the honey-making process, see a new garden of plants attractive to pollinators, watch candle-making demonstrations and participate in a honey tasting.

    Kline Creek Farm to celebrate National Honey Bee Day for the first time

    Duane Marski has seen bees up close behind the lens of a camera and witnessed things most have not. Ask the photographer and volunteer beekeeper about the insects, and he'll list off facts about their length, speed of flight, their anatomy and go into detail about the process of making honey. "I call them Swiss Army insects," Marski said. Marski hopes to share his wealth of knowledge at the first...

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    Obama renews call for aid to halt teacher layoffs

    WASHINGTON — Tight school budgets have meant fewer teachers, larger classes and shorter school years, according to a White House report that President Barack Obama says shows the need for Congress to pass his proposals to help states reduce teacher layoffs.

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    An unmanned U.S. Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field, southern Afghanistan, on a moon-lit night. A missile launched from a U.S. drone struck a suspected militant hideout in a tribal region in northern Pakistan where allies of a powerful warlord were gathered Saturday, Aug. 18, killing five of his supporters, Pakistani officials said.

    US drone kills 5 militants in northern Pakistan

    ISLAMABAD — A missile launched from a U.S. drone struck a suspected militant hideout in a tribal region in northern Pakistan where allies of a powerful warlord were gathered Saturday, killing five of his supporters, Pakistani officials said.

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    First lady to see Sikh shooting victims' families

    WASHINGTON — Michelle Obama plans to go to Milwaukee to meet with family members of those killed and injured in a Sikh temple shooting this month.The White House says the first lady's visit Thursday is part of the administration's outreach to the Sikh community after the Aug. 5 shooting.

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    GM, Isuzu recall 258,000 SUVs to fix power windows

    DETROIT — General Motors and Isuzu are recalling more than 258,000 SUVs in the U.S. and Canada to fix short-circuits in power window and door lock switches that can cause fires.

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    Illinois sees 3rd case of new strain of swine flu

    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — A 5-year-old girl has contracted a new strain of swine flu, becoming the third Illinois case of the illness.The Logan County girl came into direct contact with hogs at the Logan County Fair and the Illinois State Fair. She developed flu symptoms on Monday.Logan County health officials say the girl was not hospitalized and is recovering at home.

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    Chicago cop pleads guilty to stealing cash

    CHICAGO — One of two Chicago police officers accused of stealing $5,200 in cash they thought belonged to a drug dealer but was actually part of an undercover FBI sting has pleaded guilty.

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    Chicago police officer shoots knife-wielding man

    CHICAGO — Chicago police say an officer responding to a fight between two drivers shot one of the men after he came at her with a knife.The incident occurred just before 2 a.m. Saturday on a street in the heart of downtown.

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    20 shot in violent start to Chicago weekend

    CHICAGO — It's been an especially violent start to the weekend in Chicago. Twenty people were shot overnight in the city.

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    Derby Lite participants Meg Dudek of Frankfort and Melissa Monroe of Mokena lead a line of skaters during a recent fitness class. Derby Lite classes use the drills of classic women’s roller derby — without the body-slamming contact — as the foundation for a workout.

    ‘Kinder, gentler’ Derby Lite skates across suburbs

    They arrive at a building in a Lombard office park with helmets hooked to rolling suitcases and begin their transformation from Megan or Amanda or Trina into Sybil Disobedience, Punch It Margaret or Malicious Z. As knee pads, wrist guards and quad speed skates come out, the women get ready for Derby Lite, a non-contact, non-competitive form or roller derby that's expanding across the suburbs.

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    Sam Buttitta, 4, left, and Connor Michael, 3, both of Arlington Heights, test their budding musical talents.

    Day as a Knight gets young kids excited about music, band

    Nearly 300 children, friends and family members of the Prospect Marching Knights enjoyed a day with the band recently, getting to experience the excitement of playing, marching and dressing like a Marching Knight. "Our mission is to get kids excited about music at an early age," said event organizer Bruce Nejdl. "The point is to give them a fun musical experience that will spark their interest...

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    Silphium, better known as compass plant, blooms at LeRoy Oakes Forest Preserve in St. Charles.

    How the prairie survives a hot, dry summer

    Robins perched motionless in the shade, bills agape. Thirsty plants wilted in flower beds, and trees prematurely surrendered their yellowing leaves. Humans holed up in air-conditioned houses. Everyone, it seemed, was held hostage by the heat this summer. Everything was dying for rain. Everyone and everything except the prairie.

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    10 tips for stepparents that will help both the kids — and you

    The divorce rate continues to hover around 50 percent. A majority of children will live in stepfamilies at some time in their lives. Ken Potts suggests some guidelines for becoming a stepparent that may not only help you get along with your stepchildren, but maybe save your marriage as well.

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    Republican Judy Biggert is taking on Democrat Bill Foster in the 11th Congressional District race in November.

    Social Security becomes hot topic in 11th Congressional District

    Bill Foster heard stories in Joliet filled with fear and frustration over the future of Social Security checks, which the seniors depend on to pay the bills. How to address those fears is an area the 11th Congressional District candidates — Democrat Foster and Republican Judy Biggert — don't agree. The key difference is privatization of Social Security.

Sports

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    Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall makes a catch for a first down as Washington Redskins defensive back Cedric Griffin covers Saturday at Soldier Field.

    Cutler and Co. cut through Redskins

    If the play of the Bears’ first team offense in Saturday night’s 33-31 victory over the Redskins was an indication of what’s to come, it could be a special season.On the first play from scrimmage, quarterback Jay Cutler was well protected by the oft-maligned offensive line. He was able to wait for Brandon Marshall to get behind Redskins cornerback Cedric Griffin, and he hit the 6-foot-4 wide receiver for a 41-yard gain. It was a sight familiar to Redskins coach Mike Shanahan, who was the Broncos’ head coach when Marshall caught 206 passes for 2,590 yards with Cutler as his quarterback in 2007 and ’08.Three plays later, Cutler and Marshall collaborated on a 20-yard hookup. Then the quarterback fired a strike over the middle to slanting rookie wide receiver Alshon Jeffery for a 16-yard gain to the Washington 1-yard line, where Michael Bush banged in for the score.“It’s fun to get back out there,” said Cutler, who didn’t play in the first preseason game, which was the day after his son was born. “Last game it was tough to only watch. We threw the first one to B. (Marshall), and we started rolling a little bit.”Not to be outdone, the defense came up big late in the first quarter. Israel Idonije sacked Robert Griffin III and stripped the first-round pick. Julius Peppers recovered for the Bears at the Redskins’ 8-yard line, and Bush scored on the next play.Idonije, who had just 5 sacks al of last season, had 2½ sacks of Griffin in the first quarter.But it was the offense that electrified the Soldier Field crowd. When Cutler left after four possessions, the Bears led 17-0 early in the second quarter.“We started fast and we moved the ball,” coach Lovie Smith said. “I felt like we needed to throw the ball, and Jay was outstanding. He spread the ball around to all the receivers. I was pleased with what our offensive starters did.”Cutler wasn’t sacked, although he scrambled away from danger twice for 9 yards. But he also utilized almost all of the weapons that have given the Bears the potential for their most explosive offense in years.Devin Hester caught 2 passes for 22 yards, including an 18-yarder that helped set up the first touchdown. Earl Bennett’s 19-yard reception of a Cutler bullet over the middle helped set up Robbie Gould’s 45-yard field goal that gave the Bears a 17-0 lead with 11:06 left in the first half.“We have a lot of guys who can play football,” Cutler said. “You bring in the second-team running back (Bush), and he’s making guys miss in the hole and scoring touchdowns.”Cutler completed 7 of 13 passes for 122 yards and a passer rating of 86.1 before turning it over to backup Jason Campbell.Campbell, who played through the third quarter, was sacked three times, all in the second quarter. But he completed 9 of 15 passes for 141 yards and a passer rating of 91.2.No. 4 quarterback Matt Blanchard played only the final possession, but he guided the Bears into position for Robbie Gould’s game-winning 57-yard field goal.The offensive line performed better than it did in the preseason opener, but it’s far from a finished product. Starter J’Marcus Webb shared time at left tackle with Chris Williams, while left guard starter Chris Spencer shared time with Chilo Rachal. Spencer and Rachal each committed a false start penalty, a pet peeve of offensive coordinator Mike Tice. And Campbell was sacked twice in a three-play sequence late in the second quarter with Webb and Spencer in the game.“The offensive line knows it starts with them,” Cutler said. “If they play well, we’ll take care of the rest.”Smith was cautious in his praise of the O-line.“They gave us a chance,” he said. “For the most part, they did a decent job.

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    Bandits win playoff tuneup

    The Chicago Bandits entered Saturday's regular-season finale looking to even up their two-game series against the Carolina Diamonds. The same teams face off against each other starting Thursday in the first round of the NPF Championship Series. The playoff prelude went in favor of the Bandits, who claimed a 5-1 victory in The Ballpark at Rosemont.

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    Bayrir, with jockey Christophe Lemaire, won the Secretariat Stakes on Saturday.

    Bayrir translates to victory in Secretariat

    Trainer Alain De Royer-Dupre said he wasn't sure why his French-bred colt was named Bayrir. But he did know one thing Saturday afternoon at Arlington Park. Bayrir's name can join the list of 35 other champions of the Grade I Secretariat Stakes which was first run in 1974, one year after Secretariat's renowned Triple Crown triumph.

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    Kaneland’s Luke Kreiter reacts to his putt on the third green during the Geneva boys golf invite Thursday at Mill Creek Golf Club. Kaneland fired a 304, an indication of what a promising season the Knights expect to have.

    Scouting Tri-Cities boys golf teams

    For the first time in recent memory, the boys golf season is underway without a single local returning state qualifier from the large-school finals.

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    White Sox designated hitter Adam Dunn rounds the bases after hitting a two-run home run Saturday during the eighth inning against the Kansas City Royals at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo.

    Dunn hits home run No. 400, but Sox lose to Royals 9-4

    Adam Dunn and Kevin Youkilis were in no mood to celebrate their milestone hits. Dunn belted a two-run shot for his 400th career homer, but the White Sox lost 9-4 at the Kansas City Royals on Saturday night. "It's just about the worst-case scenario, getting it like this," Dunn said. "We've played two bad games. Tonight was a disaster from the get-go. Obviously, I would have wanted it to come in a win."

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    Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall makes a catch for a first down as Washington Redskins defensive back Cedric Griffin covers Saturday at Soldier Field.

    Cutler, Marshall sharp; Bears beat Redskins 33-31

    Jay Cutler and Brandon Marshall looked sharp from the start, and the Bears beat Robert Griffin III and the Washington Redskins 33-31 in a preseason game on Saturday night. In their first appearance together for the Bears (tied for 11th in the AP Pro32), Cutler and Marshall picked up where they left off when they starred together with the Denver Broncos.

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    Boomers’ comeback falls short

    After spotting the Road Warriors a 4-run lead, the Schaumburg Boomers battled back to get within a run before dropping a 6-5 decision at Boomers Stadium on Saturday.

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    JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.com Little Mike, right, is the Arlington Million at Arlington Park Saturday.

    Arlington Million remains a special day in suburbs

    ASaturday's 30th running of the Arlington Million was celebrated by astonishing weather and 34,002 fans, the largest crowd for the race in this century. I have covered probably 25 Millions, maybe more, and this had the feel of one of the most spectacular. For the record, I'm not saying that just because I had the winner. What, you thought I was going to bet on a horse not named Little Mike?

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    The Fire’s Chris Rolfe, center, gets congratulations from teammates after scoring against the New England Revolution Saturday during the first half at Toyota Park.

    Nyarko plays big in Fire’s win over Revolution

    Sherjill MacDonald's first MLS goal broke a tie just past midway through the first half and the Chicago Fire held on to beat the New England Revolution 2-1 Saturday night. Chris Rolfe also scored to help the Fire (12-7-5) win their third straight and move into a tie with New York for second place in the Eastern Conference, five points behind Kansas City.

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    Schaub, Holliday lead Texans over 49ers

    Matt Schaub threw a touchdown pass to Lestar Jean, Trindon Holliday returned a punt for another score and Houston's defense stifled San Francisco in the Texans' 20-9 win over the 49ers on Saturday night.

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    Bradford on game, Rams beat Chiefs 31-17

    Sam Bradford threw touchdown passes on his first two drives, and the St. Louis Rams made improvements on the other side of the ball in a 31-17 preseason victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in the annual Governor's Cup game on Saturday night.

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    Giants stifle Sanchez, Tebow in 26-3 win over Jets

    Rookie Jayron Hosley returned an interception of Mark Sanchez 77 yards for a touchdown, and the New York Giants' defense stifled the Jets' starters in a 26-3 preseason victory between the hometown rivals on Saturday night.

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    Cubs center fielder Brett Jackson (7) is congratulated by Adrian Cardenas (45) Saturday night after hitting hit a solo home run off Cincinnati Reds starting pitcher Todd Redmond during the second game of a doubleheader.

    Brett Jackson homers, Cubs split doubleheader with Reds

    Brett Jackson hit his first career home run to help Brooks Raley earn his first major league win, leading the Cubs to a 9-7 victory over the Cincinnati Reds and a split of their day-night doubleheader on Saturday. Starlin Castro had three hits and two RBIs as the Cubs rebounded after losing the first two in the four-game weekend series. David DeJesus added his fifth home run of the season in the ninth.

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    Washington Redskins running back Alfred Morris is tackled by Bears defensive end Israel Idonije Saturday during the first half at Soldier Field.

    Bears’ Idonije hard to miss against Washington

    Defensive end Israel Idonije’s versatility often goes unnoticed, except by the coaching staff.But everyone noticed Idonije Saturday night against the Redskins, when he had 2½ sacks in the first quarter, including a forced fumble.“You just want to be better than the first game,” Idonije said. “Personally, I felt I did that. As a team, we definitely took a step in the right direction.” Early in his career, the 6-foot-6, 275-pound Nigerian from Canada was moved back and forth between tackle and end, one year being asked to bulk up to 300 and the next asked to slim down to 270. Because he can play both, the Bears are working Idonije in at tackle in nickel situations in order to get rookie defensive end Shea McClellin or other pass rushers into the game on obvious passing downs.“It’s not so much (Idonije) is an under tackle, but he’s an inside rush tackle on third down,” defensive coordinator Rod Marinelli said. “You try to get as much speed and athleticism on the field as you can. You just work guys in and you get certain matchups you like.”It’s a start:Pro Bowl running back Matt Forte made his 2012 debut Saturday night and picked up 16 yards on 4 carries.He’ll play a much bigger role in the regular season, where he’ll be looking for his fifth straight 50-plus-catch campaign and his third 1,000-yard season. Forte fell 3 yards short of the 1,000-yard milestone last season only because he missed the final four games with a sprained knee, although he averaged a career-best 4.9 yards per carry.“He’s the ultimate pro,” coach Lovie Smith said. “He can do everything you want him to do. He can run the routes like a receiver can, make you miss in the open field. We have a lot of things in store for him this year.”Comfort level:Forte’s backup, Michael Bush, enjoyed his second game with the Bears much more than his first, when he lost a fumble and gained 2 yards on 3 carries. Against the Redskins Bush scored twice in the first quarter, first on a 1-yard run and then on an 8-yard burst in which he made a nifty move at the line of scrimmage to slip a tackle. He finished with 5 carries for 21 yards and also had a 4-yard reception.“Last week I didn’t get a lot of reps, so it was different,” Bush said. “Once you get a lot of reps and get comfortable, everything works out for you.”Bumps and bruises:Rookie free safety Brandon Hardin was placed on a back board and carted off the field with a neck injury after his head collided with the hip of Redskins tight end Logan Paulsen. Hardin missed all of his senior season at Oregon State with a fractured shoulder.Safety Chris Conte suffered a right shoulder injury midway through the second quarter and did not return, but neither did most of the defensive starters. Punter Adam Podlesh injured his hip on Brandon Banks’ 91-yard punt-return touchdown late in the second quarter and did not return. Backup punter Ryan Quigley replaced Podlesh, who also holds on field-goal attempts. Odds and ends:Coach Lovie Smith wasn’t happy with the 91-yard punt-return TD by WR Brandon Banks late in the first half. “We didn’t like what we saw there,” Smith said. But the Bears turned the tables when Lorenzo Booker brought back the second-half kickoff 105 yard for a TD. … The Bears had 133 yards of total offense in the first quarter against the Redskins, 1 more than they had in the entire first game. … By halftime, they had 262 yards of total offense, including 210 through the air.

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    Ramirez hits 2 HRs, Dodgers beat Braves 6-2

    Hanley Ramirez drove in four runs with two homers, including the first of three straight shots by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the second inning Saturday night during a 6-2 win over the Atlanta Braves. Ramirez, James Loney and Luis Cruz hit consecutive homers in a span of four pitches from Ben Sheets. Ramirez added a three-run homer in the sixth.

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    Niese, Davis lead Mets over Nationals 2-0

    Jonathon Niese pitched into the eighth inning and Ike Davis hit a two-run homer in the seventh to lead the New York Mets over the Washington Nationals 2-0 Saturday night. Nationals starter Edwin Jackson allowed one hit through six innings — a triple to Mike Baxter in the first — and struck out a season-high 10.

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    Davis powers Orioles past Tigers 3-2

    Chris Davis hit a three-run homer and the Baltimore Orioles snapped the Detroit Tigers' four-game winning streak with a 3-2 victory on Saturday night. Adam Jones and Matt Wieters opened the seventh inning with consecutive singles off Rick Porcello (9-8). Davis then drove a 1-1 pitch over the wall in left for his 19th homer, snapping the scoreless tie.

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    Shoemaker vs. Piggott: which jockey is best?

    Editor's note: With the 30th running of the Arlington Million this weekend, we thought you might enjoy a look back at the first Million ever held. The column by Mike Imrem about jockeys Bill Shoemaker and Lester Piggott was published on Aug. 30, 1981, the day of the race.

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    ‘Shoe’ made Million a classic

    Editor's note: Here is a reprint of Mike Imrem's column on the first Arlington Million, which was won by Bill Shoemaker aboard John Henry. It appeared on Aug. 31, 1981, in the Daily Herald.

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    Little Mike, with jockey Ramon Dominguez, won the Arlington Million Saturday at Arlington Park.

    Little Mike wins Arlington Million

    Priscilla Vaccarezza will have quite a story to tell in a few weeks when she comes back to town for a 30th reunion of Glenbard North High School. Despite having lived in Carol Stream and a few other towns in the Chicago area for many years, Vaccarezza had never been to Arlington Park until Saturday, when she was in attendance with her husband Carlo and two sons. It gets better. A million times better.

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    I’m a Dreamer, in bronze silks, center, wins the Beverly D. at Arlington Park on Saturday.

    Dream finish in Beverly D

    The stretch at Arlington Park is by no means the longest in the country; just one look at the never-ending run for home at Belmont Park is all the proof you need of that. But for David Simcock, trainer of I'm a Dreamer, it sure seemed like the longest run to the finish line in history during Saturday's running of the Grade I $750,000 Beverly D.

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    Saturday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Daniel White/dwhite@dailyherald.com Neuqua Valley's Nick Rouches tees off during the Vern McGonagle Memorial High School Golf Championship, held at the Naperville Country Club.

    Scouting DuPage County boys golf

    A complete look at the DuPage County boys golf season.

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    Colts’ Luck faces difficult encore at Steelers

    Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck needed just one game to make Pittsburgh Steelers coach Mike Tomlin a believer. Tomlin says the top pick in April's NFL draft played like a veteran in a 38-3 win over St. Louis in last week's preseason opener.

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    Locker, Hasselbeck? Titans still trying to pick QB

    Jake Locker's struggles in his first preseason start have the Tennessee Titans pushing back their timetable for announcing their starting quarterback for this season. Mike Munchak had pegged the third preseason game for making that decision, but neither veteran Matt Hasselbeck and Locker have been impressive splitting starts through the first two exhibitions.

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    Arizona OT Levi Brown tears triceps, faces surgery

    Arizona Cardinals starting left tackle Levi Brown has a torn right triceps and probably will not play this season. Coach Ken Whisenhunt revealed the extent of the injury at his Saturday news conference, saying the five-year starter will require surgery, with an anticipated recovery time that would approach the end of the season.

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    Buffalo Grove’s Grace Kil is ready to begin an attempt at a high school grand slam of golf — winning the conference, regional, sectional and state meets in her senior year.

    BG’s Kil aims to finish with a thrill

    Buffalo Grove's Grace Kil would love to repeat what former Conant and current Wisconsin golfer Kris Yoo did, winning the conference, regional, sectional and state meet as a senior.

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    Scouting girls golf / Northwest

    A look ahead at the girls golf season for Mid-Suburban League schools, plus St. Viator and Maine West.

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    Jakkalberry, with jockey Colm O’Donoghue, is the winner of the St. Leger at Arlington Park on Saturday.

    In the long run, St. Leger suits Jakkalberry

    Jakkalberry has to get his props. Not only for surviving the 1 11/16ths mile endurance test that was the St. Leger, but for doing it in style with a 2 ¼-lengths victory over pace-setting Ioya Bigtime from the barn of Chicago-based trainer Chris Block. "That was the horse that scared me — the winner," Block said.

  •  
    This July 10, 2012 file photo shows the Giants’ Melky Cabrera showing off his MVP trophy after the All-Star Game. Cabrera has been suspended for 50 games without pay after testing positive for testosterone.

    Steroids rear their ugly head in baseball again

    Mat Spiegel believes people can change. He believes athletes can improve. He believes a hitter can grow up; he can mature, tending to his craft with unprecedented vigor. That a hitter can incorporate new ideas, utilizing the wisdom and personality mesh he may have luckily found with a good hitting coach. But having an open mind to that is getting increasingly difficult. Lazy, knee-jerk cynicism gets rewarded, time and again.

  •  
    Senior Dylan Ganow is one of Larkin’s top returning players this season.

    Scouting Fox Valley boys golf

    One the area deans of high school golf coaching is calling it a career after this season. Veteran Larkin coach Tim Jones will retire from teaching at the end of the school year. This is Jones' 35th year as a teacher in U-46 and his 25th as Larkin's golf coach. Jones also is Streamwood's head boys basketball coach. "You realize you've been doing this a long time," said Jones, who is looking forward to following his son, Andrew's senior sports seasons next year at Larkin. "I've done enough. Let someone else do a good job."

  •  

    Cruz homers, Nathan seals Texas win over Toronto

    The Texas Rangers felt confident their bullpen would bail them out. Nelson Cruz hit a two-run homer, Joe Nathan converted his team-record 22nd straight save opportunity and the Texas Rangers beat the Toronto Blue Jays 2-1 Saturday.

  •  

    Lester, Gonzalez lead Red Sox over Yankees 4-

    Jon Lester shut down the Yankees' offense for seven innings, Adrian Gonzalez provided an early lead with a two-run homer and the Boston Red Sox beat New York 4-1 Saturday for a badly needed win. Yankees nemesis Pedro Ciriaco was 4 for 4, raising his average against New York this year to .517 (15 for 29), and Boston reliever Craig Breslow and catcher Ryan Lavarnway became what is thought to be the first all-Yale battery in the major leagues since 1883.

  •  

    Molina helps Cardinals to 5-4 win over Pirates

    Yadier Molina had three hits and two RBIs in his return to the lineup, leading the St. Louis Cardinals to a big 5-4 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates on Saturday.St. Louis bounced back from Friday night's 2-1 loss in the series opener and pulled within a game of Pittsburgh for the second NL wild-card spot.

  •  
    Schaumburg Boomers bench coach Mike Kashirsky is currently serving as the left-handed batting practice pitcher for the White Sox. Kashirsky signed with the White Sox in 1999, but multiple injuries ended his career.

    Boomers coach enjoying ‘unreal’ experience with Sox

    After 13 years, the Schaumburg Boomers bench coach is back with the team that signed him as an undrafted free agent, serving as the White Sox left-handed batting practice pitcher.

  •  
    USC quarterback Matt Barkley and the Trojans are ranked No. 1 in the Associated Press preseason college football poll released on Saturday.

    USC brushes off sanctions to be No. 1 in AP Top 25

    Southern California is No. 1 in the AP Top 25, tossing off the weight of NCAA sanctions and returning to a familiar place in the rankings — with a boost from LSU's problems. USC earned the top spot in The Associated Press' preseason college football poll for the seventh time in school history and the first time in five seasons, edging out No. 2 Alabama and No. 3 LSU.

  •  
    Sergio Garcia waves to the crowd following a putt on the 15th green Saturday during the third round of the Wyndham Championship.

    Garcia shoots 66, takes 1-stroke lead at Wyndham

    No lead is ever really safe at birdie-friendly Sedgefield Country Club. The last time Sergio Garcia played here, he learned that the hard way. Garcia shot a 4-under 66 on Saturday to take the lead at 14-under 196 after three rounds at the Wyndham Championship.

  •  
    Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro looks to be on the verge of signing a seven-year, $60 million contract extension.

    Report: Castro, Cubs agree on 7-year, $60 million deal

    The Cubs were not confirming it Saturday, but a report from ESPN Desportes said they have agreed on a seven-year, $60 million contract extension with 22-year-old shortstop Starlin Castro. Castro's agent and the Cubs admitted recently talks had been opened.

  •  

    McCoughtry leads Dream past Sky

    The Olympic gold medals that Sky players Sylvia Fowles and Swin Cash won in London with the U.S. basketball team were on display Friday at Allstate Arena. But it was their Olympic teammate, Angel McCoughtry, who wound up giving the most gold medal-like performance of the night.

  •  

    Friday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Friday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

  •  
    Jake Wil Gallop wins the Arlington Fab Five vs. Legends Race with jockey James Graham aboard Friday at Arlington Park.

    ‘History’ in special Arlington turf race

    James Graham, one of Arlington's leading riders, stole the show with a come-from-behind victory in Friday's "Arlington's Fab 5" vs. the "Legends" jockey turf race. But Earlie Fires, Zoe Cadman, Patti Cooksey, Larry Melancon, Frank Lovato, Jr. rode as if they had never retired in the one-mile event won by Jake Will Gallop.

Business

  •  
    The applause for short sales over foreclosures comes from three groups: Your neighbors favor short sales because they seem to have a less negative impact on the community. Lenders are glad someone else has to maintain and sell the property. And sellers’ credit ratings take less of a hit.

    Strategy to maneuver through a short-sale

    Without question, experts say, short sales are the most complicated real estate transactions a homeowner can face -- and the most prone to failure. The failure rate for short sales locally is 49.4 percent, compared with 17.9 percent for foreclosures and 13.1 percent for traditional sales.

  •  

    Apple applications reviews: Tip or Skip; Amazon Instant Video

    Tip or Skip is a social shopping game that shows you pictures of user-submitted products, asks you to say yay or nay, then gives you the option to share your opinions to Facebook. With the release of a new app last week, Amazon has brought its video service to the iPad, with mixed results. Playback through the app is smooth and easy to navigate, but the same is not true of the app at large.

  •  
    Honda CEO Takanobu Ito announces the company’s environmental annual report in June in Tokyo. Casually attired Japanese business leaders were an unthinkable sight until recently, but now they are sweating in solidarity with the Cool Biz campaign to cut air-conditioning power use, a practice that has become an expression of solidarity after the nuclear power-plant disaster cost Japan nearly its entire supply of atomic energy.

    Executives swelter in Japan’s ‘Cool Biz’ movement

    The 90-degree heat outside Honda Motor's office prompts health warnings from the national weather agency. Inside, in an executive meeting room, it's only eight degrees cooler as President Takanobu Ito swelters. "We are already used to being in this warm office," Ito said. "We hope visitors understand the heat is part of our effort to save energy."

  •  
    Learning new technology is frustrating, but keeping abreast on the latest tech updates can be crucial in ensuring your future success.

    How to get tech savvy and help your career

    It's no secret that keeping up with advances in technology is critical to surviving and thriving in the business world. There are numerous examples of top companies that suffered by resisting change (Kodak, Blockbuster and Borders are recent examples). But these lessons also apply to individuals, and it's important to stay current on technology if you want to continue a successful career. Here are some tips to increase your savvy if you weren't a born techie.

  •  

    What the next iPhone will look like

    The new iPhone looks pretty much like the old iPhone. Sure, it's a bit taller, allowing for a display that has one extra row of icons on the Home screen. But the basic design is going to be the same. The iPhone is already near perfect, so Apple won't change much about the next one. Apple doesn't make design changes just for the sake of changing design. Instead, for the most part, Apple evolves its products slowly from one group to the next.

  •  
    The Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 is shown at a news conference in New York. Now Available in the U.S., the $499 tablet comes with a pen, or more precisely, a stylus. The Galaxy Note shows that the pressure is building on the iPad, and Apple will have to work if it wants to maintain its lead.

    Review: Samsung tablet takes aim at iPad with pen

    The tablet-computer market is like guerrilla warfare. One huge army — Apple — dominates the land, while a ragtag group of insurgents keeps raiding and probing, hoping to find some opening it can exploit. With Samsung's new Galaxy Note 10.1, the rebels have scored a small victory. It's a tablet that does something that the iPad doesn't do, and it does it well. This victory won't win the war, though.

  •  

    Google upgrades Android maps as Apple battle looms

    Google's mapping service for mobile devices is getting an upgrade as the Internet search leader braces for new competition from iPhone maker Apple. The improvements center on listings for public transportation options in nearly 500 cities around the world. Wednesday's update includes suggested routes and departure times for more than 1 million stations worldwide, about 50 percent more than a year ago. At some stations, Google will provide indoor directions to help riders navigate the system.

  •  

    Spotify, Pandora spur U.S. digital music sales past CD purchases

    The CD’s reign as the music industry’s biggest U.S. revenue source will end this year, eclipsed by downloads and newer streaming services such as Spotify Ltd. and Pandora Media Inc., according to a researcher.U.S. digital music sales will rise to $3.4 billion this year, exceeding the $3.38 billion in revenue from CDs and vinyl, Boston-based Strategy Analytics Inc. said yesterday on its website. Globally, digital music will surpass physical purchases in 2015, the company said.Record companies are licensing artists’ catalogs to streaming services as CD purchases shrink. Sales of digital tracks and albums will rise 6.7 percent this year, while streaming revenue will climb 28 percent, Strategy Analytics said. Together they account for 41 percent of U.S. music sales, compared with 22 percent worldwide.“Streaming music services such as Spotify and Pandora will be the key growth drivers over the next five years as usage and spending grow rapidly,” Ed Barton, director of digital media at Strategy Analytics, said in the statement. “The industry will be hoping that digital can rebuild the U.S. music market to something approaching its former stature.”Pandora, based in Oakland, California, gained 0.1 percent to $9.30 at the close in New York yesterday. The stock has declined 7.1 percent this year. Spotify, the closely held London-based service, began streaming in the U.S. in July 2011.U.S. sales of CDs and vinyl will decline 9 percent in 2012, a slower rate of decline than the rest of the world, Strategy Analytics said. Total U.S. recorded music spending this year will rise $134 million, or 2.1 percent, to about $6.38 billion, according to the researcher.Vivendi SA’s Universal Music Group, the world’s biggest record company, is seeking European regulatory approval for its proposed $1.9 billion acquisition of EMI Group’s recorded music business from Citigroup Inc. A Sony Corp.-led investor group purchased EMI’s music publishing in April for $2.2 billion.Sony Music is the second-biggest record company, followed by billionaire Len Blavatnik’s Warner Music Group.

  •  
    The Olympic flag is handed from London Mayor Boris Johnson, left, to International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge during the Closing Ceremony of the 2012 Summer Olympics on Aug. 12 in London.

    Trade group says Olympics hurt British tourism

    The Olympics brought less tourism money to recession-hit Britain than businesses had hoped for, a trade group said Monday, with a majority of tourist companies reporting losses from last year. "A lot of people thought London would be very busy and very expensive at this time," said Mary Rance, the group's CEO. "We weren't completely surprised, but we were a bit disappointed that (the Olympics) seem to have had an impact around the U.K., not just London."

  •  
    Bob Sutton, a Stanford professor who writes about management and organizations, related on his blog on Monday a tale of appalling customer service. Friends of his had sent their 10-year-old daughter unaccompanied on United to summer camp, assured by the airline that it would take good care of her. Instead, the girl missed her connection in Chicago — apparently because the airline employees who were supposed to help her failed to show up.

    United Airlines “loses” 10-year-old girl, enters social media hell

    As the Olympics wrapped up Sunday, United Airlines’ public relations team stood ready to capitalize on the good feelings with some nifty promotions on Facebook and Twitter. Its “Proud to Fly” challenge quizzed Facebook followers on their Olympics knowledge and encouraged them to share their score with friends. And for U.S. athletes returning home to O’Hare Airport, it had ready a water cannon salute, which it photographed and posted on Twitter.After U.S. Olympic swimmer Matt Grevers tweeted his thanks to the airline and posted a picture of himself with a medal around his neck and his arms around a United flight crew, United’s social media staff must have been flying high. Then it ran into some turbulence.Bob Sutton, a Stanford professor who writes about management and organizations, related on his blog on Monday a tale of appalling customer service. Friends of his had sent their 10-year-old daughter unaccompanied on United to summer camp, assured by the airline that it would take good care of her. Instead, the girl missed her connection in Chicago — apparently because the airline employees who were supposed to help her failed to show up.When the girl asked for help from other employees, they allegedly told her several times that they were too busy. And the parents only found out about it hours later, when the summer camp called to say their daughter had never arrived.When they called United, they were put on hold for 40 minutes, then told that the whole situation was no big deal. The girl eventually turned up, but it was only after the parents contacted a local TV station that United got serious about apologizing and addressing their concerns, according to Sutton.Sutton’s blog post struck a chord on Twitter and Facebook. As it circulated, others began to add their own tales of United malfeasance, real or perceived. And United’s own Facebook page and Twitter feed became ground zero for the outpouring of rage.“Parents, NEVER ever let your unescorted child travel on @United,” wrote Twitter user @viviane212. “Wow, hey folks when you want to get rid of your children, just put them on on a@United Airlines flight! #waytogo #FAIL,” tweeted @madmelvina.If the airline’s Twitter feed was the target of a string of barbed one-liners, its Facebook page became more like a group-therapy session for victims of United’s allegedly uncaring customer service. One user wrote, “I called the special needs desk about getting a flight for my disabled daughter and was talked to rudely and at one point the woman outright insulted my parenting!!”Another noticed that United was responding to the complaints not by addressing them, but by deleting them from its page.But the biggest insult, from her point of view, was that the airline’s social media team kept trying to milk its Olympics promotions. “Do not even begin to consider posting any adverse comments on United Airlines FB (page)! They just delete them and post purile (sic) advertising gimmicks,” she wrote. (Even that comment appears to have been scrubbed from the page.) Angry Facebook users resorted to posting their grievances on unrelated posts in United’s timeline, so that even its “Proud to Fly” quiz became a forum for anger.On Tuesday, the airline finally responded directly, posting an apology on Facebook and linking to one on Twitter. It also responded to press inquiries by saying it was taking the matter seriously and looking into what went wrong.That didn’t satisfy everyone, but it seemed to quell the storm at last. Thursday, for the first time, the airline is once again getting some positive responses to its posts on Facebook.Social media is hard for companies to do well. It’s always an uphill battle for “engagement” from followers. But United’s debacle shows that once the ball gets rolling in the wrong direction, it can be hard to stop. And ignoring bad press is a surefire way to make it worse.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Custom-made wood shutters are constructed to fit any window size.

    Wooden shutters have a timeless style

    Shutter Hut specializes in handmade furniture for windows — otherwise known as wood shutters, said Michael Ready, a second generation owner of the Volo business, along with his brother, Shaun.

  •  

    Her marriage lacks intimacy; should she leave?

    Her marriage feels more like a business than a relationship. Should she leave or work with her husband to try to rebuild it?

  •  
    The Space Needle towers over “The Sun,” center, and the Glasshouse, left, at the new Dale Chihuly Garden and Glass museum at the Seattle Center.

    Seattle Center continues to evolve 50 years later

    Fifty years after the World's Fair inserted the Space Needle into Seattle's skyline, the city is celebrating that anniversary by offering an array of new things to see and do at Seattle Center: from a zip line to a new art glass museum. Seattle's 74-acre gathering place has been gradually reinventing itself for years, with a new opera house and a rock'n'roll museum designed by Frank Gehry.

  •  
    Eva Restaurant’s 5 percent discount to customers who leave their cellphones with staff when they are seated is an attempt to create an environment where diners connect with each other instead of with technology.

    Restaurant gives discount for phone-free dinners

    Eva Restaurant in Los Angeles is giving a 5 percent discount to customers who will leave their cellphones with staff when they are seated. Owner Mark Gold says nearly half take advantage of the discount, and many express gratitude at the opportunity to let go of their devices for a while.

  •  
    This CD cover image released by EMI shows “Fifty Shades of Grey: The Classical Album,” a release inspired by the music selected by author EL James for her “Fifty Shades of Grey” book series.

    ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ phenomenon is taking over

    You've bought rope for that special someone, picked up a few sex toys and read those "Fifty Shades of Grey" books a time or three. You know who you are. Well, no need to skulk about at naughty shops or the hardware store as Fifty Shades of Consumption makes it further into the mainstream. "Anecdotally speaking, it would certainly be reasonable to attribute that to the Fifty Shades phenomenon," a hardware store owner said. "I'm looking at my rope department right now and it's half empty, and it's been like that for the past few months."

  •  
    Stylist Cliff Freeman braids the hair of Danielle Maddox, 25, at Maxine salon’s Braid Bar in Chicago on Aug. 1. Salons from Los Angeles to New York are opening “braid bars,” offering special menus of different braid styles for a fixed price.

    Thanks to ‘Hunger Games,’ braids are back in style

    A staple of the stylish grade-school set, braids have moved from the playground to the red carpet — and now local salons. Salons from Los Angeles to New York are weaving "braid bars" into their services, offering special menus of different braid styles for a fixed price.

  •  
    The next book by award-winning investigative reporter and best-selling author Bob Woodward will document how President Barack Obama and congressional leaders responded to the economic crisis and where we stand now. Publisher Simon & Schuster announced Tuesday the book will be called “The Price of Politics” and will come out Sept. 11.

    Next Bob Woodward book to take on Obama, economy

    The U.S. economy is about to get the Bob Woodward treatment. The next book by the award-winning investigative reporter and best-selling author will document how President Barack Obama and congressional leaders responded to the economic crisis and where we stand now. Publisher Simon & Schuster announced Tuesday the book will be called "The Price of Politics" and will come out Sept. 11.

  •  
    In this June 21, 2005 file photo Katie Holmes sports a Hermes handbag as she and Tom Cruise pose for photographers in Madrid shortly after announcing their engagement. The status handbag market is driven by celebrity trendsetters such as Holmes and Victoria Beckham and now some big auction houses are getting in on the act. They say it’s a new and growing category that’s attracting sellers and buyers from around the world.

    Luxury handbags making splash on the auction block

    Hermes, Chanel, Louis Vuitton. What woman wouldn't covet a handbag by one of these iconic fashion houses/ The still red-hot status handbag market — driven by celebrity trendsetters such as Katie Holmes and Victoria Beckham — has not escaped the notice of some big auction houses. They say it's a new and growing category that is attracting a global clientele of sellers and buyers.

  •  
    Tony Bennett returns to the Ravinia Festival in Highland Park on Saturday, Aug. 18.

    Weekend picks: Ravinia hosts living legend Tony Bennett

    In anticipation of a “Viva Duets” album this year, living legend singer Tony Bennett returns Saturday to the Ravinia Festival in Highland Park. Racing fans won't want to miss the 30th running of the Arlington Million Saturday. Get ready to jam Saturday at Aurora's Jam on the Fox, featuring the Charlie Daniels Band as the headliner. And don't forget about the Chicago Air & Water Show, too.

  •  

    Mortgaging Barbies

    Q. A writer recently wanted to know if a buyer can ask for a homeowner's Barbie dolls to be included in the sale of the house. You can include anything, but if the buyer is getting a mortgage loan, the bank's attorney might not allow it.

  •  
    This June 5, 2010 file photo shows Brian Aubert of Silversun Pickups performing at The 2010 KROQ Weenie Roast at The Verizon Wireless Amphitheater in Irvine, Calif. The Silversun Pickups want Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign to immediately stop the use of the rock group’s song “Panic Switch.”

    Silversun Pickups object to Romney’s use of song

    The Silversun Pickups want Mitt Romney's presidential campaign to immediately stop the use of the rock group's song "Panic Switch." And the Romney campaign has no problem with that.

  •  
    Robert Pattinson is releasing his most adult film in the midst of his largest media storm.

    Human nature + curiosity = little celeb privacy

    Technology has collided with human nature and created a culture in which everything — including our interest in and the generation of entertainment news — is accelerated and magnified. Once upon a time, we might have merely wondered what was happening in Kristen Stewart's love life. Now we can hunt down the details.

  •  

    Board and attorney communications under attorney-client privilege

    Q. I am on the board of my association. An owner recently disagreed with a decision the board made. The board emailed the association's attorney for an opinion, then forwarded the attorney's email on to the complaining owner. I objected strenuously to simply forwarding the attorney's email. Was my concern justified?

  •  

    Why we need to expand private-sector mortgage lending

    The future of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two secondary market behemoths that became wards of the federal government in September 2008, is in limbo. Virtually all politicians on the national scene would like to get rid of them, but several problems are in the way.

  •  

    Window replacement may trigger requirement of larger size

    Q. My home was built in 1989 with upgraded windows that are now starting to show their age. We want new double-hung windows but the village is giving us a hard time with the permit, saying the window opening is not large enough.

  •  
    Old wood screen doors have long framed views of the outdoors, but after they’ve worn out their welcome, they can find a new use as a wall-mounted frame for artwork and collectibles. This room was designed and styled by Marge Jackson & Mike Karambelas.

    A weathered screen door can showcase your favorite treasures

    Old wood screen doors have long framed views of the outdoors, but after they've worn out their welcome, they can find a new use as a wall-mounted frame for artwork and collectibles.

  •  
    This contemporary stone and cedar split-level home offers views of the Fox River.

    Algonquin home overlooking Fox River is listing of the week

    It would be difficult to compare this contemporary stone and cedar split-level home to just about any other home on the market in the Chicago area. This custom home, still lived in by the original owner, overlooks the Fox River and offers unobstructed views of that waterway.

  •  
    In its day, this cookie jar held yummy treats. But much of the paint is worn off now, and might not even sell if offered.

    Values for ‘Mammy’ cookie jar have dropped

    Cookie-jar prices went through the roof after artist Andy Warhol's collection was sold by Sotheby's in 1988. For a time after that, there was a cookie-jar craze that amounted to a mania. Prices and interest went up and up, but then came a crash from which cookie jars have never recovered.

Discuss

  •  

    The Soapbox
    Mosquitoes biting, suburbanites biking, neighbors bickering. Those are some of the topics covered by Daily Herald editors this week.

  •  

    Find common ground on weapons ban
    A Palatine letter to the editor: As Massachusetts governor, Mitt Romney signed a bill banning assault weapons. As a presidential candidate, Barack Obama pledged to address the assault weapons issue.

  •  

    Thank, don’t blame, business and industry
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: The letter writer cites a litany of what in his mind is wrong with Republicans. I have yet to see my Republican friends going around crying about politics.

  •  

    Don’t be blind to Internet’s falsehoods
    A Streamwood letter to the editor: I hope all Americans become aware of this simple fact regarding the internet: just because something is "on the internet" does not make it true.

  •  

    Wauconda Township officials don’t get it
    An Elmhurst letter to the editor: Wauconda Township officials are having trouble understanding the basics of the laws governing public bodies and townships.

  •  

    Of climate change and oil
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Good science requires that every belief should be held open to honest challenge. Good public policy should be based on the preponderance of evidence. The former suggests we must reduce our demand for petroleum. The latter should demand that we do.

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