Football 2

Daily Archive : Saturday August 11, 2012

News

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    Sanu John of Skokie, one of two members comprising "Illest Vocals," reacts after learning that the duo won the Suburban Chicago's Got Talent competition Saturday at the Mane Event in downtown Arlington Heights.

    Images from the Chicago’s Got Talent Finals

    Images: Suburban Chicago's Got Talent winner and finalists.

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    Xavier Da'Shawn Brown, Shawn to his friends, is working this summer at Belmont Village in Carol Stream. He's learning job skills that he hopes will help him after he graduates from Glenbard East High School. The program SALT, for Student Achievement Leadership Team, helps students stay on track academically and learn job skills for life after high school.

    Carol Stream program helps students succeed after high school

    Xavier Da'Shawn Brown dreams of going to college and becoming a police officer. But the Glenbard East High School student, 17, isn't padding his resume with an endless list of club memberships and extracurricular activities. Instead, he's participating in Student Achievement Leadership Team, a program in Carol Stream to help students succeed after high school.

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    Iran earthquake kills at least 250, over 2,000 hurt

    Iran's main news channel said twin quakes hit the towns of Ahar, Haris and Varzaqan in East Azerbaijan province at 4:53 p.m. local time also damaging hundreds of homes.

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    St. Charles police say man threatened to shoot father, barricaded himself

    St. Charles police said they arrested a man outside a townhome on the 100 block of Whittington Course Saturday night after he threatened to shoot his father inside the townhome and barricaded himself in the basement for several hours.

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    Amy Lieberman of Naperville, left, and Leigh-Anne Clark of Plainfield are among the participants in the Susan G. Komen Chicago 3-Day, which passed through Mount Prospect on Saturday.

    20 miles to go for ‘Core Komen people’ walking 60 to fight breast cancer

    About 1,200 walkers described as "core Komen people" rested Saturday night at a mobile campsite on the grounds of Maryville Academy in Des Plaines before beginning the final leg of the 60-mile Susan G. Komen Chicago 3-Day. "These people are the core Komen people," said Komen Chicagoland Area Executive Director Michael Ziener said. "With everything we've been through, they're walking 60 miles...

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    Dr. Stephen W. Hargarten poses for a photo last Wednesday at Froedtert & Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Hargarten helped many of the victims of Sunday’s shooting at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin.

    Experts say treat guns as a national health threat

    About 260 million to 300 million firearms are owned by civilians in the United States; about one-third of American homes have one. Guns are used in two-thirds of homicides, according to the FBI. About 9 percent of all violent crimes involve a gun — roughly 338,000 cases each year.

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    President Barack Obama salutes as he walks off Air Force One Saturday after arriving at O’Hare International Airport.

    Obama’s history with Ryan one of sharp words

    "There's nothing serious about a plan that claims to reduce the deficit by spending a trillion dollars on tax cuts for millionaires and billionaires," President Obama said, foreshadowing what has become the central message of his re-election campaign.He characterized Paul Ryan's plan for Medicare, the government insurance program for those 65 and older as, "tough luck; you're on your own."

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    Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, right, and his newly announced vice presidential running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, greet supporters Saturday during a campaign rally in Manassas, Va.

    Ryan seen as Romney’s bridge across GOP spectrum

    At 42, Paul Ryan has spent almost half of his life in the Washington fold, the last 14 representing a southern Wisconsin district that runs from the shores of Lake Michigan through farm country south of Madison.

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    Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, right, with his newly announced vice presidential running mate, Wisconsin Republican Rep. Paul Ryan standing behind him, during a campaign rally Saturday in Manassas, Va.

    Analysis: A true reformer is on the ticket

    Ryan is also known for his deep allergy to debt. But that concern isn't evident in his voting record. He voted for the Bush tax cuts, as well as the war in Iraq and the unfunded Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit.

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    Associated Press/April 5, 2011 House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan touts his 2012 federal budget during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    VP selection recasts battle for congress

    A recent poll from Democratic pollster Democracy Corps showed that when the Ryan budget is described as attempting to "save Medicare" in battleground House districts — many of them Democratic-leaning — 52 percent of voters say they support it, while 37 percent oppose it.

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    House Budget Committee Chairman Republican Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin introduces Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney before Romney spoke at the Grain Exchange in Milwaukee, in this April 3, 2012 file photo.

    Friends, opponents like Ryan but split on his politics

    Despite being a vice presidential candidate, Ryan isn't dropping his bid for his eighth congressional term. Wisconsin law generally prevents candidates from seeking two offices at the same time, but provides an exception when one of the offices is either president or vice president.

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    S. Elgin football player airlifted from practice, doing OK

    A 16-year-old student at South Elgin High School was airlifted from football practice to Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge. There was no indication the young man was hit hard, but he complained of numbness and grogginess, a spokesman for the school district said Saturday. It appears he will be OK, officias said.

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    St. Charles man charged in fireworks explosion

    Police in southeast Tennessee have arrested a St. Charles man after fireworks were ignited in two stores.Police in Athens told The Daily Post-Athenian that they were called to a grocery store and doughnut shop after the explosions Wednesday morning.Authorities arrested 39-year-old William Busche of St. Charles after they saw him setting off more fireworks outside a convenience store.

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    Abigail Soto, 17, of Elgin, the Puerto Rican Heritage Organization queen for 2012, learns how to salsa dance with Sylvia Acevedo, 3, also of Elgin, at BoriquaFest in Festival Park in Elgin on Saturday.

    Puerto Rican heritage on proud display at Elgin’s BoriquaFest

    The 20th annual BoriquaFest held Saturday at Festival Park in Elgin featured a dominoes tournament, plus salsa lessons, plenty of musical entertainment and booths selling Puerto Rican food, jewelry, crafts, dresses and T-shirts.

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    Participants in the walking portion of the Bob Leonard 5K make their way down the river Saturday at Pottawatomie Park in St. Charles.

    Bob Leonard 5K in St. Charles draws a crowd

    Four-year-old Charlie Rakunas liked going over obstacles at the Kids' Turtle Hurdle on Saturday at Pottawatomie Park in St. Charles. That was a new feature at the 6th Annual Bob Leonard 5K Run/Walk, which serves as the main fundraiser for the St. Charles River Corridor Foundation.

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    A nurse changes the diaper of a newborn baby at the Perinatal Clinic in Rio de Janeiro.

    Brazilian women rebel against cesarean births

    In Brazil, where natural childbirth fell out of favor years ago, more than half of all babies are born via cesarean section, a figure that rises to 82 percent for women with private health insurance.

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    Associated Press/July 17, 2012 A statue at Independence Square in downtown Charlotte, N.C., awaits delegates to the Democratic convention on Sept. 3.

    Democratic platform backs same-sex marriage

    Saturday's action at the platform committee meeting in Detroit sends the document for ratification by delegates to next month's Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina. President Barack Obama, a Democrat, said in May that he supports same-sex marriage. Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney doesn't.

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    A scorched and burnt farm appears Wednesday after the ravages of a wildfire which swept through parts La Gomera, the Canary Islands, Spain.

    Wildfire threatens ancient forest in Spain

    Officials say high temperatures have intensified a wildfire on a Spanish island, endangering a valuable wooded area that is a rare survivor of the ancient type of forest that once covered much of Europe.

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    From left, United States' Francena McCorory, United States' Allyson Felix, United States' Deedee Trotter and United States' Sanya Richards-Ross celebrate winning gold in the women's 4x400-meter relay final during the athletics in the Olympic Stadium at the 2012 Summer Olympics, London, Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012.

    Images from 2012 London Olympics Games

    Images from the 2012 London Olympics on Saturday, August 11.

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    Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, left, listens as vice presidential running mate Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., speaks at a rally at the Randolph Macon college, Saturday in Ashland, Va.

    Suburban Republicans praise Paul Ryan pick

    Suburban Republicans Saturday praised Mitt Romney's decision to pick Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan as his running mate, saying the budget-minded lawmaker was a good fit as voters focus on government spending. "In selecting Congressman Ryan, Mitt Romney has shown the nation that he understands that this election is about big issues facing our future," Illinois GOP chairman Pat Brady of St.

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    President Barack Obama, center right, greets a crowd of people after arriving Saturday at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago.

    Obama in Chicago for fundraisers

    President Obama met with top advisers today at his campaign headquarters shortly after arriving in Chicago for a series of birthday-themed fundraisers scheduled for Sunday.

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    Composer Marvin Hamlisch

    Notable deaths last week

    Marvin Hamlisch was blessed with perfect pitch and an infallible ear. “I heard sounds that other children didn’t hear,” he wrote in his autobiography.He turned that skill into writing and arranging compulsively memorable songs that the world was unable to stop humming — from the mournful “The Way We Were” to the jaunty theme from “The Sting.”

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    Republican U.S. Rep. Judy Biggert opposes Democrat Bill Foster in the 11th Congressional District race in November.

    Bush tax cuts ignite 11th Congressional District debate

    Democrat Bill Foster, in an interview with the Daily Herald, said the extension of the Bush Tax cuts two years ago, which he voted for, was "a mistake." Then he went on Fox News Chicago and said his vote came at a time when the economy was in the tank. He wouldn't vote to extend the cuts for incomes above $250,000 now. Judy Biggert and her fellow Republicans who support extending the cuts for...

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    Prospect Hts. police arrest two after shots fired

    Prospect Heights police have arrested two 15-year-old suspects in an incident where shots were fired Friday afternoon in a parking lot area by hotels along Milwaukee Avenue. Police say they believe the incident was gang-related and the suspects say it was in retaliation for a similar attack the day before.

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    The wreckage of a bus lies in a gorge Saturday in Himachal Pradesh state, about 385 miles north of New Delhi, India.

    52 killed as bus falls into gorge in north India

    An overcrowded bus fell into a deep gorge in a mountainous area of northern India on Saturday, killing 52 people and injuring 46 others, police said.

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    Afghans travel in a motorcycle cart Saturday while transporting a traditional tandoor oven in Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan.

    Afghan policeman kills 10 colleagues

    An Afghan police officer killed at least 10 of his fellow officers on Saturday, a day after six U.S. service members were gunned down by their Afghan partners in summer violence that has both international and Afghan forces questioning who is friend or foe.

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    Unlocked garages target for theft in Des Plaines

    Unlocked garages have been a common burglar target in recent days in Des Plaines. According to police reports, overnight last Sunday, burglars stole items from three unlocked garages in the 1000 and 1100 blocks of South Sixth Avenue.

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    Man dies in car crash in Alden Township

    Michael G. Doersam, 30, of the 2000 block of Hunter Road in Caledonia, died in a single vehicle car crash early Saturday morning in unincorporated Alden Township northeast of Harvard, officials said.

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    Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, right, and vice presidential candidate Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., wave at the crowd during a campaign event, Saturday, Aug. 11, in Norfolk, Va.

    Romney names Paul Ryan his No. 2

    Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney introduced Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin as his vice presidential running mate on Saturday, turning to the architect of a deeply conservative and intensely controversial long-term budget plan to remake Medicare and cut trillions in federal spending. In the campaign to come, Republicans will present economic solutions "that are bold, specific and...

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    Closing ceremonies: Spice Girls, 32 golds, mosh pit

    LONDON (AP) — You know what you want — what you really, really want — to cap the Olympic Games? A closing ceremony featuring the Spice Girls.Organizers won't confirm it, but the 90s "girl power" group have been photographed rehearsing for Sunday's night's show, so an appearance by Baby, Ginger, Scary, Sporty and Posh seems certain.

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    Obama team: Romney, Ryan would hurt middle class

    President Barack Obama's campaign says Mitt Romney's selection of Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan as his running mate shows a commitment to "budget-busting tax cuts" for the wealthy and "greater burdens" on the middle class and seniors.

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    Ryan: Obama has 'record of failure'

    His selection just hours old, Republican Mitt Romney's vice presidential pick, Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, was already tearing into President Barack Obama's "record of failure." Moving into a role as Romney's chief attack dog, Ryan declared Saturday that the nation under Obama's leadership is struggling through the "worst economic recovery in 70 years."

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    New Illinois license plates to honor veterans

    JOLIET, Ill. — Illinois veterans with disabilities like post-traumatic stress disorder will soon be able to get special license plates to note their service.Gov. Pat Quinn signed a law Friday that will recognize those veterans whose unseen disabilities may not have qualified them for disabled license plates and parking privileges.

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    Free Ill. State Fair admission Monday for seniors

    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — For "Senior Day" on Monday, the Illinois State Fair will offer free admission to those 60 and older.The state Department on Aging will host activities for seniors and their families in the air-conditioned Illinois Building near the main gate.The "Not So Newlywed Game" for couples 50 and up will test how much each knows about his or her spouse.

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    Obama pledges all-out response to drought

    WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama is pledging a wide-ranging response to the worst drought in a quarter-century.In his weekly radio and Internet address, Obama says his administration is giving farmers and ranchers access to low-interest emergency loans, is opening more federal land for grazing and is distributing $30 million to get water to livestock.

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    School application sheds light on shooting suspect

    The man accused of opening fire in a suburban Denver movie theater had been an excellent student who left an impression good enough for acceptance to a competitive neuroscience program at the University of Illinois.

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    House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., gives the GOP response to President Barack Obama's budget submission for Fiscal Year 2012, on Capitol Hill in Washington. On Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012, Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney announced Ryan as his running mate. As the chairman of the House Budget Committee, Ryan gives Romney a link to Capitol Hill leadership and underscores Romney's effort to make the election a referendum on the nation's economic course.

    Ryan seen as Romney's bridge across GOP spectrum

    Even before Wisconsin sent Paul Ryan to Congress, he was meticulously carving a path that seemed to point only upward.

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    Janet Wright Safanda

    Janet Safanda loved history, politics, arts

    Janet Safanda, Southerner by birth but Genevan by heart, devoted her life to family; educating voters; preserving local history; and helping the fine arts to flourish. She died last week and a service will be held Saturday.

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    Jason Cassidy of Villa Park remains hospitalized with critical injuries sustained in a July 22 fire in Lombard.

    Lombard fire survivor awake but ‘struggling,’ dad says

    Three weeks ago, a fire in Lombard left Jason Cassidy with burns to nearly 40 percent of his body and killed one of his friends. Cassidy's father, in his first interview since the fire, said the 25-year-old's recovery since then has been "a lot of ups and downs" but he is hopeful his son will leave intensive care soon.

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    Karen Weinert

    Grayslake District 46 officials testy about Open Meetings Act

    What started as a discussion on whether an attorney should be hired to attend meetings turned into friction between some Grayslake Elementary District 46 board members over adherence to the Illinois Open Meetings Act. The Open Meetings Act was an issue at District 46 in June, when Lake County prosecutors announced they found the board committed violations in October 2010.

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    Huntley closed on the Sawyer-Kelley Mill Friday, but officials haven’t decided whether to save or tear down the historic building, which was constructed in the 1890s.

    What happens to historic mill now that Huntley owns it?

    The future of a historic building recently Huntley bought for $115,000, has yet to be determined. The village of Huntley Friday closed on the Sawyer-Kelley Mill, which was built in the 1890s. In the coming months, the village board will decide whether to save it or knock it down and put up a parking lot in its place.

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    Chad Parker, top, and Dean Connelly, from Associated Crafts in Iowa, remove the cover from the stained-glass window at the Naperville Women’s Club building.

    Naperville Woman’s Club preserving stained-glass window

    The stained glass window adorning the Naperville Woman's Club home has remained intact for 114 years. With a little work this weekend, members hope to preserve it for at least 114 more. A professional stained glass restoration group will be on site through Saturday working to repair the window's mill work and put a new protective covering over it.

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    You might not like the sight of orange barrels as you drive around the suburbs during the summer, but this year’s extraordinarily dry weather has been a blessing for construction workers.

    No rain, no problem for some construction projects

    The ongoing drought has been terrible for the farming business, but some who work in road construction say they've actually benefited from the extra dry weather we've had this summer. Projects that entail earth-moving and excavation have been moving fast, workers and transportation officials say. "With the dry weather, we can just keep rolling," said Ryan Heuser of Marengo, a mechanic who works...

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    Karen Dobner speaks at an April forum in St. Charles, describing how she lost her son, Max, after he drove his car at 100 mph through the front of a house following experimentation with synthetic marijuana.

    Aurora mom brings fight against fake drugs to TV

    Karen Dobner, who started the "To The Maximus" foundation after her son Max, 19, died last summer after crashing his car into a house in North Aurora after smoking synthetic marijuana, told her story on the second season premiere of "Crime Inc." on CNBC last weekend. "We feel like were making progress," said the Aurora mom, who has been inundated with emails from concerned parents and media from...

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    The practice of hiring criminal substitutes is well-documented by official Chinese media.

    Do the crime, hire someone else to pay the time

    The practice of hiring "body doubles," or "stand-ins," by the rich is well-documented by official Chinese media. In 2009, a hospital president who caused a deadly traffic accident hired an employee's father to "confess" and serve as his stand-in. A company chairman is currently charged with arranging criminal substitutes for the executives of two other companies. In China, where one-tenth of 1...

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    In a poll of 1,000 registered voters, 44.1 percent said the president was both book smart and street smart. Twenty-five percent said he was just book smart, 8.8 percent said he was just street smart, and 22.1 percent said he was neither.

    Which presidential candidate would you want to help you change a tire?

    Call it the summer stalemate. It's hot outside, the presidential candidates are running from one rally to the next, but, for all their hustle, we don't really see much movement. In our last Slate/SurveyMonkey political survey, our pool of more than 1,000 registered voters told us that they felt the United States was veering off course; that around 30 percent — the largest plurality —...

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    A hoard of gold coins is shown in this undated handout photo. Two gold dinars, the type of gold currency found, would have provided sufficiently for an extended family for one month.

    Discovery of gold coins helps explain ancient economics

    Gold coins discovered last month in an ancient crusader castle that lies in what is now Israel provide surprising information on how economic transactions were made about 1,000 years ago."The scientific value is unprecedented," the director of the excavation said in an email. Crusaders "were not afraid to use older coins to complete large transactions and run large-scale businesses."

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    A robot that can interpret and react to human behavior would make a great teaching tool, especially for children with disabilities. Teaching through screens has had some success, but studies have shown that people prefer a physical presence, which robots would provide.

    Why robots might make great teachers

    We've been promised for years that robots will soon move from factories into our everyday lives (maybe even white-collar offices), and yet so far, the closest thing we have to Rosie Jetson is the Roomba. In addition to dexterity and the ability to walk, one of the biggest hurdles to personal robotics has been human-machine interaction. For a machine to enter human space, it has to understand...

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    Democrats criticize Florida’s new voter-registration laws

    This year, early voting in Florida, the country's biggest swing state, will end sooner under a new election law that Democrats have sued to block, claiming it's likely to hurt minority-voter turnout. Florida is among four key states where restrictions on voter eligibility, approved by Republican-controlled legislatures, threaten President Obama's re-election prospects in a race against Republican...

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    A screenshot of the Obama for America app page on iTunes. Some privacy advocates are worried because the app lists the first name, last initial and home address of Democrats. Others point out that all the information is publicly available elsewhere.

    Obama campaign app has privacy advocates concerned

    President Obama's re-election team has taken canvassing to the next technological level, introducing a free iPhone app that maps the location of nearby Democrats, identifying them by first name, last initial and home address. Some privacy advocates have criticized the app, but others point out that the information is publicly available elsewhere. "It doesn't make it right just because it's...

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    Lunch is served at Northeast Elementary Magnet in Danville, Ill., on Sept. 20, 2011. School lunches at this health-focused school have fresh fruit and vegetables every day. Some House Republicans want to change a program that serves fresh produce to low-income students to allow for frozen fruits and vegetables too.

    Congress has food fight over fresh vs. frozen fruit

    Are canned pears the nutritional equivalent of a juicy fruit off the tree? House Republicans seem to think so. And their proposal to tinker with a program that serves fresh fruit and vegetables to children in select schools has touched off the ultimate food fight. "If the goal is to expand and improve upon childhood nutrition, it doesn't make sense to limit the kinds of fruits and vegetables that...

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    Carol Stream fest showcases teen music talent

    Some communities plan activities to keep their teens busy. Others let teens pick the event and plan it for themselves — such as Carol Stream's seventh annual Teen Music Festival. "We listen to their voice instead of saying, we did this for you,'" said village Trustee Matt McCarthy.

Sports

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    White Sox catcher Tyler Flowers and first baseman Adam Dunn talk to starter Francisco Liriano, middle, after Oakland’s Josh Reddick hit an RBI single in the fourth inning Saturday night. Liriano didn’t make it out of the fourth inning.

    White Sox escape deep hole only to lose

    It was a tough night for the White Sox trade acquisitions. Starting pitcher Francisco Liriano fell apart in the third inning and Brett Myers was roughed up in relief late in the game after the White Sox rallied back from a 6-2 deficit before losing to the A's 9-7. And Kevin Youkilis might not be available Sunday after being hit by a pitch on the left forearm.

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    Beach Bums power past Boomers 12-2

    Schaumburg Boomers baseball coverage

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    Cougars rally, win 4-3

    Kane County Cougars game report:

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    Chicago White Sox's Tyler Flowers swings on an RBI double during the second inning of a baseball game against the Oakland Athletics in Chicago, Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

    Big bats can’t save Sox against A’s

    Jonny Gomes homered to tie the game, and Brandon Inge hit a go-ahead single as the Oakland Athletics scored twice in the eighth inning and beat the Sox 9-7 on Saturday night.

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    Chad Johnson arrested on domestic violence charge

    Police say Dolphins receiver Chad Johnson has been arrested on a domestic violence charge, accused of head-butting his newlywed wife during an argument in front of their home in Davie, Fla.

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    Bears shed no new light on Urlacher situation

    BOURBONNAIS — The Brian Urlacher mystery is no closer to being solved.The eight-time Pro Bowl middle linebacker was back in camp, but he did not practice Saturday after being excused for personal reasons for the previous three practices and Thursday night’s preseason opener.He has not practiced since July 31.“Brian Urlacher is back after he’s taken care of some business,” coach Lovie Smith said. “So it’s good to get him back on the practice field, even though he’s not practicing yet.“He still has some soreness with the knee. Exactly when he’ll be back, I can’t tell you that.”Urlacher, who suffered sprained ligaments in his left knee in the 2011 season finale, has missed eight straight practices. Smith was asked if Urlacher had additional tests on the knee during his absence.“The knee is sore, and he’s been gone for personal reasons,” Smith said. “That’s all we’re going to really talk on the subject.”No longer left out:The competition for the starting left-tackle job may be back on, after it appeared J’Marcus Webb had won the job, almost by default, from Chris Williams.Webb had gotten all the first-team reps in the week leading up to Thursday’s preseason opener, but he did not impress offensive coordinator Mike Tice with his performance in the game.So Saturday Williams got some reps on the left side with the first team. He had been occasionally spelling starting right tackle Gabe Carimi, and he played there with the second team Thursday.“Just (like) every other decision we make,” coach Lovie Smith said of the switch. “We had a chance to see guys in certain situations from the game, and we’ll continue to look at different people.”Williams has started for the Bears at both positions and at left guard.“Coach (Tice) told me get some work at left tackle today, that was it,” Williams said after practice. I just do what I’m told, man. Just go out and work. It’ll work itself out.”Horror movie:Center and line leader Roberto Garza said watching the film of Thursday’s 31-3 preseason loss wasn’t enjoyable.“It shouldn’t be,” he said. “We didn’t do a lot of things good, and we have to learn from this. Obviously this week of practice is important, and this next game is, too. Any time you’re on the field, you have to be ready to play. Nobody’s job is really secure.”The Bears allowed 6 sacks and generated just 132 yards of total offense.Other injuries:Backup linebacker and special-teams player Dom DeCicco did not practice Saturday and is out indefinitely with a groin injury.“Dom has done some good things,” coach Lovie Smith said, “but he’s going to be on the shelf for a while.”Backup guard Chilo Rachal also missed practice with general soreness, as did linebacker Jabara Williams (hamstring) and defensive tackle DeMario Pressley (foot).Rearranging deck chairs:Linebackers Xavier Adibi and K.C. Asiodu and defensive end Aston Whiteside were signed Saturday but did not practice. Defensive tackle Ronnie Cameron and cornerback Jeremy Ware were waived.Adibi played in 38 games and started eight with the Houston Texans (2008-10) and Minnesota Vikings (2011). Asiodu played in a total of 11 games with the St. Louis Rams (2009) and New Orleans Saints (2010). Whiteside was signed this season by the Dallas Cowboys as an undrafted free agent out of Abilene Christian University.

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    Alshon Jeffery continues to impress at Bears camp, and it didn’t hurt that he caught 4 passes for 35 yards in the preseason opener against Denver.

    Bears’ Jeffery says it all with his play

    BOURBONNAIS — Soft-spoken rookie wide receiver Alshon Jeffery doesn’t talk much, but his game is coming through loud and clear.The second-round pick from South Carolina has been one of the most impressive players in camp from Day One.He led the Bears with 4 catches and 35 yards in an otherwise lame team effort in the preseason opener. But the 6-foot-3, 217-pounder doesn’t have a whole lot to say about his game or his accomplishments. In one of his wordiest responses of camp, he offered this: “I’m just trying to work every day and still trying to learn the offense and still trying to read the coverages and trying to make plays and play fast.”As a training-camp promotion for fans attending Saturday’s practice, the Bears handed out life-size headshots of Jeffery on a stick. The 22-year-old was characteristically low-key.“That’s for the fans,” he said. “I don’t get into the hype and all.”There’s really no need for Jeffery to talk himself up because coaches have been doing it all camp.He had yet another impressive practice Saturday afternoon, at one point leaping over starting cornerback Tim Jennings in the end zone to pluck a high pass from Jason Campbell out of the sky for a touchdown.“Alshon Jeffery played well Thursday night also,” coach Lovie Smith said after practice. “He was one of the few guys we were pleased with as far as his effort and being able to make plays. He’s a good football player, and he’s getting more and more confidence.”In just three seasons with the Gamecocks, Jeffery had 183 receptions and accumulated 3,042 receiving yards, the most in school history and the second most in SEC history. His 23 career TD catches tied the school record.Jeffery’s physical attributes are obvious, but as Smith points out, there are additional aspects of his game that have helped the newcomer make an instant impact among a group of talented veterans.“He’s got good size,” Smith said. “He’s got excellent hands. He takes coaching well. We could talk on him for a while. We’re so pleased with what he did (Thursday night).”Back in April, some considered Jeffery a first-round prospect. But he fell to the Bears at No. 50 overall after slumping in 2011, partly as a result of the Gamecocks’ fluctuating quarterback situation.There also were concerns about Jeffery’s weight, which at times ballooned to more than 230 pounds, and his lack of elite speed.Jeffery is never going to win a footrace with Devin Hester. But he has exhibited great leaping ability, and he has a big enough frame to be open even when he’s “covered” by a smaller defensive back.On Thursday night, Denver’s 5-9 cornerback Tony Carter was all over Jeffery on a second-quarter play. But the big man was able to screen the defender from the ball and make a 9-yard reception.“As you look at receivers, you want to see production,” Smith said. “You’ve been watching it. From OTAs, we were talking about how good his hands were.“That’s just carried on, and he’s carried that to every situation we put him in. When you give a guy reps you want to see him perform and make plays, and he’s been doing that.”In recent years, even first-round wide receivers have struggled to produce as rookies in the NFL — the Bears’ David Terrell leaps to mind — but wide receivers coach Darryl Drake doesn’t anticipate Jeffery’s effectiveness diminishing once the regular season begins.“He’s going to be out there,” Drake said. We’re going to have a four- or five-man rotation. Devin Hester’s going to be doing a lot of work on the (punt and kickoff) returns, and it’s good to have a guy like Alshon Jeffery that you can put in there. “He’ll be in there a lot, no doubt.”rlegere@dailyherald.com

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    Starlin Castro continues to learn some lessons the hard way, but manager Dale Sveum is sticking with his young shortstop.

    Sveum stays patient with Cubs shortstop

    Cubs manager Dale Sveum has to walk a fine line with his handling of shortstop Starlin Castro. Sveum is doing that just fine as he balances the knowledge that Castro is still only 22 with the fact that the shortstop is in his third big-league season.

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    Cubs’ Wood does well against ex-team

    Travis Wood came out and threw 7 strong innings against his former team, the Cincinnati Reds, but reliever James Russell allowed 3 runs in the eighth as the Cubs fell 4-2. Russell has been one of the Cubs' workhorse in the bullpen, and the workload may be catching up with him.

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    Aurora native Anna Li was chosen as an alternate for the U.S. women's gymnastics team for the 2012 Olympics. She suffered a severe neck injury on July 24, but was able to stay overseas to watch the U.S. capture the team gold medal.

    Aurora gymnast Anna Li considers herself lucky

    Despite injuring her neck training as an alternate for the U.S. women's gymnastics team, Aurora's Anna Li fulfilled her Olympic dream in London.

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    With Lovie, there is no info breakthrough

    Lovie Smith acknowledged a little on the Brian Urlacher situation Saturday, but getting the whole story is like getting a truck to fly.

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    Chicago Cubs' Travis Wood pitches against the Cincinnati Reds during the first inning of a baseball game Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Jim Prisching)

    Cubs waste strong effort by Wood, fall to Reds

    Ryan Ludwick hit a two-run double in the eighth and the Cincinnati Reds rallied to a 4-2 win over the Cubs Saturday afternoon. After Drew Stubbs doubled and Brandon Phillips singled off Cubs reliever James Russell (5-1), Ludwick looped a pitch down the left-field line and into the corner.

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    Vijay Singh of Fiji watches his drive from the sixth tee during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament on the Ocean Course of the Kiawah Island Golf Resort in Kiawah Island, S.C., Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

    McIlroy, Singh tied for lead in rain-delayed PGA

    KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. — First came the black cloud that has been following Tiger Woods on the weekend at the majors. The real storm arrived a short time later Saturday in the PGA Championship, halting the brilliant start by Rory McIlroy and giving Woods a chance to stop his slide at Kiawah Island.McIlroy opened with three birdies and two par saves, none bigger than on the third hole when his tee shot lodged in the crevice of a branch about 7 feet off the ground. He reached up to remove the ball, took a penalty drop and made a 6-foot par putt to continue on his way.It all looked so easy for McIlroy, who was at 6-under par through nine holes and tied for the lead with Vijay Singh when the third round was suspended.For Woods, it was a grind on another windswept day at Kiawah Island.He failed to birdie the par-5 second hole, and then badly missed a 4-foot birdie putt on the next hole. He hit a spectator with a fairway metal off the tee at the fourth, pulled a shot into the mounds short of the par-5 fifth hole and made yet another bogey on the par-5 seventh with two poor shots to the right, a wedge over the green into a waste area and another missed putt.He made everything Friday to take a share of the 36-hole lead. He made nothing Saturday. Woods already was five shots behind and facing a 6-foot par putt on the eighth hole when the siren sounded to stop play. He was at 1 under.The wind eased as dark clouds gathered over The Ocean Course, and rain poured down on this barrier island about an hour later. The 26 players who didn’t finish the round will return Sunday morning. The final round was to be played in threesomes of both tees, rare for a major championship. Woods was about the only player going the wrong direction.Singh, the 49-year-old who has not been in contention at a major in six years, opened with a 15-foot birdie putt and made a strong recovery from trouble on the par-5 seventh by making a 25-foot putt to join McIlroy atop the leaderboard.Right behind was Adam Scott, showing no signs so far of a British Open hangover.Scott blew a four-shot lead with four holes to play last month at Royal Lytham & St. Annes a month ago by closing with four straight bogeys. He came to life toward the end of his front nine Saturday four birdies in a five-hole stretch, capped by a 45-foot birdie putt on the ninth.Scott was at 5-under par. Carl Pettersson, tied with Woods and Singh at the start of the round, was at 4 under through eight holes.This was the second time this year Woods had a share of the 36-hole lead going into weekend at the majors. He has not broken par in his previous six weekend rounds, including a 75-73 finish at Olympic Club to go from a tie for the lead to a tie for 21st in the U.S. Open.Stopping play might be the best thing that happened to him — and a tough break for Bo Van Pelt and Steve Stricker, each of whom shot 67 earlier Saturday to climb up the leaderboard as the wind gained strength.“You never know what the weather will be like when they go back out,” said Van Pelt, the clubhouse leader at 3-under 213. “So they might get the good end of it or the bad end of it. To me, just glad to be done. I did what I could do, and I’m sure before I go to bed tonight I’ll know kind of where I stand going into tomorrow.”Not really.It’s the first time since 2008 when the PGA Championship did not complete three rounds on Saturday. Some players had to go 36 holes that day, and Padraig Harrington wound up winning his second straight major.Harrington might be in the picture again, depending on how the rest of the field fares Sunday morning. He was 4 under on his round until a double bogey on the 10th hole, though that was his only big mistakes and he wound up with a 69. Harrington was at 1-under 215.

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    United States' women's 4 X 400-meter relay team from left, Francena McCorory, Allyson Felix, Sanya Richards-Ross and Deedee Trotter celebrate after winning the gold medal during the athletics in the Olympic Stadium at the 2012 Summer Olympics, London, Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)

    US women win 4x400 to give Felix 3rd Olympic gold

    By the time Allyson Felix was done doing her part, her third gold medal of the Olympics was all but hanging around her neck. Staking the U.S. team to more than a 2-second lead at the halfway point Saturday night, then watching Sanya Richards-Ross bring home the blowout victory, Felix added the 4x400-meter relay gold to those she had won earlier in the 4x100 relay and 200-meter sprint.

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    Jamaica's Usain Bolt celebrates his win in the men's 4 x 100-meter relay final during the athletics in the Olympic Stadium at the 2012 Summer Olympics, London, Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012. Jamaica set a new world record with a time of 36.84 seconds.(AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)

    Bolt anchors Jamaica to relay record for 3rd gold

    Be it a gold medal or a souvenir from a record relay run, Usain Bolt always gets what he wants at the Olympics. The Jamaican will leave London a perfect 3 for 3 — three events, three victories — just the way he departed Beijing four years ago.

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    Tina Charles (14) of the United States shoots over France's Sandrine Gruda (7) during their women's gold medal basketball game at the 2012 Summer Olympics on Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012, in London. (AP Photo/Sergio Perez, Pool)

    Women win 5th straight gold, rout France 86-50

    The U.S. women's basketball team routed France 86-50 in the final Saturday, collecting their fifth straight Olympic gold medal and putting more distance between themselves and the rest of the world heading to Rio for the 2016 Games.

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    USA’s Foluke Akinradewo (16, right) cries as she hugs teammate Jordan Larson (10) after losing to Brazil 3-1 during a women’s volleyball gold medal match at the 2012 Summer Olympics Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012, in London.

    Brazil stuns U.S. for gold in women’s volleyball

    Brazil upset the U.S. 3-1 for a second straight Olympic gold medal in women's volleyball. It was the Americans' only loss of the tournament. In a rematch of the 2008 Beijing final, which the Brazilians also won 3-1 for their first gold in the sport, second-ranked Brazil rebounded from a disastrous first set to win 11-25, 25-17, 25-20 25-17.

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    After joining Medinah as its head pro in 2003, Mike Scully will be leaving after the Ryder Cup to direct another club in Arizona.

    Medinah’s Scully off to Arizona

    From the 2006 PGA Championship won by Tiger Woods to what should be a thrilling 2012 Ryder Cup, head PGA professional Mike Scully has been a part of it all at Medinah Country Club.And shortly after the Ryder Cup is completed, Scully's run will continue when he and his wife and their three children head off to Scottsdale, Arizona, where he has accepted the position as Director of Golf at Desert Mountain"I'm real excited, I get to go from one great place to another great place," Scully said."I'm very thankful to the people at Medinah. They've been just wonderful to me and my family. If I wouldn't have had their opportunity, I wouldn't have had this one."

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    Jared Perry’s 133 receptions for the Chicago Rush this season earned him Rookie of the Years honors in the Arena Football League.

    Rush wide receiver Perry grabs AFL rookie honors

    A year ago, it was rookie defensive back Vic Hall who took home Defensive Player of the Year honors for the Chicago Rush. This year, wide receiver Jared Perry of the Rush captured Arena Football League honors as the Net10 Rookie of the Year on the strength of 133 receptions, 1,811 receiving yards and 33 total touchdowns for the Chicago franchise.

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    Alexei Ramirez celebrates his home run off Oakland Athletics starting pitcher Brandon McCarthy during the fourth inning of a baseball game Friday, Aug. 10, 2012, in Chicago.

    Sox’ Konerko goes on 7-day DL

    The White Sox were hoping for better news, but they'll have to forge ahead without first baseman Paul Konerko, who was placed on baseball's new seven-day disabled list Friday with a concussion. The Sox will make a corresponding roster move before Saturday's game vs. Oakland

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    The White Sox’ Jordan Danks, right, celebrates his game-winning home run off Oakland Athletics relief pitcher Pat Neshek with Gordon Beckham during the ninth inning Friday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Danks cranks game-winner for Sox
    John Danks had season-ending shoulder surgery on Monday. But the week wasn't a total loss for the Danks family as younger brother Jordan hit a walk-off home run against the Oakland A's Friday night to keep the White Sox in sole possession of first place in the AL Central.

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    Zimmer, Cougars topple LumberKings

    Kane County Cougars game report:

Business

  •  
    Vic Gundotra, Google Senior Vice President of Engineering, talks about Google Plus. Google Chief Executive Officer Larry Page has invested in an asteroid mining venture.

    More billionaires join asteroid mining venture

    While Planetary Resources has "enough funding for several years of operations" including its initial prospecting missions, the Seattle-based company would consider an initial public offering for future financing needs, co-founder Eric Anderson said.

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    The Plaza del Grato shopping center where Nathan’s famous Hot Dogs will locate.

    Nathan’s Hot Dogs opening in Arlington Hts. by end of year

    Suburban hot dog lovers will have another restaurant to enjoy when "Nathan's Famous Hot Dogs opens in Arlington Heights later this year. The New York-based franchise will make its first foray into Illinois with a location in the Plaza de Grato shopping center at 1766 W. Algonquin Road. "We're excited. You can't live in Chicago and not like hot dogs, they'll be right at home," said Arlington Heights Mayor Arlene Mulder.

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    Pocket change for the world’s richest billionaires, a sheet of $100,000 bills is on display Wednesday at the World’s Fair of Money, in Philadelphia.

    World’s richest gain $7 billion as Buffett reclaims 3rd place

    The 40 richest people on the planet added $7.2 billion to their collective net worth this week as Warren Buffett and Amancio Ortega dueled for the title of world's third-richest person.

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    Captain Hooshang Shahbazi in a flight simulator at the Mehrabad airport in Tehran, Iran.

    Iranian pilot campaigns to lift airliner sanctions

    Although some technical openings exist for Iranian carriers to obtain U.S. spare parts, such as conducting the repairs outside Iran, the difficult licensing and oversight procedures make them extremely difficult to act upon. Meanwhile, Iran's state carrier Iran Air was placed under specific U.S. sanctions last year over alleged links to the military.

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    Saudi shares rise to highest level since May

    Shares in Saudi Arabia, the Arab world's biggest stock market, climbed to their highest since late May on valuations and optimism in the U.S.

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    The International Association for the Wireless Telecommunications Industry has recently pledged to compile a database of stolen smartphone identifying numbers that will prevent stolen phones from being reactivated on any network

    How to find a lost cellphone

    When New York Times technology columnist David Pogue lost his iPhone, he turned to Find My iPhone, an application that uses GPS signaling to allow users to view the location of their iPhone from a computer or other device. He then tweeted the location to 1.4 million Twitter followers, who made Pogue's stolen phone a viral phenomenon.

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    Free Wi-Fi catches on with NYC’s subway riders

    Emily Langmead was hesitant when she first heard of free Wi-Fi in the subway. Like many New Yorkers, she wondered what the catch was. But now, she says, she uses it all the time. One month in to wireless service being provided in six New York City subway stations, commuters like Langmead are happy to have chances to connect when their trains head underground and pull into one of the stations with Wi-Fi.

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    There are four things you can do to reverse the likelihood that a hacker will get access to your information.

    4 steps you should take to avoid getting hacked

    Last Friday evening, a hacker got into Mat Honan’s Apple account, remotely erased the data on his iPhone, iPad and MacBook, deleted his Google account, commandeered his Twitter account, and then posted a string of nasty stuff under Honan’s name. Until recently, Honan, who’s a writer at Wired and one of my favorite tech journalists, worked at Gizmodo, and his Twitter account was still linked to the tech blog’s main Twitter page — so for about 15 minutes, the hacker was able to post a bunch of foul-mouthed, racist stuff there, too.I was on a cross-country flight when I read Honan’s first post about the hack. When the jet captain turned on the Wi-Fi, I got down to doing what I always do when I hear about an attack that could have happened to me: I changed my passwords. This made me feel better, but it turns out it certainly wasn’t sufficient. Honan spent the weekend on the phone with Apple tech support and — curiously — in conversation with the hacker. By Monday morning, he’d found out exactly how his online identities had been compromised. The upshot: Creating better passwords wouldn’t have helped him.In a lengthy Wired piece, Honan explains that the hacker got into his account not by guessing his passwords but by asking for them. On Friday, the hacker called Apple’s tech support line and, pretending to be Honan, claimed he’d been locked out of his Apple account. Apple’s support guy asked the hacker to answer the security questions on Honan’s account, but the hacker apparently said that he’d forgotten the answers.No problem, because the hacker knew something most of us don’t: If you can’t answer your security questions, Apple will issue you a new password if you can prove that you’re who you say you are using another form of identification. What identification does Apple ask to reset your password? A billing address and the last four digits of your credit card number.Billing addresses are easy to find online, and credit card numbers are only slightly more difficult to come by. The hacker had both bits of data on Honan. He’d found the billing address by looking up the registration of Honan’s personal website, and he’d gotten the credit card number by calling the support line of another tech behemoth, Amazon. The hacker had asked Amazon to place his — the hacker’s — email address on Honan’s account, which Amazon happily did. Then the hacker issued a forgotten password request on Amazon’s website — this sent a link to the hacker’s email, allowing him to change Honan’s password and get full access to his Amazon account, including the ability to see the last four digits of his credit card.Bingo! Now the hacker could get into Honan’s Apple account, which allowed him to delete everything connected to Honan’s iCloud profile (his iPad, iPhone and Mac). Because Honan had set his Apple account as his Google account’s alternate address, the hacker only had to issue another forgotten-password request for Honan’s Gmail to fall, too.This is a sorry tale. There were lots of lapses here — relatively small ones by Honan (he hadn’t backed up his data), and huge, glaring, scary ones by Apple and Amazon. But if you examine this epic hack, you’ll find a few simple lessons.Here are the four things users and companies could do immediately to reduce these kinds of attacks:1.) Everyone should turn on two-factor authentication now.To get into most online accounts, you only need to dig up a single piece of data — a password. (The username on many services — including email accounts, Twitter, and Facebook — is your public handle, available to everyone.)There was a time when passwords were enough (and you should follow my advice on how to create very strong, easy to remember passwords.) But now we’ve all got so many online accounts protecting so much valuable information that we need something in addition to passwords.

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    Your cellphone knows where you’ve been. And new research shows it can take a pretty good guess at where you’re going next. A team of British researchers has developed an algorithm that uses tracking data on people’s phones to predict where they’ll be in 24 hours. The average error: just 20 meters.

    What happens when our cellphones can predict our every move?

    Your cellphone knows where you've been. And new research shows it can take a pretty good guess at where you're going next. A team of British researchers has developed an algorithm that uses tracking data on people's phones to predict where they'll be in 24 hours. The average error: just 20 meters. That's far more accurate than past studies that have tried to predict people's movements.

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    Daniel Ray Carter Jr. logged on to Facebook and did what millions do each day: He “liked” a page by clicking the site’s thumbs up icon. The problem was that the page was for a candidate who was challenging his boss, the sheriff of Hampton, Va. That simple mouse click, Carter says, caused the sheriff to fire him from his job as a deputy and put him at the center of an emerging First Amendment debate over the ubiquitous digital seal of approval: Is liking something on Facebook protected free speech?

    Court mulls free speech implications of clicking ‘Like’

    Daniel Ray Carter Jr. logged on to Facebook and did what millions do each day: He "liked" a page by clicking the site's thumbs up icon. The problem was that the page was for a candidate who was challenging his boss, the sheriff of Hampton, Va. That simple mouse click, Carter says, caused the sheriff to fire him from his job as a deputy and put him at the center of an emerging First Amendment debate over the ubiquitous digital seal of approval: Is liking something on Facebook protected free speech?

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    A dry corn field receives some rain from a passing storm near Blair, Neb. Livestock farmers and ranchers seeing their feed costs rise because of the worst drought in a quarter-century are demanding that the Environmental Protection Agency waive production requirements for corn-based ethanol.

    Livestock farmers seek pause in ethanol production

    Livestock farmers and ranchers seeing their feed costs rise because of the worst drought in a quarter-century are demanding that the Environmental Protection Agency waive production requirements for corn-based ethanol. "If not now, when?" Randy Spronk, a Minnesota pork farmer, said of the EPA's authority to defer the ethanol production requirement when it threatens to severely harm the economy of a state or region. "Everyone should feel the pain of rationing."

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    With more Olympic coverage available online, it’s a little easier to follow foreign athletes competing at the games.

    Review: Following foreign athletes is cumbersome

    It should come as no surprise that much of the Olympics coverage in the U.S. is focused on American athletes and top performers from other countries. You're not going to hear much about the swimmer from Albania who won a preliminary heat or the Benin athlete who failed to advance in judo. But in this land of immigrants, every athlete has a fan somewhere, no matter how obscure the sport or how slim the chances of medaling.

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    Social media company Kazaana launched with $3 million in funding and with hopes of attracting users younger than 13 who will be addicted to friending, photo-sharing and farm-tending games. They’re not the only ones: Facebook is also considering breaking into the preteen market.

    Social media compete for the lucrative tween market

    A growing number of social networks are racing to capture the loyalties of the Web's youngest and most vulnerable users. Last month, Silicon Valley-based Kazaana launched with $3 million in funding and with hopes of attracting subscribers younger than 13 who will be addicted to friending, photo-sharing and farm-tending games. Kidzworld, with its 2.2 million users, has signed up advertisers such as Crocs and Crate & Barrel. Yoursphere boasts AT&T and the American Youth Soccer Organization as paying sponsors who want to lend their services to the site's 500,000 subscribers — from preschoolers to 17-year-olds.

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    Technology-packed Zik over-the-ear stereo headphones feature Bluetooth for wireless pairing with your Apple or Android device and gesture-based controls, plus sensors that automatically stop the music when you remove the headphones.

    Jobs’ yacht maker does cool headphones

    The most noteworthy thing about Parrot's new Zik over-the-ear stereo headphones isn't the sound. It's that these babies are stuffed with more technology than an F-15. Start with Bluetooth for wireless pairing with your Apple or Android device. Add gesture-based controls, plus sensors that automatically stop the music when you remove the headphones. And include a passel of microphones for taking and making phone calls, as well as for noise cancellation.

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    A new version an old-school news site

    The new Digg looks nothing like the old Digg. For one thing, it lacks people. In the old days, the pioneering site attracted a raucous crowd of loyalists who would post and comment on every passing outrage in tech and politics. Reading Digg, which I did just nearly every day from about 2005 to 2009, was like taking the pulse of the Internet's geekiest vanguard.

Life & Entertainment

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    Sanu John, half of iLLest Vocals, was named the winner of the Suburban Chicago's Got Talent showcase Saturday at the Taste of Arlington Heights.

    Beat-boxing duo take top prize in Suburban Chicago's Got Talent

    To the cheers of fans gathered on a breezy summer afternoon, the beat-boxing vocal duo ILLest Vocals won Suburban Chicago's Got Talent and secured an audition with NBC's next season of "America's Got Talent." "It's been an amazing journey from the first audition," Sanu John told the audience. John, of Skokie, lamented that his partner, Wheeling resident Shawn Kurian, was not able to perform with him because of a family emergency.

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    Judge’s view: All contestants’ skills will serve them well

    Barbara Vitello, one of the contest judges for Suburban Chicago's Got Talent: "What impressed me over the weeks I served as a guest judge for the competition was the profound impact the performing arts have beyond the obvious entertainment value, which — as this competition demonstrated — was considerable."

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    In this relationship, trust is a bigger issue than moving in together

    Should she be concerned about her boyfriend's motives for asking her to move in with him?

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    From July to September, scallops lure tourists to St. Joesph Bay, a lesser-known part of Florida.

    Scallop season on Florida’s ‘Forgotten Coast’

    It is scallop season along this tranquil stretch of Florida known as "The Forgotten Coast." From July to late September, the tasty shell-food delicacy lures tourists to this lesser-known part of Florida that lacks the amusement parks, night clubs and world-famous beaches found in other parts of the state. This region, which stretches east from the Panhandle's Panama City along the Gulf coast line as it curves south along the state's Big Bend, is known for its shallow and wide bays that give shelter to scallops, oysters and other fragile sea life.

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    Francesco Russo, creative director for Sergio Rossi, poses in front of his fall collection at Barneys New York on July 18. Russo is flattered by the celebrities such as Anne Hathaway, Diane Kruger and Michelle Pfeiffer who wear Sergio Rossi on the red carpet, but he’s in it more for the love affair he, via shoes and handbags, will make with women of all ages and lifestyles.

    Sergio Rossi’s Russo likes walking the line

    Sergio Rossi Dreative Director Francesco Russo doesn't measure change in dates, time or technological advances. For him, trends move by the millimeter. "I have always been fascinated by fashion. I like the aesthetics of beautiful things," says Russo, wearing a silk scarf tied around his neck and perched on the roof deck of Manhattan's exclusive Soho House.

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    Spectators cheer as the men’s cycling road race starts July 28 on the Mall in London during the 2012 Summer Olympics. With the advent of smartphones, more spectators are taking photos as proof they were at the games.

    Arm’s length: Does smartphone photography hold reality at bay?

    Matthew Driller was holding a navy umbrella, blocking the view of spectators standing five deep and waiting to see the Olympic women's cycling road race flash past. The police came by, signifying that the leaders were closing. The crowd leaned in. "Don't worry," Driller said. "I'll move it before they come." He did, and the first thing Jane Armston did was raise her camera, trading one obstruction for another. And understandably so: She needed to capture an image.

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    Marley, a 4-year-old pit bull mix, goes to her backyard through her doggy door in the Panorama City section of Los Angeles on Aug. 2. Because burglars and wild animals enter houses through a doggy door, residents are advised to put a barrier on a doggy door if there is no lock.

    How to secure your doggy door from burglars, pests

    A burglar will use any open door — front, back, side, garage or doggy. The FBI says there was one burglary in the United States every 14.6 seconds in 2010. Probably very few go through doggy doors, but there are ways to make sure no unwanted humans, or animals, can get inside.

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    A stamp with the face of Britain’s Laura Trott kissing her gold medal at the 2012 Summer Olympics is seen on an envelope ready to be sent by Herman Sanchez on Aug. 8 in London. London has been issuing stamps every day with photos of Britain’s gold medalists. The stamps feature the athlete in an action photo taken as they were competing.

    Olympic stamp collecting ‘the sport of the spectator’

    The Royal Mail has been busy paying tribute to the country's Olympians in the last two weeks with special-issue stamps for gold medalists. The stamps feature the athlete in an action photo taken as they were competing — and with Britain in third place on the gold medal table, Royal Mail's been on overdrive printing those new stamps. "For ordinary people, this is the only chance you have to touch the spirit of the Olympics,"said Herman Sanchez, a postal worker from Los Angeles who has traveled to almost every Summer Olympics for 20 years.

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    This undated image released by “Smart Girls at the Party,” shows Meredith Walker, left, Amy Poehler and director David Karabinas on the set of “Smart Girls at the Party,” the flagship show for the YouTube channel, and founded by Amy Poehler. “Smart Girls at the Party” is one of the latest channels to launch on YouTube with funding from the Google video-sharing site.

    On YouTube channels, comedians shift the punchline

    On the debut episode of "Smart Girls at the Party," Amy Poehler sits in a dark studio and solemnly introduces her first guest as a "singer, actor, dancer, musician, feminist, entrepreneur and skateboarder." Sitting across from Poehler is a 7-year-old named Ruby, who cheerfully displays a just-completed drawing. Charlie Rose, eat your heart out. This summer, while much of the TV world is in reruns, a number of comedians have taken to YouTube, including Poehler, Rainn Wilson, Walter Latham and, in a new role, Shaquille O'Neal.

  •  
    Iconic comic book creator Stan Lee will appear at Wizard World Chicago Comic Con in Rosemont this weekend.

    Weekend picks: The excitement continues at Comic Con

    Meet celebrities like Stan Lee, Tom Felton, Bruce Campbell and more as Wizard World Chicago Comic Con continues through the weekend in Rosemont. Take part in archery, fishing, guided nature walks and more during “Family Day at Mayslake” in Oak Brook Saturday. Celebrate 18 years of Mickey Finn's at the Backlot Brewfest, which includes a rib cook-off, beer specials, live music and more at the Libertyville brewery.

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    A train crosses the Kanchanaburi Bridge on the River Kwai in Thailand. The Eastern & Oriental is owned by the same company that took over the storied Orient Express, which began running between Paris and Vienna in 1883.

    History, glitz on Eastern & Oriental Express train

    Beads of sweat trickle down my forehead on a muggy night in Bangkok when I realize I'm late for the Eastern & Oriental Express train. I've missed the shuttle from my hotel and my baggage bounces over the unevenly paved streets as I run to the station in a panic. As I fly down the platform, my dress billows behind me. I feel like a character in an old movie as I sprint for the train, but it's not Paris in the 1920s and I'm not chasing the love of my life. Instead, I plan to be chasing back martinis as I journey through northeast Thailand's picturesque landscapes of rice paddy fields and lush hilltops, en route to Laos on this modern luxury train.

  •  

    Condo boards can require maintenance checks in units

    Q. Our condominium board of managers is interested in making sure our residents keep their individual air conditioners and furnaces, located in their units, in safe running condition. We are considering hiring a company that would perform yearly checks. Is this a something that we can legally require our residents to do?

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    How to get the best deal on a reverse mortgage

    Seniors now have useful options under the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) program that they didn't have before. While having options on a reverse mortgage is good, it also makes HECM shopping a greater challenge.

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    Cosigner in the dark on son’s foreclosure

    Q. To help my son and his wife a few years back, I consigned for a mortgage for their home in another state. When they divorced, my son's ex and her agent sent me documents to sign to sell the house. I did not know until recently that the sale fell through, and the home was foreclosed.

  •  
    Taller table sets are ideal for those wanting better views over deck or balcony railings.

    New materials, styles play on the patio

    Practicality, durability and recycle-ability seem to be the watchwords in the patio furniture industry this summer, said Steve Olson, manager of Viking Patio in Barrington. Furniture made from recycled plastic milk jugs, available for the last decade, fits all of those categories, he said.

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    Ditch the dryer: Tips for clothesline drying

    Think clotheslines are a relic of a bygone era, a time when our grandmothers slaved over their dainties with stiff birch-wood pins? Think again. Hanging clothes is hot, due in no small part to the rising costs of, well, everything.

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    Drought can damage foundation, cause structural damage to home

    Q. Were I live there is an ongoing drought and it has been suggested that I water the foundation to prevent damage. Is this true and, if so, can you explain why?

  •  
    If you are going to remain in your home for years, you might weigh possible renovations based on “return on enjoyment” rather than the return on investment.

    Remodeling projects can boost home value as well as quality of life

    Kitchen and bath remodels are widely considered the best return on investment for homeowners. But designers caution that people should prioritize house updates that will make their lives more comfortable, especially if they will be staying put for a while.

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    This stately Long Grove home is on a dead end street that backs up to the golf course.

    Country Club Estates home in Long Grove

    The Royal Country Club of Long Grove forms the backdrop for this stately, traditionally-styled home in Country Club Estates. This roomy, just-listed home features a cherry kitchen with granite countertops, an octagon-shaped master suite with soaking tub in the bathroom and recently refinished wood floors.

  •  
    Author Kenny Salwey weaves in true-life tales about living in the Mississippi River backwaters in his semi-fictional “Muskrat for Supper,” written for 12- to 15-year-olds.

    Living off the river probed in teen novel

    With gentle common sense and a self-taught naturalist's eye toward preservation and sustainability, author Kenny Salwey weaves a semi-fictional story in with his own exciting, true-life tales about living in the Mississippi backwaters in "Muskrat for Supper."

Discuss

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    The Soapbox

    Our editors muse about local talent, local Olympians and local sports and make other observations about the suburbs.

  •  

    A great loss to soccer community
    A letter to the editor: Kirk Urso has positively impacted so many people, and he will be missed. He has a great family and our thoughts and prayers are with them.

  •  

    Now is time for immunization check
    A letter to the editor: Large increases in whooping cough cases are being reported, and a new state law requires all sixth- and ninth-graders to show proof they have been immunized.

  •  

    Boating course could improve safety
    A letter to the editor: In Wisconsin, a Coast Guard-approved boating safety course certificate is required for all operators of motor boats and personal watercraft. These courses are comprehensive and beneficial even for the most experienced boaters.

  •  

    Romney’s business ethics are suspect
    A Gurnee letter to the editor: I am worried about how this wealth was attained and am supported in that concern by Mr. Romney's refusal to release tax documents showing exactly how the earnings were gained.

  •  

    Give unions more of the responsibility
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: This generational shift of obligations and debt will eventually destroy the relationship between government and the taxpayer. It will also ruin Illinois.

  •  

    Illinois has enough laws regulating guns
    A Streamwood letter to the editor: Gov. Quinn's proposed legislation would have not prevented, and will not prevent, such events from occurring. It is nothing more than feel-good legislation.

  •  

    Emanuel’s statement weakens credibility
    A Palatine letter to the editor: I find it contemptible when I have to endure angry viewpoints from the alleged elite, who call for boycotts and ill-fated wishes for customers of Chick-fil-A.

  •  

    Target domestic terrorists first
    A Palatine letter to the editor: The U.S. spends so much trying to curb terrorism overseas, why not curb the evil here first? These criminals are not trained by terrorists overseas, they are all born here, raised here and cause harm here.

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