Daily Archive : Monday July 30, 2012

News

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    Olympic athletes disrespected flag
    A Naperville letter to the editor: It has been decades since the United States has done so well in the Olympics, but what I take disgust at is the inappropriate ways the American Flag was used by the contenders and their families.

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    Naperville electoral board slapped for open meeting violations

    The Illinois attorney general's office has found Naperville's electoral board violated the state's Open Meeting Act three times during January's deliberations regarding a proposed advisory referendum question for the March 20 primary election ballot. The attorney general's office said it will not seek "remedial actions" against the electoral board because the primary election was held more than...

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    A Delaware State Office of Highway Safety decal aimed at getting distracted pedestrians to look up from their mobile devices and watch where theyÌre walking. The decals are 2 feet by 2 feet, made of nonskid material.

    Dangers of distracted driving growing

    The problem of distracted walking isn't as widely discussed as distracted driving, but the danger is real. Reports of injuries to distracted walkers treated at hospital emergency rooms have more than quadrupled in the past seven years and are almost certainly underreported.

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    Former Bolingbrook police sergeant Drew Peterson leaves the Will County courthouse in Joliet after his 2009 arraignment on charges of first-degree murder in the 2004 death of his former wife Kathleen Savio, who was found in an empty bathtub at home.

    Opening statements today in Peterson trial

    Lawyers will begin today to pull together the disjointed story of Drew Peterson and his ill-fated wives to make a case for the ex-cop's guilt or innocence, all the while navigating a bevy of legal issues — from how much hearsay evidence to admit and to just how to describe Peterson's missing fourth wife.

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    Pat Quinn

    Quinn will call Senate to Springfield on pensions

    Gov. Pat Quinn Monday announced he'd call the Illinois Senate to Springfield next month to try to force a deal on cutting teachers' and state employee pensions, even though there's no compromise deal worked out yet. "I'd like to see what form that reform would be in," said state Sen. Michael Noland, an Elgin Democrat. "I'm hopeful we can work something out. But I'm not optimistic."

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    Oak Park Eagle Scout returns medal in protest

    An Oak Park man has mailed his Eagle Scout medal back to the Boy Scouts of America to protest the group's decision to continue its ban on gay Scout leaders. He called the decision "infuriating, embarrassing and upsetting."

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    Mich. man dies in dune buggy crash at N. Ind. race

    South Bend police are investigating the weekend death of a Michigan man killed when his dune buggy crashed during a "mud bog" race at the St. Joseph County 4-H Fairgrounds.Forty-eight-year-old Steven DeLeeuw of West Olive, Mich., was pronounced dead Saturday night at a South Bend hospital after his vehicle flipped several times and crashed into a concrete barrier and chain-link fence at the...

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    Guards at 7 Ill. prisons searched

    Illinois authorities took the unusual step of searching guards and other prison employees for contraband as they left at least seven facilities last week, sparking worker allegations that the checks may have been reprisals for complaints about overcrowding and understaffing and inside information leaked to the news media, workers and union officials told The Associated Press.

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    Under a proposed settlement, Illinois residents who get a sex-change operation be able to change the gender on their birth certificate even if the surgery did not modify their genitals.

    Birth certificate deal close for sex-change recipients

    The state of Illinois is close to settling a dispute over how it handles birth certificates for people who undergo sex changes. Under the proposed settlement, people would be able to change the gender on their birth certificate even if their sex-change operation did not modify their genitals.

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    United States' Matthew Grevers competes in the men's 100-meter backstroke at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Sunday, July 29, 2012, in London.

    Images of Matthew Grevers' gold 100-meter backstroke performance
    United States' athlete and Lake Forest native Matthew Grevers won gold in the men's 100-meter backstroke swimming final at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, Monday, July 30, 2012.

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    Rita Paulina, in wheelchair, who was injured in the attack, departs the Arapahoe County Courthouse after an arraignment hearing for the accused theater shooter Monday in Centennial, Colo. Colorado prosecutors filed formal charges Monday against the former neuroscience student accused of killing 12 people and wounding 58 others at a movie theater.

    Colorado theater suspect charged with murder, attempted murder

    In a packed Denver-area courtroom Monday, the suspect in the Colorado theater shootings sat silently and did not react as he heard formal charges against him, including first-degree murder for each of the 12 who died and attempted murder for each of the 58 people who were injured in one of the deadliest mass shootings in recent U.S. history.

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    Naperville teen Alyssa Gialamas will represent Team USA swimming at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, beginning Aug. 29.

    Naperville teen freestyling her way to London's Paralympics

    For as long as she can remember 17-year-old Alyssa Gialamas has loved the pool. When she swims in next month's Summer Paralympic Games in London, though, she hopes to prove she's not at all like anyone else. "When I jump in the water, my lane is the same as everyone else's and all I have to do is get to the other side and back faster than everyone else in the water."

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    This tricky, short par three to a peninsula green is part of Chalet Hills Golf Club in Cary. The course is for sale, and the Cary Park District officials are considering buying it.

    Cary Park District may buy golf course

    The Cary Park District board is considering whether to buy the Chalet Hills Golf Club, a venture that would help the district get a foot into the lucrative banquet industry. The park district bought Foxford Hills golf course in 2004. The park district is always looking within its boundaries to see whether there are new recreation opportunities, and at the moment there are no other spaces in the...

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    Former Gurnee Police Chief Robert Jones

    Retired Gurnee police chief faced complaints of sexual harassment, more

    Sexual harassment and using employees for personal errands on village time were among the internal complaints former Gurnee Police Chief Robert Jones faced when he opted to retire with a $139,600 severance deal a year ago, the Daily Herald has learned. Those details, not released to the public or village trustees during an internal probe of Jones, were contained in documents obtained through open...

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    Round Lake has joined a growing list of suburbs to approve video gambling at bars, restaurants, truck stops and other eligible establishments in the community. Village trustees recently voted 6-0 to reverse a previous village board's ordinance that had banned video gaming in town.

    Round Lake reverses course on video gambling

    Round Lake has joined a growing list of suburbs to approve video gambling at bars, restaurants, truck stops and other eligible establishments in the community. Village trustees recently voted 6-0 to reverse a previous village board's ordinance that had banned video gaming in town. “Our businesses need this push in this economic time,” Round Lake Trustee Susan Triphahn said.

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    Petite Lake near Lake Villa was significantly less crowded with boat traffic Monday than over the weekend, when a 10-year-old Libertyville boy was killed in a boating accident. Authorities are still investigating the death, which occurred when the boy fell from an inner tube and was struck by a boat.

    Investigation continues into boating crash that killed boy

    Investigators spent Monday still trying to determine the cause of a boating accident on Petite Lake near Lake Villa over the weekend that took the life of a 10-year-old Libertyville boy, authorities said. Tony Borcia, 10, of Libertyville was killed after he fell off an inner tube and was run over by another boat. “It's not illegal to pull a kid on a tube in that location, but that area...

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    Foreign language instruction at heart of big decisions for Dist. 303

    Foreign language instruction will be at the heart of some major decisions for the St. Charles School Unit District 303 school board in coming months.

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    Elgin man struck and killed by train near station

    A 52-year-old Elgin man was struck and killed by a Metra train near the Elgin station Monday night, according to police.

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    Marcelina Kiala of Angola, left, is challenged by Croatia’s Andrea Penezic during their women’s handball preliminary match at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Monday, July 30, 2012, in London.

    Images from the 2012 Summer Olympics on Monday, July 30, 2012
    Athletes from the United States competed in basketball, water polo, gymnastics, judo and many other sports at the 2012 London Olympics Monday July, 30th.

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    Laurie Rabattini

    Rabattini blames recent absences on illness but won’t give details

    Noticeably absent from board meetings in recent months because of an unspecified malady, Island Lake Trustee Laurie Rabattini on Monday said she plans to return to work "effective immediately." "My condition is private," Rabattini said. "I do not feel obligated to share my diagnosis with anyone."

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    President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton wave to the crowd during a campaign event at the New Amsterdam Theater in New York on June 4. Clinton will have a marquee role in this summer’s Democratic National Convention, where he will make a forceful case for Obama’s re-election, several Obama campaign and Democratic party officials said Sunday.

    Report: Democrats move to formally back gay marriage

    The Democratic Party is moving to include support for gay marriage in the official party platform for the first time, a Democratic official said Monday, marking a key milestone for advocates of same-sex unions.

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    Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, his wife Ann, and son Josh, laying a wreath during their visit to the World War II Memorial Westerplatte, in Gdansk, Poland, Monday.

    Another hiccup? Romney’s bumpy journey abroad

    Mitt Romney outraged Palestinians on Monday, telling Jewish donors that their culture is part of what has allowed them to be more economically successful than the Palestinians. That fresh controversy on his visit to Israel came just days after insulting the British on what was intended as a feel-good visit to the Olympics in London.

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    This undated photo shows President Barack Obama’s father, also named Barack Obama, and mother, Stanley Ann Dunham. Ancestry.com announced Monday the president may have at least one descendent who was a slave in the U.S. But the connection comes though his mother.

    Obama may be descended from African slave

    A team of genealogists has found evidence that President Barack Obama could be a descendent of an African slave — but not through the lineage of his black father, the most likely route researchers had followed and exhausted.

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    Shaker Masri

    Would-be suicide bomber pleads guilty in Chicago

    A Chicago man accused plotting a suicide bombing overseas and claiming he was inspired by a radical Muslim cleric has pleaded guilty. The plea Monday from 28-year-old Shaker Masri ends one of the last terrorism trials pending in the Chicago federal court.

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    Crews take down tents and clean up trash Monday after the closing of the 2012 DuPage County Fair. Officials reported a significant increase in attendance this year.

    DuPage fair officials say attendance took significant jump

    It was a good year at the DuPage County Fair, both for organizers of the five-day festival that ended Sunday in Wheaton and the people who attended it. Officials on Monday said it will take a couple days to get final numbers, but they're expecting about a 30 percent spike in attendance, thanks in part to a cooperative Mother Nature who kept rain and extreme heat at bay throughout most of the...

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    Michael A. Chacon

    Glendale Heights man charged with killing girlfriend’s Chihuahua

    A Glendale Heights man has been charged with beating his girlfriend's Chihuahua to death after the couple had an argument, prosecutors said Monday. "The dog showed obvious signs of head trauma. There was blood everywhere," DuPage County State's Attorney Robert Berlin said.

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    Symphony to perform in Mundelein

    The Lake Shore Symphony will perform at 5:30 p.m. Sunday at Kracklauer Park in Mundelein as part of the village's outdoor concert series. The performance is free, but attendees should bring their own food, blankets or chairs.

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    Hanover Park woman sues police claiming excessive force

    A confrontation that took place nearly two years ago between four Hanover Park police officers and the mother of a student they were attempting to arrest has led to a lawsuit. Though the police department's arrest report describes Annie Bainer as the aggressor, a complaint filed last week on her behalf against the officers and the village claims excessive force, false arrest and malicious...

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    Krisada M. Cheung

    North Aurora 18-year-old accused of selling more than a pound of marijuana

    An 18-year-old North Aurora man faces felony charges that he sold more than 500 grams of marijuana, which is at least a pound, to an undercover cop, court records show. Krisada M. Cheung is due in court Aug. 8 and faces up seven years in prison if convicted.

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    Teens accused in Gurnee burglary

    Gurnee Police Chief Kevin Woodside again is crediting information from alert residents in helping investigators catch accused burglars over the weekend.

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    Fox Lake hosts fifth annual Venetian Night Saturday

    The fifth annual Fox Lake Venetian Night and fireworks show will take place Saturday on Grand Avenue west of Route 12. This year's theme is "Mardi Gras on the Chain."

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    Libertyville parks brochures arriving this week

    Households in Libertyville on Wednesday will receive a 52-page Recreation and Sports Complex Department fall registration brochure in the mail. The guide features activities, events and recreation programs offered during fall and winter.

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    Chicago continues rollout of new trash pickup system

    Chicago is continuing to roll out its new grid garbage collection program with about 72,000 homes on the city's Northwest Side. The program started with about 55,000 homes on the North Side last month.

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    Quinn appoints special investigator for human services

    Gov. Pat Quinn has appointed a special investigator for the Office of the Inspector General of the Illinois Department of Human Services. The appointment comes after a Belleville News-Democrat investigation revealed that, since 2003, the department's inspector general didn't investigate 53 cases about disabled adults living at home who were allegedly abused or neglected and later died.

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    Oakwood Farms in Barrington Hills, which has a barn large enough for 60 horses, has long been a subject of public debate about commercial horse boarding on residential property. But could the topic determine the outcome of the next village board election?

    Horse boarding likely to be an election issue in Barrington Hills

    Many residents and officials on all sides of the ongoing debate over commercial horse boarding on residential property in Barrington Hills see political motivations as the driving force behind the controversy. “They're going to use horse boarding or nonresidents on Barrington Hills riding trails as fear mongering," said Riding Club of Barrington Hills, club President Matt Yetarian.

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    Caitlyn R. Knight

    Elburn suspect in beating wants to enter program, avoid trial

    An Elburn woman accused of breaking into her ex-boyfriend's St. Charles residence and pummelling his girlfriend wants to be admitted into the county's pre-trial diversion program. Caitlyn R. Knight, 21, is charged with home invasion, a felony that carries a miniumum six-year prison term. She has no prior criminal record other than traffic offenses.

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    Glenford Coombs

    Court date set for Volo man accused of pointing gun at 11-year-old girl

    A Volo man accused of threatening an 11-year-old girl and her father with a loaded gun last week is due in court Wednesday on multiple charges. Glenford Coombs, 40, is charged with two counts of aggravated unlawful use of weapon, aggravated assault and disorderly conduct stemming from the July 26 altercation in Round Lake Park.

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    Waubonsie Lake: A local treasure discovered anew

    As the saying goes, there's really nothing like being there. Such is the case with Waubonsie Lake Park. On behalf of the Fox Valley Park District, I'd done numerous press announcements over the last 18 months detailing all the renovations and improvements taking place at this beautiful park. But a recent check-in changed everything and created an even greater sense of appreciation.

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    A two-week-old baby squirrel receives a special squirrel formula via a tiny tube and syringe. Currently there are about 30 infant squirrels at the center, many who came in after violent storms blew through and knocked them out of their tree nests.

    Helping animals through hard times: Fox Valley Wildlife Center

    "You get used to the smell," say volunteers at the Fox Valley Wildlife Center in Elburn. Odor is the first thing that hits when walking into the two-bedroom farmhouse, not surprising, since nearly 300 animals dwell here. Call it a shelter/hospital for homeless animals who have fallen on hard times: hit by a car, orphaned, injured, alone. And this year, the heat has taken a severe toll on them so...

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    Top headlines of Elgin in the summer of 1912

    A heated battle as whether or not Elgin theaters should be open on Sundays came to a climax 100 years ago when citizens were given the opportunity to vote on the question. Here's a look at those and other stories that made Elgin area headlines during summer of 1912.

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    Dean Hewson crosses the finish line at the July 8 Splash, Pedal, Dash Triathlon.

    Palatine, Schaumburg athletes are tops at triathlon

    The two fastest triathletes swam, biked and ran past their competition in Schaumburg Park District's Triathlon: Splash, Pedal, Dash on July 8.Dean Hewson of Palatine powered through the triathlon's 400-meter swim, 15-mile bike ride and 5K run with a time of 1:01:49. Triathlete Judie Refvik of Schaumburg was the overall female winner in 1:12:57.

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    Joe Berenyi of Oswego lost an arm and a kneecap in a 1994 construction accident. But that won't stop him from competing in five cycling events next month for Team USA at the Paralympic Games in London.

    Oswego man pedaling toward Paralympic Games in London

    Aurora native Joe Berenyi has overcome injuries he suffered during a construction accident 18 years ago to become one of the best Paralympic cyclists in the nation. In August, he will be representing Team USA during the Paralympic Games in London. "I don't have to win, but getting a medal is the ultimate goal," Berenyi said.

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    Paul McCartney performs during the Opening Ceremony at the 2012 Summer Olympics on Friday in London.

    McCartney paid $1.57 for Olympics gig

    London Olympic organizers say former Beatle Paul McCartney and other star performers who took part in Friday's opening ceremony essentially donated their time — receiving a mere pound ($1.57) — for their performances.

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    Peter Jackson is adding a third film to what was planned to be the two-part series “The Hobbit.”

    Jackson to make ‘The Hobbit’ into a trilogy

    Peter Jackson, director of the Oscar-winning "The Lord of the Rings" movies, said Monday that after viewing a cut of the first film and part of the second that there was room for a third.

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    A stranded passenger brushes his teeth at the door of a stationary train compartment following the power outage that struck in the early hours of Monday at a train station in New Delhi, India. A major power outage struck northern India, plunging cities into darkness and stranding hundreds of thousands of commuters.

    Indian power failure puts 370 million in dark

    A power grid failure blacked out northern India for hours Monday, halting trains, forcing hospitals and airports onto backup power and providing a dark, sweltering reminder of the nation's inability to meet its energy needs as it strives to be an economic power.

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    This artists rendering provided by NASA shows the Mars Rover, Curiosity. After traveling 8 1/2 months and 352 million miles, Curiosity will attempt a landing on Mars the night of Aug. 5, 2012.

    NASA to athletic Mars rover: ‘Stick the landing’

    It's NASA's most ambitious and expensive Mars mission yet — and it begins with the red planet arrival late Sunday of the smartest interplanetary rover ever built. Also the most athletic. Like an Olympic gymnast, it needs to "stick the landing." It won't be easy. The complicated touchdown NASA designed for the Curiosity rover is so risky it's been described as "seven minutes of terror"...

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    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney delivers a speech in Jerusalem, Sunday, July 29, 2012.

    Romney: Anyone who overpays taxes unqualified to be president

    Mitt Romney says that if he paid more taxes than were required, he wouldn't be qualified to be president.

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    21 charged in Chicago auto theft ring

    Investigators in Chicago say they've cracked an auto theft ring that targeted high-end vehicles and sold them for much less than they were worth. Some vehicles worth $50,000 were sold for just $10,000.

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    Cortina Nystad, left, and Kristen Guerrieri wear red dresses during their regular run at rush hour in Algonquin, as a symbol of their fight against child sex trafficking. They have organized the Red Run 5K Run/Walk on Aug. 11 to benefit organizations who help combat the problem.

    5K against child sex trafficking in Algonquin

    Algonquin moms Kristen Guerrieri and Cortina Nystad have been going on weekly runs through downtown Algonquin donning red dresses. The dresses symbolize the fight against child sex trafficking. Nystad and Guerrieri are organizing The Red Run 5K Run/Walk, which will host its inaugural event on Aug. 11. The race will benefit Anne's House, a residential program run by the Salvation Army's Promise...

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    Chicago continues grid garbage collection roll out

    Chicago is continuing to roll out its new grid garbage collection program with about 72,000 homes on the city's Northwest Side. The Chicago Department of Streets and Sanitation says the next phase will start on Monday. The program started with about 55,000 homes on the North Side last month.

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    Diana Sharp, former assistant provost at Harper College in Palatine, is beginning her first year as principal of the Illinois Math and Science Academy in Aurora. She said she looks forward to preparing students for “jobs that aren’t even out there yet.”

    New IMSA principal ready to focus on STEM

    Preparing students for jobs that don't exist yet — that's Diana Sharp's challenge. The former Harper College assistant provost took over this month as principal of the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy in Aurora. "It's fun to have a place where students live there, go to school there," Sharp said.

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    Iranian nurse Zahra Akbarzadeh, left, gives one-day-old baby girl Setayesh to her mother, Tayyebeh Sadat Bidaki, to feed her at the Mehr hospital, in Tehran, Sunday.

    Iran scraps family planning policies to spark baby boom

    TEHRAN, Iran — Iran’s new message to parents: Get busy and have babies.In a major reversal of once far-reaching family planning policies, authorities are now slashing its birth-control programs in an attempt to avoid an aging demographic similar to many Western countries that are struggling to keep up with state medical and social security costs.

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    U.S. Naval Sea Cadets Christopher Kinyon, left, Chris Barbot, Andrew Matthews, Jaeger Shaffstall and Travis McCoig stand inside one of the former Nike missile magazine in Vernon Hills.

    Cadets clearing sludge, debris to restore Nike missile base

    Working with a youth group called the U.S. Naval Sea Cadets, Lincolnshire Mayor Brett Blomberg is dedicated to restoring part of a former Nike missile base in Vernon Hills. The project involves removing decades of sludge and grime and rust and debris. "We have a little cleaning up to do," Blomberg joked. "It's a fixer-upper."

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    Jason Gould

    Fundraiser benefits leukemia and lymphoma research

    Dave Heun talks to Sandy Gould, whose son, Jason, died in 2006 from a viral complication following a transplant for leukemia. The annual Jason's Hogfan Party, which raises money for leukemia and lymphoma research, will be Sept. 8 at the St. Charles Moose Lodge.

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    Anne Eddings, a state-certified wildlife rehabilitator, feeds three young deer from baby bottles at her home in Herrick.

    Herrick woman helps injured animals

    All creatures great and small, Anne Eddings saves them all.She is a licensed wildlife rehabilitator with the state of Illinois, empowered to accept Mother Nature's flotsam and jetsam, those injured or suddenly orphaned critters that won't stand much chance without human intervention.So police and civilians out on the highways and byways bring her a steady stream of parentless and only hours-old...

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    Student charged with threats against Kent State

    Police have arrested and charged a 19-year-old Kent State University student who posted a message on Twitter saying he planned to "shoot up" the campus.

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    Missing UW-Whitewater student found dead in quarry

    A missing University of Wisconsin-Whitewater student has been found dead in a limestone quarry in Walworth County.The sheriff's office says the body of 21-year-old Benjamin R. Fuder was found Sunday about 6:45 a.m. The circumstances of his death were not immediately released, although foul play is not suspected.

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    4 ships to visit Milwaukee next week

    Four ships from the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and Canadian navy are set to visit Milwaukee next week. It's part of the Navy's commemoration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812. The ships are the frigate USS DeWert, the coastal patrol ship Hurricane, the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Neah Bay and the Canadian frigate HMCS Ville de Québec.

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    Dawn Patrol: Libertyville boy’s tubing death; Final Five’s got talent

    Libertyville boy drowns in tubing accident near Lake Villa. St. Charles hosts first cycling race. Suburban Chicago's Got Talent down to Final Five. Hoffman Estates townhouse damaged by fire. American swimmer sets butterfly world record. Anthony Rizzo hits walk-off home run to beat Cardinals.

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    Nguyen Thi Chi, 20, left, and Dinh Thi Hong Loan, 30, pose in their apartment in Hanoi. The couple has dated for more than two years and plans to marry next month.

    Vietnam surprises nearly everyone by considering same-sex marriage

    HANOI, Vietnam — Dinh Thi Hong Loan grasps her girlfriend’s hand, and the two gaze into each other’s love-struck eyes. Smiling, they talk about their upcoming wedding — how they’ll exchange rings and toast the beginning of their lives together.

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    In this photo taken in February, a mother shows the burnt arm of her child suffering from nodding disease at their home in the Kitgum district, Uganda. Uganda this week hosts a four-day international conference on nodding syndrome.

    Mysterious nodding disease hits Ugandans

    KITGUM, Uganda — Augustine Languna’s eyes welled up and then his voice failed as he recalled the drowning death of his 16-year-old daughter. The women near him looked away, respectfully avoiding the kind of raw emotion that the head of the family rarely displayed.

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    Remya Jose of India demonstrates the pedal-powered washing machine she invented. She was forced to do laundry by hand when her mother became sick because her family had no washing machine. So she invented a washing machine/exercise bike that is cheap to make and requires no electricity.

    Hunter searches for inventions in India

    SEHORE, India — It’s 110 degrees, and Prof. Anil Gupta has been hiking the scorched plains of central India for hours. But he smiles widely as he enters a tiny village in search of another unsung genius.“If you have any new ideas or you have any new inventions, I’m here to promote you,” he tells farmers squatting beside a dusty roadside shrine to the Hindu god Shiva.

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    From left, United States' Nathan Adrian, United States' Michael Phelps, United States' Cullen Jones and United States' Ryan Lochte pose with their medals for the men's 4x100-meter freestyle relay final Sunday at the Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

    Weekend in Review: Fatal boating accident; Olympics coverage

    What you may have missed over the weekend: Suburban talent contest down to final five; Libertyville boy dies in boating accident; state treasurer's 're-branding effort' comes with big price tag; Wheaton man still holds racewalk records; suburban athletes survive death race; What's Higgs Boson?; St. Charles cycling event a success; U.S. gymnast, world champ misses cut; U.S. swimmer sets world...

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    A June 20, 2009, derailment of a freight train carrying ethanol caused an explosion that killed a woman in Cherry Valley and forced the evacuation of 600 homes.

    What’s being done to prevent rail hazmat releases?

    Freight trains are part of life in Chicago and the suburbs, carrying cars, coal and chemicals. About 29.4 million carloads of freight a year travel through the U.S. and nearly 6 percent — or 1.8 million carloads — contain hazardous materials. Although hazardous materials accidents rarely happen, when they do it can be a disaster. So what's in place to prevent them?

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    The vast expanse of traditional paper textbooks at the Elgin Community College bookstore could one day be replaced by e-books. ECC is piloting the use of e-books for students in the nursing program. Instead of lugging around heavy books that cost hundreds of dollars, students in the program will be able to download all of their course materials on to a tablet or laptop.

    ECC hoping to save students' money, backs

    College textbooks can break the bank -- and your back. But Elgin Community College is affording some students an option to get digital versions of their textbooks, which could render rolling backpacks useless and trips to the chiropractor unnecessary. For nursing students, the price for textbooks for two semesters in 2011 was $1,595.52. Those books also weighed 68½ pounds. The electronic option...

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    The start of the 104th Chicago Yacht Club Race to Mackinac on Lake Michigan near Chicago on Saturday, July 21.

    Images: The Week In Pictures
    This week's edition of The Week in Pictures features highlights from several county fairs, the Mac race, the first day of school, and a toad.

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    U.S. gymnast Gabrielle Douglas performs on the floor during the Artistic Gymnastic women’s qualifications at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Sunday, July 29, 2012, in London.

    Images from the 2012 Summer Olympics on Sunday, July 29, 2012
    Athletes from the United States competed in basketball, swimming, archery, gymnastics and many other sports at the 2012 London Olympics Sunday July, 29th.

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    Marge Hall of Winfield paints a new oil piece of a peony at the Geneva Arts Fair on Third Street on Saturday, July 28. Hall has been doing the Geneva show for several years.

    Images: Weekend festivals in the suburbs
    This weekends suburban festivals included Geneva Arts Fair, Algonquin Founders Day, Streamwood Summer Celebration and Wingfest in Schaumburg

Sports

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    Mets left fielder Scott Hairston rounds third base after hitting a two-run home run off Giants relief pitcher Sergio Romo during the eighth inning Monday in San Francisco.

    Mets’ Hairston homers twice in extra-inning win over Giants

    Scott Hairston two homers Monday night, connecting in the 8th and 10th innings to send the New York Mets past the reeling San Francisco Giants 8-7. The Giants have lost five in a row, all at home.

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    Pitcher Hisashi Iwakuma’s 13 strikeouts Monday night against the Blue Jays broke the Mariners rookie record of 12 previously shared by Mark Langston, Randy Johnson and Freddy Garcia.

    Iwakuma whiffs 13 in Mariners’ win

    Hisashi Iwakuma struck out a career-high 13 and Michael Saunders and Kyle Seager had two hits apiece to help Seattle win its fifth consecutive game 4-1 over the Toronto Blue Jays.

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    The Diamondbacks’ Chris Johnson connects on a grand slam against the Dodgers in the fifth inning Monday in Los Angeles.

    Johnson slams Dodgers’ Harang in D-backs debut

    Chris Johnson hit a grand slam in his first game with the Arizona Diamondbacks and Paul Goldschmidt hit a three run shot in the first inning — both off Aaron Harang — in a 7-2 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers on Monday night.

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    Fans cheer and teammates congratulate the Brewers’ Cody Ransom after his three-run home run against the Houston Astros on Monday in Milwaukee.

    Ransom’s HR caps late burst as Brewers beat Astros

    Cody Ransom's homer capped a four-run burst in the eighth inning and the Milwaukee Brewers, after firing their bullpen coach, held off the Houston Astros 8-7 Monday night.

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    Roth, Boomers roll 11-0

    The Schaumburg Boomers used a pair of 2-run homers and a solid outing from Cameron Roth to shut out the Rockford RiverHawks 11-0 on Monday night. Roth (8-4) extended his scoreless-innigs streak to 17 by working 8 innings. Roth, who threw 8 innings in a 1-0 victory over Joliet last Wednesday, retired 10 in a row from the third through the sixth.

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    White Sox catcher A.J. Pierzynski watches his three-run home run during Monday’s first inning in Minneapolis.

    Sox start strong, but lose in 9th

    Jamey Caroll's sacrifice fly in the ninth inning scored Alexi Casilla and the Minnesota Twins won their fourth straight, beating the White Sox 7-6 Monday night. A.J. Pierzynski homered in his first game after missing five with a strained oblique, and Alejandro De Aza returned from a wrist injury and matched a career high with four hits for the White Sox.

  •  
    Cubs outfielder David DeJesus congratulates Starlin Castro after Castro’s two-run home run Monday against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Wrigley Field.

    Cubs sink Pirates with 9-run inning

    Anthony Rizzo and Starlin Castro homered during a nine-run fifth inning and the Cubs routed the Pittsburgh Pirates 14-4 Monday night at Wrigley Field in their highest-scoring game of the season. Rizzo and Darwin Barney hit three-run homers. Castro had a two-run shot and reached base four times as the Cubs won for the 11th time in their last 13 games at Wrigley Field.

  •  
    Kyle Zimmer created some buzz with his first start for the Kane County Cougars last week.

    No. 5 overall draft pick creates ‘buzz’ for Kane County Cougars

    At No. 5 overall, pitcher Kyle Zimmer is the highest draft pick to player for the Kane County Cougars since Adrian Gonzales in 2001. Zimmer is scheduled to make his second start in Beloit, Wisc., on Tuesday against the Snappers.

  •  
    Boston’s Dustin Pedroia, center, celebrates his two-run home run that drove in Carl Crawford, right, in the sixth inning Monday at home against Detroit.

    Buchholz and Pedroia carry Red Sox past Tigers 7-3

    Dustin Pedroia hit a tiebreaking homer and drove in three runs to support Clay Buchholz's eight solid innings, leading the Boston Red Sox over the Detroit Tigers 7-3 Monday night for their third straight win.

  •  
    Orioles pitcher Miguel Gonzalez struck out a career-high eight without walking a batter Monday in New York.

    Gonzalez solid for Orioles in win over Yankees

    Nick Markakis drove in two runs to back a solid outing by rookie Miguel Gonzalez, and the Baltimore Orioles held on to beat the struggling New York Yankees 5-4 Monday night.

  •  
    Los Angeles Angels designated hitter Kendrys Morales, batting as a lefty, watches his two-run homer fly during the sixth inning Monday in Arlington, Texas.

    Morales hits 2 HRs in sixth inning as Angels rout Rangers

    Kendrys Morales homered from both sides of the plate during a nine-run sixth inning, capping the burst with a grand slam that sent the Los Angeles Angels romping past the Texas Rangers 15-8 Monday night.

  •  
    The Braves’ Chipper Jones congratulates Jason Heyward on his solo home run against the Miami Marlins during the third inning Monday in Atlanta.

    Heyward homers as Braves beat Marlins 8-2

    Jason Heyward homered and scored three runs and the Atlanta Braves snapped a string of 16 straight losses on Mondays, including 12 this season, by beating the Miami Marlins 8-2 on Monday night.

  •  
    Reds catcher Devin Mesoraco yells at home plate umpire Chad Fairchild as head coach Dusty Baker, right, steps in to pull him back after Mesoraco was ejected for arguing balls and strikes in the third inning Monday at home

    Padres end Reds’ 10-game win streak

    Will Venable drove in four runs with a single and a bases-loaded triple Monday night, and the San Diego Padres emphatically ended one of the longest winning streaks in Reds history with an 11-5 victory that brought out the worst in Cincinnati.

  •  
    Starting pitcher Francisco Liriano will make his White Sox debut Tuesday night against the Minnesota Twins, his former team.

    Which Liriano will it be for White Sox?

    Tonight in Minnesota the White Sox will begin learning whether they acquired "Franchise Liriano" or "Frankie Enigma" over the weekend.

  •  
    White Sox general manager Kenny Williams has made all the right moves so far this season.

    White Sox GM Williams on magical run

    With so many games to play and a talented Detroit roster lurking, it is far from a guarantee that the Sox will make the playoffs. But at this moment, White Sox GM Ken Williams is a leading candidate for MLB Executive of the Year.

  •  
    Bears head coach Lovie Smith is seen as a unifying presence by general manager Phil Emery.

    Emery likes Smith’s qualities as Bears coach

    Bears GM Phil Emery has had a lot of positive things to say about coach Lovie Smith. "I felt that was a positive coming in as a first-time general manager, that Lovie Smith was our head coach," Emery said. "I think he's a very fine head coach and even a better person. "He cares about our team, he cares about the people in our building, he's a guy that unifies people. He doesn't create cliques; he creates unity."

  •  

    Nate Robinson joining Bulls?

    The Bulls need to replace Derrick Rose at point guard for at least the first part of next season. The latest candidate to emerge for a fill-in spot is former Golden State guard Nate Robinson. It was reported in several places that Robinson had agreed to join the Bulls, but a league source maintained Monday afternoon said a deal was not yet official.

  •  

    Colts coach gives Steelers fan Andrew Luck jersey

    Colts safety Tom Zbikowski spotted the Steelers jersey in the front row right away. A few minutes later, the former Buffalo Grove High School star asked first-year coach Chuck Pagano to take care of the offensive sight.

  •  
    The United States’ Jordan Larson celebrates during Monday’s volleyball match against Brazil at the London Olympics. Larson had 18 points for the top-ranked Americans.

    U.S. women’s volleyball team defeats Brazil

    The U.S. women's volleyball team defeated Brazil 3-1 on Monday at the Olympics in an early-round rematch of the Beijing Games final won by the Brazilians. Destinee Hooker had 23 points and Jordan Larson added 18 for the top-ranked Americans, who won 25-18, 25-17, 22-25, 25-21 to improve to 2-0 in pool play at Earls Court.

  •  
    United States’ forward and Stevenson High School grad Tamika Catchings, right, and guard Sue Bird, center, vie for the ball with Angola’s guard Catarina Camufal, second from right, during Monday’s women’s preliminary round group A basketball match at the 2012 Summer Olympics.

    Naperville’s Candace Parker leads U.S. women in rout over Angola

    The U.S. women say they don't care about the final score. They just want to have least one more point than their opponent at the end of games in the women's Olympic basketball tournament. That sounds like the right thing to say after Naperville Central High School grad Candace Parker had 14 points and 12 rebounds to lead the Americans to a 90-38 rout of Angola on Monday night.

  •  

    Cougars rally to beat River Bandits 5-3

    Kane County Cougars game report:

  •  
    United States’ Matthew Grevers celebrates his gold medal win in the men’s 100-meter backstroke swimming final at the Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, Monday, July 30, 2012.

    Lake Forest swimmer sets Olympic record to win 100 back

    Lake Forest High and Northwestern graduate Matt Grevers of the United States set an Olympic record to win the men's 100-meter backstroke at the London Olympics on Monday. In other Olympic swimming action, Yannick Agnel dealt another crushing blow to Ryan Lochte and everyone else in the supposed Race of the Century at the London Olympics

  •  
    A woman who was not part of India’s athletic delegation marched right beside India’s flag bearer Sushil Kumar during the Opening Ceremony Friday.

    So far, London Olympics wins gold medal for gaffes

    An appearance by the hapless comic character Mr. Bean was one of the highlights of the London Olympics opening ceremony. Yet a series of Keystone Cops moments has games organizers hoping they don't keep up this slapstick routine in real life. London police acknowledged Monday that last week they lost a set of keys to Wembley — one of the most famous soccer stadiums in the world and an Olympic venue in London.

  •  

    Titans’ O.J. Murdock found dead in his car

    O.J. Murdock, a wide receiver for the Tennessee Titans who failed to report to training camp last week, died of what appears to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound, police said. He was 25.Tampa, Florida, police officers discovered Murdock’s body in his car outside Middleton High School at around 8:30 a.m. local time today, according to the City of Tampa’s website. Murdock, who graduated from the school in 2005, was transported to Tampa General Hospital in critical condition and died at 10:43 a.m.Murdock was signed by the Titans as an undrafted free agent in July 2011. He spent last season on injured reserve after injuring his right Achilles tendon early in training camp.“We are shocked and saddened to hear of O.J. Murdock’s death this morning,” the Titans said in an e-mailed statement. “In his brief time here, a number of our players, coaches and staff had grown close to O.J., and this is a difficult time for them. He spent the last year battling back from an Achilles injury as he prepared for this year’s training camp. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends as they try to cope with this tragedy.”Orenthal James Murdock was born on Feb. 15, 1987. He spent two seasons at Fort Hays State University after beginning his college career at the University of South Carolina and then Pearl River Community College. At Fort Hays State, he had 95 catches for 1,987 yards and 20 touchdowns in 21 games.Murdock had been recovering from the Achilles injury and was excused from July 28 practice for “personal reasons,” CBS Sports said, citing Titans coach Mike Munchak. Murdock was listed on the team’s Reserve/Did Not Report list.

  •  

    Swiss soccer player could be booted for tweet

    A Swiss soccer player could be expelled from the Olympics for allegedly sending a racist message on Twitter.

  •  
    Ryan Lochte going for a second gold in the men's 200 freestyle today.

    5 Olympic things to know for Monday

    Ryan Lochte going for a second gold in the men's 200 freestyle today.

  •  

    Mike North video: Are the Bears better than the Packers?

    Are the Green Bay Packers no longer in the same division as the Chicago Bears? The way so many people are picking the Bears to win not only their division , but the Super Bowl makes Mike North a little puzzled.

Business

  •  
    Joe Mattes of Arlington Heights, makes the 50-mile run across the border to Wisconsin every month to pick up three or four cases of Spotted Cow, his favorite beer.

    New Glarus keeps local people running north

    Joe Mattes of Arlington Heights, makes the 50-mile run across the border to Wisconsin every month to pick up three or four cases of Spotted Cow, his favorite beer. And he's not alone. The brewery has engendered a cult-like following, and more than 100,000 people visited last year. This year, the Careys expect more than 150,000. And they have no intention of expanding delilvery outside of Wisconsin.

  •  
    J. Patrick Benton, Market President of First Community Bank — Naperville, from left, Doug Krause, Naperville councilman; Naperville Mayor A. George Pradel; Steve Chirico, Naperville councilman; and Scott Wehrli, member of the bank's board, break ground on the new site.

    Naperville bank exec in it for long haul

    J. Patrick Benton knows what it's like to stay for the long haul. He's been a lifelong Naperville resident. He's been married to retired District 203 teacher, Polly Benton, for 40 years. And he's been a banker for most of that time, including nearly 30 years at Harris Bank in Naperville and then as market president of the First Community Bank in Naperville.

  •  
    Ross Levinsohn, who was interim chief executive officer at Yahoo, is leaving after the board passed him over for the top job and unexpectedly recruited Marissa Mayer, a former Google executive.

    Levinsohn leaving Yahoo after second CEO snub

    Ross Levinsohn, the interim CEO who was snubbed in the search for a permanent leader at Yahoo, is leaving the Internet portal.

  •  
    The Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services chose Heritage Woods of South Elgin as one of five locations for an affordable memory care pilot project in its Supportive Living program. The 32 new affordable memory care apartments are under construction, along with 18 new assisted living units. All are expected to be finished by the end of October.

    Assisted living expansion in S. Elgin includes pilot for dementia care

    A 132-unit assisted living facility in South Elgin is about to become the largest campus developed by the largest provider of affordable assisted living communities in Illinois. An expansion project at Heritage Woods of South Elgin has been under construction since the end of April as anyone who drives by the intersection of McLean Boulevard and Bowes Road has probably noticed. The massive project will add 18 affordable assisted living units and open White Oaks at Heritage Woods of South Elgin with 32 affordable memory care apartments for adults with Alzheimer's or some form of dementia.

  •  
    Changes are coming to the long-vacant Dominick’s property along Kirchoff Road in Rolling Meadows.

    Rolling Meadows takes first step toward revitalized downtown

    Tuesday will be a very good day for the city of Rolling Meadows. After years of waiting and a few false starts, ownership of the long-vacant Dominick's property will officially change hands, which is the first step in ending the era of shuttered store fronts along the city's main road, said Mayor Tom Rooney.

  •  
    Samsung Electronics’ Galaxy S, left, and Apple’s iPhone 4 are displayed at a mobile phone shop in Seoul, South Korea.

    iPhone appeal dims as Samsung shines

    The latest iPhone looks much the same as the first iPhone, which came out more than five years ago. That hasn't been a problem for Apple — until, now.

  •  
    Chrysler Group LLC, the automaker controlled by Fiat SpA, reported second-quarter net income of $436 million as the company plans to extend gains in passenger-car sales with the new Dodge Dart compact.

    Chrysler posts $436M second-quarter profit

    Strong sales in the U.S. and Canada powered Chrysler to a $436 million second-quarter profit.

  •  
    An attorney holds an Apple iPad, left, and a Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 at the regional court in Duesseldorf, Germany. The two tech Titans are squaring off in federal court.

    Jury selection begins in battle of tech titans

    With billions of dollars and control of the U.S. smartphone and computer tablets markets at stake, jury selection began Monday in a closely watched trial between two of the world's leading tech companies over patents.

  •  
    U.S. stocks declined amid concern that a rally which gave the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index its biggest two-day gain in 2012 has outpaced the economic outlook.

    Stock indexes drift lower, ending a two-day rally

    A two-day rally that sent stocks soaring last week fizzled out Monday.

  •  

    Reznick Group moving from Skokie to Chicago

    An accounting firm is relocating its Midwest headquarters from Skokie to Chicago, in a move that’s expected to bring at least 150 jobs to the Loop.Chicago Mayor Emanuel says Reznick Group will make the move in the next year. In a statement Monday, Emanuel says he’s certain Reznick Group “will find world-class employees and will be a strong member of Chicago’s outstanding professional services business community.” Reznick is expected to bring 150 to 200 jobs to Chicago by 2015.The firm was founded in 1977 and is ranked among the top 20 U.S. accounting firms.George Klenovich of Reznick Group says his firm is confident that being located in downtown Chicago will allow it to attract and retain the top-quality talent needed to help the company grow.

  •  
    Coca-Cola Co., the world’s largest soft-drink maker, reorganized under three new management groups, marking the end of the integration of the company’s North American distribution operations.

    Coca-Cola move seen as early CEO succession test

    The Coca-Cola Co. is streamlining its business and raising the profiles of two key executives, a move that could better position them to eventually succeed CEO Muhtar Kent.

  •  
    There is a lot of interest in Arlington Heights in getting the movie theater back open.

    Still hope for first-run theater in downtown Arlington Heights

    Owners of the recently-closed Arlington Theaters in Arlington Heights say they're still committed to getting another first-run movie theater in that location, but said there's no deal on the table yet. "They want to reopen as soon as possible, but there's no predictions about when that might happen," said Bud Perrone, spokesman for Miami Beach, Fla.-based landlord LNR Partners.

  •  
    A genetic test maker is asking the Food and Drug Administration to approve its personalized DNA test in a move that, if successful, could boost acceptance of technology that is viewed skeptically by leading scientists who question its usefulness.

    23andMe seeks FDA approval for personal DNA test

    Genetic test maker 23andMe is asking the Food and Drug Administration to approve its personalized DNA test in a move that, if successful, could boost acceptance of technology that is viewed skeptically by leading scientists who question its usefulness. 23andMe is part of a fledgling industry that allows consumers to peek into their genetic code for details about their ancestry and future health.

  •  
    A customer looks at the new OS X Mountain Lion operating system at an Apple store in Palo Alto, Calif.

    Apple says Mountain Lion downloads top 3 million in four days

    Apple Inc. said downloads of its Mountain Lion software exceeded three million in four days, making it the most successful operating system release in the company's history.

  •  

    Reznick Group moving from Skokie to Chicago

    An accounting firm is relocating its Midwest headquarters from Skokie to Chicago, in a move that's expected to bring at least 150 jobs to the Loop. Chicago Mayor Emanuel says Reznick Group will make the move in the next year.

  •  

    Europe’s economic confidence slides in July

    The EU's executive branch reports that economic confidence fell in July, as hope declined in industry and the services sector.The European Commission said Monday that its economic sentiment indicator for the 17 eurozone countries fell 2.0 points, to 87.9. In the 27-nation EU, the indicator decreased 1.4 points, to 89.0.

  •  
    Craig Herkert

    Supervalu fires CEO Herkert, names Sales to post

    Jewel-Osco’s parent copany Supervalu is ousting CEO Craig Herkert as the grocery chain looks to right its business only weeks after reporting disappointing quarterly results and suggesting it might put itself up for sale. Chairman Wayne Sales was named Monday to take on the additional roles of president and CEO.

  •  
    Best Buy Co. founder Richard Schulze

    Best buy founder Schulze recruits team for buyout

    Best Buy Co. founder Richard Schulze has been recruiting executives to help lead the retailer if his attempt to take the company private is successful, according to a senior Best Buy executive."He is talking to people he trusts," J.D. Wilson, senior vice president of enterprise capabilities, said in an interview. "There is a small group he'd like to have with him in righting the ship.

  •  

    Italian yields drop in bond auctions

    Italy has won some respite as it managed to tap investors for (euro) 5.48 billion ($6.75 billion) with key borrowing rates lower than they had been previously.

  •  

    GM says ex-marketing chief didn’t meet company expectations

    General Motors Co. Chief Marketing Officer Joel Ewanick resigned because he didn't "meet the company's expectations of an employee," according to an e- mailed statement by the automaker yesterday.Greg Martin, a GM spokesman, declined to comment further last night. GM senior managers, who had been happy with the marketing executive's work, requested Ewanick resign after reviewing a sponsorship agreement that failed to meet company policies,

  •  
    A woman selects fashion clothes hanging for sale at a shopping mall in Beijing, China Sunday.

    China calls for private investment in key fields

    China's government said Monday it will launch projects to attract private investment in energy, health and other industries as it tries to reverse an economic slump.The Cabinet announcement adds to a flurry of efforts to stimulate growth that has fallen to a three-year low, raising the threat of job losses and social unrest.

  •  

    Gallagher acquires Nebraska agency

    Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. announced the acquisition of Grace/Mayer Insurance Agency, Inc. in Omaha, Nebraska. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

  •  

    Z Trim Holdings adds ex-energy executive to advisory board

    Z Trim Holdings, Inc. said G. Stephen "Steve" Finley, former Chief Financial Officer of Baker Hughes, Inc., will joing the company's advisory board.

  •  

    Illinois Fire Safety Alliance opens Mount Prospect office

    MOUNT PROSPECT — The Illinois Fire Safety Alliance recently hosted an open house and dedication ceremony for its new fire sprinkler-protected office building in Mount Prospect.

  •  

    LCS Technologies joins Flexera Software program

    Flexera Software said Brazilian-based LCS Technologies has joined Flexera Software's Reseller Partner Program.

  •  
    People walk past a logo of HSBC headquarters in Hong Kong Monday.

    HSBC says sorry as it takes $700 million hit

    HSBC PLC apologized to shareholders Monday as it disclosed a $700 million charge to cover the cost of U.S. penalties for lapses including its failure to enforce money-laundering controls in Mexico.The provision was announced as Europe's biggest bank reported an 11 percent advance in pretax profit in the first half of the year following $4.3 billion in gains from asset sales. For the six months ending June 30, the bank made a pretax profit of $12.7 billion, up from $11.5 billion a year earlier.

  •  

    Saudi Arabia bans smoking in most public places

    Saudi Arabia has banned smoking in government offices and most public places, including restaurants, coffee shops, supermarkets and shopping malls.

  •  
    A Government employee protests against cuts in Barcelona, Spain, Monday, July 30, 2012.

    Spain’s economy contracts third quarter in a row

    The Spanish economy remains stuck in its second recession in three years after contracting 0.4 percent in the second quarter of 2012 from the previous three months, according to official data. It was the third consecutive contraction following the previous two 0.3 percent quarterly declines, Spain's National Statistics Institute said Monday.

  •  

    Oil rises for 5th day on Europe action hopes
    Oil prices rose for a fifth day ahead of a meeting Monday between the U.S. Treasury Secretary and top European finance officials as expectations remain elevated for ECB action to prevent Spain's financial woes from deepening.Benchmark crude for September delivery was up 30 cents at $90.43 a barrel at midafternoon Bangkok time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract added 74 cents on Friday to finish at $90.13 per barrel in New York.

  •  

    Take Action Fitness is a dream come true for owner
    A fitness trainer from Lily Lake has dreamed about carrying out a carrying out a career in the fitness industry since she was 16. Her mission is to change lives and change the way fitness is done.

  •  

    Selling on Facebook: Puppies and babies help

    Facebook is not advertising. It's relationship marketing. People are on Facebook to have fun, not to shop. They want to see cute pictures of puppies and babies. Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall looks at how businesses should respond.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Drury Lane announces 2013-14 season

    A mix of old classics and new prizewinning shows are part of the 2013-14 lineup, announced Monday, at the Drury Lane Theatre in Oakbrook Terrace. Shows include the popular new Broadway comedy "Boeing Boeing," the Pulitzer Prize-winning musical drama "Next to Normal," the Mel Brooks classic "Young Frankenstein," and the popular musicals "Oliver" and "Hello, Dolly."

  •  

    How can you live with a ‘one-upper’?

    Q. So my wife is a one-upper, and after 30-plus years of marriage, it is really getting to me. And I know for a fact that we lost a close friendship of a couple over this issue. I’m still friends with the husband and it’s been brought up by other friends, too. (No, I do not solicit complaints.)I don’t want to be the corrector, but it’s gotten like fingernails on a blackboard to me. She gets very defensive about it when I do, and I’m sure I leave something to be desired in the diplomacy area.A Hot PlaceA. The facts you provide are tips of icebergs. Your wife is a one-upper and defensive when challenged (tip), which says she’s a deeply insecure woman (iceberg). Friends have complained to you about her (tip), even though you haven’t solicited such complaints (tip), which says your receptiveness to third-party wife-bashing is apparent in other ways (iceberg). You are long married (tip) and beyond diplomacy (tip), which suggests this has metastasized into generalized alienation of affection (iceberg).It doesn’t take much imagination to envision an insecure mate reading your negative body language and ... saying, “Oops, you’re right, I’ll stop dominating conversations!!!” No she’s going to fortify her defenses, and churn out one-uppings to keep pace with her need to feel good.If my interpretation is accurate, then you have only two choices: perpetuate this cycle, or break it.To break it, I suggest you summon the will to drop your defenses, and keep them down no matter how loudly nails meet chalkboard. Force yourself to set aside your anger, your hopes she’ll transform, your desire for vindication, all of it. You are kindness, forgiveness, peace.From there, the most straightforward approach is to look at your wife not merely as the host of this conflict, but instead as the whole of the person you love. Unfortunately, looking for what’s wrong with other people tends to comes naturally, once the pheromones back down, especially when you’re trying to justify your side in an ongoing conflict.So try instead to forgive her insecurity as her built-in flaw — the kind everyone has, the suck-it-up yin to her lovable yang. In fact, as a thought exercise, think of your own best qualities and the baggage on the flip side of each.Think fully about her for the specific purpose of renewing your appreciation for her.Disposing yourself more kindly toward your wife is the most reliable way to draw out her best. Should she soften, that in turn will likely dispose others more kindly to her. It’s not a promise of sunshine and flowers, but this can ease you back from the brink.If you haven’t the affection or patience to pull that off, then you’ll need the have-it-out conversation, where you start with a “When you do X, I feel Y” statement, and then you ask her how she would like you to handle this. The “Help me” approach welcomes where the “Do this” approach repels.This doesn’t guarantee anything, either. However, both ensure a change to what you bring to the cycle. Since that’s the only part of it you control, and since you’re the one seeking a new outcome, that’s where any productive path has to start.Ÿ Email Carolyn at tellme@washpost.com, follow her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/carolyn.hax or chat with her online at noon Eastern time each Friday at www.washingtonpost.com.© 2012 The Washington Post

  •  
    This Sept. 18, 2011 file photo shows Ty Burrell, left, Julie Bowen from the television series “Modern Family” holding their Emmys for best supporting and actress actress in a comedy, backstage at the 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles. Five stars of the hit ABC series sued 20th Century Fox Television on Tuesday July 24, 2012, claiming their contracts with the studio are illegal under California law and should be invalidated.

    Modern Family’ stars settle contract fight

    The stars of the ABC comedy "Modern Family" reached new contract agreements that end a legal dispute between the parties and allow production on the top- rated show to resume.

  •  

    Deadline extended to Aug. 3 for Cook of the Week Challenge

    We know it’s been one crazy summer. That’s why the Daily Herald has extended the deadline to apply for our second annual Cook of the Week Challenge until noon Friday, Aug. 3. We’ve already heard from some great cooks, but I know there are more out there. Why not take the chance to be among the 16 cooks who will compete for the title Cook of the Year?

  •  

    Keeping up to date on hepatitis viruses, vaccines

    Hepatitis A is a virus known to infect the liver, and infection can result in a monthlong illness featuring fever, vomiting and diarrhea, dark urine, clay-colored stools and jaundice. While vaccines have not yet been developed for the rest of the "alphabet" of infectious hepatitis, it is fortunate that safe and effective vaccinations are available against both the hepatitis A and hepatitis B viruses.

  •  
    The oldest wooden lighthouse in the U.S. is situated on a 1.66-acre peninsula off Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay.

    Live in a 19th century lighthouse

    For many years, the Poplar Point lighthouse was the beacon guiding ships in Wickford Harbor, a protected inlet in Rhode Island's Narragansett Bay. Built in 1831, the structure — listed as the oldest wooden lighthouse in America — is left over from the era before GPS and satellite.

  •  
    Appearance and creativity as well as taste will count during the ‘Best Apple Pie in Lisle Contest’ Aug. 4.

    Contest seeks best apple pie in Lisle

    Bakers can pull out their recipes for the "Best Apple Pie in Lisle Contest" to be held during the second annual Great American BBQ on Aug. 4 at Wheatstack - A Midwestern Eatery & Tap in Lisle. Contestants must register by Aug. 1.

  •  
    Charlie Sheen’s FX sitcom “Anger Management” is halfway through its initial 10-episode run and is poised to get an order for 90 more.

    Charlie Sheen sitcom poised for 90-episode pickup

    Charlie Sheen says he's not insane anymore. Instead, these are good days for the "Anger Management" star, he declares, with his FX sitcom halfway through its initial 10-episode run and poised to get an order for 90 more. Sheen told reporters Saturday that the prospect of continuing is as exciting and added cheerily, "I don't think 90's gonna be enough."

  •  
    “The Dark Knight Rises” starring Christian Bale stayed atop the box office for the second straight weekend, making just over $64 million. But it’s lagging behind the numbers of its predecessor, 2008’s “The Dark Knight.”

    ‘Dark Knight’ stays atop box office with $64M

    "The Dark Knight Rises" stayed atop the box office for the second straight weekend, making just over $64 million. The final piece in Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy has now grossed more than $289 million in its first 10 days in theaters.

  •  
    This early-blooming dahlia has not been named.

    Blooming mastermind: Secret process gives new dahlia colors a sporting chance

    Spartacus is a rich dark red dahlia, but Steve Meggos has bred yellow, lavender, orange, white and bicolored flowers with it. Meggos has been growing the big, exotic blooms for 30 years and has come up with nine distinct flowers based on Spartacus. His secret: A chemical process he won't divulge.

  •  
    Kurt Fredricks considers his 1953 Buick Super convertible a rolling relative.

    Prospect Heights resident adopts rolling relative

    Our classic vehicles have a way of working their way into our hearts, becoming not just mere cold, metallic modes of transportation, but rather cherished four-wheeled family members. Kurt Fredricks has one such rolling relative in the form of a 1953 Buick Super convertible.

  •  

    A few changes that could make us healthier

    In "Why Calories Count: From Science to Politics," Marion Nestle, a professor in the nutrition, food studies and public health department at New York University, and Malden Nesheim, professor emeritus and former director of the division of nutritional sciences at Cornell University, offer a smart, thorough survey of the history, science and politics of the calorie. We live, they say, in an eat-more world, but it doesn't always have to be this way.

  •  

    Anesthetic before root canal greatly reduces pain

    If you've never had a root canal, and if you've heard someone say, "I'd rather have a root canal than have ..." you probably think it's very painful. I've had several root canals. They're no fun, that's for sure. But you get an anesthetic before the procedure that greatly reduces or eliminates the pain. Every tooth has roots that anchor the tooth in the bone of the jaw. Teeth have a hollow central chamber, or canal, that is inside both the body and the roots of the tooth. Inside the hollow chamber is an inner pulp that contains a network of nerves, blood vessels and tissues. The pulp helps nourish your tooth and also relays sensory information. That's why injury or damage near the pulp evokes pain.

  •  
    Several new studies suggest that simple exercises may improve memory in older adults.

    Exercise may improve memory, researchers say

    Simple exercise, such as walking and resistance training, improved thinking and memory in older adults in several new studies that suggest physical activity should be a key method in slowing mental decline. One trial found that walking may boost brain volume in the region for memory. Another showed that weight training helped the mental function of older women with mild cognitive impairment.

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    ‘Autism wave’ prompts schools, businesses to adapt

    For a college class, the assignment seemed simple enough: Gather in circles of five or six students and discuss a few questions as a group. But one young man refused, sitting uncomfortably apart from his classmates and saying nothing. In the past, he might have flunked the assignment outright. But in this case, the professor met with the student in private and decided to let him answer the questions by himself. That's just one way colleges and other parts of society are starting to adapt to what might be called the autism phenomenon.

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    Quitting smoking may add more weight, study finds

    Giving up smoking may lead to an average weight gain of about 11 pounds after 12 months, according to a review of 62 past studies.That's higher than the 2.9 kilograms in weight gain often cited in smoking cessation advice leaflets, researchers at Universite Paris-Sud and the University of Birmingham in England said in the review published yesterday in the British Medical Journal. The finding was similar for both people who used nicotine replacement therapy and those who didn't, they said.Nicotine, the addictive substance in cigarettes, quells appetite by latching onto certain brain receptors that crank up the activity of a system of neurons influencing food desire, according to a recent Yale University study. While most quitters in the reviewed studies gained weight, as many as 21 percent shed pounds and 14 percent gained more than 10 kilograms, indicating a wide variety of outcomes, the authors said.“Some people are either destined or able to prevent weight gain without intervention, whereas others seem likely to gain enough weight that puts them at risk of diabetes, among other complications,” the authors said in the published article. The varied effect on the bathroom scale “is rarely described or discussed in the literature” on quitting, they said.Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the developed world and kills 443,000 and sickens 8.6 million each year in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Gaining weight limits some of the health benefits of quitting and is associated with an increased risk of medical conditions such as diabetes, the authors said.“These data suggest that doctors might usefully give patients a range of expected weight gain” and intervene early to keep quitters slim, they said.

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    Sal Gentile noticed a persistent sound in his head that wouldn’t go away. He has tinnitus, a condition that can range from merely annoying to entirely debilitating.

    Tinnitus sufferers struggle to cope with persistent sounds

    The sound may be continuous or come and go. It may change pitch or character or volume. For some, it's hissing, roaring, whistling, chirping, clicking or a steady high-pitched tone. Others say it's like white noise, the fuzzy sound that occurs when a radio is between stations.The exact cause of tinnitus is unknown, but researchers believe that, for most people, it's probably related to exposure to loud noise that damages the inner ear. The exposure can be over a period of time, or it can occur at a single event

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    Dogs helping patients with brain disorders

    Many of the small towns dotting the Southern Illinois landscape go unnoticed — and Willisville is no different. But on the outskirts of town, Tiffany Denyer and her colleagues at Wilderwood Service Dogs are on the cutting edge of research and execution of the training of dogs to work with individuals with neurological disorders. Denyer founded an organization to work with people of all ages suffering from brain disorders, including autism and Asperger's, stroke and brain injury and Alzheimer's and dementia.

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    Research reveals secrets to longer, healthier life

    Explorers and scientists have been looking for ways to "beat" aging for hundreds of years. The challenge in research today lies in untangling which of the many threads of our lives can be stretched out even longer, but also healthier. While it might be great to live to be 100, many folks would settle for making it to 90 with a healthy mind and body. Much of the time, researchers study animals because things move along faster. They can watch a biological process unfold in a matter of weeks or months, rather than decades.

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    New approaches in treating kids with brain tumors

    Doctors noticed long ago that although children afflicted with the most common type of malignant brain tumor were getting the same treatment, the outcomes differed greatly, with some kids being cured completely while others died. Now the Pediatric Cancer Genome Project launched by St. Jude and Washington University in St. Louis is yielding vital new insights about how medulloblastoma develops — and how doctors might be able to cure more cases of it, researchers said.

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    Study finds even 7-year-olds sometimes hurt themselves

    Even children as young as 7 sometimes cut themselves on purpose, according to a small study believed to be the first to examine self-injury at such early ages. The study was based on interviews with children in the Denver area and central New Jersey, without confirmation from parents or others. But the researchers and independent experts say the results are credible and raise awareness about a disturbing problem.

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    Patients often defer to their doctors to avoid being labeled as “difficult,” a new study finds.

    Patients’ fear of being ‘difficult’ may hurt care, study finds

    A recent study suggests many people refrain from asking their doctor questions for fear of being labeled a "difficult" patient. "What's interesting to us is these were mostly Caucasian, highly educated, well-to-do people, and they're talking about these difficulties," said Dominick Frosch, one of the study's lead authors. "It's difficult to imagine this is easier for people in a less advantageous social position."

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    Molly Woolsey has struggled with anorexia since she was a teenager. She finds it helpful to ground herself when she sits outside on her stoop and breathes slowly.

    Eating disorders exact a toll on older women, too

    Molly Woolsey was 19 when her anorexia was diagnosed. Once she passed her 20s, the St. Paul woman said, passers-by assumed she had cancer because she was so thin. “It doesn’t occur to them that someone my age could have an eating disorder,” said Woolsey, now 45. Increasingly, older women are admitting to eating disorder symptoms, which put them at higher risk for a wide range of health problems.

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    Honey has many healthy benefits, from helping you sleep to exfoliating your skin.

    Your health: The miracle of honey

    Inside and out, honey is good for your body in more ways than one. Try it as a sweetener in your tea, or in your hair as a conditioner. “Few realize that honey is a powerful food, beauty aid, and a topical antibiotic,” Dr. Lindsey Duncan said.

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    Doctors’ patient connections can affect care

    Although the image of the lone physician motoring down back roads for house calls or tending to a waiting room full of patients in a quaint office might be charming, the reality is that most doctors aren't loners. Various surveys and studies suggest that only about a third of physicians practice alone or with a single partner, largely because docs have had to join forces in larger groups to handle paperwork and insurance claims.

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    Health officials say the U.S. is on track to have the worst year for whooping cough in more than five decades. One way to help prevent it is to make sure your child is up-to-date on vaccinations.

    Protecting kids from whooping cough starts with vaccine

    Whooping cough was once a terrible menace to U.S. children, with hundreds of thousands of cases reported annually. Then a vaccine drove cases down, and the illness became thought of as rare and even antiquated. But it never totally disappeared, and now there's been a spike in cases.

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    Studies show placebo remedies often effective

    Sugar pills deserve more respect. That's the conclusion of international researchers who examined how scientists treated placebo medications in comparison with the "active" target drugs being tested against them in large clinical trials. Scores of recent studies have shown that placebo remedies often work quite well — typically in 30 percent and often up to 70 percent of people who take them.

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    Why is weight loss often temporary?

    The United States is well into its fourth decade of the "obesity epidemic," and no matter how loudly we repeat the refrain "eat less and exercise more," the numbers on our collective scale keep creeping upward. Is weight gain caused by individuals' poor diet and lack of exercise? Or is it an unavoidable effect of an abundant food supply, out-of-control marketing and unlucky genetics?

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    A virtual sense of life with dementia

    After her sister wandered away from home recently, Pat Herzberg knew that she needed help to care for Marcella, who suffers from dementia. Herzberg and her niece, Gloria Farrar, went to Sun City Senior Living recently for help — and left with an entirely new perspective. Thanks to a hands-on, sensory exhibit at the assisted-living facility, the women experienced firsthand the kind of physical and sensory changes that can turn simple tasks into tremendous challenges.

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    More black teenagers practicing safe sex

    Dramatically fewer black high school students are taking part in sexual behavior that puts them at risk for contracting HIV than they were 20 years ago. However, those students still engage in risky behavior more often than their white and Hispanic counterparts. Meanwhile, teens overall continue to engage in risky behaviors at rates that have declined only slightly over the past two decades, according to an analysis released by U.S. government researchers.

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    With Alzheimer's, hospital stays can be a hazard

    For people with Alzheimer's disease, a hospital stay may prove catastrophic. People with dementia are far more likely to be hospitalized than other older adults, often for preventable reasons like an infection that wasn't noticed early enough. Hospitals can be upsetting to anyone, but consider the added fear factor if you can't remember where you are or why strangers keep poking you.

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    iStockphoto

    Show encourages thinking outside of the box

    Vintage, salvage and antique stores are great places to find items and inspiration for a farmhouse kitchen. Look for old tables and furniture pieces like hutches that could be repurposed for the kitchen.

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    Strike a balance: Exposed beams and vintage jars and cutting boards complement the modern detailing in the sinks and faucets in this light-filled farmhouse kitchen.

    Farmhouse kitchens balance rustic style with modern function

    It's no surprise that with all the chaos waiting outside the front door, we'd want the inside of our homes to be a little more calm and welcoming. It's a desire that's resonating in kitchens across America where, after years of cold stainless steel and brushed nickel, the simple warmth and comfort of the farmhouse style is coming barreling back into favor.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Celebrating our towns as transit leaders

    While we still have work to do to encourage the use of mass transit, a Daily Herald editorial recognizes several towns that have made it a more pleasant experience.

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    Suppose Michele Bachmann is right about Islamic infiltration

    Columnist Cal Thomas: Many in government and the media don't want to face the possibility that infiltration is a tactic of Islamic extremists who repeatedly say they want to destroy not only Israel but the "Great Satan" America.

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    Leviathan on a government fishing expedition

    Columnist George Will: The protracted and pointless tormenting of Nancy Black illustrates the thesis estimatiung that our normal daily activities expose us to potential prosecution at the whim of a government official.

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    Where Is Baltimore?

    Columnist Susan Estrich: I did something so unusual last week as to trigger the "fraud" section at my credit card company to freeze my account.

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    President’s remarks misunderstood
    A Lombard letter to the editor: I feel compelled to respond to Carl Palash's letter In the July 31 paper. He, and so many others, seem to have missed the entire point of President Obama's recent speech.

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    Once, we were headed to ice age
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: In response to Anne Krick's July 24 letter: I personally remember when the opinion of the "scientific" community was that we were heading toward another "ice" age.

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    Global warming note sparks Romney vote
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: Regarding a recent letter, "The candidates and global warming," the position stated for each POTUS candidate can only convince me to vote for Mitt Romney. What has Obama done on this issue other than stating his belief in it while spending billions on alternate energy sources that are not providing any value to the planet?

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    Natural gas project seems a little suspect
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: I am writing in response to state Rep. Linda Chapa LaVia's letter advocating the "Chicago Clean Energy Project," which will produce substitute natural gas from coal. I'm sure that her heart is in the right place and that she actually believes that this project will "save consumers at least $100 million ... add $1.25 billion in added tax revenue ... and create thousands of jobs."

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    Thanks for Relay For Life support
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: Thanks to your support, Relay For Life of Glen Ellyn, Wheaton and Winfield had 44 teams participate, celebrated alongside survivors and caregivers and watched as hundreds of luminaria were lit to honor loved ones.

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    Village only a small part of tax problem
    Letter to the editor: Charles Glomski of Elk Grove Village replies to another resident's letter by saying the responsibility for higher taxes isn't just the village's. "While I expect all government to exercise spending restraint, I also believe Marcie Leonard is out of line in holding only village government responsible for the financial mess," he writes.

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    Maine Twp. offers help with medicines
    Letter to the editor: Maine Township Supervisor carol Teschky reminds residents they can get help with medical expenses by picking up a free Coast2Coast RX card at township offices.

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    Park and school districts should team up
    Letter to the editor: Harry Trumfio suggests the Arlington Hts. Park District confer with District 25 to use school gyms for park programs. "There needs to be more cooperation ... so as not to burden the taxpayers with additional expenses when facilities already exist in the community," he writes.

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    Can’t see need for park district tax hike
    Letter to the editor: "At a time when people are losing their jobs and companies are cutting costs, downsizing and consolidating it makes no sense to burden taxpayers with frivolous expansion projects that few residents will use," writes Chuck Kulig of Arlington Hts., dismissing a new tax hike referendum by the park district.

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    Park district already plenty well funded
    Letter to the editor: Steve Kopp of Arlington Hts. says a look at the financial statements for all government entities in Cook County shows that in his view, the Arlington Hts. Park District is in good shape. "Compared to a well-run business, AHPD has $15 million more in current assets than it needs to responsibly meet its current liabilities," he writes.

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    Transportation bill a win for Illinois
    A letter to the editor: The plan approved recently by Congress finally brings some certainty after multiple short-term extensions of the law that expired in 2009. For the next two-plus years, 68,000 people in Illinois will keep or have new jobs.

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    Obamacare a threat to each of us
    A Carol Stream letter to the editor: People of faith will now be forced to either abandon their religious beliefs or resist and be fined with a "tax," as this onerous law forces insurance companies to pay for abortion-inducing drugs, contraception and sterilizations, and many types of abortions.

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    Continue fight against synthetic drugs
    A letter to the editor: Even though this bill provides an excellent foundation for the country's response to synthetic drugs, public education must continue.

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    Trust and online journalism

    Columnist Rick Newcombe: Years ago, I gave Arianna Huffington her start as a syndicated columnist, and recently, her website got my brother condemned by quoting him out of context. That is an amazing set of facts set side by side.

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