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Daily Archive : Saturday July 21, 2012

News

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    The start of the trophy division of the 104th Chicago Yacht Club Race to Mackinac on Lake Michigan of Chicago on Saturday, July 21, 2012, from left to right front is M*A*S*H, USA 412, owned by Ronald Kallen of Highland Park, with Chicago Corinthian Yacht Club, Retention, USA 410, owned by Mark and Joni Croll of Chicago, with Chicago Yacht Club, Winnebago, USA 26300, owned by Gerald and Kathleen Thomas, of Hinsdale, with Columbia Yacht Club.

    Images from start of Chicago to Mackinac Race
    Images from start of Chicago to Mackinac Race.

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    Firefighters walk to shade Saturday as temperatures neared 100 degrees, at the booby trapped apartment of James Eagen Holmes, who police have identified as the suspect in the deadly shooting at a crowded movie theater a day earlier.

    Police defuse lethal apartment bombs

    The shooting suspect accused in a deadly rampage inside a Colorado theater planned the attack with "calculation and deliberation," police said Saturday, receiving deliveries by mail that authorities believe armed him for battle and were used to rig his apartment with dozens of bombs. New details of the suspect also emerged.

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    Drew and Heather Collins, of Evansdale, are seen Saturday at the RiverLoop Amphitheatre in Waterloo, Iowa following the 5K Run/Walk/Ride/Stroll/Roll for two missing Iowa cousins, Lyric Cook-Morrissey, 10, and Elizabeth Collins, 8, in Waterloo, Iowa.

    Authorities believe missing Iowa girls are alive

    Authorities searching for two missing Iowa cousins have information that leads them to believe both girls are still alive, an FBI spokeswoman said Saturday.

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    Baker Memorial United Methodist Church is celebrating its 175th anniversary in St. Charles this year and will have an open house and will host an open house Sunday, July 29.

    St. Charles church starts anniversary celebration with open house

    Dave Heun is looking forward to an open house on Thursday, July 29, that kicks off the celebration of Baker United Methodist Church's 175th anniversary in St. Charles.

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    Children sit on the luggage carts Saturday as they stranded at the Beijing Capital International Airport after flights are canceled due to the heavy rains.

    Beijing’s heaviest rains in 6 decades kill 10

    China's government says the heaviest rains to hit Beijing in six decades have killed at least 10 people.The torrential downpour Saturday night left low-lying streets flooded and knocked down trees. News reports said roofs of some buildings collapsed.

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    Christian Bale as Batman in a scene from “The Dark Knight Rises.” Bale released a statement of condolence on Saturday to victims and their families.

    Some theaters still playing ‘Gangster Squad’ promo

    A film trailer featuring mobsters firing automatic weapons into a movie audience was still running in some theaters, even after Warner Bros. pulled the promo following the Colorado shooting during a screening of "The Dark Knight Rises."

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    Scout Bernard, 2, of Chicago visits the horse stables at the Kane County Fair in St. Charles Saturday. Children had the opportunity to pet a variety of farm animals including horses, cows and pigs under the watch of the animals’ owners.

    Kids cheer on cowboys at Kane County Fair rodeo

    Braden Shepka's first rodeo featured six cowboys, three cowgirls, bulls, broncos, calves and even a rodeo clown clad in suspenders and oversized jeans. Just the countdown to the competition, held Saturday during the Kane County Fair in St. Charles, was enough to get 5-year-old Braden of Minooka excited. "Here's some cowboy music," he said to his grandparents as country tunes aired over the...

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    Feds nab 44 in immigration sting

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials said they arrested 44 men in the Chicago area this week as part of an operation targeting criminal aliens and immigration fugitives. The men, who were arrested in Chicago and 23 area towns, all had criminal records.

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    Hoffman Estates firefighters Saturday afternoon were called to extinguish a brush fire that swept over a dry patch of grass and quickly spread over a berm off Bode Road next to the Victoria Crossings subdivision in Hoffman Estates.

    No one hurt in Hoffman Estates brush fire

    Hoffman Estates firefighters Saturday afternoon were called to extinguish a brush fire that swept over a dry patch of grass and quickly spread over a berm off Bode Road next to the Victoria Crossings subdivision in Hoffman Estates. The fire was stopped just before it reached nearby houses. No injuries or property damage was reported.

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    This undated photo shows John Larimer of Crystal Lake. Relatives have identified Larimer, a U.S. Navy sailor, as one of the victims killed by a gunman Friday at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo.

    Crystal Lake man who died in Colorado 'unique'

    As family members traveled to Denver Saturday to claim the body of Crystal Lake South High School graduate John Larimer, the Aurora, Colo., theater shooting victim's former teachers and neighbors mourned a young man known for his unassuming nature and his strong sense of social justice. "He was a unique individual with a really strong idea of right and wrong," Crystal Lake South High School...

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    This citizen journalist image shows Syrians walking past destroyed vehicles Saturday after fighting between rebels and Syrian troops in the Yarmouk camp for Palestinian refugees in south Damascus, Syria.

    Syrian rebels fight for Aleppo

    Riding a wave of momentum, Syrian rebels made a run on Aleppo Saturday in some of the fiercest fighting seen in the country's largest city, which has been a key bastion of support for President Bashar Assad over the course of the 17-month-old uprising.

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    Tony Robbins

    Firewalk burns 21 at Robbins event

    Fire officials said 21 people at an event hosted by motivational speaker Tony Robbins suffered burns while walking across hot coals and three of the injured were treated at hospitals.

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    Country music trailblazer; self-help pioneer

    Considered a pioneer in the self-help genre aimed at helping readers become more productive in their lives, author Stephen R. Covey had an enormous impact on both the corporate world and the personal lives of millions.

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    Navy sailors high-five before the gay pride parade Saturday.

    Troops march in San Diego gay parade — in uniform

    Some of the loudest cheers Saturday at San Diego's gay pride parade were for active-duty troops marching in military dress, the first time that U.S. service members participated in such an event while in full uniform.

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    Kentucky teen faces charge for naming attackers

    A 17-year-old Kentucky girl who was upset by the plea deal reached by a pair of teenagers who sexually assaulted her is now facing a contempt charge for tweeting their names in violation of a court order.

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    Associated Press Air Force Staff Sgt. Luis Walker, right, arrives Friday for the fourth day of his trial at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas.

    Air Force instructor sentenced to 20 years

    An Air Force instructor was sentenced to 20 years in prison Saturday, after being convicted of rape and sexual assault in a sweeping sex scandal that rocked one of the nation's busiest military training centers.

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    New lab working on security shoe sole to ID people

    High-tech security? Forget those irksome eye scans. Meet the biometric shoe.

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    Judge Christine Spilde looks over the animals at last year’s Lake County Fair in Grayslake.

    Lake County Fair adds a dose of wackiness

    What does sasquatch sound like? Even the judges aren't sure how to gauge the sasquatch-calling competition, which is new to the 84th annual Lake County Fair, July 25 to 29. That and other competitions are among several new wrinkles this year.

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    Standing on a wooden platform, Eduardo Bautista, right and Labrador Ahmed hold up empty pitchers Saturday after filling an oversized fiber-composite cocktail glass with daiquiris at El Floridita tavern in Old Havana, Cuba.

    Cuba whips up giant daiquiri in world record bid

    Cuban mixologists whipped up a giant daiquiri Saturday morning in the Old Havana tavern where the tropical cocktail was born and where regular barfly Ernest Hemingway made it popular.

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    Shelly Fradkin, the mother of a friend of shooting victim Alex Sullian, kisses a photograph of Sullivan before placing it at a makeshift memorial across from the Century 16 theatre east of the Aurora Mall in Aurora, Colo., on Saturday, July 21, 2012. Authorities report that 12 died and scores people were shot during an assault at the theatre during a midnight premiere of

    Final list of Colorado victims released

    Authorities have released the names of the remaining victims of the Colorado shooting massacre. In all, 12 people killed were killed and dozens of others injured, including Ashley Moser who is drifting in and our of consciousness in the ICU with bullets lodged in her throat and a gunshot wound to her abdomen, calling for her 6-year-old daughter who has already died.

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    The Cubs honored Ron Santo by wearing a patch with his number on their jerseys, and now No. 10 will officially join the National Baseball Hall of Fame on Sunday. Take our trivia test and check out our special section in Sunday's Daily Herald for more on the life of the Cubs legend.

    A Hall of Fame trivia quiz to test your inner Santo

    Baseball player, businessman, broadcaster, and now, finally, Hall of Famer. Sunday afternoon in Cooperstown, N.Y., beloved Cubs legend Ron Santo will take his place among the greats in the game. Here is a 10-question trivia test for honor No. 10 as we await his official coronation into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

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    Kevin Youkilis isn't pleased after another strikeout in the sixth. The Sox fell out of first with a 7-1 loss to the Detroit Tigers Saturday at Comerica Park.

    Sox fall out of first with loss to Tigers

    Rick Porcello pitched brilliantly into the ninth inning, and the Detroit Tigers took over first place in the AL Central on Saturday with a 7-1 victory over the White Sox.Brennan Boesch hit a three-run homer and Austin Jackson drove in the other four runs for the Tigers, who lead the White Sox by a half-game in the Central. Detroit was six games out after a loss to the Cubs on June 12.

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    Members of law enforcement wearing body armor and helmets prepare to what ATF sources describe as a”water shot” in the apartment of alleged gunman James Holmes Saturday, July 21, 2012 in Aurora , Colo. The “water shot” is exploded and used to disrupt the device. Authorities reported that 12 died and more than three dozen people were shot during an assault at a movie theatre midnight premiere of “The Dark Knight Rises.”

    Residents evacuated while authorities secure Colorado shooting suspect’s apartment
    Authorities in Aurora, Colo., Saturday began to disarm explosive devices and trip wires "set up to kill" inside the apartment of the suspect in Friday's movie theater shooting that killed 12 people. Police, who first evacuated the building, were hoping to find clues about the motive without destroying possible evidence. Federal authorities detonated one small explosive

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    People mourn at a vigil, Friday, July 20, 2012 in Aurora, Colo. Authorities report that 12 died and more than three dozen people were shot during an assault at the theatre during a midnight premiere of “The Dark Knight.”

    Images from the Aurora, Colo., memorials
    Images from vigils and memorials for the victims in the Aurora, Colo. shooting where authorities report that 12 died and more than several dozen people were shot during an assault at the theater during a midnight premiere of "The Dark Knight Rises."

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    Adam Scott has never had a better chance to end that long wait for a major championship — mostly because of that long putter. Scott stayed in the game early with two key par saves, pulled away with three birdies around the turn and was solid at the end Saturday for a 2-under 68 that gave him a four-shot lead going into the final round at Royal Lytham & St. Annes.

    Scott takes 4-shot lead into Open final round

    Adam Scott has never had a better chance to end that long wait for a major championship — mostly because of that long putter. Scott stayed in the game early with two key par saves, pulled away with three birdies around the turn and was solid at the end Saturday for a 2-under 68 that gave him a four-shot lead going into the final round at Royal Lytham & St. Annes.

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    Associated Press/July 16, 2012 Men fish from boats on the first day of recreational salmon fishing in the Sacramento River near Sacramento, Calif.

    California to implement controversial water plan

    California Gov. Jerry Brown is set to reignite the state's water wars when he makes the long-awaited announcement next week about plans to build a massive twin tunnel system to carry water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to farmland and cities.

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    Republican U.S. Rep. Judy Biggert opposes Democrat Bill Foster in the 11th Congressional District in the November general election.

    Foster: Spirit of bipartisanship all but dead in Washington

    Bill Foster, the former Fermilab scientist and former Democratic congressman trying to unseat Republican Rep. Judy Biggert of Hinsdale, says that the spirit of bipartisanship has been all but "killed off" in Washington, D.C.

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    India’s Anirban Lahiri acknowledges applause Saturday from the gallery during day three of the 2012 Open Championship at Royal Lytham & St. Annes Golf Club, Lytham & St Annes. The 25-year-old Indian, making his Open debut, made the first hole in one of the 2012 tournament Saturday on the par-3 ninth hole from 150 yards.

    Lahiri makes first ace at this year’s British Open

    Anirban Lahiri , the 25-year-old Indian, making his Open debut, made the first hole in one of the 2012 tournament Saturday when he aced the par-3 No. 9 from 150 yards, the ball landing to the right of the cup and bouncing in.

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    Tony Robbins poses for a portrait Monday, July 26, 2010 in New York. Fire officials in California say at least 21 people were treated for burns after attendees of an event for motivational speaker Tony Robbins tried to walk on hot coals.

    At least 21 treated for burns after Tony Robbins event

    Fire officials in California say at least 21 people were treated for burns after attendees of an event for motivational speaker Tony Robbins tried to walk on hot coals.

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    Calls for gun control stir little support

    Gun control advocates sputter at their own impotence. The National Rifle Association is politically ascendant. And Barack Obama's White House pledges to safeguard the Second Amendment in its first official response to the deaths of at least 12 people in a mass shooting at a new Batman movie screening in suburban Denver.

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    The Aug. 16, 2012 file photo shows United States' Michael Phelps reacting after winning the gold medal in the men's 100-meter butterfly final during the swimming competitions in the National Aquatics Center at the Beijing 2008 Olympics in Beijing. Whether it's Chinese-made uniforms for American athletes, a tattoo inked on a runner's body or a miniature American flag that can't go on Phelps' swim cap, Olympians should have figured out one thing by now: What they can or cannot wear at the London Games has very little to do with their fashion, marketing sense or patriotism, and a whole lot to do with rules, regulations and, of course, money.

    What to wear all a matter of money at Olympics

    Olympians should have figured out one thing by now: What they can or cannot wear at the London Games has very little to do with their fashion, marketing sense or patriotism, and a whole lot to do with rules, regulations and, of course, money.

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    This image made from amateur video released by Shaam News Network and accessed by the Associated Press Saturday, July 21, purports to show the spread of fires as a result of the shelling of Homs, Syria by government forces on July 21.

    Activists report heavy fighting in Syria's Aleppo

    Syrian troops clashed with rebels in the city of Aleppo for a second day Saturday, forcing inhabitants to flee to safer areas in some of the fiercest fighting to date in a key bastion of support President Bashar Assad, activists said.

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    First Lady cancels Indy campaign fundraising stop

    First Lady Michelle Obama has canceled her weekend campaign fundraiser in Indianapolis following Friday's deadly shooting rampage at a Colorado movie theater.

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    Hammond removes eyesores, razes vacant properties

    Hammond, Ind., officials are cracking down on efforts to rid the city of dilapidated properties, demolishing more than 100 a year in the last four years.

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    In this Friday, Dec. 9, 2011 file photo, members of Saudi Arabia team take part in the opening ceremony of the pan-Arab Games at Sheikh Khalifa stadium in the Qatari capital Doha. These Middle Eastern countries have also only embraced women’s sports in the past decade, with Saudi Arabia and Qatar sending women to the Olympics for the first time this year.

    Gulf nations learning cash can’t always buy gold

    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — At a nearly empty stadium in Dubai, several dozen runners had gathered in a bid to clock qualifying times for the London OIympics.There were Africans runners stretching on the track and athletes from Europe mingling in the stands. Despite hosting the event, though, the United Arab Emirates was barely represented.

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    People stand in front of a tapestry map of the county of Warwickshire, where Shakespeare was brought up, dated about 1588, made for wealthy landowner Ralph Sheldon, during the press view of the “Shakespeare: staging the world” exhibition at the British Museum in London, Wednesday, July 18, 2012. The exhibition, which is being held as part of the London 2012 cultural Olympiad, provides a unique insight into the emerging role of London as a world city 400 years ago, seen through the innovative perspective of Shakespeare’s plays. It runs from July 19 to November 25.

    London’s Olympic summer has a Shakespearean flavor

    As the world comes to Britain for the Olympics, Britain is celebrating arguably its greatest gift to the world — the plays of William Shakespeare. Anyone who doubts that accolade for the playwright dead almost 400 years might want to go to the new "Shakespeare: Staging the World" exhibition at the British Museum, and look at the final exhibit, a well-worn, one-volume collection of...

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    Iona Mathis, 91, of Forest Lake holds a picture of distant relative Stephen A. Douglas with Abraham Lincoln.

    Forest Lake woman finds famous relatives, including Stephen Douglas

    Iona Mathis, a 91-year-old Forest Lake resident, has been researching her family history for about 25 years. Growing up in a poor, urban famil, with nine brothers and sisters, Mathis didn't learn much about her family's history. Sixty years later, she decided to start digging and learned that her ancestors, including Stephen A. Douglas and John Proctor, were critical parts of American history.

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    Margaret J. Clark

    Margaret Clark remembered for pride in Batavia

    Margaret Clark, wife and mother of the former owners of Avenue Chevrolet, longtime Batavia Park District business manager, volunteer at Bethany Lutheran Church, avid bridge player and golfer, has died at age 86.

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    An artist’s rendering shows how the new Metra station in Fox River Grove will look. Construction on the station itself is slated to begin around Sept. 1. Work has already started on extending the platforms.

    Work starts on modernizing Fox River Grove Metra stop

    While work got under way Thursday to expand an existing platform at the Fox River Grove Metra station, construction on a modernized station won't start until around Sept. 1, officials said.

Sports

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    James Buescher crosses the finish line to win the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series auto race at Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet Saturday.

    Buescher wins NASCAR Trucks at Chicagoland

    With James Buescher's truck losing power in the first half of the race, his crew made a quick decision: They'd have to come into the pits and replace their carburetor, even if cost them a few laps to the leaders. The decision left Buescher's crew under pressure to complete a less-than-routine repair that involved removing and reinstalling several small parts — all while wearing gloves to avoid burning their hands on a scalding hot engine. But they got it done in just a matter of minutes and Buescher did the rest, coming from two laps down to win the NASCAR Truck Series race at Chicagoland Speedway on Saturday night.

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    The Fire's Orr Brouch, right, takes the ball away from Aston Villa's Fabian Delph during the first half of a friendly soccer game on Saturday. Ashton Villa won 1-0.

    Aston Villa beats Fire 1-0 in friendly exhibition

    Gaby Agbonlahor scored in the 29th minute and then left with an injury in the second half as Aston Villa beat the Fire 1-0 in a friendly game on Saturday.

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    Cubs third baseman Ron Santo is shown in Scottsdale, Ariz., in 1971.

    Ron Santo finally gets his day in Cooperstown

    Ron Santo didn't live to experience what will be a special day today will be for his family as he is inducted into the Hall of Fame on Sunday. “It was unfortunate that he didn't receive that award while he was living, and he so much warranted it,” said former Cubs star Billy Williams, elected to the Hall in 1987. “He won't get the enjoyment (he would have if) he were living and walked up to that podium and received that award.”

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    Cubs starter Matt Garza was taken out after working three scoreless innings against the St. Louis Cardinals apparently due to an injury that wasn't obvious, prompting speculation that he had been traded.

    Garza leaves after 3 innings; cramping cited

    Starter Matt Garza was taken out after working three scoreless innings against the St. Louis Cardinals due to cramping in his right triceps. X-rays were negative.

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    David DeJesus misplays a ball hit by St. Louis Cardinals' Skip Schumaker in the seventh inning Saturday in St. Louis. The Cards scored 12 runs in the inning and the Cubs went on to lose

    Cardinals' record-tying 7th whips Cubs 12-0

    The St. Louis Cardinals totaled 15 runs in their six-game trip to open the second half. They threatened that total in a single inning against the Cubs. Jake Westbrook worked seven innings of three-hit ball and the Cardinals finally backed him — and then some — by tying a 76-year-old major league record with seven doubles in seventh inning of a 12-0 victory on Saturday night.

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    Mateo, Cougars roll 9-1

    DAYTON, Ohio — Danny Mateo delivered 2 home runs, including a 3-run shot in the fourth inning, as the Kane County Cougars dropped the Dayton Dragons 9-1 on Saturday night at Fifth Third Field. Mateo’s first blast gave the Cougars (49-49, 15-13) a 3-0 lead in the third, and it followed a solo homer from Tim Ferguson against Dayton starter Wes Mugarian (0-2).Earlier in the second inning, Michael Antonio doubled and scored on a Dean Espy double.In the fourth, the Cougars pulled away with 5 runs. Espy singled to start the inning and advanced to third on a Henry Moreno double.Kenny Swab lifted a sacrifice fly to center, scoring Espy. Moreno also scored thanks to a throwing error by shortstop Juan Perez.After Alex Llanos singled and Ferguson drew a free pass, Mateo drilled his second home run to make it 8-0.The Cougars picked up another run in the sixth when Ferguson grounded out to second, scoring Yowill Espinal.Dayton bagged its tally in the sixth against Kyle Smith (1-1) with Kyle Waldrop’s RBI single scoring Yorman Rodriguez.Smith struck out nine in 5 innings, while Mike Giovenco and Andrew Triggs combined for the final 10 outs.

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    White Sox general manager Kenny Williams made another in-season move Saturday, acquiring reliever Brett Myers from the Houston Astros.

    What do Williams’ moves mean in big picture for Sox?

    White Sox general manager Kenny Williams made another aggressive move Saturday. The question is whether his aggressiveness will translate into a playoff berth for a change.

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    Tigers ace Justin Verlander paces himself so that he’s at his very best in the later innings.

    How La Russa’s brilliance led to bullpen madness

    While he calls Tony LaRussa brilliant, Matt Spiegel contends the former MLB manager is responsible for more harm than good when it comes to how bullpens are used today. LaRussa had a perfect system when he was with the Oakland Athletics, and too many teams have tried to copy it without success. Spiegel explains in this week's baseball column.

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    Bradley Wiggins all but sealed the Tour de France title Saturday, capturing the final time trial with a commanding show of authority.

    Bradley Wiggins all but clinches Tour de France

    Bradley Wiggins all but sealed the Tour de France title Saturday, capturing the final time trial with a commanding show of authority. The Team Sky leader obliterated the pack in the 33-mile ride from Bonneval to Chartres and punched the air as he crossed the Stage 19 finish line. He is set to become the first Briton to win cycling's most prestigious race when the three-week ride ends Sunday in Paris with a largely ceremonial ride onto the Champs-Elysees.

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    Lovie Smith kicks off his ninth training camp as head coach Thursday at Olivet Nazarene University.

    Big expectations for this Bears team

    There’s no ignoring the buzz surrounding the Bears as they prepare to embark upon their ninth training camp under coach Lovie Smith beginning with Thursday’s opening practice at Olivet Nazarene University. But there are issues that must be addressed before Super Bowl reservations are made.

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    Chicagoland Speedway is about the closest thing Danica Patrick has to a home track in NASCAR. Although the 1.5-mile oval on the outskirts of Chicago's southwest suburbs didn't play a part in her early racing career — it didn't open until 2001 — it's only about 100 miles away from her hometown of Rockford.

    Patrick hopes for another good run at Chicagoland

    Chicagoland Speedway is about the closest thing Danica Patrick has to a home track in NASCAR. Although the 1.5-mile oval on the outskirts of Chicago's southwest suburbs didn't play a part in her early racing career — it didn't open until 2001 — it's only about 100 miles away from her hometown of Rockford.

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    The Houston Astros trader pitcher Brett Myers to the Chicago White Sox for two minor league pitchers and a player to be named. Houston receives right-hander Matt Heidenreich and left-hander Blair Walters.

    White Sox trade 3 to get Houston closer Myers

    The White Sox found some veteran help for the bullpen Saturday as they completed a trade for Houston Astros closer Brett Myers. The Sox, however, had to give up three players in return, and take on the $12 million salary of Myers, who was successful in 19 of 20 save opportunities this season. To get the 6-foot-4 right-hander, the Sox also gave up right-handed pitcher Matt Heidenreich, left-handed pitcher Blair Walters and a player to be named later.

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    White Sox’ Morel updates his progress

    On the disabled list since mid-May with a bad back, White Sox third baseman Brent Morel started abother rehab assignment Friday night - this time with Class A Winston-Salem..

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    For White Sox, bullpen help not easy to find

    The White Sox lost to the Tigers 4-2 Friday night, and they lost another game in the AL Central standings. The Sox have a lot of problems at the moment, and frequent blowups in the bullpen top the list.

Business

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    Associated Press The 2013 Ford Escape.

    Manufacturing problem caused Ford Escape recall

    A manufacturing problem at a company that makes fuel lines forced Ford to recall thousands of its brand-new Escape small SUVs and tell owners to stop driving them right away.

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    Marissa Mayer is Yahoo’s next CEO, the fifth in five years.

    Can Marissa Mayer save Yahoo?

    One evening in the spring of 1999, Marissa Mayer got a recruiting email from a tiny search company. “I was in a long-distance relationship at the time, so I was pathetically eating a bad bowl of pasta in my dorm room by myself on a Friday night,” she once told me. Mayer was then a computer science graduate student at Stanford, and she’d been getting bombarded with offers from some of the world’s biggest tech firms. “I remember I’d told myself, ‘New emails from recruiters — just hit delete.’ “But Mayer found Google interesting. She’d heard about the firm from one of her professors, and her graduate work — she’d been building a recommendation algorithm for Web pages — meshed with the company’s technological aims.On the day Mayer interviewed at Google, the company only had seven employees. Most of them were software engineers, and all of the engineers were men. Google’s founders, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, saw that Mayer would fit right in to the geeky boys’ club (during the interview, they all chatted about a data-analysis method known as k-means clustering), and they quickly offered her a job. Mayer, though, wasn’t instantly sold.“I had to think really hard about how to choose between job offers,” she said. Mayer approached the choice analytically. Over spring break, she studied the most successful choices in her life to figure out what they had in common.“I looked across very diverse decisions — everything from deciding where to go to school, what to major in, how to spend your summers — and I realized that there were two things that were true about all of them,” she said. “One was, in each case, I’d chosen the scenario where I got to work with the smartest people I could find. . . . And the other thing was I always did something that I was a little not ready to do. In each of those cases, I felt a little overwhelmed by the option. I’d gotten myself in a little over my head.”After weighing her options, Mayer chose Google. After an amazingly successful 13 years with the company, where she oversaw the look and feel of some of the company’s most high-profile products, she’s decided to move on. This week, Mayer announced that she’s going to become the new CEO of Yahoo. (She also revealed that she’s pregnant.)Deciding to lead Yahoo certainly is in line with Mayer’s second requirement for successful decisions — she’s got to feel more than a little overwhelmed by taking on the Web’s most chronically troubled company. The problem has to do with the first of Mayer’s life-choice criteria. Though a lot of smart people have moved through its ranks in the past — and certainly many brilliant people still work there — Yahoo has never been the smartest company in tech.Yahoo’s problem in recent years has been that it’s never been the best at anything. Rather than trying to define itself, the company has flitted from one new Web fad to another. First it was an online directory, then a search engine, then a portal, then a media company, then briefly a Web 2.0 social-networking juggernaut, then a social-powered media company — and for the last couple years, it’s been all of those things at once. Its fortunes waxed and waned with the ad market and the particular interests of its many leaders, but Yahoo never found an answer to the first question any company has to answer: Why do we exist? What problem are we trying to solve? If she wants to attract the tech world’s smartest people to Yahoo, Mayer first has to figure out what it should do.

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    China’s population of Internet users, already the world’s biggest, has risen to 538 million, driven by rapid growth in wireless Web surfing, an industry group said.

    China’s online population rises to 538 million

    China's population of Internet users, already the world's biggest, has risen to 538 million, driven by rapid growth in wireless Web surfing, an industry group said.

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    Next Issue, a new iPad app offering unlimited access to a growing number of well-known titles for a single monthly fee. Despite its cost, and some significant limitations, many avid readers will find it a godsend.

    iPad serves all-you-can-eat magazine banquet

    Next Issue, a new iPad app offering unlimited access to a growing number of well-known titles for a single monthly fee. Despite its cost, and some significant limitations, many avid readers will find it a godsend.

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    Report: New iPhone to have thinner screen

    A published report says the new iPhone will have a thinner screen. That could leave more room for a larger battery.

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    Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt speaks Tuesday, July 17, 2012, during the Illicit Networks Forces in Opposition conference organized by Google Inc.ís think tank Google Ideas, in partnership with the Council of Foreign Relations, in Westlake Village, Calif. Google wants to take on Mexico’s powerful drug cartels, offering technological solutions to a grinding drug war that has horrified the country for the past six years.

    Google tries to help stop human traffickers, drug cartels

    Google has been quietly turning its search capabilities to something far more challenging: criminals. Drug cartels, money launderers and human traffickers run their sophisticated operations online — and Google Ideas, Google Inc.'s think tank, is working with the Council on Foreign Relations and other organizations to look for ways to use technology to disrupt international crime.

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    “Sunshine” and “princess” were among the top 10 base words used to create aboout 400,000 Yahoo Mail passwords.

    The most common passwords from the Yahoo mail leak

    We learned last week that about 400,000 Yahoo Mail passwords were apparently leaked. Another annoying bit of news for those who struggle to come up with new secret codes. More interesting are the most frequently used "base words" to create passwords.

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    In this July 13, 2011 photo, Samsung's new Chromebook laptop is shown, in Atlanta. Ga. The laptop offers a new approach in portable computing. It presents all of the user's experience, from websites to apps to gaming to productivity tools, through Google's Chrome browser and underlying Linux-based operating system. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

    Review: Internet-focused alternative in Chrome PCs

    Two new computers running Google's Chrome operating system are looking to lure people to a browser-based environment. Both target light-duty computer users who don't need the full range of capabilities that traditional Windows and Mac computers provide. The first thing to know about these machines is they lack regular hard drives for storage.

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    Report: States’ financial woes likely to worsen

    U.S. states face long-term budget burdens that are already limiting their ability to pay for basic services such as police, local schools and transportation, a report says.

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    A new study finds that YouTube is emerging as a major platform for news, one to which viewers increasingly turn for eyewitness videos in times of major events and natural disasters.

    Study: Viewers turning to YouTube as news source

    A new study has found that YouTube has become a major platform for news, one where viewers are turning for eyewitness videos in times of major events and natural disasters. The Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism study found that while viewership for TV news still easily outpaces those consuming news on YouTube, the video-sharing site is a growing digital environment where professional journalism mingles with citizen content.

Life & Entertainment

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    “American Idol” winner and Mt. Prospect native Lee DeWyze married model/actress Jonna Walsh in a “vintage-inspired” ceremony Saturday in California, according to People magazine.

    'Idol' winner DeWyze of Mt. Prospect gets married

    "American Idol" winner and Mt. Prospect native Lee DeWyze married model/actress Jonna Walsh Saturday in California, according to People magazine. Walsh walked down the aisle to song titled "Who Would Have Known," which DeWyze penned for the occasion. "It's a personal song that will be on my next album," DeWyze told the magazine.

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    Candles, flowers and a Batman figure are shown at a memorial Saturday in Aurora, Colo. Twelve people were killed and dozens were injured in a shooting attack early Friday at the packed theater during a showing of the Batman movie, “The Dark Knight Rises.” The shooting has moviegoers and movie theaters worried about the long-standing tradition of midnight movies. Some people are reconsidering going to midnight showings, and AMC has banned costumes and face-covering masks.

    Essay: Midnight movie safety has been shaken

    Midnight movies are supposed to be fun. They're supposed to be giddy gatherings of the most excited fans who can't wait to have the images flicker across their faces first — whether it's at a 12:01 a.m. showing of a wildly anticipated blockbuster or infamous schlock that's achieved a cult following and is best viewed during the weird, wee hours. That thrill was shattered early Friday morning when a man unleashed his arsenal upon an audience at the first showing of the hotly awaited new Batman movie, "The Dark Knight Rises," at a theater in Aurora, Colo., killing at least 12 and injuring 58 others.

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    Actress Nicole Kidman poses for photographers during a photo call for “Hemingway & Gellhorn” in Cannes, France, on May 25. At the London Olympics, Kidman is expected at a launch party July 28, while a space-themed bash on Aug. 2 will feature American astronauts Buzz Aldrin, Gene Cernan and Tom Stafford.

    Celebrities descend on London for Olympic parties

    The athletes and the Olympic torch have arrived in London — and so has the party. For those keener on celebrity-spotting or dancing the night away than medal counting, the British host city has plenty of action to offer during games time. Away from the track and field, Hollywood royalty such as Brangelina and Nicole Kidman will be rubbing shoulders with diplomats and businessmen at the city's glitziest clubs and grandest historic buildings.

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    Russian baritone Evgeny Nikitin poses at a hotel in Berlin on June 9. Nikitin, who was due to sing the lead role in Richard Wagner’s “The Flying Dutchman” when the annual Bayreuth opera festival opens next week, has withdrawn from the event after it emerged that he once had Nazi-related symbols tattooed on his body. Festival organizers said Saturday that Nikitin made his decision amid questions from a German newspaper on the significance of some of his tattoos.

    Russian quits German festival over Nazi tattoos
    A Russian baritone who was due to sing the lead role in Richard Wagner's "The Flying Dutchman" when the Bayreuth opera festival opens next week withdrew from the event Saturday after it emerged that he once had Nazi-related symbols tattooed on his body. "It was a major mistake in my life, and I wish I had never done it," he said.

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    Actor Fred Willard, who starred in such films as “Best in Show” and “Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy,” was arrested in a Hollywood theater July 18 on suspicion of engaging in a lewd act, police said Wednesday.

    PBS says it had to move fast after Fred Willard arrest

    PBS President Paula Kerger said Saturday that the decision to remove Fred Willard as narrator of the new public TV series "Market Warriors" had to be made quickly. Willard's lewd conduct arrest last week prompted concern that the "unfortunate circumstances" would distract from the show that debuted last week, Kerger said.

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    Casey Simmons checks the engine cowl work at the Memphis Belle restoration at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. The most celebrated American aircraft to emerge from the great war rests these days in a cavernous hangar at a southern Ohio Air Force base undergoing a loving and fastidious restoration.

    (No heading)
    your time

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    Puerto Rico is luring TV and film crews to the island with tax breaks. Episodes for Showtime’s The Big C” have been filmed there.

    Puerto Rico woos Hollywood with more tax breaks

    SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Puerto Rico’s governor has signed another package of tax breaks aimed at luring more Hollywood film crews to the Caribbean island.Gov. Luis Fortuno says the additional incentives will make the U.S. island territory among the most attractive locales for film production crews. The incentives will provide film studio tax credits for money spent on non-resident actors, writers, directors and other talent. Previous legislation already created tax credits for hiring Puerto Rican residents.Many U.S. states have similar programs to entice film crews. Fortuno says incentives in place since March 2011 have resulted in about 30 productions coming to the island, generating about $80 million in investment. Recent examples include television episodes for Showtime’s “The Big C” and the movie “Runner, Runner” with Ben Affleck and Justin Timberlake.

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    In this July 2007 file photo, actor David Hasselhoff attends the NBC All-Star Party in Beverly Hills, Calif. Hasselhoff flashes a dreamy smile and displays a lean tank top-clad torso in giant photo cutouts that his fans apparently can’t leave alone. About 550 of the cutouts of Hasselhoff were stolen from outside Cumberland Farms convenience stores in recent weeks. Cumberland brand strategy specialist Kate Ngo says only about 20 remain for the roughly 570 stores in New England and Florida.

    Giant Hasselhoff ads too tempting for thieves

    Actor David Hasselhoff flashes a dreamy smile and displays a lean tank top-clad torso in giant photo cutouts that his fans apparently can't leave alone. About 550 of the cutouts were stolen from outside Cumberland Farms convenience stores in recent weeks.

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    In this image taken on Sept. 25, 2006, a Pakistani boy arranges dishes of fruits and other items for Muslims to break their first fast at a local mosque in Karachi, Pakistan. During Ramadan observant Muslims refrain during daylight hours from eating, drinking and smoking.

    Celebrating Ramadan with a world of flavors

    What’s on the table for Ramadan? Plenty.If you were expecting kebabs and more kebabs, think again. Food served during the Islamic observance is as diverse as the Muslim world itself. Ramadan, which lasts one month and falls on July 20 this year, focuses on spirituality and inner reflection, with observers fasting from just before sunrise to sunset.The structure of Ramadan (ninth month of the Islamic lunar calendar) is fairly simple. Two main meals are eaten, often with the family and with friends — “suhoor” before dawn, and “iftar” just after sundown. During the day, observers take in nothing — no food or water — although there are exceptions for people who can’t maintain the fast for health or other reasons.The month ends with Eid-ul-Fitr (eed-ull-fitter), sometimes a big feast and other times a more humble affair, where friends and family often get together to share food and celebrate.Observant Muslims are required to eat food that is “halal,” meaning it meets Islamic dietary guidelines for what is permissible. Other than that, the food served is dictated by culture and preference. And that can vary widely. In Morocco, one might eat lentil soups, in India, curry, and in Indonesia, kolak, a fruit dessert.One thing just about every Ramadan meal has in common is dates. Most observers break their fast with dates because this is what the prophet Muhammad did. (According to Muslim beliefs, Ramadan is when the Quran, the Muslim scripture, was first revealed to Muhammad.) Observers usually are eager to offer each other dates to break the fast as a gesture of good will and to aid fellow worshippers in breaking the fast.Another benefit to dates is they’re an excellent way to restore blood sugars.“Whether you’re from Senegal or Detroit, you’ll try to break your fast with dates,” says Yvonne Maffei, a food writer and recipe developer who publishes the website www.myhalalkitchen.com. “It’s just something Muslims hold very dear.”Meals often start with a crunchy appetizer, perhaps a samosa in Pakistan or an egg roll in China, then move on to soups; people don’t typically jump into meat dishes, though they likely will be served at some point during the meal.“Whether you’re Chinese Muslim or American Muslim you’re going to have meat on the table because it’s considered important to feed and nourish your guests. This is a time to show exceptional hospitality to your fasting guests,” says Maffei.In the United States, food choices are even broader, with traditions from different cultures often finding a place on the same buffet.“It’s just becoming very interesting as these children of immigrants who’ve come from Muslim countries with different flavor profiles, different preferences — have begun mixing and replacing many foods, doing a lot of fun things and that’s changing the landscape of our table during Ramadan,” says Maffei. “Buffets look very different than they did 10 years ago.”For Maffei, who is of Italian and Puerto Rican heritage and is married to a man of Mexican and Italian descent, Ramadan means taking old family favorites, like pasta and meatballs, and reworking them.Since halal, or what is permissible, dictates that no pork or alcohol be in the food, the ground pork in meatballs is replaced with veal and there’s no wine in the sauce.To someone who’s never tried it, the ritual of Ramadan may sound daunting. It’s hard to go all day without food, let alone water, and the hours are a challenge, too. But at the same time, bonds are formed as observers get on the same schedule of living for a month. “People embrace it, love it,” says Maffei. “Even though it may sound very difficult, I’ve never heard anyone say, `I don’t like Ramadan.”’A sampling of foods that might be served during Ramadan around the world:Pakistan: Samosas, chole (chickpea curry), rice with lamb, chicken or goat.Morocco: Lentil soups, egg rollsSenegal: Lamb stew

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    This Sept. 15, 2011 file photo shows British model Georgia May Jagger arriveing for the Rimmel party in central London. Jagger is the new spokesmodel for Material Girl, the collection designed by Madonna and her daughter Lola.

    Georgia May Jagger adjusts to life in pictures

    Give Georgia May Jagger a photo of herself and she'll find the one little thing wrong with it. But as she develops her modeling career, the 20-year-old says she's getting better at accepting these things and, honestly, getting better at her job.

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    This Feb. 14, 2012 file photo shows fesigner Sophie Theallet walks onto the runway after showing the Sophie Theallet Fall 2012 collection during Fashion Week in New York. Theallet won the U.S. division of the International Woolmark Prize this week and will go on to compete in the international contest against regional winners in China, Australia, India and Europe in February. The Woolmark contest promotes excellence in knitwear, especially using merino wool. Lagerfeld and Saint Laurent won in the 1950s.

    Fashion designer Theallet wins knitwear prize

    Could Sophie Theallet be on her way to becoming the next Yves Saint Laurent or Karl Lagerfeld? She took a step forward this week, winning the U.S. division of the International Woolmark Prize, and the $100,000 that goes with it. Her competition included Bibhu Mohapatra, Naeem Khan and Prabal Gurung.

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    After calling it quits twice, Squeeze mainstays Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford are back together again, opening for the B-52s.

    ’80s pop band ‘Squeeze’ has the juice again

    Pop songs are variously about falling in love, breaking up and/or getting back together again. That pretty much sums up the ongoing history of Squeeze, the British band that delighted fans with such songs such as "Pulling Mussels (From the Shell)," "Up the Junction" and "Black Coffee in Bed." After calling it quits twice, mainstays Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford are back together again, opening for the B-52s.

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    “Today” show co-host Savannah Guthrie appears on the set during a broadcast, in New York. Nielsen says NBC’s “Today” was beaten last week by ABC archrival “Good Morning America” by 357,000 viewers

    ‘Today’ and new co-host fall to ‘GMA’ in Week 1

    A majority of morning viewers has greeted the arrival of Savannah Guthrie with a yawn in her first week as "Today" show co-anchor. NBC's "Today" was beaten last week by ABC archrival "Good Morning America" by 357,000 viewers, the Nielson Co. said.

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    Hikers pause on the trail to Numa Ridge in the North Fork, a remote section of the park.

    Glacier Park's North Fork a rewarding journey for the 'self-reliant'

    Many of the people who go to Montana's Glacier Park in the summer see it only through a windshield as they travel Going-to-the-Sun Road, the winding, 50-mile blacktop through forests, past sweeping alpine expanses, along the shores of glacial lakes and over the Continental Divide at 6,646 feet. But for those wanting to unwrap the gifts of Glacier and environs differently, the North Fork is hard to beat.

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    Terri Hunt, Realtor with RE/MAX Suburban, said she had the busiest spring since 2008, and expects the market to pick up again next month.

    Best showing plus right pricing equaled quick sales this spring

    Terri Hunt is optimistic about the housing market in the Chicago area. The realtor with Re/MAX Suburban in Schaumburg had a very busy spring — the best since 2008.

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    This is a classy home, fit to house the Huxtables of ‘The Cosby Show.’

    Home in Kildeer’s Prairie Creek subdivision

    This magnificently appointed custom brick and stone home in Kildeer's Prairie Creek subdivision has everything you could want, from a theater room, wine cellar and large recreation area in the walkout basement to a travertine foyer, gourmet kitchen and spacious main level living spaces with what seems like acres of hardwood floors.

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    Condo Talk: Snowplow contract considerations

    Record breaking temperatures aside, arrangements must soon be made for the removal of the snow that will make this year's summer a distant memory. Today's column will focus on some of the issues that should be addressed in a contract for snow removal in an association.

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    Muntu Dance Theatre performs at Millennium Park's Harris Theater for Music and Dance in Chicago on Saturday, July 21.

    Weekend picks Saturday: African dance performance

    Muntu Dance Theatre explores the future of African and African-American dance as part of its new voices/new vistas summer gala and concert at Millennium Park's Harris Theater for Music and Dance in downtown Chicago. Also check out, the Wheaton Band Festival featuring a wide selection of bands performing at Memorial Park.

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    Reverse mortgage defaults meet the industry at the crossroads

    Home Equity Conversion Mortgages (HECMs) are FHA-insured reverse mortgages that allow homeowners 62 years of age or older to withdraw cash from their home while retaining the right to live there until they die, sell the home or move out of it permanently.

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    Landlords can only deduct certain expenses from income taxes

    Q. We bought a house in January. What bills can be deducted from our income tax next year? Our costs are down payment, closing fee, mortgage insurance, house insurance, taxes (included in mortgage payment), water and trash bills. We are renting the house out. We installed a new furnace right after we bought the house.

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    William Baffin roses are in the Canadian Explorer series of blackspot-resistant varieties.

    Out, spot: how to combat blackspot on roses

    If it's your rose bush rather than your dog that you're calling "spot," then it's time for action. And getting rid of blackspot, the disease that's maring your roses, need not mean dowsing the plant with chemicals.

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    Improper insulating can cause fires

    Q. You have written that it is not possible to insulate over older knob-and-tube wiring in walls and attics. But many states have adopted amendments to NEC 324.4 to allow for exactly this practice.

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    The Greek key pattern has moved out of its safety zone of fabrics and into the world of furniture, such as this Trina Turk pillow.

    Greek key design appearing everywhere from furniture to pillows

    It sounds too good to be true: A design element that works in traditional and modern, casual and formal. But that's exactly what the Greek key motif does. "It's a very classic symbol that represents unity by displaying an eternal band that doesn't end," says Laura Casey, an interior designer based in Charlotte, N.C.

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    Beacon Pointe subdivision is a family-oriented neighborhood in Hoffman Estates. This home is on Bonita Lane.

    Beacon Point offers sense of community for families

    Two years ago, Reena and Arun Paul sought a family home in a culturally diverse, friendly community in Hoffman Estates. With a 17-month-old son, they also wanted a neighborhood where families with young children lived. Beacon Pointe in Hoffman Estates offered that and more.

Discuss

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    Balloons are released Saturday, July 21, 2012, at a vigil at Gateway High School in Aurora, Colo., for AJ Boik, who was a student at the school and who was killed along with 11 others when a gunman opened fire in a movie theater.

    Editorial: Murder in a Colorado movie theater

    A Daily Herald editorial asks, what are the lessons from a sudden, random act of horror?

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    The Soapbox
    Daily Herald editors offer thoughts on the new Jeanine Nicarico Children's Advocacy Center, exercising in the heat and the finals of Suburban Chicago's Got Talent, among other items.

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    Cut off federal aid to fix system
    What in the world is going on? From the storm repair contractors trying to talk you into scamming the insurance companies for new siding or roofs, to the teacher administrators getting free lunches designed for the poor, for their own kids, to the former mayor of Chicago padding his pension by $50,000 a year by listing himself as a state employee, to the doctors scamming Medicare to the tune of billions, to food stamp recipients who don’t need or deserve them, to teachers padding their pensions over the last few years of working, to union leaders buying lucrative contracts from the politicians, it seems just about everyone or anyone is scamming the system. These people are no better than the petty thieves that rob or steal from the innocents. As a result, the state and cities are broke, and worse yet, as a result of being broke, criminals are not being charged, or are let out of prison early, essential services are not being met, people’s lives are being risked so that state union retirees can bask is the sunshine of Florida. It is about time we face facts, and the fact is too many people have corrupted the system. All state and federal aide should be cut off until we can devise a way to correct the problems, otherwise the innocent people will continue to be stolen from not only by the petty thieves but by those who run the corrupt system that they themselves have corrupted. Martin J UttichCarol Stream

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    Duff lucky to get heart surgery now
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Timing is everything, Mr. Hufnagel. If we were under Obamacare, you most certainly would not have been permitted to have your heart valve replacement surgery. The government panels would have decided that you were, in fact, too old to have any such thing. You would have been advised to enjoy your next six months.

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    Concealed carry puts public at risk
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: What gun advocates simply do not understand is that when a loaded handgun is carried onto a public street or into a public park or establishment, it simply is no longer a private matter, but rather a very public one.

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    Walsh simply doesn’t respect Duckworth
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: Does he respect women and family by not paying child support to his first family until it went to court or on his voting record?

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    Walsh right about Duckworth’s comments
    A letter to the editor: Was she chosen by a political machine over other veterans that also suffer with combat-inflicted disabilities both visible and unseen? That is obvious.

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    GOP has rid itself of moderates
    An Elgin letter to the editor: The Republican Party has gone so far to the right that it has not only halfway destroyed the middle class but has rid itself of any moderate members. Once again it has allied itself with the religious right.

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    Healthcare act costs me more
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: I was diagnosed with breast cancer one year before The Affordable Care Act was put in place and I can tell you that my financial obligation for medical bills was far less before The Affordable Care Act was put in place than after. It costs me more now than ever for medical coverage.

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    Using religion to justify intolerance
    A West Dundee letter to the editor: Over the last few months the Daily Herald has printed numerous letters on gay marriages. Nearly all of those who write opposing gay marriages start talking about Christian, or Judeo-Christian opposition to gay marriages.I'm tired of people using their religion to hide behind their intolerance.

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