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Daily Archive : Sunday July 15, 2012

News

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    19-year-old drowns in Antioch lake

    A 19-year-old Antioch man drowned in Homer White Lake in Antioch Saturday night, according to the Lake County coroner's office.Daniel Villalobos-Barajas, who lived less than a block from the lake, was pronounced dead at the scene once a rescue team pulled his body from the water at about 10:15 p.m., said Lake County Coroner Artis Yancey.

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    Power restored in Arlington Heights

    Power has been restored to about 800 people who lost power Sunday night in Arlington Heights. More than 850 ComEd customers in Arlington Heights lost power at about 9:35 p.m. Sunday, ComEd officials said. But power was turned on before 11 p.m., they said.

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    Glorie Iaccarino of East Moline poses with part of her collection of environmental art pieces.

    East Moline woman promotes eco-art

    Glorie Iaccarino, of East Moline, loves art, nature, children and making art more accessible to people of all ages. The passionate artist is combining all those interests in a new group she helped form — Eco Arts Council of the Quad Cities. Its first project is based on a successful initiative called "Papergirl," which has been done in several cities around the world.

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    In this Dec. 14, 1995, file photo, Robert Wright, president and chief executive officer of NBC, speaks in New York with Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates, displayed on screen, speaks from Hong Kong, during a news conference announcing that NBC and Microsoft would form a joint venture to start a cable news channel and related online service called MSNBC. Microsoft is pulling out of the joint venture that owned MSNBC.com so it can build its own online news service. The breakup, announced late Sunday, dissolves the final shred of a 16-year marriage between Microsoft Corp. and NBC News, which is now owned by Comcast Corp.

    Microsoft, NBC dissolve MSNBC.com joint venture

    Microsoft is pulling out of the joint venture that owned MSNBC.com, freeing the world's largest software maker to build its own online news service. The breakup announced late Sunday dissolves the final shreds of a 16-year marriage between Microsoft Corp. and NBC News, which is now owned by Comcast Corp. The relationship began to unwind in 2005 when Microsoft sold its stake in MSNBC's cable TV...

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    In this photo combo, at left, in an Oct. 8, 2011 file photo, Penn State president Graham Spanier walks on the field before an NCAA college football game in State College, Pa. At right, former Penn State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky leaves the Centre County Courthouse in custody after being found guilty of multiple charges of child sexual abuse in Bellefonte, Pa., June 22. National campus safety experts say such problems reporting crimes on campus spread far beyond Penn State, even as the U.S. Department of Education has stepped up enforcement in recent years and teamed up with the FBI on some inquiries.

    Penn State report shows limits of campus crime law

    For more than two decades, colleges and universities have been required to publicly share details of campus crimes and report murders, rapes, robberies, arson and other serious offenses to the federal government. That requirement was apparently unheeded by former Penn State President Graham Spanier, other top officials and the larger ranks of university employees responsible for student safety,...

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    Man dies in crash on I-94 near Gurnee

    A 64-year-old Gurnee man was killed in a single vehicle crash on Interstate 94 Sunday morning, according to police. Authorities said the man suffered a heart attack, and veered off the road into a light pole and a number of trees.

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    Members of the Addison Park District’s Polish dance group perform Sunday during International Day at Glendale Heights Fest at Camera Park.

    Carnival a hit during final day of Glendale Heights Fest

    Families flocked to the carnival rides on Sunday, the final day for this year's Glendale Heights Fest at Camera Park. In addition to all the rides, the fest included plenty of food, live music, fireworks, an "American Idol"-style singing competition and an international fashion show Sunday.

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    A drummer salutes the home of a World War II veteran during the “Pearls of our Community” parade in West Chicago on Sunday. The parade was among the highlights of the 40th annual Railroad Days festival, which started Thursday.

    Local ‘pearls’ get spotlight at West Chicago parade

    West Chicago residents paid tribute Sunday to "Pearls of Our Community" during the annual Railroad Days Parade, which spotlighted local community organizations.

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    Competitors line up in the 13 and younger division of the Ice Cream Eating Contest during Sunday’s Windmill City Festival at the Riverwalk in downtown Batavia. The contest was followed by a fire hose challenge, giving participants multiple chances to cool off on the hot day.

    Brain freeze never felt so good in Batavia

    Batavia residents found multiple ways to cool off on a hot Sunday afternoon during the Windmill City Festival. The day's events included an ice cream eating contest and a fire hose challenge.

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    Deer Park to host jazz festival

    Jazz legend Judy Roberts will bring her quartet to Deer Park Town Center Aug. 11 to headline the Jazz Patio Festival from noon to 5 p.m. The festival will feature four Chicagoland jazz groups and seating in a garden setting.

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    Barrington firefighters ratify three-year contract

    Barrington officials expect to sign a new three-year contract with their firefighters' union Monday night. The contract, which is retroactive to May 1, would grant raises of 1.5 percent this year, 2 percent in May 2013 and 2 percent in May 2014.

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    Rollins Road crossing to close

    The railroad crossing on Rollins Road just west of Route 83 in Round Lake Beach will be closed for repairs for about a week beginning at 8 a.m. Tuesday, July 17.

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    Hawthorn expansion to be discussed

    The proposed $40 million to $50 million expansion and remodeling of the Westfield Hawthorn shopping center, routes 21 and 60, in Vernon Hills will be the topic of a joint meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 17.

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    Shih Tzu Shuffle in Vernon Hills

    [No Paragraph Style]NewsNews for digestsNew Beginning Shih Tzu Rescue is hosting the fourth annual Shih Tzu Shuffle from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 21 at Deerpath Park, near Warrington Road and Elm Tree Lane, Vernon Hills.

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    In this citizen journalism image taken on Friday, and provided by Edlib News Network ENN, Free Syrian Army soldiers aim their weapons in Idlib province, northern Syria.

    Red Cross declares Syrian conflict to be civil war

    Syria's 16-month bloodbath crossed an important symbolic threshold Sunday as the international Red Cross formally declared the conflict a civil war, a status with implications for potential war crimes prosecutions. The Red Cross statement came as U.N. observers gathered new details on what happened in a village where dozens were reported killed in a regime assault.

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    President Barack Obama delivers remarks during a campaign event Saturday at Centreville High School in Clifton, Va. Obama says he won’t apologize for attacking Mitt Romney’s time at a private equity firm.

    Obama says no apology to Romney over Bain attacks

    Mitt Romney's campaign said Sunday that President Barack Obama is willing to say anything to win a second term and should say he's sorry for attacks on the Republican's successful career at a private equity firm. "No, we will not apologize," the president responded, adding that if Romney wants credit for his business leadership, he also needs to take responsibility.

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    Construction crews work outside the Olympic Stadium Sunday as preparations continue for the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. At left is the Orbit.

    Much work to do before London is Olympic ready

    Shades of Athens, where chronic delays pushed workers to the brink to complete preparations in time for the games to start in 2004? Hardly, say London organizers who have prided themselves on finishing their massive construction project ahead of time and on budget. Things may look a bit messy now, they say, but all will be fine by the time the curtain goes up, on July 27, when the torch is lit.

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    Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, left, and Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, crew members of the mission to the International Space Station, ISS, gesture prior the launch of Soyuz-FG rocket Sunday at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan.

    Russian rocket launches on mission to space station

    A Russian Soyuz craft launched into the morning skies over Kazakhstan on Sunday, carrying three astronauts on their way to the International Space Station, where they will quickly start preparing for a frenzy of incoming traffic. NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Russian cosmonaut Yury Malenchenko and Japan's Akihito Hoshide are set to travel two days before reaching their three colleagues already...

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    Governors put off health care questions, for now

    More than two weeks after the Supreme Court gave the green light to President Obama's signature legislative achievement, many governors from both parties said they haven't decided how their states will proceed on two parts under their control: an expansion of Medicaid, expected to extend coverage to roughly 15 million low-income people, and new insurance exchanges, projected to help an additional...

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    Owners of quarter horses in the Midwest region have come to races at Poker de Ases Ranch and Training Center in Union for more than two years, much to the dismay of several neighbors. The races are banned for a year while officials decide how to regulate horse events through the a new ordinance.

    McHenry County horse events under scrutiny

    Sunday afternoon horse races that have become beloved entertainment for spectators and a hated source of noise for neighbors are the first McHenry County events to be banned by the Planning and Development department in more than a decade. In a county more used to dressage shows than quarter horse races, officials must decide how to regulate activity that has drawn opposition from a vocal few.

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    The stolen car sits on small transport trailer as it is delivered to Robert Russell ‘s home in Texas.

    Man spots car on eBay 42 years after theft

    A man whose prized sports car was stolen 42 years ago recovered the vehicle after spotting it on eBay, authorities said Sunday. Robert Russell told the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department that he had never given up searching for the 1967 Austin Healy after it was stolen from his Philadelphia home in 1970.

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    Text of ex-slave’s letter to his former master

    The famed letter written by an ex-slave in response to his former master's request that he return to the plantation, soon after the end of the Civil War.

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    The parsonage at First United Methodist Church in West Dundee is the subject of debate. Preservationists want the historic building saved and spiffed up. But church leaders want it razed and turned into a parking lot.

    Officials losing patience with church over parsonage

    West Dundee authorities have waited months for leadership at First United Methodist Church to respond to their latest proposal, which outlines a plan to save a historically significant, but crumbling parsonage on the church's property. But because they've mostly gotten silence in return, the village's patience has finally run out.

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    Fatumata Djalo on May 22 stands in her shared room at the House of Mothers, where women with high-risk pregnancies can wait out the final weeks under medical supervision on the grounds of the regional hospital in Gabu, Guinea-Bissau. Women sleep three to a room, and the House of Mothers, like the hospital, has no electricity. But access to the hospital’s trained midwives can make the difference between life and death for a mother or her baby. In Guinea-Bissau, one of the deadliest places in the world to give birth, a woman has a 1 in 19 chance of maternal death, compared with about 1 in 2,100 in the United States. Experts say women are increasingly heading to medical centers when things go awry, but logistical, financial and cultural barriers still keep many pregnant women from seeking help in time.

    In Guinea-Bissau, new life often means mean mother’s death

    Guinea-Bissau is one of the deadliest places in the world to give birth. Despite some progress, childbirth is still a perilous endeavor across sub-Saharan Africa, and Guinea-Bissau stands out for its dire statistics. A woman has a 1 in 19 chance of maternal death in this tiny country, compared with about 1 in 2,100 in the United States.

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    Jordon Anderson, left, is the author of the letter at right dated Aug. 7, 1865, to his former master, Patrick H. Anderson, published in the Cincinnati Commercial newspaper. Jordon Anderson was a former slave who was freed from a Tennessee plantation by Union troops in 1864 and spent his remaining 40 years in Ohio. He lived quietly and likely would have been forgotten if not for the remarkable letter published shortly after the Civil War.

    Exploring the history of a remarkable freedman’s letter

    Jordan Anderson was a former slave who was freed from a Tennessee plantation by Union troops in 1864 and spent his remaining 40 years in Ohio. He lived quietly and likely would have been forgotten if not for a remarkable letter to his former master published in a Cincinnati newspaper shortly after the Civil War. In the letter, a reply to his master, who wanted to hire the former slave, he tallies...

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    DuPage election panel scrutinizes PR firm contract

    Members of the revamped DuPage Board of Election Commissioners are questioning the need to keep a public relations firm hired by their predecessors. Board Chairwoman Cathy Ficker Terrill says she wants staff to justify a plan to pay $3,000 a month to the company Reverse Spin. "I'm just asking for factual information about the need and the purpose," Terrill said, "and what it is that we get for...

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    Palatine officials join trend of forgoing pensions

    The pool of elected officials participating in the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund has been shrinking as eligibility requirements continue to come under increased scrutiny. The latest officials to forgo their pension benefits are Palatine’s mayor and council members, who last month unanimously approved the move despite annual contributions costing the village just $11,400 annually.

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    Predictably dressed in black and sporting a smile, Nick Salvi clutches the Capt’n C trophy he won this year from relatives who voted the 21-year-old Wauconda man as the person who most exhibits the island spirit.

    Wauconda man delights in spreading happiness

    Handing out a business card identifying himself as CEO of World Renowned Treasure Hunters, 21-year-old Nick Salvi of Wauconda smiles broadly.

Sports

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    White Sox scouting report
    Scouting report: White Sox vs. Boston Red Sox

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    Sox’ Floyd set back with sore arm

    White Sox starter Gavin Floyd was scratched from Monday night's scheduled start against the Red Sox with pain in his right elbow and forearm. With any luck, Floyd won't have to go on the disabled list.

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    White Sox third baseman Kevin Youkilis talks with starting pitcher Chris Sale during the eighth inning of Sunday’s 2-1 victory over the Royals.

    Youkilis returns to Boston this week

    Kevin Youkilis really doesn't want to talk about it, but the White Sox' new third baseman figures to get a rousing reception when he returns to Fenway Park Monday night.

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    Darwin Barney hits a 2-run homer in the second inning Sunday.

    Barney doing it all at second base for Cubs

    Cubs second baseman Darwin Barney is doing everything right these days. He hit a 2-run homer in Sunday's 3-1 win over the Diamondbacks at Wrigley Field. He also has not committed an error at second base since April 17.

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    Cougars fall 6-3 to Whitecaps

    Four innings of hitless relief helped the West Michigan Whitecaps hang on to a 6-3 victory as they defeated the Kane County Cougars on Sunday night at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark.

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    White Sox slugger Adam Dunn is congratulated by teammates Sunday after his solo home run off Kansas City Royals starting pitcher Luis Mendoza in the first inning at Kauffman Stadium.

    Dunn, Sale lead Sox to victory in Kansas City

    Chris Sale won his eighth straight decision, Adam Dunn homered in his third straight game and the White Sox beat the Kansas City Royals 2-1 Sunday. Sale (11-2) is 8-0 with two no-decisions since a May 12 loss to the Royals.

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    Starter Matt Garza worked 7 scoreless innings Sunday to help the Cubs sweep the Diamondbacks out of Wrigley Field.

    Cubs’ Garza in no hurry to leave Chicago

    The Cubs are on a little bit of a roll after sweeping the Arizona Diamondbacks over the weekend at Wrigley Field. Matt Garza pitched the Cubs to a 3-1 victory Sunday, one day after Ryan Dempster turned in a gem. It's possible both pitchers will be traded soon, but Garza has many reasons he'd like to stay in Chicago.

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    Ryan Dempster’s career with the Cubs has far exceeded anything Len Kasper expected — on the field and in the clubhouse and the community.

    Cubs will expect impact players in any trade deal

    In his weekly Cubs column, Len Kasper examines the trade winds swirling around the Cubs and offers his assessment of Ryan Dempster's impact as a Cub. He also offers some insight on the job manager Dale Sveum has done.

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    Memphis Grizzlies guard O.J. Mayo (32) heads to the basket as Denver Nuggets forward Al Harrington (7) defends in the second half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2012, in Memphis, Tenn. The Grizzlies won in overtime 100-97.

    Dealing for Mayo would be tricky for Bulls

    The new hot topic among Bulls fans is O.J. Mayo. The Memphis Grizzlies shooting guard is an unrestricted free agent and the Bulls have interest. But as Mike McGraw points out, the big question is what they have to offer.

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    For Bears running back Matt Forte, and most athletes in his position, his contract situation might be as much about principle as it is about money.

    Bears’ Forte might decide to stand on principle

    Maybe principle really is Matt Forte's driving force in contract negotiations with the Bears. Along with money, of course.

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    Zach Johnson displays the championship trophy after prevailing on the second playoff hole Sunday to win the John Deere Classic.

    Johnson stops Stricker’s fourpeat bid at John Deere classic

    Steve Stricker's bid for an historic four-peat at the John Deere Classic fizzled Sunday, but the end result was almost as good for an emotionally-drained gallery at TPC Deere Run.

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    Boomers sweep CornBelters

    The first-place Schaumburg Boomers completed their fifth series sweep in 10 chances at home in their inaugural season thanks to a 7-4 victory over the Normal CornBelters in Frontier League action Sunday afternoon.

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    David DeJesus, left, celebrates with Bryan LaHair after scoring on a single hit by Anthony Rizzo during Sunday’s first inning of the Cubs’ victory over Arizona at Wrigley Field.

    Cubs complete 3-game sweep of Arizona

    Darwin Barney homered and Matt Garza threw seven shutout innings to lift the Cubs to a three-game sweep of the Arizona Diamondbacks with a 3-1 win Sunday.

Business

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    What’s behind the TV channel blackouts?

    Channel blackouts such as the one that resulted from the recent spat between Viacom and DirecTV have become far more common over the past three years. Media companies such as Viacom and Disney have become steadily more profitable since the gloom of the recession lifted in early 2010. But the cable and satellite providers that pay to carry their channels have seen profitability virtually stagnate as they fight each other for subscribers. The squeeze has prompted distributors such as Dish and DirecTV to revolt against higher programming costs.

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    Work advice: Handling the delicate dances of acceptance, rejection

    In this week's Watercooler advice column, Karla L. Miller tackles the question of if it's OK to bail on a job you just accepted for a better opportunity. She also answers a question about leaving a message for job candidates you're not going to hire.

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    With government support, small businesses buy offices

    At an otherwise bleak time for real estate, there's a mini-boom in one corner of commercial property. Dentists, restaurant owners, doctors and other business owners are snapping up space in vacant strip malls and office buildings. They're doing it with help from a government loan program that has been around since 1959 but has shot up in popularity since the end of the recession.

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    President Barack Obama speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington on July 9. President Barack Obama's health care law says almost all Americans should get insurance coverage by 2014. What about uninsured young people who feel healthy and don't have money to spare? Some will probably skip coverage and pay financial penalties that will be much cheaper than insurance premiums. But health care advocates urge caution.

    Six health insurance tips for young people

    They're young, healthy and flat broke — and now the government says they have to buy thousands of dollars' worth of medical insurance. What should tapped-out 20-somethings do? Well, some may just do nothing. The annual fine for shrugging off the new federal insurance requirement, which is to begin in 2014, starts out at a relatively low $95, depending on income. That would be far cheaper than paying premiums.

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    Poor economy has small-business owners wary

    The economy and uncertain political climate are taking a toll on small-business owners' optimism, making them hesitant to expand. The National Federation of Independent Business said its index of small-business owners' sentiment fell 3 points in June to 91.4 after edging lower in May.

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    Scott Gamm, 20, a student at New York University’s Stern School of Business, used his income from freelance work and blogging to obtain a Visa card and then an American Express card recently. He charges $200 or $300 on them monthly and pays every bill in full.

    Parents face choice on cards for college kids

    Parents of college-bound students have a decision to make as offers stream in for their soon-to-depart teenagers. Should they send their green freshmen off to campus armed with a debit or credit card to learn how to handle money? Or is it better to keep firm control through the Bank of Mom and Dad? The "correct" answer will vary by family and personal preference.

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    President Barack Obama lays out his plan to extend tax cuts for the middle class during an announcement from the East Room of the White House in Washington on July 9.

    Obama calls for rise in write-offs for small businesses

    President Barack Obama is calling on Congress to increase the amount of investments small businesses can expense next year.The White House says Obama wants lawmakers to let small businesses write off up to $250,000 in expenses. Officials say the initiative is included in Obama’s proposal earlier this week for Congress to end tax cuts for families making more than $250,000 a year. Republicans says ending the tax cuts would lead to a tax hike on small businesses owners. A spokesman for House Speaker John Boehner says the president’s announcement Wednesday would be “no solace” for small businesses facing a tax increase.

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    The working nuclear reactor is seen at V.C. Summer Nuclear Station in Jenkinsville, S.C., on April 9. Licensing delay charges, soaring construction expenses and installation glitches have driven up the costs at V.C. Summer Nuclear Station and two other plants in Georgia and Tennessee, from hundreds of millions to as much as $2 billion, according to an Associated Press analysis of public records and regulatory filings.

    Quick rundown on nuclear power plants

    Nuclear power plants are very expensive and difficult to build, and the last one was built in the United States in 1996. Many nuclear power plants and reactors currently under construction in the U.S. are coming in over budget, a cost that could be passed onto electricity consumers.

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    The Unit 3 nuclear island, where a new nuclear reactor will sit, is seen before a visit by U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu at the Vogtle nuclear power plant in Waynesboro, Ga., on Feb. 15 Vogtle, initially estimated to cost $14 billion, has run into more than $800 million in extra charges related to licensing delays. A state monitor has said bluntly that co-owner Southern Co. can't stick to its budget. The plant, whose first reactor was supposed to be operational by April 2016, is now delayed seven months.

    Nuclear age delayed by human error

    America's first new nuclear plants in more than a decade are costing billions more to build and sometimes taking longer to deliver than planned, problems that could chill the industry's hopes for a jump-start to the nation's new nuclear age. "People are looking at these things very carefully," said the head of the department of nuclear science and engineering at the MIT. Inexpensive gas alone, he said, "is casting a pretty long shadow over the prospects" for construction of new nuclear plants.

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    Indian drug-maker plans to expand stateside

    The head of Indian drugmaker Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd. says he's charging ahead with plans to expand sales in the crucial U.S. market despite extra oversight from American regulators over quality questions that have blocked imports of 31 of its medicines. Ranbaxy, which almost exclusively makes generic pills, particularly is aiming to regularly be first on the U.S. market with just-approved generic drugs, CEO Arun Sawhney said.

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    Entrepreneurs having tough time in China

    Reformers say China needs more entrepreneurs like Liu Peijian. His chain of six furniture stores employs 60 people. But Beijing's response to the deepest economic slump since the 2008 crisis is to pump money into state industry, leaving businesspeople like Liu who create jobs to fend for themselves.

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    Emerging market bonds: 4 things you need to know

    Investors continue to pour their money into bonds. And the decline in the stock market this month certainly won't stem their flight to safer investments. Yet those willing to accept a bit more risk in the bond market are finding that they are being appropriately rewarded.

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    The sheer amount of writing that the average executive and business professional does on a daily basis is causing some to become lax on quality.

    6 ways leaders can write better in the post-Twitter world

    With the fast-paced universe of instant communication via emails, text messages and social media, we are all constantly writing. Effective writing skills are half the equation for effective communication, a critical component of leadership. Unfortunately, top executives aren't always the gifted writers they should be. Here's how to get better.

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    Bartender Shannon Longabaugh pours a mini salt-caramel-mocha martini with pretzel bites in foreground at Strawberry Moon martini bar in Wauconda.

    Downtown Wauconda's new look a hit

    When Bliss Wine & Gifts opened in a Wauconda storefront in 2009, Maria Weisbruch remembers looking out its windows onto Main Street with a sensation her new tasting menu might describe as a spicy blend of excitement with hints of dread. Friends had cautioned Weisbruch: The stereotype of a “richy, highfalutin” wine bar might not fit well in small-town Wauconda. But Weisbruch, who has lived in the village since she was 11 years old, felt Main Street was ripe for a revival.

Life & Entertainment

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    This Miami Beach resort patio has an art deco feel.

    Patio styles that evoke favorite vacation destinations

    As staycations get more popular, homeowners want to make their outdoor space feel like an escape from day-to-day life. These four patio styles will evoke favorite vacation destinations right at home.

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    Man-on-the-run Richard Hannay (Peter Simon Hilton, second from right) surprises Pamela (Angela Ingersoll) with a kiss to avoid detection by the police (Jeff Dumas, left, and Paul Kalina) in David New's highly entertaining revival of “The 39 Steps” at Drury Lane Theatre in Oakbrook Terrace.

    Brilliantly executed '39 Steps' worth a climb

    Drury Lane Theatre in Oakbrook brilliantly revives the comedy "The 39 Steps" inspired by the Alfred Hitchcock film of the same name.

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    “The Universe: A Walk Through Space and Time” gives visitors the opportunity to see the world before, during and after the Big Bang.

    'Universe' exhibit takes interactive approach to space

    From planets to stars to the science behind their creation, the Adler Planetarium reveals it all in the new permanent exhibit "The Universe: A Walk Through Space and Time." The exhibit relies on projections, high-resolution photography and interactive programs similar to those used in the planetarium's theater shows.

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    TV binge-watching is a pandemic that has afflicted many viewers, with sites like SideReel, Netflix, and Megavideo — not to mention full-season DVD sets — at their disposal.

    How binge-watching can ruin great TV

    Catching up on shows after they've aired is the only way anyone could keep pace with all the good TV out there these days. But there's a proper way to do so, one that maintains the integrity of the art form. Here are some guidelines.

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    Max Payne uses his Shootdodge maneuver to fire off some shots in “Max Payne 3.”

    Max Payne can be your life coach too

    "Max Payne 3" demonstrates the narrative and moral value of hard video games — the ones that make your loved ones fear for your health and sanity. Mastery requires error and segmented iteration.

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    Kathleen Riley, left, and Alison Carroll resigned as teachers at St. Ann Catholic Church in Arlington, Va., explaining they would not sign a new Profession of Faith required by their bishop.

    Catholic laypeople, bishops at odds over church teachings

    Kathleen Riley knows her beliefs on the male-only priesthood and contraception put her at odds with leaders of her church. But as a fifth-generation Catholic who went to a Catholic school and grew up to teach in one, Riley feels the faith deeply woven through her. So when her Arlington, Va., parish asked for volunteers last summer to teach Sunday school, she felt called by the Holy Spirit to say yes. A year later, the 52-year-old computer scientist feels the same spirit calling her to say no.

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    Researchers say birth control reduces health risks by delaying first pregnancies, which carry higher risks in very young women; cutting down on unsafe abortions; and controlling dangers associated with pregnancies that are too closely spaced.

    An essay on common-sense contraception and maternal mortality

    New research from Johns Hopkins released this week suggests that one of the most effective ways we have to lower the maternal mortality rate would be simply to meet the unmet demand for contraception in developing countries, a move that researchers say could reduce the maternal mortality rate by as much as one-third.

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    Joshua Whitaker competed in bronco riding during a previous edition of the IPRA Rodeo hosted by the Wauconda Chamber of Commerce at the Golden Oaks rodeo grounds.

    Sunday picks: Go country at the rodeo, Dierks Bentley concert

    Take the family to the 49th Annual IPRA Wauconda Rodeo, where you can see the Midwest Renegade Equestrian Drill Team or watch rodeo events like saddle bronco riding and steer roping. Dierks Bentley headlines the last day of Taste of Chicago, so don't miss out. Parents, daughters and their American Girl dolls are invited to The American Girls Dinner & Chicago's First Lady River Cruise on Sunday.

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    The queen greets the crowds during a parade at the Bristol Renaissance Faire.

    It's 25 years and counting for Renaissance Faire

    It's been 1574 at the Bristol Renaissance Faire for 25 years, but that doesn't mean things don't change at the annual tribute to history and fantasy. This year's anniversary event will be the biggest faire ever, bringing in a mix of brand new performers and returning favorites. "We're really embracing the celebration part of the show this year," said Bristol entertainment director Kristen Mansour.

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    The fastest way through airport security

    It was an eerie feeling to speed through airport security without taking off my shoes, removing my laptop and liquids from my bag or stripping away my belt and suit jacket. Eerie but amazing. In lines next to me, people danced around in socks, emptied their pockets and fed plastic trays through X-ray machines. But for the first time in more than a decade, I effortlessly passed through security. There wasn't even a line.

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    Mice can squeeze into house through tiny holes

    Q. I am having trouble with mice. I have looked everywhere but cannot figure out how they get in the house. I see some small openings around where the electric cable goes into the house at the basement level, but it seems too small to let them in. I'd appreciate any suggestions you have.

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    Fuel pump barely outlasts warranty

    Q. Thirteen months ago our local Ford dealer installed a new fuel pump in our 2003 Ford Windstar van. Last week that pump failed. The same dealer installed a second fuel pump for a grand total of $1,268. Safe to say I was not too happy.

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    Roger Hazard used Custom Cabinets in lavender for a kitchen after noticing the homeowner always wore shades of purple. The island that is not shown is eggplant colored.

    Creative tips for the kitchen, bath

    Roger Hazard has designed a kitchen with cabinets colored lavender and eggplant. In fact, the designer and producer of A&E network's “Sell This House” used green cabinets in his own Texas kitchen, and we're betting blue is in his professional future. But Hazard understands you might want a more neutral choice for your cabinets, and recommends you consider gray.

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    Since teens become adults, legally, at age 18, parents should know that they could be kept out of the loop in their health care, among other things, unless they get some legal documents drawn up.

    Your teenager is now an adult, but what does that really mean?

    Parents tend to dismiss the 18th birthdays of their children as nothing too special. It often gets ignored in favor of celebrating a high school graduation and heading off to college. But an attorney says since your child legally becomes an adult at 18, unless you get some key documents drawn up, your child might have no one but a judge in a guardianship court to oversee their care if they become ill or seriously injured and are unable to speak for themselves.

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    The world-renowned Canadian Skyhawks parachute team will be part of the EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wis.

    On the road: Air show in Oshkosh

    Around 500,000 people from more than 60 countries will descend on Oshkosh, Wis., for the annual EAA AirVenture at Wittman Regional Airport to celebrate the past, present and future of flight. There's also the third annual Oregon Trail Days, which will include a Native American encampment, cowboy and frontier acts, a raptor show, children's crafts and covered-wagon rides.

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    A standby generator is a backup electrical power system installed directly to a home. It needs to be professionally installed by licensed contractors.

    Ask the plumber: How to choose a standby generator

    Q. I now have the budget to install a standby generator system at my home. I've read about standby generators in your past articles, and now that I'm ready to go forward I'd like some final tips. What basic information and system features should I keep in mind when I meet with my contractor?

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    Backing out of contract to buy a risky decision

    Q. My husband and I signed a contract to buy a house and we are supposed to close in the middle of August. This was a cash deal. The seller agreed to fix a couple of things our inspector found at the inspection. We now have been presented an opportunity in another state which we are seriously considering.

Discuss

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    Editorial: The broad picture of life in the suburbs

    A Daily Herald editorial reflects on the values of a balance of coverage that includes a generous supply of "good news" to help reflect the community as it really is.

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    Trouble in the middle

    Columnist Susan Estrich: While kids at the top have been subject to enormous attention, and kids at the bottom have been subject to enormous attention because of debates about whether they should be promoted even when they lack basic skills, kids in the middle just slip by.

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    Increase enforcement of traffic laws
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: I am confused as to why our state or local police do not enforce traffic law

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    Law should allow audio recording for safety
    A Round Lake Beach letter to the editor: I live in Meadow Green Townhomes in Round Lake Beach and changing the audio recording law In Illinois would improve living here.

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    Walsh shows he supports veterans
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: Joe Walsh has repeatedly supported veterans and would certainly not disrespect Ms. Duckworth and fellow veterans for their countless sacrifices.

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    Service to country is worthy of note
    A letter to the editor: Tammy Duckworth would not make personal attacks on an opponent, but she will stand up to them as she stood up for our country.

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    Lombard House Walk a huge success
    A Lombard letter tro the editor: The Kiwanis Club of Lombard wishes to thank the many people who made our 8th annual "Over the Threshold" tour of distinctive Lombard homes a great success.

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    Coolidge’s decisions will be based on facts
    A Cary letter to the editor: This fall voters have the opportunity to begin to break down the extremist political orthodoxy that crashed the economy in 2007-2008 and has been refusing to let it restart.Leslie Coolidge, running for Congress in the 6th District, promises fact-based decision making in Congress, not the fantasy based denial of reality that we see in the current congressional crowd who think that the fearful shouting of "no" is a plan.

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    Give it up, Mr. Speaker
    A Huntley letter to the editor: To Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan: I understand the importance of experience and value of a decade or two of service. But 30 years or more? Give it up and give your grandson or granddaughter a chance.

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    Bloomingdale PD huge help in storm
    A Blomingdale letter to the editor: I want to thank the Bloomingdale Police Department for their extraordinary help during the power outage of Sunday, July 1. I was unable to open my garage door, cook on my electric range. Within 10 minutes of my phone call to the police department, Officer Colin Trusk was at my door.

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    Great job by ComEd during storm
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: My friends and I want to express our huge gratitude to the steadfast workers from ComEd and the tree companies who have toiled without stopping in this terrible heat to restore power to the north side of Wheaton.

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    DuPage hit hard two weeks ago, but pales compared to '96

    We're still cleaning up from the nasty storm of two weeks ago, which prompted DuPage Editor Jim Davis to recall the deluge of 1996 that dumped up to 17 inches of rain on some parts of the county in a 24-hour span.

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