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Daily Archive : Thursday July 12, 2012

News

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    Lisle man charged with stalking woman from Plainfield to Geneva

    A Lisle man has been accused of stalking his ex-girlfriend at her new boyfriend's home near Geneva, including crawling through weeds with binoculars to try and keep tabs on her.

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    Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon put out a call to action Thursday night for any women who have ever considered running for elected office. Simon told an audience in St. Charles that women can't wait to be asked to take a place on the ballot. They must find the confidence inside themselves.

    Forum encourages women to take the lead

    Cheryle Robinson Jackson ran for U.S. Senate in 2010 and knew her gender made an already difficult race even harder for her. She knew it not only because of her life experiences, but because of a speaking engagement she'd once had at the Chicago Finance Exchange.

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    Greg Walker

    District U-46 says goodbye to assistant superintendent

    Elgin Area School District U-46 said goodbye this week to Assistant Superintendent of Secondary Education Greg Walker. He held the job for the past three years and will start his new job as regional vice president for the College Board's Midwest regional office July 16. "He did an incredible job here at U-46," U-46 Chief of Staff Tony Sanders said.

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    Randy Hundley, a former teammate of Ron Santo, tells a story as Cubs radio broadcaster Pat Hughes, center, and Ron Santo Jr. listen during a Subscriber Total Access event celebrating the life of Ron Santo, at Drink Nightclub in Schaumburg Thursday.

    Images: Ron Santo celebration in Schaumburg
    Daily Herald subscribers were treated to an amazing afternoon in honor of Cubs ledgend Ron Santo, at the Drink nightclub in Schaumburg. The event is one in a series of Subscriber Total Access events which puts subscribers face-to-face with the columnists, writers, photographers and newsmakers they read about every day.

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    Marilyn Sturlini of Rolling Meadows greets Cubs radio broadcaster Pat Hughes during a Subscriber Total Access event celebrating the life of Ron Santo, at Drink Nightclub in Schaumburg Thursday.

    This old Cub still has pull with fans, friends

    There was a lot of love gathered in Schaumburg Thursday as fans and friends gathered at a Daily Herald event to pay tribute to former Cubs star and broadcaster Ron Santo just 10 days away from his induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. The all-star lineup of panelists shared classic stories and highlights of Santo's legendary careers as a standout third baseman, a local businessman...

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    Brian Costin, the Illinois Policy Institute's director of government reform, speaks at an Americans for Prosperity town hall meeting held Thursday at the Arlington Heights village hall.

    Spirited crowd talks pension reform in Arlington Heights

    Americans for Prosperity is holding a series of town-hall meetings urging quick and meaningful pension reform. "It costs our state $12.6 million a day every day that we don't reform pensions, and yet our legislators broke for summer break," Illinois State Director David From said Thursday before a spirited crowd of more than 50 people at Arlington Heights village hall. "They're on summer...

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    Anthony “Duff” Hufnagel, 93, of Glen Ellyn, meets with nurse Suzanne Wallace to follow up on his pioneering heart valve replacement surgery.

    Glen Ellyn WWII veteran, 93, pioneers new heart surgery

    A 93-year-old Glen Ellyn man was the first heart patient in the West, Southwest and Northwest suburbs to undergo a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for people with severe aortic stenosis, who because of their age, health, cannot have an open heart procedure to replace the valve. Anthony "Duff:" Huffnagel was given just six months to a year to live before the surgery. Today, doctors told him...

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    Rolling Meadows residents lose power after truck hits pole

    About 1,100 ComEd customers in Rolling Meadows lost power Thursday night after a vehicle struck a utility pole, according to a company spokeswoman.

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    Cops: Three Geneva businesses served minors during Swedish Days

    Three Geneva businesses will appear before city's liquor comissioner later this month because of alcohol sales to minors during Swedish Days, according to police.

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    Island Lake fast-tracks new village hall

    Plans for Island Lake's new village hall and police station are underway, and the construction of the new building may take shorter than officials planned. The new facility, which will be at Water Tower Park, is predicted to take about a year.

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    District 214 OKs code of conduct for coaches, advisers

    Starting this fall, all coaches and club advisers in Northwest Suburban High School District 214 must sign and adhere to a code of conduct outlining appropriate behavior standards, the school board decided on Thursday. "We hear every day about children bullying other children, but what about when it's the coaches or adviser bullying our children?" an Arlington Heights parent said.

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    Fire displaces Aurora residents

    A fire in the back of an Aurora duplex Thursday night, has forced two residents from the home, officials said. The flames were mainly contained to the rear siding of the home, but the first floor unit suffered water damaged, officials said.

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    Photo courtesy of ABC-7 Aerial view of the fatal crash on Rt. 53 Thursday morning in Schaumburg.

    Rolling Meadows man dies in fiery crash on Route 53 near Schaumburg

    A 28-year-old Rolling Meadows man has been identified as the victim of a fiery crash on Route 53 near Schaumburg Thursday morning. Police said Jose J. Diaz-Rendon was the lone occupant of the vehicle when it struck a median seperating the local and express lanes head-on.

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    A volunteer with the DuPage County Forest Preserve District found this rare blue bullfrog this week at Hidden Lake Forest Preserve near Downers Grove.

    Volunteers find rare blue-colored frog in Downers Grove-area preserve

    Jerry and Jody Zamirowski of Glen Ellyn have observed some beautiful sites in the decades they've spent volunteering to monitor animals for agencies like the DuPage County Forest Preserve and the Morton Arboretum in Lisle. But Jerry knew he found something amazing when he spied a bullfrog at Hidden Lake Forest Preserve in Glen Ellyn -- and the frog was bright blue. "It's almost like finding a...

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    Arlington Hts. dog park may depend on referendum

    The Arlington Heights Park District has narrowed the potential sites for a dog park to three, but nothing can happen without a tax increase getting passed. Residents said they don't need a Taj Mahal. "It doesn't need to be an extravagant luxury park," said one resident. "It just needs a fence, water and some grass for the dogs to run on."

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    Cook County courts to allow second hearing for some who can’t make bail

    Saying too many people arrested for nonviolent crimes are jailed because they can't post bail, Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle announced new procedures to grant another hearing for people awaiting trial and held on bond of $10,000 or less..

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    Industrial printer sparks Lake Zurich fire

    The owner of a Lake Zurich company was able to escape his business as it filled with smoke due to a machine fire Thursday afternoon, officials said. Fire officials said an industrial printer inside the business malfunctioned at about 3:35 p.m. and caught fire, but the flames were contained by a sprinkler system.

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    Prison for man who sold ecstasy pills in Schaumburg

    A 30-year-old Lincolnwood man who was arrested in March near the Woodfield Shopping Center in Schaumburg pleaded guilty Thursday to possession of ecstacy with intent to distribute, a class X felony. In exchange for the plea a Cook County judge sentenced Scott Soloman to 10 years in prison.

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    16-year-old missing from Aurora

    A 16-year-old girl has been missing from Aurora more than a month, according to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

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    DuPage Art League sponsors competition

    DuPage Art League is holding a competition titled "Paint DuPage" through Aug. 30.

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    Lombard Town Centre hosts wine, beer tasting

    Lombard Town Centre's first wine and craft beer tasting event will take place from 7 to 10 p.m. Saturday, July 14 at the Westin Lombard Yorktown Center, 70 Yorktown Center, with VIP ticketholders allowed to enter at 6 p.m.

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    New Bartlett water playground opens

    The Bartlett Aquatic Center has opened a new spray playground that features a tipping bucket that dumps water on swimmers, two water slides and numerous spraying features.

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    Rummage sale expanded

    St. Mary of Vernon Catholic Church, 236 Route 45, Indian Creek/Vernon Hills, has expanded its rummage sale to two days. Hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, July 13 and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 14.

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    New downtown leader in Highland Park

    Folk musician Lee Murdock will explore the history of the War of 1812 through story and song at the Grayslake Heritage Center and Museum at 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 25.

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    New downtown leader in Highland Park

    Jessica Weglarz recently was named executive director of the Downtown Highland Park Alliance. In that position the native of Peoria will work with business owners and community members to enhance the economic vitality of the downtown, oversee operations, develop and administer annual plans and budgets and cultivate partnerships to further the work of the group.

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    Kristina Kovarik

    Gurnee recycling for rewards may start in September

    Preparations are under way to launch an initiative in Gurnee affording residents a chance to receive discounts on goods and services in exchange for recycling. "Our goal is to reward Gurnee's residents for the good job they've been doing recycling and we believe this incentive-based program can help us achieve even greater rates of recycling," Mayor Kristina Kovarik said.

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    Juwan Franklin

    Two charged in Glendale Heights home invasion, robbery

    A judge set bail at $500,000 Thursday for two men charged with invading a Glendale Heights apartment and robbing two people at gunpoint. Juwan Franklin, 21, and William B. Lewis, 19, appeared in DuPage County bond court on charges of armed robbery and home invasion.

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    Doug Marks

    Libertarian’s signatures challenged in 33rd Senate race

    Libertarian candidate Doug Marks, who is vying for the 33rd Senate District seat against Kane County Board Chairman Karen McConnaughay, is facing a petition challenge that could keep him off the November ballot.

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    Connor Priesz, 18, of Crystal Lake died Wednesday morning, two days after friends pulled his body from the Fox River. The coroner’s office ruled his death a drowning.

    Coroner’s office can’t explain why Crystal Lake teen drowned

    An official with the McHenry County Coroner's Office said Thursday that it cannot prove whether a teenager had a seizure before he drowned in a portion of the Fox River near Crystal Lake. "Whatever caused him to go into the water might be unexplainable, but his cause of death will definitely be as a result of a drowning," Deputy Coroner Curt Bradshaw said.

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    Fox Valley police report
    Sidney Moore, 37, of the 300 block of Four Winds Way, Carpentersville, was arrested and charged with possession and possession with intent to deliver 31.67 grams of cocaine Tuesday, according to police reports. Police say the street value of the drugs was $1,100. Both charges are felonies and could result in prison time up to 30 years. Bail was set at $150,000, of which Moore must pay 10 percent...

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    Libertyville High School graduate Matthew Coleman, 26, was killed early Monday in a single vehicle crash in Murphysboro near Southern Illinois University.

    Libertyville grad dreamed of aviation career

    Libertyville High School graduate Matthew Coleman is being remembered as a caring guy who worked hard to pursue his dream. Coleman, 26, was killed early Monday in a single vehicle crash in Murphysboro near Southern Illinois University, where he was a senior with a double major in aviation management and aviation technologies.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Sharon R. Corgiat of Geneva was charged with retail theft at 12:34 p.m. Wednesday, according to a Batavia police report. She is accused of taking $12 worth of merchandise from Menards, 300 N. Randall Road.

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    Arlington Heights dog found dead in oven after burglary

    An Arlington Heights family came home last week to find their residence burglarized and their pet dog, Coco, dead in a convection oven. Police aren't saying yet how the family pet died.

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    As a mother of three who runs a jewelry business out of her Naperville home, Sharon Maguire says, “It was exciting to get extra money.” She and her husband, Mike, logged onto the state's new I-Cash website and discovered $200 they didn't realize was theirs.

    Are you 1 in 8 who deserves to get money back?

    For every eight people who read this column, one of them should get some money out of it. That's how many people are owed money or other property held by the state, Treasurer Dan Rutherford said. The state's I-Cash program is trying to return $1.5 billion in cash plus contents from abandoned safe deposit boxes to the rightful owners and heirs.

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    Festival food, anyone? Julio Garcia grills sausage and hamburgers at the Genoa Pizza stand during the last day of last year’s Batavia’s Windmill City Festival.

    Contests galore at Batavia’s Windmill City Festival

    If you have a competitive spirit, Batavia's Windmill City Festival along the Riverwalk is the place to be this weekend. The three-day festival features several contests, and visitors of all ages can join in the fun — even your furry friends. Saturday will feature the pet parade at 10 a.m. with prizes for Best Trick, Fastest Wagging Tail, Most Spots, Longest Ears, Most Unusual Pet, Best...

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    David Johnson

    A year later, third suspect nabbed in Lombard home invasion

    A man accused of restraining two adults and a 15-month-old boy during a home invasion in Lombard more than a year ago has been taken into custody and is being held on $200,000 bail. David Johnson, 31, of the 3500 block of Adams Street in Bellwood, was the third person arrested in connection with the March 2011 robbery on the 100 block of West St. Charles Road.

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    Schaumburg doctor receives 30-month prison sentence

    Schaumburg doctor Jaswinder Rai Chhibber, 50, was sentenced to 30 months in prison after being convicted of health care fraud and making false statements during a weeklong federal trial.

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    McHenry County Department of Health are reporting that mosquitoes from a mosquito trap in Fox River Grove have tested positive for West Nile virus.

    Mosquitoes test positive for West Nile virus in Fox River Grove

    McHenry County Department of Health are reporting that mosquitoes from a mosquito trap in Fox River Grove have tested positive for West Nile virus. According to a news release early Thursday, the McHenry County Department of Health one batch of mosquitoes out of 122 tested came back positive for West Nile.

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    Signs throughout the Prospect Heights Park District building, including this one at the front desk that changes colors, remind residents to vote.

    Vote now: Prospect Hts. park in line to win grant money

    Lions Park in Prospect Heights is trying to win grant money from Coca-Cola, but they need your help to do it. The contest, "America's Favorite Park," ends Sunday, and Lions Park is inching up iun the standings, trying to make the top 25. Here's how to vote.

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    Dylan Ichiba and David Brancato from the Fry Family YMCA's Camp EDGE watch the performance group Watch My Feet, a performance group that mentors kids on topics that affect them.

    Naperville campers learn value of service to community

    Their shirts read "Live," "Inspire," "Dream" and "Believe," and that's just what Watch My Feet tries to help kids do. The program was started six years ago by a group of students who realized they had performance skills and wanted to use them to mentor kids on topics that affect them. The wrapped up activities this week at Neuqua Valley High School in Naperville.

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    Erna and Andrew Koeppen work the farmstand at 327 W. Dundee Road, Wheeling in the 1940s.

    Matriarch of one of Wheeling’s biggest farms has died

    Erna Koeppen, one of Wheeling's last farming pioneers, died July 5 at age 90. "She was truly a farm wife," says her grandson, Greg Koeppen, a former Prospect Heights city councilman. "She never learned to drive, but was happiest working on the farm and making her family happy."

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    Tax bills troubling for many seniors

    Hundreds of suburban Cook County homeowners — mostly senior citizens — have been flooding the county assessor's office at the Rolling Meadows courthouse in recent weeks to file for adjustments to their property tax bills.

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    Antioch sports complex to get restrooms

    Antioch Township is close to wrapping up work on its portion of the Tim Osmond Sports Complex. By fall, township supervisor Steve Smouse said, officials should be finished installing a storage and restroom building, the final part of the project.

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    Lori Lyman

    Stevenson High School board member Lyman resigns

    Adlai E. Stevenson High School District 125 board member Lori Lyman has resigned after nearly four years on the board. As a volunteer and then school board member, the Long Grove resident and landscape architect, was all in when it came to Lincolnshire school. She designed the Garden of Peace, Hope and Rembrance at the Lincolnshire school.

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    Study will say whether parking sufficient for Riverside Plaza

    Algonquin's planning and zoning commission postponed making a decision on a plan to convert Riverside Plaza into apartments in order to settle questions about parking, officials said. Earlier this week, John Breugelmans, principal of Riverside Plaza LCC of North Barrington, presented to the commission his plan to change the partially-built development at Routes 31 and 62 from a 54-unit condo...

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    Readers may say they want more stories about good news and smiling, happy people, but our list of “Most Viewed Stories” always is filled with tragedy, scandal and disaster. Why is that?

    Talk with the Editor: Why do people ask for good news but look for bad?

    In this Talk with the Editor, John Lampinen asks why people say they want more positive news but then rush to read stories of tragedy, scandal and disaster.

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    Markeyah Johnson, 11, left, and Alexis Ruiz, 11, perform during a rehearsal of “Destined Lives,” an original opera created and produced entirely by 10-to-13-year-old students involved in Hamilton Wings’ SCORE program. Johnson is from Elgin and Ruiz is from South Elgin.

    U-46 kids create an opera of their own

    Music has been a prominent force in 12-year-old Cesar Mendez's life. But he never thought he'd be involved in the writing and producing of an original opera. "Destined Lives," a work created and produced entirely by 10- to 13-year-old students involved in Hamilton Wings' SCORE program, which includes nine elementary and middle schools in Elgin Area School District U-46.

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    ‘Destined Lives’ cast
    Cast of "Destined Lives," an original opera created and produced entirely by 10 to 13-year-old students involved in Hamilton Wings' SCORE

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    This Maggie Schwarz Kraus painting, “Sailor,” depicts the artist's son. Kraus' show is presented by the Lake County Art League and runs through Aug. 9, with a reception from 5-8 p.m. Thursday, July 19.

    Waukegan artist's ever-evolving works on display

    "Maggie Schwarz Krausfrom the start, " featuring the art of Maggie Schwarz Kraus, will be on display at the Jack Benny Center in Waukegan.

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    Bill helps minority, women-owned businesses

    Minority and women-owned businesses are getting some help in Cook County.On Wednesday, Gov. Pat Quinn signed a law that will allow the county's forest preserve district to take into account whether businesses are owned by women or minorities when they are awarding bids for construction and purchasing contracts.

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    A book is automatically moved from the conveyor belt to a bin as a new sorting system works at the Gail Borden Public Library during a public demonstration Tuesday evening in Elgin. Library material can now be sorted and reshelved in minutes instead of days.

    Gail Borden Library automatic sorter up and running

    Whether a book is returned from the outside drive-through lane at Gail Borden Public Library or the indoor book drop, it's path to the shelves is now along a high-tech conveyor belt. The automatic sorter, which has been running smoothly for about two weeks now, will save money and staff time and bring Gail Borden to the next level, technologically.

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    Chicago's Lyric Opera awarded $2M grant

    The Lyric Opera of Chicago has been awarded a $2 million grant to expand its community engagement and to support the world premiere of an opera based on a popular novel. The Lyric's general director Anthony Freud announced the grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation on Wednesday.

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    President Barack Obama and Republican rival Mitt Romney’s campaigns traded accusations of lying Thursday, ratcheting up an already heated race for the White House.

    Obama, Romney campaigns accuse each other of lies

    WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama and Republican rival Mitt Romney’s campaigns traded accusations of lying Thursday, ratcheting up an already heated race for the White House.

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    This photo shows the home of Peter and Stephanie Lizon on Miller Hollow Road in Jackson County, W.Va. Authorities say Peter Lizon allegedly tortured and enslaved his wife for much of the past decade, forcing her to endure two pregnancies and deliveries in shackles. Lizon was in jail Wednesday, July 11, 2012, on $300,000 bond and scheduled for a preliminary hearing on a malicious wounding charge Friday morning in Jackson County Magistrate Court.

    W.Va. sheriff says woman tortured; husband charged

    LEROY, W.Va. — A West Virginia man is accused of keeping his wife captive and torturing her for the better part of a decade — beating and burning her and even leaving her shackled during childbirth.Peter Lizon, 37, was in jail Wednesday on $300,000 bond. He is scheduled for a preliminary hearing Friday on a malicious wounding charge, authorities said.

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    Campaign workers for Washington, D.C., Mayor Vincent Gray tell The Associated Press that day laborers who worked at polling places on Grayís behalf in 2010 were routinely paid $100 in cash — twice the legal limit.

    D.C. mayor’s campaign hid poll workers’ pay

    WASHINGTON — District of Columbia Mayor Vincent Gray’s 2010 campaign routinely paid day laborers $100 in cash — twice the legal limit — to tout Gray outside polling places, and the payments were later referred to on campaign finance reports as “consulting fees” paid to campaign staff members and volunteers, according to a review by The Associated Press.

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    Team looking for Ohio train crash cause eyes rails

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Investigators say a train that partly derailed and exploded in Columbus, Ohio, was traveling below the speed limit before the crash, and its operators noticed no problems with the track as they approached the curve where it happened.

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    Travis Schepker, a biology intern, holding an Asian carp pulled from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill.

    Research murky on danger of Asian carp invasion

    As scientists aboard a research boat activate an electric current, the calm Illinois River transforms into a roiling, silvery mass. Asian carp by the dozen hurtle from the water as if shot from a gun, soaring in graceful arcs before plunging beneath the surface with splashes resembling tiny geysers.

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    Tina Sipula stands outside the Clare House talking about the Little Free Library, a free book exchange, she put up outside the house she founded in Bloomington

    Bloomington opens 'Little Free Library'

    A national phenomenon that has brought free book exchanges to countless communities has made its way to Bloomington.A Little Free Library, with about eight children's books and 10 adult books, stands tall near the sidewalk outside Clare House, 703 E. Washington St. The books are free to anyone who wants to read them.

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    A rescue worker helicopter returning from the avalanche site, lands in Chamonix, French Alps, Thursday, July, 12, 2012. A slab of ice broke off Thursday high in the French Alps, sparking an avalanche that swept nine Europeans to their deaths as they tried to climb Mont Blanc, authorities said. Eleven other climbers were hospitalized and at least four are still unaccounted for.

    9 dead, 11 hurt, 4 missing in Mont Blanc avalanche

    PARIS — A slab of ice broke off Thursday high in the French Alps, sparking an avalanche that swept nine Europeans to their deaths as they tried to climb Mont Blanc, authorities said. Eleven other climbers were hospitalized and at least four are still unaccounted for.

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    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at a press conference during the ASEAN Foreign Ministers’ Meeting in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The Obama administration pressed Beijing on Thursday to accept a code of conduct for resolving territorial disputes in the resource-rich South China Sea, a difficult U.S. mediation effort that has faced resistance from the communist government — although it has endeared the U.S. to once-hostile countries in Southeast Asia.

    US, China square off over South China Sea

    PHNOM PENH, Cambodia — The Obama administration pressed Beijing on Thursday to accept a code of conduct for resolving territorial disputes in the resource-rich South China Sea, a difficult U.S. mediation effort that has faced resistance from the communist government — although it has endeared the U.S. to once-hostile countries in Southeast Asia.

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    Former Vice President Dick Cheney is using his popularity with Republican conservatives to give a boost to Mitt Romney, hosting a fundraiser for the party’s likely nominee in Wyoming Thursday July 12, 2012.

    Cheney lends a bit of his GOP star power to Romney

    JACKSON, Wyo. — Former Vice President Dick Cheney is using his popularity with Republican conservatives to give a boost to Mitt Romney, hosting a fundraiser for the party’s likely nominee at a mountain valley resort as well as a private dinner at his Wyoming home.

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    American Airlines plane diverted to Miami due to cabin pressure

    MIAMI — An American Airlines flight headed to Los Angeles has been diverted to Miami International Airport after reports of problems with pressure in the cabin.

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    James Ammons, President of Florida A & M University, resigned Wednesday, July 11, 2012, the same day parents of a drum major who died after being hazed added the university to a wrongful-death lawsuit. Robert Champion died in November 2011, after being beaten by fellow band members during a hazing ritual in Orlando.

    FAMU still dealing with fallout from hazing death

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — The fallout from the hazing death of a Florida A&M University drum major appears unlikely to end soon.University leaders will hold an emergency meeting next week to start the search for a new president after James Ammons, the president since 2007, abruptly resigned Wednesday.

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    Blake C. Durbin

    Kansas man charged with stalking Elgin ex-girlfriend

    A Kansas man is being held on $1 million bond after being arrested for stalking an Elgin person, authorities said.

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    Warrant: Jealousy drove Wisconsinfather to run down son

    A search warrant says a man accused of running down his young son and the boy's mother confronted her about a new relationship just before striking them with his SUV in Fitchburg.

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    Wisconsin mink production up 19 percent last year

    Wisconsin continues to lead the nation in the production of mink pelts, accounting for one in three U.S. pelts last year.The U.S. Department of Agriculture says Wisconsin produced 1.1 million mink pelts last year. That was up 19 percent from the previous year.

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    U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr.

    Jackson’s ‘mood disorder’ raising more questions?

    U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr.'s disclosure that he is suffering from a "mood disorder" still leaves many questions about his secretive medical leave and whether the Illinois congressman has satisfied mounting calls to be more open about his monthlong absence.

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    Shipping expected to resume into Waukegan Harbor

    Authorities in northern Illinois say commercial shipping into Waukegan Harbor is expected to resume next month.

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    26 Illinois counties hit by drought can get aid

    Farmers in 26 counties in southern Illinois can apply for drought-related disaster relief. Under new rules announced Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, those counties automatically qualify for a disaster designation. No formal declaration is necessary.

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    Possible ruling on terrorist suspect’s release

    A federal judge in Chicago could announce her ruling on a terrorist suspect's request to go live with his cousin while awaiting his September trial. A Thursday status hearing comes a month after 29-year-old Shaker Masri (SHOCK'-uhr MAHZ'-ree) asked Judge Sharon Johnson Coleman to release him.

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    Jill Wesselhoff of Island Lake, right, pictured with her caregiver Lorel Voss at the Ms. Wheelchair Illinois America in March.

    Island Lake woman takes part in Ms. Wheelchair Illinois America pageant

    Jill Wesselhoff, 31 of Island Lake proudly earned the title as first runner-up at the second annual Ms. Wheelchair Illinois America competition, where Wesselhoff said contestants are breaking the misconception of what a beauty pageant stands for. "It doesn't have to be about your looks or what you are wearing. It is about the person. Just because we have wheels doesn't mean we are any less a part...

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    Hoffman Estates Olympic figure skating hopeful Tomoki Hiwatashi, 12, flies over the ice during a training session at the Centennial Ice Rink in Wilmette.

    Champion Hoffman figure skater, 12, eyes Olympics

    Even in the swarm of skaters buzzing by each other during the final minutes of an open-ice session, Tomoki Hiwatashi stands out. Given his unadulterated joy and unmatched skill, it's no wonder the spirited Hoffman Estates 12-year-old already is a two-time national figure skating champion.

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    Dawn Patrol: Teen collapses in Fox, dies; Elgin limits gambling

    Crystal Lake teen dies after being pulled from Fox River. Wauconda will let voters decide if they want to switch to Lake Michigan water source. Des Plaines man found naked and covered with blood has charges dropped. Boy, 11, struck by semitrailer truck in Elk Grove Village. Cocaine found in fatal DUI suspect's system, according to prosecutors. Elgin affirms ban on video gambling.

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    When jazz drummer Paul Wertico performs, every show is different. “The thing about live music is that when you go to a live show, that’s a once-in-a-lifetime event,” said Wertico, who performs Saturday at Jazz in Glen Ellyn.

    Drummer Paul Wertico headlines Jazz in Glen Ellyn

    Drummer Paul Wertico can make jazz out of anything — even the kitchen sink. He's bringing his Grammy-winning beats to Jazz in Glen Ellyn on Saturday, July 14, as the evening's headliner. "The thing about live music is that when you go to a live show, that's a once-in-a-lifetime event," Wertico said. "It's just something that happens."

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    Elgin council changes format for public comment at meetings

    Elgin City Council members now will be able to respond to people speaking during the public comment portion of their meetings thanks to an informal decision made Wednesday. Councilman John Prigge suggested the change to proactively deal with resident concerns and increase transparency of government. He also requested that members wishing to table an item up for discussion be required to say why.

Sports

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    After the Thursday release of the Freeh report, there already is discussion on the future of Joe Paterno statue that stands outside Beaver Stadium on the Penn State campus.

    Paterno name means only one thing

    Penn State fans — and those who despise the school equally — wanted to know, “What will this mean for Joe Paterno’s legacy?” Joe Paterno will be remembered for one thing and only one thing: He helped a child rapist commit crimes with impunity, Barry Rozner writes. He sat back and let it happen, all in the name of making money for Penn State, winning football games and preserving his good name.

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    Jake DeClute

    Wheaton College grad coaching against Fire Saturday

    Wheaton native Jake DeClute got his start coaching in his hometown for the legendary Joe Bean, and he's made it all the way to Major League Soccer as a Vancouver Whitecaps assistant. Soccer columnist Orrin Schwarz describes how the local kid made it to big-time soccer.

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    Cougars clobbered 9-1

    With 6 runs in the final three innings, the South Bend Silver Hawks pulled away late and trounced the Kane County Cougars with a 9-1 victory Thursday night at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark.South Bend pulled ahead in the top of the second as Roidany Aguila singled and advanced to second on a balk from Kellen Moen (3-6) before scoring on a two-out knock from Raul Navarro.Chris Ellison tripled to start the third inning and scored on a groundout off the bat of Elgin native Ryan Court to put the Silver Hawks up by a pair.Archie Bradley (8-5) was solid over six innings as he surrendered just a run on 4 hits while punching out six.Bradley’s only run allowed scored in the third as the Cougars (45-45, 11-9) strung together 3 singles with Kenny Swab scoring on a Justin Trapp hit, coupled with an Ellison error in center.South Bend never looked back from there. They picked up 1 more run off Moen in the fourth as Aguila cracked an RBI double to bring home Kerry Jenkins.Kane County’s bullpen was tagged late as the Silver Hawks scored 3 runs off Jonathan Dooley and 1 in the eighth against Andrew Triggs before Aguila ripped a 2-run homer in the ninth off Cody Fassold.

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    Durant scores 24, US Olympic team wins exhibition

    Kevin Durant had 24 points and 10 rebounds to lead the U.S. Olympic basketball team to a 113-59 victory over the Dominican Republic on Thursday night in an exhibition game. The MVP of the world basketball championship two years ago, Durant came off the bench to shoot 9 of 11 from the field, making 5 of 6 3-pointers in 22 minutes.

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    Things brewing for Bulls?

    Two days into the NBA’s free-agent signing period, this much is clear about the Bulls: Nothing has happened.No Kirk Hinrich signing. No massive offer sheet for Omer Asik. So what’s going on?The inaction is an indication that a number of potential moves are simmering on the grill. Only time will tell if any survive.Hinrich will end up signing with the Bulls eventually. Clearly, they’re waiting to see if other things can happen first.There has been talk about trying to trade Kyle Korver for a draft pick, which would create a $5 million trade exception for the Bulls.Atlanta has been mentioned as a potential destination and just gained a trade exception by sending Joe Johnson’s hefty salary to Brooklyn.It’s difficult to predict the chances of a Korver trade happening, but here’s something to remember about trade exceptions — they give teams a chance to take on salary in a trade.The Bulls couldn’t create a trade exception and use it to sign a free agent such as Courtney Lee or O.J. Mayo. It would have to be a sign-and-trade with something headed back to that player’s current team.In the meantime, rumors swirled Thursday that Houston was preparing to make an all-out pitch to trade for Orlando center Dwight Howard. The Rockets planned to use the amnesty provision on power forward Luis Scola, according to reports, which could give them as much as $30 million in cap space.Using the Brooklyn trade that didn’t go down as a model, the Magic seem to prefer draft picks and salary relief in any Howard trade. The Rockets could take on the expensive deals of Hedo Turkoglu, Jason Richardson and send young players to Orlando.So what does all this mean for Houston’s offer sheet to Asik? Well, if the Rockets took on salary to add Howard, they could end up with the massive Year 3 luxury-tax bill meant for the Bulls.And Asik probably assumed he was headed to Houston to be a starter. If the Rockets traded for Howard, would it change Asik’s thinking?Once Hinrich signs, the Bulls can add free agents using only the league’s minimum salary, so they’re chasing a wide variety of players. One Bulls target, former Nets forward Gerald Green, signed a three-year deal with Indiana on Thursday.Bulls announce summer squad:The Bulls released their summer-league roster Thursday. The main guys are rookie guard Marquis Teague and second-year forward Jimmy Butler.An interesting name on the list is power forward Leon Powe, who has played for the Celtics, Cavs and Grizzlies. There was talk the Bulls might sign Powe last season, but with no injuries to their big men, there was no need.The rest of the summer players are longshots to make an NBA roster.Former Illinois point guard Demetri McCamey, who played in Turkey last season, is on the list. Some others are Georgetown center Henry Sims and San Diego State forward Malcolm Thomas.The Bulls will play five games at the Las Vegas summer league, starting Tuesday against Boston.Free-agent roundup:New names continued to hit the open market Thursday. Dallas reportedly was set to amnesty center Brendan Haywood, while Houston planned to do the same with forward Luis Scola.Charlotte signed former Lakers guard Ramon Sessions, then renounced point guard D.J. Augustin, who quickly found a new home in Indiana.And here’s a potential backup center if the Bulls lose Omer Asik. Former No. 1 overall pick Greg Oden reportedly changed his mind about sitting out next season to rest his knees and is now hoping to play again.

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    Penn State coach Joe Paterno walks off the field after warmups before Penn State's game at Northwestern. Paterno and other senior Penn State officials “concealed critical facts” about Jerry Sandusky's child abuse because they were worried about bad publicity, according to an internal investigation into the scandal released Thursday.

    Paterno's legacy may now be damaged beyond repair

    For decades Penn State was considered special, immune from the corruption of college athletics by virtue of Joe Paterno's high ideals, long list of victories and even longer list of graduates. For decades Penn State was considered special, immune from the corruption of college athletics by virtue of Joe Paterno's high ideals, long list of victories and even longer list of graduates.

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    Tom Kite, left, and Peter Jacobsen walk off the 18th green Thursday after the first round at the U.S. Senior Open golf tournament at the Indianwood Golf and Country Club in Lake Orion, Mich.

    Kite has record-breaking 28 in 9 at US Senior Open

    Tom Kite set a U.S. Senior Open record with a 28 on the front nine at Indianwood and finished a 5-under 65 on Thursday. Corey Pavin's sixth birdie on his 17th hole pulled him into a tie atop the leaderboard, but a penalty pushed him back to the pack after completing his first round.

  •  
    Ricky Barnes tees off on the sixth hole Thursday during the first round of the John Deere Classic golf tournament at the TPC at Deere Run in Silvis Ill.

    Matteson shoots 61 to lead at John Deere Classic

    Troy Matteson scored 10 birdies Thursday en route to a bogey-free round of 10-under 61 for a three-stroke stroke lead after one round of the John Deere Classic. Matteson, a two-time winner on the PGA Tour, birdied five holes on each nine of the TPC Deere Run to surpass the 7-under 64 of second place Ricky Barnes.

  •  
    With trade talk heating up, could Ryan Dempster be making his last start for the Cubs when he faces the Diamondbacks on Saturday?

    Change a good thing for Cubs

    The Cubs resume the unofficial second half of the season with a weekend series at Wrigley Field against the Arizona Diamondbacks. Cubs fans should take a good luck at this bunch because change is definitely in the air as the trading deadline approaches.

  •  
    White Sox starter John Danks has been out since May 20 with a shoulder injury, and a September return looks like the best-case scenario.

    Simple second-half plan for White Sox

    The first half of the season is in the books, and the White Sox were quite the story. But there are still 77 games on the schedule, so it's not even close to time for celebration. Beat writer Scot Gregor reviews the keys to the second half as the Sox get back to business Friday night in Kansas City.

  •  
    Team USA’s Scottie Pippen, left, with Michael Jordan and Clyde Drexler, pose with their gold medals after beating in Barcelona in the 1992 Olympic Games. Jordan tells the Associated Press that he laughed when heard Kobe Bryant said this year’s USA Olympic basketball team could beat the Dream Team that Jordan played on.

    Jordan: 1992 Dream Team better than 2012 USA squad

    Michael Jordan said there's no way Kobe Bryant and this year's USA Olympic basketball team could've beaten the 1992 Dream Team. Jordan told The Associated Press Thursday that he laughed — "I absolutely laughed" — when hearing Bryant's comments that the squad training in Las Vegas could take Jordan and company.

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    Hall of Fame coach Joe Paterno and other senior officials “concealed critical facts” about Jerry Sandusky's child abuse because they were worried about bad publicity, according to an internal investigation into the scandal concluded.

    Penn State probe accuses Paterno of cover-up

    Joe Paterno and other top Penn State officials buried child sexual abuse allegations against Jerry Sandusky more than a decade ago to avoid bad publicity, according to a scathing report Thursday that exposed a powerful "culture of reverence" for the football program and portrayed the Hall of Fame coach as more deeply involved in the scandal than previously thought. Read former FBI Director Louis Freeh's full report here.

  •  
    Former FBI director Louis Freeh speaks Thursday about the Freeh Report during a news conference in Philadelphia. Freeh says the most “saddening and sobering” finding from his group’s report into the Jerry Sandusky child sex scandal is Penn State senior leaders’ “total disregard” for the safety and welfare of the ex-coach’s child victims.

    Reaction to Freeh Group’s findings on Penn State

    Reactions to Freeh Report released Thursday that found Joe Paterno and other top Penn State officials hushed up child sex abuse allegation against Jerry Sandusky more than a decade ago for fear of bad publicity:

  •  
    Blake Griffin aggravated a left knee injury during U.S. Olympic team training camp and has returned to Los Angeles for evaluation. The Clippers forward was hurt during a scrimmage Wednesday, a person with knowledge of the details said, confirming a Yahoo Sports report.

    Griffin hurts knee at US camp, out for exhibition

    Blake Griffin aggravated a left knee injury during U.S. Olympic team training camp and has returned to Los Angeles for evaluation. The Clippers forward went through a full practice Wednesday before reporting discomfort, USA Basketball said. Griffin will miss the Americans' first exhibition game Thursday night.

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    Pierre Rolland kisses his pendant Thursday as he crosses the finish line to win the 11th stage of the Tour de France in La Toussuire.

    Rolland wins tough Tour stage; Wiggins holds lead

    Pierre Rolland of France won the hardest Alpine stage in the Tour de France on Thursday, and Bradley Wiggins dusted defending champion Cadel Evans in the final climb to extend his overall lead. Rolland gave the Europcar team its second straight stage win after the 92-mile ride in the Alps from Albertville ended with a grueling ascent to the ski resort of La Toussuire.

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    And now there are 10. Simeon Career Academy’s Jabari Parker, the Gatorade National Boys Basketball Player of the Year, has narrowed his choices for college to 10 schools, and DePaul is one of them. Parker hopes to narrow his list to five schools this fall, and make his decision by November.

    Simeon’s Parker puts DePaul on his Top 10 list

    Simeon high school basketball star Jabari Parker has named the 10 college programs he is considering with a year to go before he graduates, and DePaul made the cut but Illinois and Northwestern did not. Parker tweeted his 10 schools Wednesday night in no particular order: national champion Kentucky, Stanford, Michigan State, Kansas, Florida, Duke, BYU, Georgetown, DePaul and North Carolina."I want to make my decision in November if that's possible," he told The Associated Press at the Gatorade national prep athletes of the year dinner a night earlier in Los Angeles. "I just need to cut it down so I'll be able to go on visits and make my decision from there."

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    Mike North video: Clary get off Phelps

    What kind of teammate is Tyler Clary to talk about Michael Phleps? Is he all wet?

Business

  •  
    On the same day a scathing report was released, condemning former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno and others for covering allegation of child abuse, Nike has decided to change the name of the Joe Paterno Child Development Center, a child care facility at the company’s headquarters.

    Nike taking Paterno’s name off child care center

    The president of Nike Inc. says he has decided to change the name of the Joe Paterno Child Development Center, a child care facility at the company’s headquarters. CEO Mark Parker said Thursday he was deeply saddened by the news coming of the Louis Freeh investigation on the child sex abuse scandal at Penn State. Says Parker: “It is a terrible tragedy that children were unprotected from such abhorrent crimes.”

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    An empty bike rack sits outside LA Fitness in Schaumburg, which is closing Aug. 1. Company officials would not comment on the reason for the closing, but village officials speculated it may be the result of increased competition nearby.

    LA Fitness in Schaumburg to close August 1

    Barely half a year after changing from a Bally's, the LA Fitness health club at 1020 N. Meacham Road in Schaumburg will close Aug. 1, members and employees learned this week. Village of Schaumburg staff believes increased competition in the area could have been a factor. That competition will increase toward the end of the year when a 24-hour XSport Fitness opens about a block away, in the former Great Indoors building it will share with the PGA Tour Superstore at Golf and Meacham roads.

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    A protestor wearing a donkey costume walks among thousands of others gathered in Lisbon’s main Rossio square Thursday, during a teachers demonstration protesting the government’s education budget cuts. Concerns over Europe’s financial crisis weighed U.S. markets down Thursday.

    Stocks slide on Wall Street for sixth straight day

    U.S. stocks slid for a sixth day Thursday as concern spread that weaker global economic growth and the European debt crisis will hurt U.S. corporate earnings.

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    Yahoo’s restless shareholders let interim CEO Ross Levinsohn, above, know that they won’t give him much time to turn the company around if he gets the job on a permanent basis at Yahoo’s annual shareholders meeting Thursday.

    Yahoo’s interim CEO faces off with shareholders

    Yahoo's restless shareholders let interim CEO Ross Levinsohn know that they won't give him much time to fix the troubled company if he gets the job on a permanent basis.

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    MyTouch in black, manufactured by Huawei, will be carried by T-Mobile.

    Huawei may expand in Rolling Meadows, offers more smartphones

    Kukec's eBuzz looks at China's Huawei, which could expand its Rolling Meadows office, after launching more consumer smartphones and tablets this year. The devices are in an affordable range: Both will be offered on T-Mobile later this summer, in stores and online at www.t-mobile.com, for $49.99 after $50 mail-in rebate card and a two-year contract.

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    Yahoo said Thursday that a security breach on its site exposed 450,000 user names and passwords for accounts at Yahoo and other Internet services such as Microsoft Corp.’s Hotmail and AOL Inc.

    Yahoo confirms theft of 450,000 users’ passwords

    Some 450,000 Yahoo users' email addresses and passwords have been leaked because of a security breach, the company confirmed Thursday, adding that just a small fraction of the stolen passwords were valid.

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    Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Ray Conner, left, presents a model of Boeing’s new 737 Max 9 to United Airlines CEO Jeff Smisek during a news conference as Boeing CEO Jim McNerney looks on, Thursday in Chicago.

    United Airlines orders 150 Boeing 737s

    United Airlines is buying 150 Boeing 737s, planning to use them to replace older planes that are not as fuel efficient.

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    Billionaire investor Warren Buffett said Thursday that U.S. economic growth has slowed in the last two months as fears about Europe’s debt woes mounted.

    Buffett says general economy slowing this summer

    Billionaire investor Warren Buffett said Thursday that U.S. economic growth has slowed in the last two months as fears about Europe's debt woes mounted.

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    An open-air style European market, like this one in Lisle, soon could be opening in Vernon Hills but may be delayed until next year.

    European-style market plan in Vernon Hills depends on vendor interest

    An open-air style European market could be opening in Vernon Hills but the timing depends on the availability of vendors. With the farm market season in full swing, there has been limited interest among vendors to fill slots in a French Market. Village officials have bought into the concept, operated by Bensidoun USA Inc., in several other communities but its opening at the Metra parking lot on Route 45 may have to wait until 2013.

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    Hoffman Estates launches website to attract business

    Hoffman Estates has launched a new website aimed at attracting more business to the village by allowing customizable online searches for available commercial, industrial and retail properties. More than 100 properties are listed on the website.

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    Suzanne Meredith, of Walpole, Mass., gases up her car at a Gulf station in Brookline, Mass.

    Oil prices fall to near $85 a barrel in Asia

    Oil fell to near $85 a barrel Thursday as signs of slowing global economic growth offset hopes that central banks will soon implement stimulus measures. Benchmark oil for August delivery was down 71 cents at $85.10 a barrel by late afternoon Singapore time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Crude rose $1.90 to settle at $85.81 on Wednesday in New York.

  •  
    American Airlines is weighing various options for its future, but most analysts say the nation's No. 3 airline only has one viable choice: combine with No. 5 US Airways.

    Merger Dance: Rating American Airlines' options

    American Airlines is weighing various options for its future, but most analysts say the nation's No. 3 airline only has one viable choice: combine with No. 5 US Airways. American could leave bankruptcy protection as an independent airline. Or join forces with a much smaller airline such as JetBlue or Frontier.

  •  
    Marvin Traub

    Merchant prince Marvin Traub dead at 87

    Marvin Traub, a merchant prince and former CEO of Bloomingdale's, who transformed the department store chain into an international powerhouse, died at his home in Manhattan on Wednesday. He was 87. The cause was bladder cancer, according to Mortimer Singer, president of Marvin Traub Associates Inc., a consulting firm that Traub started in 1992. He had been battling the illness since late 2009.

  •  
    A customer holds a Link card, Illinois' version of food stamps, before paying for groceries at a store in Chicago.

    House committee approves 5-year farm bill

    The House Agriculture Committee has approved a five-year farm and nutrition bill that gives farmers new ways to protect themselves from bad weather and poor prices and slices about 2 percent off the $80 billion the government spends every year on food stamps.

  •  
    In this June 25, 2012 file photo, DeAun Tollefson, whose home is in foreclosure, joined others in a march at the Capitol to protest home foreclosures in Sacramento, Calif.

    More U.S. homes facing foreclosure risk in June

    Banks are increasingly placing homes with unpaid mortgages on a countdown that could deliver a swell of new foreclosed properties onto the market by early next year, potentially weighing further on home values.

  •  
    Job seekers attend a career fair hosted by GreenTech Automotive in Horn Lake, Miss.

    Jobless claims in U.S. plunge as fewer auto plants close

    Fewer Americans than forecast filed first-time claims for unemployment insurance payments last week, reflecting the volatility of applications during the annual auto-plant retooling period. Applications for jobless benefits decreased by 26,000 in the week ended July 7 to 350,000, the fewest since March 2008, Labor Department figures showed today. Economists forecast 372,000 claims, according to the median estimate in a Bloomberg News survey.

  •  
    Workers walk past a site map in PSA Peugeot Citroen La Janais factory near Rennes, western France, Thursday

    France’s PSA Peugeot-Citroen slashing 8,000 jobs

    Struggling French carmaker PSA Peugeot-Citroen announced Thursday a drastic cost-cutting plan to slash 8,000 jobs in France and close a factory north of Paris, as it faces diving sales in crisis-hit southern Europe. Union members vowed to try to fight back and plan protests later Thursday.

  •  
    A startup company can continue to send live TV programming to iPhones and other mobile devices.

    Judge lets startup relay live TV to iPhones in NYC

    A startup company can continue to send live TV programming to iPhones and other mobile devices in the city despite objections from major broadcasters that say expansion can threaten the free broadcasting of events such as the Super Bowl, a judge ruled Wednesday. U.S. District Judge Alison Nathan said she understood how the service provided by the company, Aereo, may be unfair to broadcasters. But she said the law left her no choice but to reject a request by News Corp.'s Fox and other broadcasters to pull the plug on the company.

  •  
    A street vendor tries to sell cheap handbags in Beijing, China.

    China's economic slowdown painful despite stimulus

    China's economic slowdown slammed into Li Fangliang, cutting sales at his Shanghai auto parts store by half."There are just fewer and fewer customers," said Li, who has avoided layoffs among his four employees. "I plan to start a shop online to find new markets."

  •  
    Yahoo Inc. says it's investigating reports of a security breach that has purportedly exposed nearly half a million users' email addresses and passwords.

    Yahoo investigating reported mass password breach

    Yahoo Inc. says it's investigating reports of a security breach that has purportedly exposed nearly half a million users' email addresses and passwords. The company said in a statement that that it was looking into "claims of a compromise of Yahoo! user IDs" but didn't give any further detail as to the size of the reported breach or how it may have happened.

  •  
    Chicao-based Groupon’s stock hit its lowest level Wednesday since the online deals company went public last November amid concerns about traffic to its website and its exposure to Europe’s weak economy.

    Groupon’s stock hits lowest level since IPO

    hicao-based Groupon's stock hit its lowest level Wednesday since the online deals company went public last November amid concerns about traffic to its website and its exposure to Europe's weak economy.Internet trends tracker ComScore Inc. says traffic to Groupon declined 15 percent in June from a year earlier. Groupon.com had about 12.2 million unique visitors last month from 14.5 million in June 2011.

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    Social site Formspring hacked, passwords disabled

    Social networking site Formspring said Tuesday that it was disabling nearly 30 million registered users' passwords after hundreds of thousands of them were leaked to the Web in their encrypted form. Formspring said in a blog post that the breach happened after someone hacked into one of the San Francisco-based company's servers.

  •  
    People walk past the electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo Thursday.

    Global stocks slide on Fed minutes

    Global stock markets fell Thursday on fears growth may slow in China and after U.S. Federal Reserve minutes indicated the central bank may not move as quickly as hoped to stimulate the country's economy. Britain's FTSE 100 was down 0.6 percent at 5,626.91. France's CAC-40 shed 0.4 percent to 3,145.38, while Germany's DAX fell 0.8 percent to 6,402.15, while Asian markets fell overnight.

  •  
    Two former private investigators, Joseph DePante, left, and his son Mathew DePante charged with allegedly using false identities to access the phone records of Hewlett-Packard board members, employees and journalists are scheduled for sentencing in federal court Thursday .

    Ex-HP investigators to be sentenced in fed court

    Two former private investigators are facing sentencing on charges of allegedly using false identities to gain access to the phone records of Hewlett-Packard board members, employees and journalists.Matthew DePante and his father, Joseph DePante, were to appear in U.S. District Court in San Jose Thursday, each to be sentenced to three years of probation and six months of electronic monitoring as part of a deal with prosecutors.

  •  
    Workers inside the AMF Rolling Meadows bowling alley Wednesday were tearing out the lanes.

    Rolling Meadows bowling alley closure surprises many

    After more than 50 years in the community, AMF Rolling Meadows bowling alley closed last week, catching many in the community by surprise. "It came as a complete surprise to a lot of people," said Rolling Meadows Community Development Director Valerie Dehner said. "We consider it a great loss for our downtown."

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    A look at ‘Live More, Want Less: 52 Ways to Find Order in Your Life’

    Every year, millions of people vow to get organized. And every year, millions fail. Author Mary Carlomagno decided to tackle this predicament in her new book, "Live More, Want Less: 52 Ways to Find Order in Your Life" (Storey Publishing, $12.95). "I wanted a setup that is accessible all year round so you could jump in at any point and get started," she said in a phone interview.

  •  
    Rebecca Anderson, and her daughter, Lily, 4, enjoy the sidewalk chalk made from scratch.

    Moldable dough, catchable bubbles all homemade fun

    When my 2-year-old spills his new bottle of bubbles, I see nickels and dimes evaporating. Or when my 4-year-old uses half the chalk in one afternoon to make a pile of chalk dust to dance in, I try not to see dollar signs in her footprints. Luckily, I've found some pretty easy "recipes" for some of these basic staples of childhood using things we already have around the house.

  •  
    “American Idol” judges, from left, Steven Tyler, Jennifer Lopez and Randy Jackson are shown on the set of the singing competition series, “American Idol,” in Los Angeles. Tyler announced Thursday that he will not be returning as a judge on the singing competition series “American Idol.” Tyler served as a judge with singer/actress Jennifer Lopez and Randy Jackson on the 10th and 11th season of the series.

    Steven Tyler exiting as ‘American Idol’ judge

    Steven Tyler says he's exiting "American Idol" to put rock n' roll first. Tyler said he's leaving the hit show after two seasons to rededicate himself to Aerosmith, the band he fronts. The rock star said he loved every minute on the hit Fox singing contest but added, "it's time to bring rock back."

  •  
    Actress and singer Kristin Chenoweth was taken to the hospital after suffering an injury on the set of the CBS drama “The Good Wife” in New York City.

    Chenoweth injured on set of ‘Good Wife’

    Actress Kristin Chenoweth is out of the hospital after being injured on the set of the CBS drama “The Good Wife.” Her publicist, Jill Fritzo, said Thursday that Chenoweth was home recovering after being hit on the head by a piece of set equipment that fell in a gust of wind on Wednesday.

  •  
    The rock band the Rolling Stones, from left, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood and Charlie Watts marked the 50th anniversary of their first-ever live performance at the Marquee club in London.

    Rolling Stones celebrate 50 years on stage

    Mick Jagger may rethink the words he sang more than 45 years ago — "What a drag it is getting old." Thursday marks 50 years since Jagger played his first gig with a band called the Rolling Stones, and the group is marking its half-century with no letup in its productivity or rock 'n' roll style.

  •  
    A scam artist (John Goodman) offers some Cutty Sark to Uncle Mort (John Malkovich) in Bob Meyer's Chicago-shot drama "Drunkboat."

    Chicago-shot ‘Drunkboat’ a pretentious mess

    Dann reviews the Chicagoland-made drama "Drunkboat" starring John Malkovich, and Sarah Polley's newest romantic drama "Take This Waltz" starring an amazing Seth Rogen. Dann also supplies a few Reel Life critics' notes, plus reveals how Hollywood screenwriters are so artistically inbred that they continue to recycle key lines of dialogue over and over in their movies, regardless of genres.

  •  
    Diego (Denis Leary) shares a love-hate pussycat relationship with Shira (Jennifer Lopez) in "Ice Age: Continental Drift."

    Latest kid-friendly 'Ice Age' sequel plays it safe

    The animated 3-D comedy “Ice Age: Continental Drift” proves that the fourth time's fairly charmless. Directed with accelerated verve, this sequel sacrifices nuance and depth for pacing and sitcom payoffs, resulting in a kid-friendly movie without much bait to hook adult viewers. And again the franchise has allowed its innovation to melt, along with its opportunity to deliver important lessons to viewers.

  •  
    “Exit Interview” by David Westin

    'Exit Interview' takes readers behind cameras of ABC News

    As president of ABC News from 1997 through 2010, David Westin guided the network through an impressive list of history-making stories: the impeachment of President Bill Clinton, the 2000 election and 9/11. In "Exit Interview," Westin takes readers behind the cameras for his post-mortem on the job. It turns out that what was going on behind the cameras was just as interesting as the stories unfolding in front of it.

  •  
    Maybach Music Group’s “Self Made Vo. 2”

    Rick Ross, MMG offers solid ‘Self Made 2’

    The Maybach Music Group has become one of the most popular record labels in hip-hop with a roster loaded with talented artists. Rick Ross is one of the genre's best and the star of the label, which includes rappers Wale, Meek Mill along with the new additions of rapper Stalley and singer Omarion. Collectively, the core unit continues their hot streak with the label's second compilation, "Self Made Vol. 2."

  •  
    Chris Colfer signs copies of his first children’s book at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 19, at Anderson’s Bookshop in Naperville.

    Book notes: Chris Colfer comes to Anderson’s

    Golden Globe-winning actor Chris Colfer of television's "Glee," signs copies of his first children's book, "The Land of Stories," on Thursday, July 19, at Anderson's Bookshop in Naperville.

  •  
    Sisters Masha (Carrie Coon, left), Irina (Caroline Neff, center) and Olga (Ora Jones) yearn to leave their provincial home for Moscow in Tracy Letts’ modern take on “Three Sisters,” Anton Chekhov’s timeless examination of inertia.

    Adaptation breathes new life into ‘Three Sisters’

    Tracy Letts' punchy, pithy adaptation of "Three Sisters" might rile Chekhov purists, but the new Steppenwolf production takes the work's original points about a family in decay and brings them firmly into the present. Far from being ponderous, Letts' "Three Sisters," as directed by Anna Shapiro, even breathes a little humor into the text.

  •  

    Music notes: On Parr at Viper Alley

    It'll be a busy week for music, with the Pitchfork Music Festival bringing dozens of indie-rock bands to Chicago this weekend and Def Leppard performing its brand of '80s metal in Rosemont on July 19.

  •  
    Village Vitner in Algonquin is a winery, brewery and restaurant.

    Home-brewed beers, wines a fine touch at Village Vintner

    House-blended wines, on-premise brewed beers and made-from-scratch food. The newly expanded and relocated Village Vintner in Algonquin does it all. Village Vintner's wine experts buy grapes from the world's premier wine regions and then locally do everything from fermentation through bottling. In a separate wing of their building, brewmasters concoct their microbrewed beers. Not to be outdone by the beverage experts, the chefs and kitchen staff create everything in-house from wood-fired oven pizzas to barbecued ribs.

  •  

    Recipes for homemade fun
    Recipes for homemade play stuff for kids. Check out bubble solution, sidewalk chalk, sponge balls, could dough, cooked playdough and baked cotton balls (aka dinosaur rocks).

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: Water district should be dissolved

    The Otter Creek Water Reclamation District is a clear example of a governmental layer that can be folded into the duties of other agencies, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    Where they play, rich conservatives like zoning

    Last weekend’s memorable photo is of Mitt Romney driving his massive powerboat past a privately built castle, not unlike his own, on New Hampshire’s Lake Winnipesaukee. On Sunday, he moseyed across the Long Island Sound to the beachy pleasure dome of billionaire conservative David Koch, in Southampton, N.Y. -- for a $75,000-a-couple dinner to raise money from like-minded Republicans. Not far away, Koch’s brother Bill, a fellow funder of conservative causes, holds court in the exclusive waterfront enclave of Osterville, on Cape Cod. The brothers’ family business, based far away in Wichita, Kan., is a notoriously careless emitter of toxic wastes. The Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Massachusetts ranks Koch Industries as America’s 10th-worst air polluter. Thus, not a few eyes roll as Bill continues to lead the long fight against a planned wind farm off Osterville’s shore. You understand, it would mar the alleged environmental perfection of the waters in which he sails. The region’s choice corners are chock-a-block with rich Democrats, too, but it is politically their natural habitat. Why do conservatives from elsewhere hang out in places that tax and regulate and do all kinds of other mean things to rich people like themselves? The reason is that these are nice places, and they are that way precisely because they tax and regulate. And these guys know it. If cooler summers were all they craved, they’d be partying in Upper Wisconsin. A libertarian friend, a journalist from Texas, once told me she’d like to live in a nice, preserved New England village, but no one there would buy her politics. I told her that if the region bought her politics, the village wouldn’t be nice and preserved. Google the words “McDonald’s” and “Osterville,” and the first link is “Places for McDonald’s near Osterville,” not “in Osterville.” The West’s libertarian ethic is a beautiful thing when it comes to letting folks get fat, smoke pot or otherwise conduct their lives in peace. But the belief that a man can do anything he wants on his land often leads to destroyed environments. New England had a piece of environmental good luck when America’s boundaries started expanding. The land was useless from an extractive-industry point of view. Little gas, little coal. Ditto gold, silver and other metals. At the first opportunity, even farmers fled the rocky soil for the fertile Midwest. And so the Yankees had to switch to plan B. They built factories, using river power, until put out of business by cheaper energy and labor elsewhere. This was at bottom a knowledge economy that continues to this day. The modern version relies on universities to churn out computer, biotech and other inventors of new businesses. Another part of plan B was to become financiers to the national economy. As investors, New Englanders fanned across the country extracting riches from other regions. They did mining, oil drilling, railroad building. How their activities harmed these other environments was, in most cases, the last thing on their minds. They made sure that their kids attended prized schools back East and that they themselves would not spend their summers near an open pit mine in southern Arizona. They came home to the fresher breezes and charming villages of the Northeast. And the rich from other regions joined them for the summer party. It’s one thing to pollute other areas. It’s another to despoil where one goes for recreation. It’s animal nature not to dirty one’s own nest. Wherever the well heeled — no matter how freedom-loving they profess to be — go to play, you can be sure of one thing: The place will be zoned to its teeth. © 2012, Creators Syndicate Inc.

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    In ‘rough draft,’ we err on the side of inclusion

    Daily Herald columnist Jim Slusher: The Letters to the Editor column can be seen as a rough draft of local thinking, and like all rough drats, it is sometimes not very pretty.

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    Lombard owes thanks to ComEd
    A Lombard letter to the editor: On behalf of the village of Lombard, I wish to publicly thank ComEd for its prompt and efficient response to our residents and businesses in restoring their power after our recent storm.

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    ComEd must resolve power outage issues
    AWood Dale letter to the editor: When I look at my calendar I see the year 2012 but no one would know it if you based it on the ability of ComEd to provide dependable, and that's the key word, power to its customers.

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    Editorial saw the senselessness in fray
    A Chicago letter to the editor: Rep. Joe Walsh obviously admires and respects our military personnel and recognizes the great heroism of his opponent. It is equally obvious what he was trying to say.

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    War in Syria needs careful management
    An Oak Park letter to the editor: The civil war in Syria should be managed with great diplomacy lest it result in an event that turns out to be a disaster of incalculable proportions for the world.

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    Make illegal workers a campaign issue
    A letter to the editor: Romney is missing a golden opportunity because the economy is about jobs, and jobs is an immigration issue.

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    Heroin use is a community problem
    A Hinsdale letter to the editor: We need to remove the stigma from families so honest dialogue at home, at school and with trusted friends can begin.

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    Watch for untruths in your email inbox
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: The number of lies being circulated about President Obama is very upsetting and mind blowing. To me, this is a very sad time for our country.

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    Cut the spending on unneeded activities
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: Families have had to take serious measures to cut back on their spending to live within their means during this recession — why can't government do the same?

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    Stand for candy but not for the flag?
    A Palatine letter to the editor: I just returned from the Fourth of July parade. Very few people stood up or covered their heart when the flag passed by.

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    As voters we can control politics
    A Des Plaines letter to the editor: There is a saying, "Fight crime, vote them out." Only the voters can do this, maybe the time to do it is now.

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    Route 53 extension is long overdue
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Stop playing favoritism to the few and do what is right for the people and has been right for 50-plus years. The people want it, need it and have paid for it over and over again.

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    Who still knows our Bill of Rights?
    An Elgin letter to the editor: I believe the main problem is that nobody knows what is in the Bill of Rights in the Constitution or even cares to read it anymore. Do the school systems even require the passing of the Constitution test anymore to graduate from high school?

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    The good, the bad and the ugly
    A Sugar Grove letter to the editor: We all know what the government has done for the post office, Social Security, Medicare and everything else they get their hands on. They all are broke or are going broke. Now they want to take over our health care.

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