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Daily Archive : Tuesday July 3, 2012

News

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    Police: Aurora woman set fire that killed dog

    An Aurora woman faces arson charges after admitting to setting a fire that injured her roommate, sent a police officer to the hospital to be treated for smoke inhalation and killed one of her two dogs, authorities said Thursday. Mary Mueller, 50, of the 300 block of Grant Place, faces charges of aggravated arson resulting in bodily harm and residential arson after setting fire to her second-floor...

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    John Hutton

    Gurnee-area schools trying to eliminate need for student taxi rides

    Three school districts serving the Gurnee area intend to replace or supplement the current use of private taxis for students who require special-needs transportation. "It is very difficult to ensure that the taxi companies have valid insurance, conduct criminal background checks and do sexual predator checks," Gurnee Elementary District 56 Superintendent John Hutton said.

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    Several suburbs are canceling fireworks shows due to the heat and dry weather — or damage from storms.

    Latest status of fireworks shows in the suburbs

    Several suburbs have canceled fireworks shows. Here's a list at a glance of what's on, what's not and what's still up in the air.

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    Customers try samples during the grand opening of Mariano's Fresh Market Tuesday in Palatine.

    Mariano's grocery store coming to Lake Zurich

    A Mariano's Fresh Market and two banks will make their way to Lake Zurich in the near future. The retail project on the northwest corner of Route 22 and Quentin Road, was approved by the village board Monday night. Steve Pagnotta, president of Bradford Real Estate Co. explained landscape, architecture, and traffic issues of the plan at the meeting. "People tend to go to grocery stores multiple...

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    Abby Goldberg, 12, of Grayslake listens to Gov. Pat Quinn at a Chicago news conference Tuesday after she presented him with a petition with 154,000 signatures urging him to veto a proposed recycling law that would prohibit communities from imposing a ban on plastic bags.

    Foes say plastic bag recycling law won't work

    Environmentalists are urging Gov. Pat Quinn to veto a bill that would require manufacturers of plastic bags to set up collection and recycling programs, calling it a ploy by industry to do an end run around communities that want to adopt more stringent recycling or reduction programs — or ban the ubiquitous bags altogether.

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    Bartlett gold dealers now under regulation

    Jewerly and gold dealers in Bartlett will now be required to keep a digital photograph of each jewelry or precious metal item they buy, along with an accurate description of the items purchased or received and the name, address, driver's license number and description of the person selling the item. The information will be relayed to police and the items will be kept on hold by the owner for five...

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    McHenry County sets nonunion raises

    The McHenry County Board voted to grant a 2.5-percent raise to nonunion workers with the assurance that the county could afford that without raising the tax levy. Tuesday morning's 14-8 vote took place much earlier than usual as per the new budget policies recently set by the county board.

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    Rounds have been up at the Countryside Golf Club in Mundelein and other courses operated by the Lake County Forest Preserve District.

    Rounds played up at Lake County forest golf courses

    Better weather this spring meant a growth spurt for golf at the Lake County Forest Preserve District's facilities compared with last year. At the district courses — Countryside in Mundelein, Brae Loch in Grayslake and ThunderHawk in Beach Park — revenues and the number of rounds played have increased substantially, officials say. "Especially the first five months," of the year, said...

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    Phillip Perlini

    Grayslake village board approves new police chief

    Grayslake Mayor Rhett Taylor's recommendation that Phillip Perlini become the new police chief was ratified by the village board Tuesday evening. Perlini had been Glenview's deputy police chief. He replaces Matthew McCutcheon, who resigned after Kenosha County authorities accused him of causing an alcohol-related crash in Wisconsin.

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    Vincente Torres-Vasquez

    Round Lake Beach man pleads guilty to aggravated DUI in fatal crash

    Vincente Torres-Vasquez, 49, of Round Lake Beach, pleaded guilty Tuesday to his role in a DUI crash that killed a Lake Geneva motorcyclist and injured two women in Wauconda last year. He could be sentenced to up to 26 years in prison on Aug. 14.

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    Teens charged in $30,000 theft from Lindenhurst school

    Two 17-year-olds and a juvenile have been charged in connection to the theft of $30,000 worth of electronics from a Lindenhurst middle school.

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    This is an undated file photo shows American aviatrix Amelia Earhart. A $2.2 million expedition is hoping to finally solve one of America’s most enduring mysteries. What happened to the famed aviator who went missing over the South Pacific 75 years ago?

    Search to find Earhart wreckage begins in Hawaii

    A $2.2 million expedition is hoping to finally solve one of America's most enduring mysteries: What exactly happened to famed aviator Amelia Earhart when she went missing over the South Pacific 75 years ago?

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    Wheaton approves luxury apartment plans

    Wheaton officials have approved plans for a luxury apartment complex downtown and an agreement with the developer to reimburse about 2 percent of the costs associated with the project. The deal ends months of negotiations and comes after the developer cautioned June 18 that delays were crippling momentum on the $64 million project: a six-story, 306-unit apartment complex bounded by Wesley, Scott,...

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    Shodeen Construction’s request to convert 210,000 square feet of what was envisioned as office space into rental units in Mill Creek was recently OK’d by a Kane County Board committee.

    Mill Creek residents raise ruckus over apartment plan

    Mill Creek residents are angry and appalled by a plan that would give them neighbors from at least 390 new apartments for neighbors. Now a county board that once supported the plan may have a change of heart.

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    A decision hasn't been made whether another parade will be held now that Wheaton's Fourth of July celebration has been canceled. On Tuesday, Carol Stream also canceled its parade and fireworks display.

    Carol Stream latest to scrap July 4 activities

    Carol Stream joined Wheaton Tuesday in canceling its Fourth of July parade and fireworks display because of safety concerns. Rick Gieser of the village's July Fourth Parade Committee said officials were concerned there wasn't enough time to remove debris from Sunday's storm in advance of the planned celebration. "We always want to make sure the public and the residents of Carol Stream are safe,"...

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    Nathan Saavedra

    Kidney transplant recipient out of hospital, now at home

    Nathan Saavedra is home for the holiday and, hopefully, for good. Doctors released the 3-year-old Carpentersville boy from Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago on Tuesday afternoon, 12 days after he underwent a kidney transplant. His mom said the first goal will be to reconnect with the rest of the family.

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    Larry Moore

    Aurora man pleads guilty to his role in robbery

    A 22-year-old Aurora man is sentenced to nine years in prison after pleading guilty to aggravated robbery. Larry Moore was accused of hitting a man over the head with a piece of wood, tying him up and stealing cash, jewelery and his car in March 2012.

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    Wheeling ends FY 2011 with unexpected surplus

    Wheeling ended fiscal year 2011 with a surplus of about $1.5 million even though staff predicted the year would have a deficit of $800,000 or more.

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    Tammy Duckworth, left, opposes Joe Walsh in the 8th Congressional District for the 2012 General Election.

    Duckworth attacks Walsh over military comments

    Democrat Tammy Duckworth Tuesday accused Republican U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh of attacking her military service and a video of some of his comments is drawing national attention, providing another blow in the heated contest for Congress from the 8th District. At a town-hall meeting in Elk Grove Village Sunday, Walsh contrasted Duckworth with Republican U.S. Sen. John McCain, who he said often...

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    Republicans: No pension free lunch

    Illinois Senate Republicans are pointing to new numbers they say make the case that school funding benefits Chicago schools get outweigh the pension costs of suburban and downstate districts.

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    Former Hogan chief of staff leaves U of I

    The woman who served as former University of Illinois President Michael Hogan's chief of staff has agreed to resign from a faculty job and will be paid $175,000 as part of a deal with the school, the university said Tuesday.

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    Fourth NATO terror suspect pleads not guilty

    A 24-year-old accused of threatening to blow up a bridge during the recent NATO summit in Chicago has pleaded not guilty to several counts of falsely making a terrorist threat. Sebastian Senakiewicz appeared at an arraignment hearing on Tuesday at a Cook County courthouse.

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    Rollins railroad crossing closure

    The railroad crossing on Rollins Road in Round Lake Beach will close for a week, starting at 8 a.m. July 17.

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    Clerks get OK to defend gay marriage ban

    Two county clerks from downstate Illinois have received permission to defend the state's gay marriage ban in court. Effingham County Clerk Kerry Hirtzel and Tazewell County Clerk Christie Webb on Tuesday got the OK to intervene in the lawsuit filed in Cook County by 25 gay and lesbian couples.

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    Garner fit to stand trial

    An evaluation of a Waukegan man accused of first degree murder in the shooting death of a cabdriver he was trying to rob on March 13, 2010 determined he is fit to stand trial.

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    Ambrosio Medrano

    Former alderman free on bond

    A federal judge has freed a former Chicago alderman jailed since his arrest on charges he tried to accept kickbacks in a scheme to sell bandages to hospitals. Prosecutors and defense attorneys said at a Tuesday hearing they had agreed to terms of Ambrosio Medrano's release. The conditions included a $175,000 bond secured by his mother-in-law's home and a daily 10 p.m. curfew.

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    Bartlett woman sues after boat crash

    A Bartlett woman injured in a Lake County boating accident in May has sued the driver of the other boat, its owner and a local bar, her attorney announced Tuesday.

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    Fox River Grove fireworks show bites the dust

    The fireworks show scheduled for Wednesday in Huntley, is still a go, but authorities are taking precautions to ensure it goes off without a hitch. Meanwhile, the dry conditions prompted officials in Fox River Grove to postpone their show that was originally slated for Saturday.The new date for Fox River Grove's show is Sept. 8

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    7th Heaven to again close Schaumburg’s Septemberfest

    For the second year in a row, popular local band 7th Heaven will close Schaumburg's three-day Septemberfest on Labor Day. The band will play from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, Sept. 3, on the main stage on Schaumburg's municipal grounds at 101 Schaumburg Court.

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    Erik Paxton

    Police say Aurora man admits to spying on women, girls

    Erik Paxton, a 24-year-old Aurora resident, faces charges of burglary, child pornography possession and misdemeanor "window peeping," according to police and court documents. Police said the former Heritage YMCA worker admitted to them he stole undergarments from women and girls and spied on others.

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    The village of North Aurora is taking over finishing the public improvements such as streets and sidewalks on several stalled developments. At Randall Highlands, however, the village is giving the developer until July 30 to start the work.

    Village will finish roads, sidewalks in several stalled developments

    North Aurora is taking over finishing streets, sidewalks and utility relocation in several stalled developments. It will pay for the work by collecting on letters of credit posted for the projects.

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    Pope fires Slovak bishop in show of authority

    VATICAN CITY — Pope Benedict XVI fired a 52-year-old Slovak bishop for apparently mismanaging his diocese in a rare show of papal power over bishops that could have implications for U.S. sex abuse cases.

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    Jim Messer coaches wrestlers at Oak Park-River Forest High School, with one of his twin daughters, Josephine, in hand.

    Hersey grad among coaches who helped prepare an Olympian

    Years ago, Jim Messer learned a lot from his wrestling coach at Hersey High School; now, as an assistant coach at River Forest/Oak Park High School the Prospect Heights resident hopes he gave Ellis Coleman some of that, too. Coleman is the youngest wrestler on the U.S. Olympic team, and Messer and his fellow coaches are going to London to see him compete.

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    Jeff Brierton was principal at Warren Township High School's O'Plaine Road campus in Gurnee when he got into a dunk tank during a spring sports assembly. He was supposed to become Warren's superintendent July 1 but instead will receive more than $250,000 under a resignation agreement.

    Warren superintendent choice gets $250,000 to quit

    More than $250,000 will be paid to Jeff Brierton for quitting shortly before he was scheduled to move up this month from principal to superintendent at Warren Township High School in Gurnee, according to documents obtained through a Daily Herald open records request. "Unfortunately, both the board and Dr. Brierton have found that their working relationship has broken down," a statement reads.

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    Lombard Park District workers, including Chad Flint, were clearing fallen branches Tuesday at Madison Meadow Park in preparation for the Taste of Lombard.

    ‘Fingers crossed,’ DuPage towns clean up

    Municipal officials across DuPage County reported significant progress Tuesday in cleaning up the aftermath of Sunday's storm but said it could be weeks before everything is back to normal. "We're keeping our fingers crossed that the storms and this heat spell don't create another problem," Addison Mayor Larry Hartwig said.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A Mount Prospect man was arrested by Mount Prospect police and charged with criminal trespass to residence after he reportedly climbed through a window into an apartment where he once lived and where a 12-year-old girl was babysitting her 8-year-old brother. The girl ran from the apartment and phoned 911.

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    West Chicago making Dumpsters available

    West Chicago is making regional Dumpsters available for residents to place perishable food that has spoiled as a result of the recent electrical power outage.

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    Chef Ron Godsey from Texas Outlaw BBQ prepares racks of pork ribs during last year’s Rockin’ Ribfest. Texas Outlaw and other vendors will return to this year’s Ribfest at Sunset Park beginning Thursday, July 5. The Ribfest benefits the Rotary Club of Lake in the Hills.

    Ribfest in Lake in the Hills benefits local service group

    Rib lovers, rejoice! Summer is the time for cooking outdoors, which lends itself perfectly to barbecue. If you're hankering for award-winning meat from around the nation, Lake in the Hills Rockin' Ribfest is the place to be this weekend.

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    Videotape leads to Des Plaines arrests

    A videotape led to the arrest of a man who Des Plaines police reports said purposely rammed into a Mercedes. Raudel Sanchez, 26, of the 2000 block of Pine Street, Des Plaines, was charged Saturday with improper stopping, improper backing, failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident, leaving the scene of an accident, reckless driving and felony criminal damage to property.

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    Round Lake Park man charged with selling cocaine to officers

    A Round Lake Park man is behind bars after selling crack cocaine to an undercover Lake County Sheriff detective, authorities said Tuesday. Rafael Russell, 24, was arrested about 8 p.m. Monday after he sold about $280 worth of crack to a detective, Lake County Sheriff's Office Chief Wayne Hunter said.

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    Mount Prospect Lions Club auctions Ryder Cup tickets

    The Mount Prospect Lions club is auctioning off a pair of tickets for each day of the Ryder Cup at Medinah Country Club.

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    Andy Griffith as the beloved Sheriff Andy Taylor.

    Andy Griffith, 86, dies at home

    Andy Griffith reportedly died this morning in is Dare County home in North Carolina. He was 86. Former UNC President Bill Friday says The Andy Griffith Show and Matlock actor died at his home in Dare County, North Carolina around 7 a.m.

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    A MQ-9 Predator B, an unmanned aircraft, is displayed at a ceremony to celebrate the authorization from the FAA to use the aircraft to patrol the Texas-Mexico land border Sept. 8, 2010, in Corpus Christi, Texas.

    Conduct code for unmanned aircraft is unveiled

    A trade group for drone aircraft manufacturers and operators has released the industry's first code of conduct in response to growing privacy concerns.

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    The family of Penn State coach Joe Paterno is calling on the Pennsylvania attorney general and former FBI Director Louis Freeh to release all emails and records related to their investigations into the Penn State child sex abuse scandal.

    Email citing Paterno brings defense of late coach

    Details from a decade-old email are raising new questions about Joe Paterno's response to a sex abuse complaint regarding former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky, but a Paterno family spokesman says he's not worried about the impact on the late coach's legacy.

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    Michael Kuryla, president of Cook County Fire Chiefs Association consoles Laura Barros, assistant executive director at the Illinois Fire Safety Alliance in Mount Prospect, as she answers reporters’ questions after being burned during a fireworks safety demonstration.

    One injured during fireworks safety demonstration

    Fire safety experts prove how unsafe fireworks can be when a demonstration goes wrong and the fireworks injure one of the officials on hand to assist in the demonstration. The assistant executive director of the Mount Prospect-based Illinois Fire Safety Alliance suffered a small burn injury on her left foot as a result of the demonstration.

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    Students use a laptop at the Jose Maria public school in a shantytown on the outskirts of Lima, Peru. Peru has sent more than 800,000 laptop computers children across the country, one of the world’s most ambitious efforts to leverage digital technology in the fight against poverty. Yet five years into the program, there are serious doubts about whether the largest single deployment in the One Laptop Per Child initiative was worth the more than $200 million that Peru’s government spent.

    Peru’s ambitious laptop program gets mixed grades

    Peru's equipping of more than 800,000 public schoolchildren in this rugged Andean nation with low-cost laptops ranks among the world's most ambitious efforts to leverage digital technology in the fight against poverty. Yet five years in, there are serious doubts about whether the largest single deployment in the One Laptop Per Child initiative inspired by MIT Media Lab founder Nicholas Negroponte...

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    Carol Stream cancels parade, fireworks

    Carol Stream's Fourth of July parade and fireworks display has been canceled for safety reasons, organizers said Tuesday.

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    Dann Gire meets Griffith in airport line

    During the late 90s, I was standing in line to board an American Airlines jet at Los Angeles International Airport when a tall guy in front of me caught my eye. There was something vaguely familiar about him. So I tapped him on the shoulder and asked, “Excuse me, sir, are you Andy Griffith?”Andy Griffith turned around and smiled at me.

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    Andy Griffith sits in front of a bronze statue of Andy and Opie from the “Andy Griffith Show,” in this Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2003 file photo, after the statue was unveiled during a ceremony in Raleigh, N.C. Griffith, the actor who portrayed the sheriff of the fictional town of Mayberry, N.C. died Tuesday in his North Carolina home.

    Images: Andy Griffith 1926 - 2012
    Andy Griffith died Tuesday morning in is Dare County home in North Carolina. Griffith's legacy role, which earned him the title of "America's Favorite Sheriff"on "The Andy Griffith" show, set in fictional Mayberry, put North Carolina on the map in the entertainment industry. He starred on other shows and in films, but found his greatest success again with legal drama Matlock, from 1986 to 1995.

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    With his wife, Beatrice, taking lots of medications, 93-year-old World War II veteran Jake Joseph of Prospect Heights decided to put all her empty pill bottles to use. The self-taught folk artist used 170 empty bottles and 175 spent inhalation tubes to craft this log cabin. The lighthouse is made from 60 bottles and 60 tubes.

    D-Day veteran, 93, makes art from old medicine bottles

    Jake Joseph, a World War II Army sergeant, can tell stories of carnage and death, courage and bravery, but he would rather focus on the much more whimsical activities he's doing now — creating elaborate miniature buildings out of discarded medicine bottles. “It took 170 pill bottles and 175 inhalation tubes to build this log cabin,” the 93-year-old from Prospect Heights said.

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    If you want a glimpse of some of the worst of global warming, scientists suggest taking a look at U.S. weather in recent weeks.

    This summer is ‘what global warming looks like’

    If you want a glimpse of some of the worst of global warming, scientists suggest taking a look at U.S. weather in recent weeks. Horrendous wildfires. Oppressive heat waves. Devastating droughts. Flooding from giant deluges. And a powerful freak wind storm called a derecho. These are the kinds of extremes climate scientists have predicted will come with climate change, although it's far too early...

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    Arlington Hts. police report restaurant scam

    A man has been using a cleaning bill for a phony restaurant spill to scam money out of diners, Arlington Heights police said. The man approached a manager at the Dunton House Restaurant, 11 W. Davis St., around 4:45 p.m. Saturday. He convinced the manager that an employee on the morning shift spilled food on him.

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    Abortion issue surfaces at Palatine parade

    There's a difference of opinion between the Palatine Jaycees and a local abortion prevention group that wanted to march in the annual parade but didn't get permission because of an image in a banner.

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    A traveling scale model of the World War II Memorial in Washington D.C., will soon be on display in Itasca as part of the Itasca Fest celebration.

    Itasca honors World War II vets with traveling memorial

    There's an old guy down the street who doesn't get out much anymore. But each morning, he wakes to raise the American flag on the pole outside his home. Maybe it's a great uncle. A cousin. A neighbor who fought for our country in World War II. The Itasca Lions Club knows about such veterans and wants residents to seek them out and bring them to see the traveling World War II Memorial model that's...

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    Northwest Fourth-Fest schedule
    Northwest Fourth-Fest schedule

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    Bartlett 4th of July Fest schedule
    Bartlett 4th of July Fest schedule

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    Northwest suburbs in 60 seconds

    Thieves damaged two vending machines at Frontier Park, 1933 N. Kennicott Ave., Arlington Heights, overnight June 27 while attempting to open the coin slots with a pry tool. Damage is estimated at $200.

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    Baltimore city worker Joe Lane gives away free bags of ice to residents at the Northwood Plaza shopping center in Baltimore on Monday, July 2, 2012. Around 2 million customers from North Carolina to New Jersey and as far west as Illinois were without power Monday morning after a round of summer storms.

    1.4 million still blacked out after broad U.S. storms

    WASHINGTON — Utility crews struggled to catch up with a backlog of millions of people without electricity for a fourth hot day Tuesday as frustration grew and authorities feared the toll of 22 storm deaths could rise because of stifling conditions and generator fumes.

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    Syrian President Bashar Assad

    Report: Assad regrets shooting down Turkish jet

    BEIRUT — Syrian President Bashar Assad said he regrets the shooting down of a Turkish jet by his forces, and that he will not allow tensions between the two neighbors to deteriorate into an “armed conflict,” a Turkish newspaper reported Tuesday.

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    Iraq bombs, market attacks leave 33 dead

    BAGHDAD — Market blasts and other bombings across Iraq killed at least 33 people and wounded nearly 100 on Tuesday, spooking an already-rattled public and spurring security officials to clamp down on traffic as Shiite Muslims brace for more tragedy during pilgrimages this week.

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    French arrest man suspected of financing al-Qaida

    PARIS — French authorities have arrested the administrator of an extremist French website who is suspected of playing a key role in financing and recruiting for al-Qaida and other terrorist groups in several countries, the Paris prosecutor’s office said Tuesday.

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    In a March 10, 1937 file photo American aviatrix Amelia Earhart waves from the Electra before taking off from Los Angeles, Ca., on March 10, 1937.

    Search to find Earhart plane wreckage begins in Hawaii

    A $2.2 million expedition is hoping to finally solve one of America's most enduring mysteries: What exactly happened to famed aviator Amelia Earhart when she went missing over the South Pacific 75 years ago? A group of scientists, historians and salvagers think they have a good idea, and are trekking from Honolulu to a remote island in the Pacific nation of Kiribati starting Tuesday in hopes of...

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    A damaged New York Fire Department truck is stored in Hangar 17 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The truck is part of the collection of artifacts for the National September 11 Museum.

    NY mayor rejects Port Authority bid for greater control of 9/11 memorial

    NEW YORK — New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has rejected the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey’s efforts to have a greater say over the 9/11 memorial.The mayor said Monday control should remain with the National September 11 Memorial & Museum foundation to keep the site out of “the political process.”

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    Island cleanup volunteers find message in bottle from 2000

    SOUTH ADDISON, Maine — Volunteers picking up trash in a coastal Maine community found a message in a bottle that apparently floated down the coast from Canada.Becky Lee of Downeast Coastal Conservancy says she discovered the note as she and others cleaned up Tibbett Island off of South Addison.The plastic soda bottle was under a spruce tree with other debris.

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    Donations enable burial for baby found in freezer

    TOLEDO, Ohio — A newborn found dead in an apartment freezer in northwest Ohio is being honored at a public burial service made possible by donations.

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    Man hits $180K jackpot 1 day after son wins $1K

    CRANSTON, R.I. — Perhaps there’s luck in their genes.A man from East Providence has claimed more than $180,000 in lottery winnings, a day after his son won $1,000 in a different game.

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    The Memories Fountain at Fredenhagen Park in downtown Naperville was dedicated in June 2004.

    Memories of the Exchange Club, Ribfest and more

    Ribfest and its sponsor, the Naperville Exchange Club, bring back plenty of happy memories for our Stephanie Penick.

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    Veterinarian Dr. Maureen McMichael, left, head of emergency medicine at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital, and veterinary student Georgean Zyrkowski demonstrate a new method of CPR on critical care Jerry, a model dog used for training .

    University of Illinois develops CPR for dogs, cats

    When a person's heart stops, emergency responders don't have to guess which way is the best to administer CPR. But up until now, there haven't been any real guidelines for the best way to resuscitate a dog or cat suffering cardiac arrest."It was just, `This is what we think you should do,"' says Dr. Maureen McMichael, head of emergency medicine at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching...

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    Teen killed in Antigo crash had high blood alcohol

    The teenaged driver in a May crash that killed two teens in Antigo had blood alcohol content close to three times the legal limit. WAOW in Wausau reports Monday that the Department of Transportation says 18-year-old Jeffrey Smith had a blood alcohol content of .218 at the time of the May 28 crash. The legal limit for driving is .08.

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    Supreme Court ruling could affect Wis. districts

    MILWAUKEE — Most headlines from the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent rulings involved health care. But an unrelated decision could affect how Wisconsin’s election maps get drawn eventually.The court upheld a Maryland redistricting law that would count prisoners as living at their last known address. Before that they were counted as living in their prison cells.

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    Ill. National Guard unit readies for Egypt stay

    Forty-five Illinois Army National soldiers are preparing to deploy to Egypt this fall as part of an international peacekeeping force in the Sinai Peninsula.

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    1 killed, 5 wounded after fight in Indianapolis

    Police say a woman was killed and five people wounded from gunfire after a group of women gathered for a fight at a youth sports complex on the west side of Indianapolis.

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    Dawn Patrol: Thousands without power; fireworks update

    Thousands still without power; Comed hopes for majority to be restored by late Wednesday. Scientists expected to announce existence of "God particle" thanks in part to Fermilab research. Firework shows canceled in Antioch, Mundelein, Wheaton. Drowning victim's body found in Loon Lake. Kaneville teacher sues over DUI arrest.

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    In 2004 drivers on Arlington Heights Road were surprised and delighted by this iconic pose of Marilyn Monroe.

    Snow sculptor Volz forced out of Arlington Hts. home

    Arlington Heights has seen its last snow sculpture by Fran Volz, whose rented home on Arlington Heights Road will be torn down soon. "I'd like to thank everybody for all the years of coming by and giving me support and taking pictures and bringing kids over," said the artist, who says he is moving to Elgin. “It's sad, but maybe this will turn into something."

Sports

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    Tigers reliever Darin Downs pitches in the ninth inning against Minnesota on Tuesday in Detroit.

    Tigers have feel-good story in 8-6 loss to Twins

    Detroit's Darin Downs made his major league debut Tuesday, striking out one and walking one in a hitless ninth inning, to complete quite a comeback. He had a fractured skull and brain swelling after getting hit by a line drive while pitching for Tampa Bay's Double-A team in 2009, putting him on the brink of death.

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    San Diego’s Jesus Guzman gets a high-five from teammate Will Venable after Guzman hit a pinch-hit home run Tuesday against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the eighth inning in Phoenix.

    Padres beat Diamondbacks, spoil Bauer’s home debut

    Chase Headley doubled in three runs and the San Diego Padres roughed up Arizona rookie Trevor Bauer in his home debut 9-5 on Tuesday night, winning their fourth straight and sending the Diamondbacks to their fourth loss in a row.

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    Cubs starting pitcher Chris Volstad walks near the mound Tuesday after giving up a home run to Atlanta Braves right fielder Jason Heyward, rear, during the fifth inning at Turner Field in Atlanta.

    More of the same for Cubs’ Volstad in loss

    The Cubs were hoping Chris Volstad's recall fro the minor leagues would signal a new beginning for the big right-hander. Instead, another big inning proved to be Volstad's undoing as the Cubs had their four-game winning streak snapped in Atlanta.

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    White Sox third baseman Kevin Youkilis gets congratulations from third base coach Joe McEwing after hitting a two-run home run Tuesday during the first inning at U.S. Cellular Field.

    White Sox continue to roll, rout Rangers 19-2

    Is it time to start looking at the White Sox as a legitimate postseason contender?Since 1995, 68 percent of the teams leading their division on July 1 have gone on to the playoffs.The Sox (43-37) still are on top of the AL Central, and they took another day off the calendar Tuesday while hammering the Rangers 19-2.At 50-31, Texas has the best record in major-league baseball.General manager Kenny Williams was feeling pretty good about his team before the White Sox won a game by 17 runs for the first time since July 5, 1987.Williams was not thinking about possible rotation combinations for the playoffs.“Don’t get too far head of yourself,” the GM said. “What we need to focus on on a continuous basis is winning the series, each and every series. It will all take care of itself at the end if we just do that and not take anything for granted.“We are still, I understand, we’re in first place, but we’re a first-place team that has nine rookies. Last I counted. I stopped counting right around seven or so. Well, let’s not tell anyone or tell them. We have so many and maybe no one will notice.“I think it’s a tribute to the scouting department and our player-development department No. 1. Some of the guys that we’ve brought up we’ve drafted, and some of them we’ve gotten whether it be off the waiver wire or through trade, guys have shown a tremendous amount of growth and a tremendous amount of character. Knock on wood, just keep our focus, don’t get too far ahead of ourselves.”Staying in the present, it was an impressive 21-hit showing by the White Sox’ offense, including home runs by Kevin Youkilis, Adam Dunn and Alex Rios in the first inning off Texas starter Roy Oswalt and a 3-run shot by A.J. Pierzynski in the fifth.That was way more than enough run support for Chris Sale (10-2), who had another monster outing in his final start before the all-star break.“It was like an explosion went off,” Sale said after pitching 7 scoreless innings and leaving to raucous cheers from a nice crowd of 30,183 at U.S. Cellular Field.“It was fun to watch. I’d like to sit here and point out who did what, but through the lineup up and down, everyone swung the bat outstanding.“To get that kind of run support, I’ve said it before, it kind of calms you down and you just go about your business and everything will take care of itself.”Youkilis set the tone with a 2-run homer to open the scoring.“It was a good way to start,” manager Robin Ventura said. “Everybody throughout the lineup was able to swing it tonight, and Chris was great. You come to expect that.”Williams landed Youkilis in a June 24 trade from the Boston Red Sox, and the gritty veteran immediate plugged a gaping hole. Are there any more moves on the horizon before the July 31 nonwaiver trade deadline, especially with so many rookies on the 25-man roster?“I guess I’ve always tried to do this job simply by operating under the premise that there’s always one more move to make, and you can’t ever say that there’s not,” Williams said. “I don’t care what time of the year it is, so why should now be any different?”sgregor@dailyherald.com

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    White Sox third baseman Kevin Youkilis, right, celebrates with Alejandro De Aza as they scored on Youkilis’ two-run home run Tuesday against the Texas Rangers during the first inning at U.S. Cellular Field.

    White Sox pound Oswalt and Rangers 19-2

    Kevin Youkilis, Adam Dunn and Alex Rios homered in the first inning off Roy Oswalt and All-Star Chris Sale won his 10th game Tuesday night and the Chicago White Sox routed the Texas Rangers 19-2. Playing in his first home game with the White Sox since his trade from Boston on June 24, Youkilis had three hits and drove in four runs in a meeting of division leaders that saw Chicago score its most runs this season.

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    Indians topple Angels 9-5

    CLEVELAND — Rookie Zach McAllister lasted six innings, overcoming a throwing error and two home runs in the fifth, and Shelley Duncan homered to lead the Cleveland Indians to a 9-5 win over the Los Angeles Angels on Tuesday night.McAllister (3-1) allowed three earned runs and eight hits, and he and the Indians recovered after blowing a four-run lead.Duncan homered in the fourth off an ineffective Dan Haren (6-8). Jose Lopez had three hits and Michael Brantley two RBIs for Cleveland.Rookie Mike Trout hit a three-run homer and Albert Pujols had a solo shot but also made a crucial error in the fifth for the Angels, who lost for just the fourth time in 13 games.The Indians are 5-1 in games started by McAllister, who began the season in the minors.

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    Francis solid, Rockies beat Cardinals 3-2

    Jeff Francis worked five solid innings before the Colorado bullpen took over and Tyler Colvin hit a three-run homer as the Rockies beat the St. Louis Cardinals 3-2 on Tuesday night. Matt Holliday hit his 14th homer for the Cardinals. Carlos Beltran was 0 for 3 with a walk to end a nine-game RBI streak in which he drove in 15 runs.

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    Dynamo and Fire play to scoreless draw

    The Houston Dynamo remained unbeaten at home with a 0-0 draw against the Chicago Fire on Tuesday night. The Dynamo (6-5-6) recorded two shots on goal and moved to 4-0-3 in their new downtown stadium, BBVA Compass Stadium. Tally Hall stopped the Fire's lone shot on goal in the first half, and helped snap Chicago's season-high winning streak at three matches.

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    Desmond, Nationals pound Lincecum, top Giants 9-3

    All-Star shortstop Ian Desmond hit his 14th home run, and the Washington Nationals became the latest team to beat up on Tim Lincecum, pounding the struggling right-hander hard early and often Tuesday night in a 9-3 victory.

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    Cubs starting pitcher Chris Volstad walks near the mound Tuesday after giving up a home run to Atlanta Braves right fielder Jason Heyward, rear, who rounds third base during the fifth inning at Turner Field in Atlanta.

    Jones has 5 hits, 4 RBIs as Braves beat Cubs 10-3

    Newly chosen All-Star Chipper Jones delivered his first five-hit game in a decade, driving in four runs Tuesday night and leading the Atlanta Braves over the Chicago Cubs 10-3. Jones was added to the NL All-Star roster before the game. The 40-year-old third baseman replaced injured Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp.

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    White Sox third baseman Kevin Youkilis, right, celebrates with Alejandro De Aza as they scored on Youkilis’ two-run home run Tuesday against the Texas Rangers during the first inning at U.S. Cellular Field.

    ‘Youk’ a big hit with Sox fans

    Kevin Youkilis was a big hit in his first game at U.S. Cellular Field with the White Sox, going 3-for-6 with a home run and 4 RBI. Youkilis said he is surprised the first-place Sox receive less media attention in Chicago than the last-place Cubs.

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    Cougars’ Brickhouse earns first pro win

    PEORIA — Bryan Brickhouse tossed a 1-hitter through 6 innings as he cruised to his first professional victory in the Kane County Cougars’ 4-1 win over the Peoria Chiefs on Tuesday night at O’Brien Field.Brickhouse (1-0) gave up a double to open the third inningy by Yasiel Balaguert, who advanced to third when Yaniel Cabezas reached on an error by third baseman Danny Mateo. Pin-Chieh Chen bounced into a double play to score Balaguert with an unearned run for the Chiefs (38-43, 3-9).The Cougars (42-40, 8-4) had put Brickhouse in front before his first pitch when Jack Lopez singled and stole second before Jorge Bonifacio walked. A wild pitch from Joe Zeller (0-1) allowed both runners to advance a base. Michael Antonio singled off the glove of third baseman Wes Darvill to drive both runners home for a 2-0 lead.Brickhouse and reliever Andrew Triggs made that lead stick through the first 8 innings. The Cougars finally added to it in the top of the ninth against Luis Liria. Bonifacio singled to start the inning and was at first with two outs when Julio Aparicio cranked an opposite-field home run. Malcom Culver earned his third save.

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    Schaumburg Boomers can’t catch Evansville Otters

    EVANSVILLE, Ind. — The West Division-leading Schaumburg Boomers rallied late but left the tying run in scoring position in both the eighth and ninth innings and dropped a 2-1 decision to Evansville in the series opener at Bosse Field on Tuesday night.The Otters, who own an ERA under 2.00 at home, grabbed a 1-0 lead with two outs in the second when Matt Sheely received a bases-loaded walk, scoring the only earned run allowed by hard-luck loser Robby Donovan (5-2). Donovan worked 7 innings and gave up an unearned run in the fifth.The Boomers (27-16) pulled within 2-1 in the eighth when Chad Mozingo extended his hitting streak to nine games with an RBI single. Otters closer Eric Massingham came on in relief and stranded the tying run at second and did the same in the ninth after a one-out walk to Ty Nelson. Karexon Sanchez belted a deep drive down the line in right field with two outs that went foul.Frank Pfister had 2 hits, and Nelson and Steve McQuail reached base twice. But the Boomers were unable to solve Bryce Morrow (3-4), who tossed 7 shutout innings.

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    Sutton’s walkoff HR lifts Pirates to 8-7 win

    PITTSBURGH — Drew Sutton hit a one-out solo homer in the bottom of the ninth and the Pittsburgh Pirates improved to eight games over .500 for the first time in 20 years with an 8-7 win over the Houston Astros on Tuesday night.Acquired via waivers last week, Sutton homered for the first time since Oct. 3, 2010, lifting the Pirates to their sixth walkoff win of the season, the first via a home run.The Pirates rallied from deficits of 4-0 and 6-2 to take a 7-6 lead on a Garrett Jones two-run homer in the seventh. But with Houston down to its last strike in the ninth, pinch-hitter Jason Castro drove in Jed Lowrie with a double.Andrew McCutchen continued his recent torrid pace by going 3 for 4 with a home run, taking over the National League batting lead at .360. Sutton had three hits and Jones and Casey McGehee each had two hits for Pittsburgh (44-36), which has won six of seven.Houston has lost six straight and eight in a row on the road.

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    Deron Williams said Tuesday on his Twitter page that he "made a very tough decision today" and posted a picture of the new team logo that accompanies the Nets' move from New Jersey to Brooklyn. A person with knowledge of the decision says Williams told the team Tuesday he was accepting their five-year contract worth $98 million.

    Deron Williams takes Nets' $98 million deal

    Deron Williams is moving to Brooklyn with the Nets, instead of back home to Dallas. The All-Star point guard said on his Twitter page Tuesday night that he "made a very tough decision today" and posted a picture of the Nets' new team logo that accompanies their move from New Jersey to Brooklyn.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Chris Sale looks up as he pitches to the Texas Rangers Tuesday during the first inning at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Williams on all-star Sale: Go for it

    Chris Sale is not going to make his scheduled start for the White Sox Sunday, but he is expected to pitch 1 inning in next week's All-Star Game. GM Kenny Williams explains the decision, A.J. Pierynski shrugs off his all-star snub and Jake Peavy talks about running second in Final Vote balloting.

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    Sean Rodriguez keys Rays win over the Yankees

    ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Sean Rodriguez hit a go-ahead two-run homer, helping the Tampa Bay Rays continue their home dominance over the New York Yankees in a 7-4 victory over the AL East leaders on Tuesday night.Rodriguez, mired in a 17 for 100 slump dating back to May 21, finished with 3 for 4.After blowing a three-run lead, New York went ahead 4-3 on Eric Chavez’s RBI single during the fourth. Tampa Bay responded in the bottom half and grabbed a 5-4 lead on Rodriguez’s first homer since May 27 off Ivan Nova (9-3).James Shields (8-5) gave up four runs and 10 hits over seven innings for the Rays, who have won nine straight at Tropicana Field over the Yankees.

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    Lind’s homer leads Cecil, Blue Jays past Royals

    TORONTO — Adam Lind hit a three-run homer, Brett Cecil won for the first time in three starts and the Toronto Blue Jays beat the Kansas City Royals 6-3 on Tuesday night.Lind’s sixth homer was the big blow in Toronto’s six-run fourth inning. The win put the Blue Jays over .500 at 41-40 at the midpoint of the season.The Royals lost for the fourth time in five games since matching their season high with a four-game winning streak.Cecil (2-1) allowed three runs and five hits in six-plus innings to win for the first time since June 17 against Philadelphia, his first start after being promoted from Triple-A Las Vegas. The left-hander walked one and struck out three.

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    Wright, Niese, Mets rough up Phillies

    NEW YORK — Jonathon Niese had a two-run single to back his fine performance on the mound Tuesday night and David Wright hit a three-run homer to break open the New York Mets’ 11-1 romp over the reeling Philadelphia Phillies. Niese (5-3) pitched a season-high eight innings and gave up three hits, one a homer to Carlos Ruiz. His hit in the second inning put New York up for good. The Mets put on a clinic of clutch hitting and slick fielding in handing the Phillies their sixth straight loss. The only thing they did wrong was run into two outs on the basepaths.Daniel Murphy finished a homer short of the cycle, doubled twice, drove in four runs and made a leaping catch and diving stop at second base.

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    Jagr to Stars, Suter and Parise still deciding

    While the two biggest stars on the NHL free-agent market were still pondering their futures, a future Hall of Famer found a new home in Texas. The Dallas Stars signed 40-year Jaromir Jagr to a one-year deal worth $4.55 million on Tuesday.

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    Brewers power past Marlins 13-12

    Aramis Ramirez hit a two-run homer off Heath Bell in the bottom of the 10th inning to lift the Milwaukee Brewers to a 13-12 win over the Miami Marlins on Tuesday.

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    Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville continues to believe his team can play a puck-possession style built around a great offense. That’s contrary to what most NHL teams are doing.

    Hawks in market for change

    The Blackhawks' flirtation with a couple New Jersey free agents is proof of their intention not to stand pat this summer. As of Tuesday, they still had plenty of time to make something happen, and the expectation here is that they will make some changes — maybe even a big one.

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    Northwestern basketball lands highly touted recruit

    Northwestern scored its highest rated recruit in years Monday with New Jersey-native Jared Sina. The point guard is the Wildcats first committement for the class of 2013.

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    NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell stands has rejected the appeals of four players suspended in connection with the league's bounty investigation of the New Orleans Saints.

    NFL denies appeals of bounty suspensions

    NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has rejected the appeals of four players suspended in connection with the league's bounty investigation of the New Orleans Saints. In a ruling handed down on Tuesday, Goodell told Jonathan Vilma, Anthony Hargrove, Will Smith and Scott Fujita that he retains "the inherent authority to reduce a suspension should facts be brought to my attention warranting the exercise of that discretion.

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    USOC to pass on 2022 bid, consider ‘24 and ‘26

    The U.S. Olympic Committee will not bid for the 2022 Winter Games, but will instead explore the possibility of hosting either the 2024 Summer or 2026 Winter Olympics. In a meeting Tuesday, the USOC board decided to form a committee that would look into 2024 and 2026, in part because going for the 2022 Games would put the federation on a fast timeline. A bid for those games would be due in the fall of 2013.

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    Cardinals’ Chris Carpenter to undergo season-ending surgery

    St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Chris Carpenter will undergo season-ending surgery to repair a nerve issue in his shoulder that has sidelined him since spring training.

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    An arbitrator in Philadelphia has ruled in Drew Brees' favor in a dispute over how much the Saints would have to pay him if they applied the franchise tag to the star quarterback again in 2013. The ruling adds leverage to Brees, who has so far skipped the Saints' offseason practices while holding out for a new long-term contract with New Orleans.

    Arbitrator rules for Brees in franchise tag matter

    Drew Brees gained additional leverage in his protracted contract talks with the New Orleans Saints on Tuesday when an arbitrator in Philadelphia ruled in Brees' favor in a dispute over how much the Saints would have to pay the star quarterback if they applied the franchise tag to him again in 2013.

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    Serena Williams plays a shot to Petra Kvitova Tuesday during a quarterfinals match at Wimbledon.

    Serena tops defending champ Kvitova at Wimbledon

    Thanks to a bit of advice from her big sister and a bunch of aces from her big serve, Serena Williams is back in the Wimbledon semifinals. With two more victories, Williams will be holding a Grand Slam trophy for the first time in two years. "I went and had Venus talk to her, because Venus can get (through) to Serena better than anyone in the world. So I told Venus, 'I'm not going to talk to her. You talk to her.'"

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    Joe Paterno Paterno's family is calling on the Pennsylvania attorney general and former FBI Director Louis Freeh to release all emails and records related to their investigations into the Penn State child sex abuse scandal. Family lawyer Wick Sollers' statement Monday comes after reports of leaked emails between administrators about a graduate assistant's account in 2001 of an encounter between former defensive coordinator Sandusky and a boy in the showers. Sollers represents the family of former coach Paterno, who was fired and died in January. Sollers says it's clear someone in authority was not interested in a thorough investigation, given the leaks of selective emails. Freeh is leading the school's internal investigation.

    Email citing Paterno brings defense of late coach

    Details from a decade-old email are raising new questions about Joe Paterno's response to a sex abuse complaint regarding former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky, but a Paterno family spokesman says he's not worried about the impact on the late coach's legacy. Family spokesman Dan McGinn said Tuesday that Paterno never directed him to protect his legacy or clear his name. McGinn says Paterno believed his record would speak for itself.

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    Peter Sagan celebrates Tuesday as he crosses the finish line ahead of Fabian Cancellara, wearing the overall leader's yellow jersey, second right, Peter Velits, third from right, and Edvald Boasson Hagen, second left, to win the third stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 122.4 miles.

    Peter Sagan wins Tour stage, channels Forrest Gump

    Once upon a time in Hollywood, the cry was "Run, Forrest, Run!" The message was not lost on Peter Sagan at the Tour de France. The 22-year-old Slovakian won Tuesday's ride toward the English Channel in dramatic fashion, and then went cinematic — pumping his arms in the running style of fictional antihero Forrest Gump at the behest of his Liquigas teammates.

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    Saints’ coach Payton, wife file divorce petitions

    Suspended New Orleans Saints coach Sean Payton and his wife of nearly 20 years have filed dueling divorce petitions in Texas. Payton filed a petition in Tarrant County district court seeking a divorce from Beth Payton on June 14.

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    The reigning U.S. Women's Open golf champ, So Yeon Ryu of South Korea, will defend her title this week when the tournament begins Thursday at Blackwolf Run in Kohler, Wis.

    Two area golfers join U.S. Women’s Open field

    The 67th U.S. Women's Open, which tees off Thursday at Blackwolf Run in Kohler, Wis., has two late qualifiers with Chicago connections: Aimee Neff, winner of the Illinois Women's Open in 2008 and 2009, and amateur Ashley Armstrong, a Notre Dame sophomore-to-be who won the 2011 Western Junior title. Len Ziehm has more on the U.S. Women's Open in his weekly golf column, plus details on a caddie change for Zach Johnson at the upcoming JDC, and Mike Small's qualifying bid for next month's PGA Championship.

Business

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    Bus seat maker to start production in N. Indiana

    A German company that makes passenger seats for buses and trains plans to start its first U.S. manufacturing facility in northern Indiana.

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    Spanish olive-oil production may plunge 37 percent in the year through September 2013 after dry conditions stressed olive trees and as trees need to recover following three years of above-average yields, Oil World wrote.

    Olive-oil proudction could plunge by 37% in Spain

    Spanish olive-oil production may plunge 37 percent in the year through September 2013 after dry conditions stressed olive trees and as trees need to recover following three years of above-average yields, Oil World wrote. The country’s output of the oil used for cooking and in salad dressings may slide to 1.1 million metric tons from a record 1.73 million tons in 2011-12, the Hamburg-based oilseed- industry researcher wrote in an emailed report. Prices fell to a nine-year low this year after Spanish output jumped at the same time consumption in Spain, Italy and Greece fell, it said.

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    President Barack Obama speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, after the Supreme Court ruled on his health care legislation. The victory will help define Obama’s legacy.

    Spin meter: Meet the health care tax

    It looks like a tax, smells like a tax, and the Supreme Court says it must be a tax. But politicians in both parties are squirming over how to define the Thing in President Barack Obama's health care law that requires people to pay up if they don't get health insurance.The problem for Obama is that, if the Thing is indeed a tax, he is by definition a raiser of taxes on the middle class, which he promised not to be.

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    Target Corp. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. plan to hire tens of thousands of workers in Canada over the next two years, increasing pressure on domestic retailers from Sears Canada Inc. to Canadian Tire Corp Ltd. Target, the second-largest U.S. discount retailer, will hire as many as 27,000 people in Canada next year for its first stores in the country, while Wal-Mart said it plans to add 4,000 employees this year, about 500 more than it initially forecast.

    Target, Wal-Mart on Canadian hiring binge

    Target Corp. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. plan to hire tens of thousands of workers in Canada over the next two years, increasing pressure on domestic retailers from Sears Canada Inc. to Canadian Tire Corp Ltd. Target, the second-largest U.S. discount retailer, will hire as many as 27,000 people in Canada next year for its first stores in the country, while Wal-Mart said it plans to add 4,000 employees this year, about 500 more than it initially forecast.

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    Chuck E. Cheese has undergone a makeover and now is a hip, electric guitar-playing rock star.

    Chuck E. Cheese transforming into a rock star

    Chuck E. Cheese, the chain of children's pizza restaurants, is retiring the giant rodent's outdated image — and the man who voiced its character for nearly two decades.

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    OraQuick detects the presence of HIV in saliva collected using a mouth swab.

    FDA approves first rapid, take home HIV test

    WASHINGTON — Americans will soon be able to test themselves in the privacy of their own homes for the virus that causes AIDS, now that the Food and Drug Administration has approved the first rapid, over-the-counter HIV test.The OraQuick test detects the presence of HIV antibodies using a mouth swab and returns a result in 20 to 40 minutes. Government officials estimate that about 240,000 people, or one-fifth of the roughly 1.2 million people carrying HIV in the U.S., don’t know they are infected. Testing is a chief means of slowing new infections, which have held steady at about 50,000 per year for two decades. FDA officials said the test is designed for people who might not otherwise get tested.“The availability of a home-use HIV test kit provides another option for individuals to get tested so that they can seek medical care, if appropriate,” said Dr. Karen Midthun, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. Orasure plans to start selling the test in October, both online and through retailers like Walgreens, CVS and Walmart. It hasn’t set a price yet but expects the consumer version to cost less than $60 but more than the one marketed to health professionals, which costs about $17.50. CEO Doug Michels said the price increase will help pay for a toll-free call center to provide counseling and medical referrals to test users.“Each of the call-center operators is bilingual in English and Spanish, they’ve gone through 160 hours of training on HIV counseling and testing,” Michels said in an interview with the Associated Press. “So they are highly trained professionals and they’ll be there to support the consumer.”Michels said the company’s marketing efforts will focus on populations at greatest risk of being infected with HIV, including gay and bisexual men, African Americans and Hispanics. FDA stressed in its approval announcement that the test is not 100 percent accurate in identifying people with the virus. A trial conducted by test maker Orasure showed OraQuick detected HIV in those carrying the virus only 92 percent of the time, though it was 99.9 percent accurate in ruling out HIV in patients not carrying the virus. That means the test could miss one in 12 HIV-infected people who use it but would incorrectly identify only one patient as having HIV for every 5,000 HIV-negative people tested, the FDA said. People who test negative should get re-tested after three months, because it can take several weeks for detectable antibodies to HIV to appear, according to Dr. Jonathan Mermin, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s HIV unit.The FDA has approved several other HIV test kits designed for home use, but they usually require a blood sample that must be sent to a laboratory for development. HIV awareness groups hailed the approval as an important step in expanding testing for the virus. “This test will allow anyone to empower themselves to know their HIV status when, how and with whom they want to,” said Tom Donohue, founding director of Who’s Positive. Experts say it’s difficult to predict how widely the test will be used. According to the Orasure’s study, 41 percent of people who discovered they were HIV-positive using OraQuick had never been tested. The company estimates that 9,000 new HIV carriers would be identified for every 1 million people who use the test.Based in Bethlehem, Pa., Orasure has marketed a version of OraQuick to doctors, nurses and other health care practitioners since 2002. When used by professionals, the test is shown to accurately identify both carriers and non-carriers 99 percent of the time. It’s not clear why the test is less accurate in consumer trials, but researchers said they expected its sensitivity to drop when it was used by consumers. HIV eventually develops into AIDS, unless treated with antiviral drugs. AIDS causes the body’s immune system to breakdown, leading to infections which become fatal.

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    Lake Zurich grants special permit to luxury auto dealer

    The village of Lake Zurich will have a new luxury car dealership in the fall. Village trustees approved of a special permit use to allow Benjamin Ripstein, president of Midwest Motors Inc., to operate in the Capaccio Bros. building. Trustees believe the luxury car dealership will bring in much needed revenue for the village. "I'm thankful (he's) willing to take it over, taking this is a huge financial risk," said Trustee Dana Rzeznik.

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    U.S. stocks advanced, sending the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index to a two-month high, after data showed factory orders topped estimates and as speculation grew that global central banks will act to spur economic growth.

    Stocks rise as oil prices, factory orders climb

    Stocks climbed Tuesday in an abbreviated holiday trading session after an encouraging report about manufacturing. Energy stocks rose the most because of increased tension over oil-rich Iran.

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    A new season of “Arrested Development” will be carried on Netflix, as part of its effort to offer members more complete seasons of Twentieth Century Fox TV shows.

    Netflix’s monthly video streaming tops 1 billion hours

    Netflix says its subscribers watched more than 1 billion hours of online video last month as the advent of high-speed Internet connections and high-powered mobile devices change people's viewing patterns.

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    Chrysler reported Tuesday, July 3, 2012, that U.S. sales rose 20 percent, its best June in five years, thanks to demand across its lineup.

    Chrysler’s U.S. sales rise 20 percent in June

    From mini cars to monster pickups, sales of vehicles charged higher in June despite concerns that Americans would be turned off by slower hiring and other scary headlines. By midday Tuesday, most automakers reported big gains over June of last year. Chrysler posted its best June in five years. Volkswagen is on track for its best year in the U.S. since 1973. The results appeared to allay fears that growth would stall after a strong start to 2012.

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    Ford’s U.S. sales up 7 pct in June

    DETROIT — Ford Motor Co. says its U.S. sales rose 7 percent in June on strong demand for the new Escape SUV.Sales of the new Escape, which debuted last month, were up 28 percent. Ford said the Escape had its best month ever at 28,500 sold. Ford also saw strong sales for its Explorer midsize SUV, which was up 35 percent.But small cars were weaker than June 2011, when Ford gained some sales while its Japanese rivals struggled after the earthquake. Sales of the Fiesta and Focus small cars were both down from last year.Ford’s best-seller, the F-Series pickup, was up 11 percent as housing construction recovers.

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    Chicago-based Boeing is predicting that the world’s airlines will buy 34,000 new airplanes over the next 20 years, driven by strong growth in China, India, and other emerging markets.

    Boeing predicts 34,000 new planes sold through 2031

    Chicago-based Boeing is predicting that the world’s airlines will buy 34,000 new airplanes over the next 20 years, driven by strong growth in China, India, and other emerging markets. Boeing predicted that $4.5 trillion worth of planes will be sold. It will have to compete with Airbus and other competitors including Bombardier, Embraer, and China’s state-owned COMAC.

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    Barclays Chief Executive Bob Diamond has resigned with immediate effect, the latest scalp of a financial markets scandal that has also cost the job of the chairman. The bank said Tuesday July 3, 2012, that outgoing-chairman Marcus Agius would lead the search for Diamond’s replacement.

    Barclays CEO Bob Diamond falls on sword

    He was a poster boy for corporate arrogance, telling Parliament last year that the time for bankers to apologize had passed. Now Bob Diamond is just the latest victim of growing public anger at a British establishment they regard as greedy and ethically challenged. The hard-driving CEO of Barclays bank resigned Tuesday, buckling under massive media pressure and a few none-too-subtle hints from top politicians that his days at the top should be numbered.

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    Duke, Progress complete energy merger; Progress CEO out

    CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Duke Energy and Progress Energy have completed their $13.7 billion merger to form the nation’s largest electric company. But the normally routine event came with a twist. Bill Johnson, who was tapped to lead the combined company as president and chief executive, has decided to leave by “mutual agreement,” the companies said Tuesday. Duke CEO Jim Rogers, who was expected to be executive chairman, has instead been named CEO.Whether it was Johnson or the company’s board that had a last-minute change of heart is unclear. The company declined to answer questions about the switch at a morning conference call. But as late as Monday, Duke staffers were describing Johnson as the pending CEO and scheduling post-merger interviews for him as the new company’s top manager.Duke won federal approval for the merger June 8. The North Carolina Utilities Commission voted in favor of the deal last week. South Carolina’s Public Service Commission approved an agreement Monday.The combined company will serve about more than 7 million customers in North Carolina, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Florida and South Carolina. Experts said the new company will be able to borrow money more cheaply, and it will use fewer coal-burning power plants in favor of ones that use natural gas. It’s also expected to keep power prices stable. Regulators saw the deal as the best possible in an environment of energy industry consolidation. “We’re now ready to embark on a new chapter,” Rogers said on the conference call. “We’re one company.”

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    FDA lays out medical device identifier system

    WASHINGTON — Federal health regulators are proposing a new system to track millions of medical devices used in the U.S., an effort which they say will help protect patients by catching problematic implants earlier.The Food and Drug Administration’s proposal would require most medical devices to carry a unique code to identify the product’s make, manufacturer and lot number. The codes would be stored in a publicly accessible database to help regulators, doctors and companies could monitor safety issues with devices.The FDA will accept public comments on the proposal for about four months before finalizing it. Regulators plan to phase in the system gradually, starting with the highest risk devices. Devices sold over-the-counter at pharmacies and other retailers would not have to carry a code.

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    U.S. stocks slightly higher before holiday

    NEW YORK — Stocks rose Tuesday after the government reported higher factory orders for May.The major U.S. stock indexes moved slightly higher in early trading. The Dow Jones industrial average was up 19 points to 12,891. The Standard & Poor’s 500 was up three to 1,368. The Nasdaq composite index was up seven to 2,958.Trading volume was light, with the market scheduled to close at 1 p.m. and many traders already off for the Fourth of July holiday.Chrysler, Ford and General Motors all said that auto sales rose in May. Ford stock rose 3 percent, and GM rose 4 percent. Other car companies were reporting sales throughout the day.Stocks rose broadly at 10 a.m. after the government reported that U.S. factories received more orders in May after two months of declines. On Monday, a trade group said that U.S. manufacturing shrank in June for the first time in almost three years.But mostly, investors were in a holding pattern. They were waiting for the government’s report on June employment, which comes out Friday, and corporate earnings for the second quarter, which are reported beginning next week.Europe was relatively quiet, though with underpinnings of discord. A Greek government spokesman said the government was preparing an “alarming” report on its recession in a bid to renegotiate the terms of its bailout.Major indexes in France, Britain, Germany and Spain rose slightly. The European Central Bank will announce later this week whether it will cut interest rates. That could drive markets higher.Eastman Kodak stock rose 15 percent after getting approval from a bankruptcy court to auction more of its patents.Alcoa, the aluminum company, was up the most of the 30 companies in the Dow, rising about 2 percent. It reports second-quarter earnings Monday, the first Dow stock to report. Home Depot was down the most, falling more than 2 percent.

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    General Motors’ U.S. sales up 16 pct in June

    DETROIT — General Motors Co. said its U.S. sales rose 16 percent in June on solid demand for small and midsize cars.Sales of the Chevrolet Volt electric car more than tripled over June 2011, to more than 1,700. GM also saw double-digit sales increases for the Chevrolet Malibu and Buick LaCrosse midsize cars.Sales of the Chevrolet Cruze small car were down 24 percent. The Cruze surged in popularity last year when Japanese cars were unavailable after the earthquake. But GM made up for some of that volume with strong sales of its new Chevrolet Sonic subcompact.GM’s best-seller, the Silverado pickup, was up 3 percent as housing construction continues to recover. GM said all truck and SUV sales were up 11 percent.

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    IMF urges Germany to spur domestic demand

    BERLIN — The International Monetary Fund on Tuesday praised Germany’s strong economic record in the face of turmoil in financial markets and Europe’s debt crisis, but urged Berlin to take the opportunity to boost domestic demand in case exports drop off.In an annual report on Europe’s biggest economy, the IMF said low unemployment and healthy pay increases for workers would normally lift consumer spending, and recommended the government allow this to happen.It also suggested that Germany should take advantage of favorable economic conditions to encourage investment outside manufacturing, the country’s traditional area of strength.This year has seen significant pay rises for many workers in Germany, increases that came after a long period of relative restraint and two years of strong economic growth.In May, Germany’s biggest industrial union, IG Metall, secured a 4.3 percent pay raise over 13 months for some 3.6 million manufacturing workers. In March, some 2 million public-sector employees won a raise totaling 6.3 percent over two years.Meanwhile, Germany’s year-on-year inflation rate hit an 18-month low of 1.7 percent in June and unemployment stands at 6.6 percent.“The performance of the German economic has been remarkable so far,” the IMF report’s lead author, Subir Lall, told reporters in a conference call.“With incomes rising and healthy balance sheets you should expect naturally domestic demand to pick up,” he said, adding that by spurring domestic demand Germany would also benefit other countries in the troubled 17-nation eurozone.The IMF report identified the eurozone’s debt woes, undercapitalized banks and the possibility of a global downturn as the biggest risks to the German economy. It concurred with a recent German central bank forecast of 1 percent economic growth in 2012. The IMF predicts growth will rise to 1.4 percent next year.

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    Boat builders work on SeaHunter hulls at SeaHunter Boats, for delivery in Princeton, Fla. Companies placed more orders with U.S. factories in May from April, demanding more computers, machinery and other equipment that signal investment plans.

    U.S. factory orders increased 0.7 percent in May

    Companies placed more orders with U.S. factories in May from April, demanding more computers, machinery and other equipment that signal investment plans.The increase is a welcome sign after two months of declining factory orders. Still, manufacturing has slowed from the start of the year, adding to worries that weaker global growth could weigh on the U.S. economy. The Commerce Department said Tuesday that factory orders increased 0.7 percent in May.

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    Orhan Senger is the owner of Soccer Heads at 1275 N Randall Road, Crystal Lake. He said his new location puts him in the middle of soccer players from several park districts.

    Crystal Lake store customizes soccer gear

    After seven successful years of providing just about anything you need related to soccer out of his Algonquin Soccer Heads store, owner Orhan Senger is now ready to reach an even bigger audience. Last month he moved his store from its west Algonquin Road location to the Randall Road corridor.

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    Liz Murphy sits in her room at the Hospice House in Concord, N.H. As they brace themselves for the eventual needs of the aging baby boom generation, hospice providers are working to both diversify their services and dispel misconceptions about what they do.

    With boomers coming, hospice industry diversifies

    Forget that image of a hospice worker sitting next to a hospital bed in a dimly lit room. Today, hospice care is delivered everywhere from the golf course to the casino. As they brace for the eventual needs of the aging baby boom generation, hospice providers are working to diversify their services and dispel misconceptions about what they do.

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    A scant rack of road maps at a gas station/mini mart in Solon, Ohio.

    Paper maps: Amid GPS boom, nostalgia finds a place

    Used to be, Dad would stuff a half-dozen maps in the glove box before setting out with the family on a road trip to see the waterfalls at Yosemite or the granite faces of Mount Rushmore. Colorful maps bearing the logos of the oil companies that printed them — names like Texaco, Gulf, Esso — once brimmed from displays at filling stations, free for the taking.But of the more than 35 million Americans expected to travel by car this Fourth of July, a good chunk will probably reach for technology before they're tempted to unfold — and in a tradition that used to bind Americans as tightly as a highway cloverleaf, try to refold — a paper road map.

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    Spain bank could get bailout money within weeks

    Spain's ailing banks could get their rescue money within weeks as talks over the terms of their bailout from a European fund are moving swiftly, the economy minister said Tuesday. Spain will have access to up to (euro) 100 billion ($126 billion) in rescue loans from the 17-country eurozone's bailout fund for its banks, many of which were stung by the collapse of a real estate bubble and left holding billions in bad loans and foreclosed property.

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    A man waits to cross a road as others watch a digital display of global stock indexes outside a securities firm in Tokyo.

    Asian stocks rise on hopes for stimulus measures

    Asian stock markets rose Tuesday amid expectations policymakers will implement stimulus measures to help spur weak global growth.Japan's Nikkei 225 index rose 0.6 percent to 9,057.24 and South Korea's Kospi gained 0.9 percent to 1,868.01. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 fell 0.2 percent to 4,124 while China's Shanghai Composite advanced 0.7 percent to 2,240.49.

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    NY judge promises ruling in a week on TV lawsuit

    A judge says she'll rule within a week whether lawsuits by broadcasters against a service that offers commercial-free TV will be heard in Los Angeles or New York.

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    Oil rises above $84 amid tighter Iran sanctions

    Oil rose above $84 a barrel Tuesday in Asia as tighter sanctions against Iran threaten to restrict crude supplies while demand holds up despite Europe's debt crisis. Benchmark oil for August delivery was up 39 cents at $84.14 a barrel at late afternoon Singapore time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract fell $1.21 to close at $83.75 in New York on Monday.

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    Horst Reichenbach head of the Task Force of the European Commission in charge of providing technical assistance to Greece, right, talks with Leader of the Socialist PASOK party Evangelos Venizelos during an Economist conference in Athens, on Tuesday.

    Greece to present debt inspectors ‘alarming’ data

    A spokesman for Greece's new government says it will present "alarming" data on its recession and unemployment to international debt inspectors this week, in a bid to renegotiate the terms of its bailout agreements. Spokesman Simos Kedikoglou said in a television interview Tuesday that the data would demonstrate that the current austerity program was counterproductive. He did not elaborate.

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    Amy Pinto-Walsh, right, girlfriend of artist Thomas Kinkade, leaves with her attorney, Sonia Agee, left, from a San Jose, Calif., courthouse in San Jose, Calif., Monday.

    Kinkade estate dispute to remain public for now

    Hearings in the dispute between Thomas Kinkade's widow and girlfriend over the late artist's $66 million estate will not be conducted behind closed doors — at least for now, a judge ruled on Monday. Kinkade's widow, Nanette Kinkade, had sought to keep the matter private, asking Judge Thomas Cain to immediately send the case to an arbitration panel and not open probate court.

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    A trade group for drone aircraft manufacturers and operators has released the industry’s first code of conduct in response to growing privacy concerns.

    Conduct code for unmanned aircraft is unveiled

    A trade group for drone aircraft manufacturers and operators has released the industry's first code of conduct in response to growing privacy concerns.The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International said Monday that the recommendations for "safe, non-intrusive operation" are meant to guide operators and reassure a public leery of the possibility of spy drones flying undetected over their homes.

Life & Entertainment

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    “The Casual Vacancy” by J.K. Rowling will be released in September.

    Cover of new J.K. Rowling book revealed

    "The Casual Vacancy" will be the Harry Potter author's first offering aimed primarily at adults. The novel is set in the fictional English town of Pagford and deals with the unexplained death of a village resident.

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    Chris Brown’s “Fortune”

    Chris Brown’s ‘Fortune’ is patchy album

    When Chris Brown opens up, he's the best version of himself. Unfortunately, there aren't enough of those songs to make "Fortune," the 23-year-old's fifth album, a must have (it's the follow up to last year's Grammy-winning "F.A.M.E."). The album veers from hip-hop flavored party jams to electronic, pulsating tracks meant for laser light shows to more emotional fare. The album suffers from Brown's cocky rap-talk and the computerized noises that drown out today's dance songs.

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    Roobibus Relaxer is punched up with fruity accents and a bit of rum. Adding the bubbles — in the form of lemon-lime soda — to each glass as you serve it allows you to enjoy this pitcher cocktail at your leisure without worrying about the whole batch losing its fizz.

    Rioboos Relaxer
    Rioboos Relaxer

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    Fettuccine-style shirataki noodles make this pasta salad an option for those watching their carbs.

    A quick, easy and fresh pasta salad that’s healthy

    The trouble with being a food editor is that you eat. A lot. It's fun and wonderful and satisfying ... and sometimes incredibly fattening. Especially if, like me, you've already spent most of your life wrestling with your weight. So lately I've been doing a lot of watching of carbs, trying hard to minimize them, or at least eat them mostly in the form of veggies. That was my inspiration for this lower-carb pasta salad. Because in summer I really crave pasta salads. And I crave them bursting with fatty mayo and carb-rich pasta.

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    Later this month, 13-year-old Steffan Argus of Des Plaines and the rest of the Kidz Bop crew will kick off a 22-city national concert tour. The Kidz Bop kids will open for 11-year-old Ethan Bortnick, who has shared the stage with artists such as Beyoncé, Reba McEntire and Natalie Cole.

    Des Plaines teen, Kidz Bop, hit the summer concert circuit

    Steffan Argus thought the highlight of summer break would be camp, a two-week stay at a friend's Indiana cottage and the all-important season pass to Six Flags Great America. Instead, the 13-year-old from Des Plaines and the rest of the Kidz Bop crew will soon kick off a 22-city national concert tour.

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    Strawberry syrup and allspice add a layer of complexity to this refreshing Jamaican Punch.

    How to keep a thirsty crowd sated on the Fourth and beyond

    You've got burgers to grill, pasta salad to make, the table to set, so the last thing you want to be thinking about is playing bartender at your own Fourth of July cookout. Instead of welcoming guests with the offer of a freshly muddled mojito (delicious, yes, but a bit of an effort), pitcher cocktails are a quick and easy way to refresh a thirsty crowd.

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    Fresh ginger adds a bit of a spark to vodka-based Front Porch Fizz.

    Front Porch Fizz
    Front Porch Fizz

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    Red, White and Blue Freezies are a fun, kid-friendly drink for the Fourth of July.

    Red, White & Blue Striped Juice Freezie
    Red, White and Blue Striped Juice Freezie

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    Strawberry syrup and allspice add a layer of complexity to this refreshing Jamaican Punch.

    Jamaican Punch
    Jamaican Punch

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    This refreshing summer punch mixes orange, lemon and lime juices with black and mint tea.

    Orange-Lemon-Lime Tea-Ade
    Orange-Lemon-Lime Tea-Ade

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    Howard Slatkin, co-developer of Torie & Howard Organic Hard Candy, lost more than 100 pounds seven years ago.

    Organic candy satisfies a sweet tooth

    The way Howard Slatkin talks about it, creating Torie & Howard Organic Hard Candy was just as difficult as designing million-dollar palatial spaces for the rich and famous in France, America and elsewhere.

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    Jeff Tweedy and his band, Wilco, headline Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva on Sunday, July 8.

    Music notes: Wilco, Andrew Bird rock Cougars' ballpark

    Wilco, the Chicago-based band acclaimed for its literate, multitextured rock, will perform at a special show at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva Sunday. Fellow Chicagoan Andrew Bird will be joining them on the bill. And Head Count, a national voter-registration group, will be registering people to vote at the show.

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    Jim Belushi and Dan Aykroyd appear as The Blues Brothers and perform with The Sacred Hearts at 8 p.m. Wednesday, July 11, the Ravinia Festival in Highland Park.

    Best bets: Soak up some Blues Brothers at Ravinia

    Need your Blues Brothers fix? Dan Akroyd and Jim Belushi bring their Chicago stylings to Ravinia Festival Wednesday, July 11. But for a concert of a different sort, catch the American Idol Live! tour at the Allstate Arena Saturday, July 7. The weekend also heralds the opening of the Bristol Renaissance Faire in Kenosha, Wis., and the weekend-long Anime Midwest 2012 in Lisle.

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    “The Risk Agent” by Ridley Pearson

    'The Risk Agent' crackles with suspense

    A kidnapping on the streets of Shanghai propels two people into a conspiracy in "The Risk Agent," Ridley Pearson's latest thriller. A man named Lu Hao witnesses a crime committed by someone high up in the Chinese government. Before he can alert the authorities, he's grabbed on a public street. The Americans were watching Hao, and the man tailing him is also kidnapped. The ransom demand soon arrives and the clock begins ticking.

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    American commandos explore a ruined Dubai in “Spec Ops: The Line.”

    Killing machines go haywire in 'Spec Ops'

    "Spec Ops: The Line" takes place in Dubai six months after it has been demolished by an apocalyptic sandstorm. Only a few refugees remain, along with a U.S. Army infantry unit. After receiving a distress call from inside Dubai, your three-man commando team is sent to investigate. "Spec Ops" is a take on Joseph Conrad's "Heart of Darkness," by way of Francis Ford Coppola's "Apocalypse Now."

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    Susan Zybko learned to bake recipes like Plum and Nectarine Kuchen from her grandmothers. You can buy her treats July 11 and Aug. 3 and 17 at the Glen Ellyn Farmers Market.

    Plum and Nectarine Kuchen
    Plum and Nectarine Kuchen:Susan Zybko

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    Cook of the Week Susan Zybko of Glen Ellyn.

    Country girl at heart and in the kitchen

    The old saying may be true: you can take the girl out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the girl. For Susan Zybko getting off the farm and into the city was a major goal when she was growing up. Susan bucked tradition when, instead of getting married, she went off to college, and then chose to major in marketing instead of the more acceptable teaching and nursing.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Shine a light on school chief searches

    Suburban school districts ought to adopt transparent policies when searching for a new superintendent just like schools in other states do, a Daily Herald edidtorial says.

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    Feeling the heat

    Still don’t believe in climate change? Then you’re either deep in denial or delirious from the heat. As I write this, the nation’s capital and its suburbs are in post-apocalypse mode. About one-fourth of all households have no electricity, the legacy of an unprecedented assault by violent thunderstorms Friday night. Things are improving: At the height of the power outage, nearly half the region was dark. The line of storms, which killed at least 17 people as it raced from the Midwest to the sea, culminated a punishing day when the official temperature here reached 104 degrees, a record for June. Hurricane-force winds of up to 80 miles per hour wreaked havoc with the lush tree canopy that is perhaps Washington’s most glorious amenity. One of my neighbors was lucky when a huge branch, headed for his roof, got snagged by a power line. Another neighbor lost a tree that fell into another tree that smashed an adjacent house, demolishing the second floor. Yes, it’s always hot here in the summer — but not this hot. Yes, we always have thunderstorms — but never like these. The cliché is true: It did sound like a freight train. According to scientists, climate change means not only that we will see higher temperatures but that there will be more extreme weather events like the one we just experienced. Welcome to the rest of our lives. This is the point in the column where I’m obliged to insert the disclaimer that no one event — no heat wave, no hurricane, no outbreak of tornadoes or freakish storms — can be definitively blamed on climate change. Any one data point can be an anomaly; any cluster of data points can be mere noise. The problem for those who dismiss climate change as a figment of scientists’ imagination, or even as a crypto-socialist one-worldish plot to take away our God-given SUVs, is that the data are beginning to add up. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says the past winter was the fourth-warmest on record in the United States. To top that, spring — which meteorologists define as the months of March, April and May — was the warmest since record-keeping began in 1895. If you don’t believe me or the scientists, ask a farmer whose planting seasons have gone awry. NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, which monitors global surface temperatures, reports that nine of the warmest 10 years on record have occurred since 2000. The warmest year of all was 2010; last year was only the ninth warmest, but global temperatures were still almost a full degree warmer than they were during the middle of the 20th century. Why might this be happening? Well, the level of heat-trapping carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is more than 35 percent greater than in 1880, NASA scientists report, with most of the increase coming since 1960. And why might carbon dioxide levels be rising? Because since the Industrial Revolution, humankind has been burning fossil fuels — and spewing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere — at what could turn out to be a catastrophic rate. Scientists’ predictions about how quickly temperatures would rise — and how rapidly assorted phenomena, such as melting polar ice and rising sea levels, would proceed — have turned out, thus far, to be conservative. There comes a point where anomalies can start looking like a trend. What much of the country has seen the past few days is no ordinary heat wave. Temperatures reached 105 in Raleigh, 106 in Atlanta and 108 in Columbia, S.C., and Macon, Ga., 109 in Nashville — all-time highs. Meanwhile, the most destructive wildfires in Colorado history were destroying hundreds of homes — a legacy of drought that left forests as dry as tinder. Changes in rainfall and snowfall patterns in the West cannot, of course, be blamed on climate change with any certainty. But they are consistent with scientists’ predictions. It becomes harder to ignore those predictions when a toppled tree is blocking your driveway and the power is out.

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    Ralph Martire

    Blame ‘Pension Ramp’ for state’s liability

    Guest columnist Ralph Martire: The "Pension Ramp" established a repayment schedule to get the pension systems funded. Unfortunately it continued the practice of borrowing against pension contributions to fund services for 15 more years.

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    Justice Roberts’ resurrection

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: One of several ironies of last week's ruling is that liberals are crowing about winning something they didn't actually win.

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    Think how health law helps others
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: It long past time we stop referring to the Affordable Care Act as Obamacare. We do not call Social Security FDR-care, or Medicare LBJ-care; let's get over ourselves and think about what it accomplishes for those in need.

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    Health decision out of touch with most
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: The June 28, 5-4 decision legalizing Obamacare (aka the Affordable Care Act) adds taxes to an already-burdened American people. No real surprise there. That's being going on for decades.

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    Judges don’t worry about health care
    A Lombard letter to the editor: An interesting fact: Of the four Supreme Court justices who ruled to overturn the Affordable Care Act in its entirety, all four have guaranteed for life government provided health insurance.

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    Healthcare law hurts
    A Winfield letter to the editor: The so-called Affordable Care Act should never have been passed in the first place. It is costing jobs, hurting seniors and preventing the economy from bouncing back. The act was a bad law yesterday, and it's a bad law today.

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    Illinois should show compassion
    A Huntley letter to the editor: To our elected officials here in Illinois, please stand up for what you know is right so Illinois can be compassionate to its people. Medical cannabis can help so many. Educate yourself on this subject. It's not a hippie thing. For many it's a better quality of life.

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