Daily Archive : Wednesday September 21, 2011

News

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    Autopsy: Fumes killed Chicago police officer

    The death of a Chicago police officer who accidentally inhaled noxious fumes from a cleaning product sprayed at work is under investigation after a new autopsy report was released this week.

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    Construction to add a westbound ramp to the Jane Addams Tollway from Route 47 will begin in the spring.

    Huntley will have western access at I-90

    Construction should start this spring on a full interchange at Route 47 and the Jane Addams Tollway (I-90) in Huntley.

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    Casting will take place in Chicago Oct. 1 for the next season of MTV’s “The Real World.” The current season, “The Real World San Diego,” premieres Sept. 28.

    Open casting for “The Real World” Oct. 1

    Wanna get real on camera? Casting will be held Saturday, Oct. 1 in Chicago for spots on the next season of MTV's hit show, "The Real World."

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    Aspiritech employees, from left, Rick Alexander, Katie Levin and Jamie Specht work together at the nonprofit enterprise that specializes in finding software bugs. Aspiritech hires only those with autism disorders.

    Company succeeds at hiring autistic adults

    A Chicago suburban-based startup that specializes in finding software bugs harnesses the talents of young adults with autism. Traits that make great software testers also happen to be characteristics of autism.

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    One of the constants about Facebook is that it never stops changing. The most recent tweaks aren't making all its 750 million users happy.

    Facebook users: Get set for more changes

    Facebook is at it again. The social network is tweaking the home pages of its 750 million users, much to the chagrin of some very vocal folks.

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    Forbes says Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates has been named America’s richest person for the 18th consecutive year.

    Forbes: Gates still richest person in America

    The nation’s economic woes don’t appear to be hurting Bill Gates, who tops Forbes’ list of the 400 richest Americans for the 18th year in a row.

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    Odor investigation forced 15 Elgin homes to evacuate

    About 15 Elgin homes were evacuated around 6 a.m. Wednesday as a precaution after an AT&T building nearby filled with an odor thought to be natural gas, according to fire department officials.

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    Route 83 in Buffalo Grove shut down after car hits pole

    A stretch of southbound Route 83 remained closed Wednesday night in Buffalo Grove due to a damaged power line caused by a single-car crash. A driver struck the pole near Pauline Avenue about 2:30 p.m.. ComEd was at the scene working to repair the pole as of 7:30 p.m., but southbound traffic could remain closed past midnight.

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    More than 15% in suburban Cook County suffer ‘food insecurity’

    A community-by-community study of food insecurity rates shows that in suburban Cook County, more than 15 percent of people are uncertain where they will find their next meal.

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    Conant HS is Channel 5’s Dance Friday site

    Conant High School will be in the spotlight early Friday morning -- this week's showcase school by the Channel 5 morning news team. The WMAQ-TV personalities will be in the Cougar Den from 5:30-7 a.m. to do the morning news broadcast live, interspersed with Conant spirit groups celebrating this year's Homecoming.

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    Claim by officer leads to perjury charge

    A former Chicago police officer has been charged with perjury for falsely accusing a mourner in a funeral procession of assaulting her, authorities said.

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    Illinois congressmen Joe Walsh, left, and Randy Hultgren chat in the hallway of the Cannon House office building in Washington D.C. shortly after both took office. Now, the two are facing each other in a primary election battle.

    Walsh decision sets up primary race against Hultgren

    Rep. Joe Walsh’s decision to run in the newly drawn 14th Congressional District sets in motion a likely GOP primary bloodbath against fellow conservative Rep. Randy Hultgren of Winfield, who now holds the seat. Walsh’s announcement Wednesday ensures Illinois will lose one incumbent congressman after the March primary election, but allows Walsh to avoid what could be an even bigger uphill battle...

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    Minister Lynn Hopkins, left, comforts her partner, Carolyn Bond, after hearing that the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a last minute plea of Georgia death row inmate Troy Davis in Jackson, Ga., Wednesday. Davis was scheduled to be executed on Wednesday for killing off-duty Savannah officer Mark MacPhail.

    Georgia executes Troy Davis for officer's killing

    Georgia executed Troy Davis on Wednesday night for the murder of an off-duty police officer, a crime he denied committing right to the end as supporters around the world mourned and declared that an innocent man was put to death.

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    Teen pleads guilty to Elk Grove auto burglaries

    The fourth of four teens charged with burglarizing cars in Elk Grove Village late last year pled guilty to the charges. Nicholas Minzenberger, 18, of Elk Grove Village, was sentenced to 24 months probation and six months in Cook County Jail in exchange to his guilty plea to the class 2 felony.

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    Some Carol Stream parks referendum money in doubt

    A drop in property values means the Carol Stream Park District may not be able to borrow all $37 million for parks improvement projects approved by voters in a 2010 referendum.

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    Joe Walsh

    Walsh: No Illinois delegation discussion about what’s best for “team”

    Congressman Joe Walsh will run in the newly drawn 14th District, rather than his current 8th District. He will face fellow conservative Randy Hultgren in the GOP primary. In a Q and A, the congressman talks about his decision and the "lack of leadership" on the issue with the Illinois Republican party.

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    New interim administrator, task force in Pingree Grove

    Pingree Grove Police Chief Carol Lussky will take on the role of interim village administrator until the village hires someone to fill the part-time position that will be vacated by Bill Barlow on Friday, officials said. The village also appointed 14 residents to serve on a new finance task force.

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    Schaumburg mulls tax break for landscape firm

    Schaumburg is preparing to authorize another Cook County property tax incentive package, this time for a relocating landscape and snow removal business, in what might be evidence that local commercial real estate slowly is recovering from the depths of the recession. “I think we’ll be seeing more and more of these,” said Schaumburg Economic Development Coordinator Matt Frank.

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    Jeff Werfel

    Grayslake firms hiring rules, targets insider connection

    Grayslake now has a local law that proponents say solidifies that a job candidate’s skills — not political connections — are what should matter at village hall. Trustee Jeff Werfel says the action should boost residents' confidence in village government.

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    Dave and Lindsey Meske of Crystal Lake can't decide on a name for their future baby girl. So they're hoping the world will help them decide — through a Facebook poll.

    Crystal Lake couple turns to Facebook poll to name baby-to-be

    Do you want to name Dave and Lindsey Meske's unborn baby girl? The Meskes, who live in Crystal Lake, are giving people a shot at picking, via Facebook, one of four names — Addilyne, McKenna, Madelyn, or Emily. “We were in a stalemate,” Dave said. “I wasn't going to budge; she didn't want to budge.” They've set up a Facebook page.

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    Rob Sherman taking Zion to court again over old seal

    Suburban activist Rob Sherman is taking legal action against the city of Zion after an advertisement featuring an old version of the city seal appeared in a newspaper. That seal, which included a cross and the phrase “God reigns,” was ruled unconstitutional by a U.S. appellate court in 1991. The city was forced to design a new seal.

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    The lights will be bright, at Randhurst Village

    Mount Prospect village board members are permitting two electronic monument signs outside Randhurst Village to have a relatively high level of brightness during the day -- needed, they say, to be seen on a bright day.

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    100 CTA rail stations getting facelifts

    The Chicago Transit Authority is sprucing things up. The public transit system plans facelifts for 100 of its rail stations over the next year. The work to clean up the stations and make repairs could include painting, new lighting, power washing and landscaping.

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    Campton Hills will use meetings to map its future

    The Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning will host a meeting Monday in Campton Hills to get another round of resident input to help formulate the village's first comprehensive plan. This meeting will focus on answering the question of what direction folks want the village to follow.

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    Dog lovers can come out for a walk with their pet Sunday, Sept. 25 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the West Suburban Humane Society's 18th annual Barkapalooza fundraiser in Lisle Community Park, 1825 Short St., Lisle.

    ‘Barkapalooza' set for Sept. 25 in Lisle

    In 17 years, the West Suburban Humane Society's annual Barkapalooza fundraiser has grown into the biggest event supporting the society's animal shelter. It's also grown out of its Patriots Park location in Downers Grove, and this year's event, set for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25, will be held at Lisle Community Park, 1825 Short St., Lisle.

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    A trader signals in the S&P 500 Futures pit at the CME Group in Chicago on Wednesday. The Federal Reserve announced Wednesday it will use more than $400 billion to try to drive down long-term interest rates, make home loans cheaper and invigorate the economy.

    Stocks plunge after Fed announces stimulus steps

    The Federal Reserve did what investors expected it said it would buy Treasury bonds to help the economy. Stocks then plunged because investors saw a grim forecast behind the Fed’s plans.

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    Jay Simon

    Former Gurnee cop gets prison for molesting girl

    A former Gurnee police officer was sentenced to six years in prison Wednesday in a negotiation that covered his child molesting conviction and settled the remaining cases against him. Jay Simon, 39, was convicted last year of aggravated criminal sexual abuse for molesting an 11-year-old girl during a sleepover at his house in Nov. 2006.

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    Bloomington school to sell American Indian statue

    Bloomington High School plans to auction its life-size statue of an American Indian at a booster club event on Oct. 1, principal Tim Moore told The Pantagraph newspaper. Bloomington High’s sports teams are known as the Purple Raiders, but the local school board decided in 2001 not to use the American Indian as its mascot. The statue carries a shield and wears shoes and other items in purple and...

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    Missing dog found in sinkhole after 6 days

    Goldie the Labrador retriever never misses a meal. So when she vanished from a vineyard near Viroqua last week, her owners were devastated. They knew their pet would never wander far from home.Mary and Jeff Aderman searched by foot and by car and put up posters hoping to find their beloved dog. Six days passed, but no Goldie. The couple grew doubtful.

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    Man who fell from semi identified

    State police say a 20-year-old man died after falling from a semitrailer on Interstate 94 in northwestern Indiana. Police say a person driving behind the truck Tuesday night near Portage saw the passenger door open and the man fall out. The man wasn’t hit by any vehicles before landing on the highway’s outer shoulder.

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    Police officer's death due to fumes, under investigation

    The death of a Chicago police officer who accidentally inhaled noxious fumes from a cleaning product sprayed at work is under investigation after a new autopsy report was released this week. The Illinois Department of Labor has opened an investigation into the death under the state's occupational safety and health plan for public employees, said spokeswoman Anjali Julka.

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    Man denies $11,000 theft from employer

    A Round Lake man pleaded not guilty Wednesday to charges he bought $11,000 worth of cell phones with his employer's money and sold the phones on eBay. German Alvarez, 31, could be sentenced to seven years in prison if convicted of online theft by deception and online sale of stolen property but would also be eligible for probation.

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    New pavement is being installed on South Main Street by Kelly Park in Wheaton.

    Controversial Wheaton park project bids way over budget

    Wheaton park officials say bids for the Kelly Park project came in about 26 percent over budget, prompting a new round of criticism from nearby residents. Board President Ray Morrill said a delay in approving the Kelly Park project, which was sent back to committee, does not indicate its future is in jeopardy.

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    The Downer Place bridges in downtown Aurora are set to be replaced beginning in January. They originally were built in 1906.

    Aurora to replace 105-year-old Downer Place bridges

    Built in 1906, the bridges that carry Downer Place over the Fox River and Stolp Island in downtown Aurora are about to be replaced — at a cost of $11.78 million. While the city has not been made aware of any dangers or structural deficiencies, after 105 years, it’s time for an upgrade. “The bridge has exceeded its useful life,” city spokesman Kevin Stahr said.

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    Bilingual parent session at Woodland

    Gurnee-based Woodland Elementary District 50 will host its first of four Bilingual Parent Advisory Council meetings for the academic year from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 28.

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    Military academy nominations

    U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh announced he is accepting applications for nominations to attend one of the United States service academies in 2012.

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    SciTech hosts end-of-summer festival

    SciTech Hands-on Museum in Aurora will hold its first End of the Summer Bash from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 at the museum’s outdoor park on the Fox River, 18 W. Benton St.

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    Owners of large rental housing complexes, such as the Batavia Apartments, will have to get licenses from the city, under a crime-free housing law the city council adopted this week.

    Batavia to try crime-free rental housing rules

    Batavia has adopted a crime-free rental housing law. It requires property owners to get licenses from the city, and property managers to undergo training in how to identify and deal with problem-causing tenants. It is meant to cut back on what city officials see as a disproportionate share of city crime occurring at rental properties.

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    Technology center expo coming to Addison
    Technology Center of DuPage will host its annual expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, at the center, 301 S. Swift Road, Addison. The center is the career and technical education campus for DuPage County high school students.

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    Bloomingdale names new clerk
    Longtime Bloomingdale resident Irene M. Jones was sworn in as village clerk, following Susan Bartucci’s recent resignation. Jones has been employed with the village since 1983 and is the current executive assistant to the village administrator.

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    Carol Stream parade fundraiser Thursday

    Organizers of the Carol Stream 4th of July Parade will hold a fundraiser Thursday at Culver’s Restaurant, 290 S. Schmale Road. The parade committee will receive a portion of all sales between 10:30 a.m. and 10 p.m. — dine in, drive through or take out.

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    Medinah Park District extends input deadline
    The Medinah Park District extended the deadline to Sept. 30 for residents to respond to its Community Input Survey. Surveys are to be returned to the Solutions Center at the University of St. Francis, or can be completed online at stfrancis.edu/solutions.

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    Stream clean-up

    Service groups, youth groups, and local residents are asked to help clean up Kellogg Creek from 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday, Sept. 24, at the Beulah Park playground at Kedron and Ezekiel in Zion.

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    Robert Lyons

    Carol Stream man guilty of mom's murder

    A DuPage County jury found a Carol Stream resident guilty Wednesday of his mother's murder in an argument prosecutors said was sparked by her failure to get him Avril Lavigne concert tickets. In closing arguments, prosecutors argued Robert Lyons' pent-up rage prompted him to stab his mother to death more than three years ago in their Carol Stream condominium.

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    Police reports
    Kyle Ryan Dimberg, 19, of the 100 block of Sweetbriar Court, South Elgin, was charged with marijuana possession, underage consumption of alcohol and resisting arrest after authorities were called at 11 p.m. Friday to investigate kids partying in the field in the 40W900 block of Woodrow Lane near Elgin, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Police reports
    Stereos were reported stolen from six vehicles sometime between 8 p.m. Monday and 7:45 a.m. Tuesday from E & R Auto, 360 Willard Ave., Elgin, according to police reports. One vehicle had damage to the front and rear bumpers, perhaps because it was used to ram the locked gate, reports said.

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    John and Judy Prim, formerly of Schaumburg, will talk about the founding of Hope Center during a fundraiser Saturday, Sept. 24, at Living Hope Church in Elk Grove Village.

    Schaumburg missionaries to speak at Hope Center benefit

    John and Judy Prim return to the U.S. for a visit, after spending the last three years in Antigua, Guatemala, establishing “Hope Center.” In 2008, they left their family, sold their cars and home in Schaumburg and set off to provide hope for girls in Guatemala.

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    Chicago Archdiocese has iPad app

    The Chicago Archdiocese has launched an iPad app that takes viewers on a tour of the most beautiful, historical and architecturally significant places in its churches. Proceeds benefit the Cardinal's Scholarship Fund.

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    To show the value of residential fire sprinklers, a side-by-side burn demonstration using actual rooms with contents will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, during the North Maine Fire Protection District’s open house.

    N. Maine Fire Dept. open house Sept. 24

    The North Maine Fire Department is hosting its annual Open House from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24. The Open House is commemorating 42 years of service to the community.

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    Eric Schmidt, chairman of Google Inc., testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee’s antitrust subcommittee in Washington on Wednesday.

    Google head disputes that company thwarts rivals

    Google Inc. Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt told a Senate panel Wednesday that the company faces tough competition and isn't using its dominance in Internet search to stifle competitors. Schmidt is testifying at a hearing examining whether Google is abusing its power to thwart competition by placing links to its own content and services at the top of search results to the disadvantage of its...

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    Members of the Mundelein fire and police departments were the guests of honor at Mundelein High School for a breakfast to remember the events of Sept. 11, 2001.

    MHS invites cops, firefighters to memorial breakfast

    Members of the Mundelein fire and police departments were the guests of honor at Mundelein High School for a breakfast to remember the events of Sept. 11, 2001. Hosted by Superintendent Jody Ware, the Sept. 8 event was meant to highlight the work of the two departments and to thank them for helping to keep the high school environment safe.

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    Tim Schmitt accepts the Golden Bison on behalf of the family business.

    Buffalo Grove bakery to accept Golden Bison

    Buffalo Grove trustees had a sweet task recently, honoring Deerfields Bakery, 201 Buffalo Grove Road, with the village’s Golden Bison Award. The annual award honors businesses that go “above and beyond” their everyday operations to benefit the community.

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    Monster trucks return to Sears Centre

    Tickets go on sale Friday, Sept. 23, for the big Monster Truck show coming to the Sears centre Arena in Hoffman Estates next March. Fans are also invited to come early to see the machines up close and meet the drivers.

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    The Servants of the Holy Heart of Mary convent grounds and house will be open to the public for the first time during Sunday’s Batavia House Walk.

    Tour historic convent at Batavia House Walk

    The 2011 Batavia House Walk is one event you won’t want to miss as it offers a look inside The Servants of the Holy Heart of Mary Convent, a seldom-seen historic property, on beautiful grounds overlooking the Fox River. Another new feature, tablescapes done by the designers at Geneva’s The Little Traveler will decorate each house on the tour.

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    The Fed and Chairman Ben Bernanke, above, reached 50 years back into their playbook Wednesday by shifting money in the Fed’s $1.7 trillion portfolio out of short-term securities and into longer-term holdings.

    Fed to shift $400 billion in holdings

    The Federal Reserve says it will sell $400 billion of its shorter-term securities to buy longer-term holdings, its latest effort to boost a weak economy.

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    President Barack Obama addresses, speaking before the U.N. General Assembly Wednesday, warned Palestinians not to press for statehood through the international body.

    Obama: No shortcut to peace in Middle East

    President Barack Obama declared Wednesday that there could be no shortcut to peace between Israel and the Palestinians, as he sought to head off a United Nations showdown over Palestinian statehood that’s becoming a thorny diplomatic problem for his administration.

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    U.S. hikers Shane Bauer, left, and Josh Fattal, seen above at a hearing last February, were released from Iranian custody Wednesday.

    Americans freed from prison leave Iran

    Two Americans jailed in Iran as spies left Tehran on Wednesday bound for the Gulf state of Oman, closing a high-profile drama with archfoe Washington that brought more than two years of hope then heartbreak for the families.

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    Google opens Plus social network to everyone

    Google Inc. has opened up its Google Plus social network to everyone after testing it with a limited audience for 12 weeks.

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    Preckwinkle to address Schaumburg-area Democrats

    Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle will be the guest speaker at the Schaumburg Area Democratic Organization’s annual breakfast fundraising meeting at 10 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 9. Democratic state senators Mike Noland and Dan Kotowski and state representatives Michelle Mussman and Fred Crespo also will give short presentations.

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    Document shredding in Wheeling Saturday

    The Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County will host a document destruction event at the Wheeling Public Works Facility, 77 W. Hintz Drive, from 9 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 24. The free event will allow residents to drive up, unload their paper and documents and have them shredded within minutes.

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    Judge stays in Wheaton abandonment case

    A motion was rejected Wednesday to have Judge C. Stanley Austin replaced in the case of a woman who left her just-born baby in a Wheaton yard.

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    Quest Academy in Palatine is positioning itself for an expansion. The private school for gifted children is set to buy the adjacent shopping center and wants to build an athletic field on another nearby site.

    Palatine’s Quest Academy eyes expansion

    Quest Academy in Palatine is positioning itself for an expansion. The private school for gifted children is set to buy an adjacent shopping center and wants to build an athletic field nearby.

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    Niven D. Beluso, 25, of chicago, charged with money laundering.

    Man denies role in Lincolnshire investment scam

    A Chicago man charged with being part of a scam to steal $330,000 from a Lincolnshire investment firm pleaded not guilty Wednesday in Lake County Circuit Court. Niven Beluso, 25, faces up to five years in prison if convicted of money laundering, but would also be eligible for probation.

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    Barrington church hosts street fair Sunday

    Community Church of Barrington will host its fourth annual Fall Festival, with a carnival theme, starting at 11:30 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 25 at the corner of Lincoln and Grove avenues in Barrington. The free event is open to all members of the Barrington community.

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    Special Olympics car wash fundraiser Saturday

    Schaumburg Township Elementary District 54 Special Olympics is holding its annual car wash fundraiser from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 at Nathan Hale Elementary School, 1300 W. Wise Road in Schaumburg. Donations received will be used for programming for the 2011-12 school year

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    Barrington firefighters holding open house Saturday

    The Barrington Fire Department and Barrington Countryside Fire Protection District will hold their annual open house from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 24 at the fire station in the Barrington Public Safety Building. The event is an opportunity for visitors to view state-of-the-art lifesaving technology, meet the firefighters who protect their communities and see how their tax dollars support...

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    Open gym every Thursday at Forest View

    Students, alumni and residents near Northwest Suburban High School District 214 can work out at the Forest View Alternative School every Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m. starting Thursday Sept. 22. The open gym is will be held in the field house of the Forest View Educational Center, 2121 S. Goebbert Road in Arlington Heights.

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    Aurora set to impose arrest processing fee

    Among some crowds, Aurora has a reputation. Among people wanted on warrants, the city is known for not charging a booking fee. “It’s been identified that some persons turn themselves in on warrants in Aurora because we don’t have a booking fee,” said Alderman-at-Large Bob O’Conno.

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    Meet the 2011 Peanut Committee, from left, Bill Cox, co-chair; Bill Knotts, 2011 Peanut chairman; Stew Liechte; and Pat Boyle. These Kiwanians are working to coordinate the club’s peanut fundraiser to raise money for local children’s agencies.

    St. Charles Kiwanis ready for peanut fundraiser
    Each year, the St. Charles Noon Kiwanis’ peanut fundraising efforts are in full force to raise money to help local children with many needs. The club has donated the money to more than 30 organizations this past year, with plans for more in 2012.

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    Support from family and friends helped Ben Settler through treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. When he was recovering from chemotherapy and missing Halloween parties, his now-fiance Caren helped him don a pirate costume for a small celebration at home.

    Keep treatment for Hodgkin's moving by donating, walking

    "At 25 years old, I thought I was indestructible," says Ben Settler of Elmhurst. Then he was diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma and began the battle against his cancer.

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    ComEd to attend Oct. 17 Palatine council meeting

    A representative from ComEd will attend the Palatine council meeting at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 17, to discuss its services and the July 23 storm that resulted in record rainfall and widespread power outages across the village.

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    Des Plaines appoints two library trustees

    The Des Plaines City Council this week gave their approval to Mayor Marty Moylan’s appointees for two vacant seats on the Des Plaines Public Library board. Richard Pope and Vincent Rangel will replace library board members Myrtle Klebe and John Robinson, and serve until June 30, 2014.

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    Palestinian police officers detain a Palestinian protester during clashes with Israeli soldiers in the West Bank city of Hebron, Wednesday.

    Obama, with Netanyahu: Peace cannot be imposed

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is thanking President Barack Obama for endorsing direct talks with Palestinians and speaking out against any United Nations bid to declare a Palestinian state on its own.

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    Art lovers fill the grounds at Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital for the 2010 Art in the Barn. The 37th edition of the juried art show takes place this weekend.

    Good Shepherd hosts Art in the Barn this weekend

    The 37th annual Art in the Barn, one of the most enduring fine arts festivals in the suburbs, will be held this coming weekend, Sept. 24-25, on the grounds of Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital, 450 W. Route 22, Barrington. More than 170 artists will present their work, surrounded by live music, food vendors and children's activities.

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    Chicago retail development getting disaster funds

    A retail development on Chicago’s South Side is receiving $4.6 million in federal funding for road repairs and sewer infrastructure.Illinois economic director Warren Ribley announced the funding Monday. It comes from money awarded to Illinois to repair damage from flooding related to Hurricane Ike three years ago.

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    Punok Blaskey

    60-year-old Glendale Heights missing woman found

    A 60-year-old Glendale Heights woman who has been missing since leaving her home early Tuesday morning has been located, police said.

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    Palestinians back un statehood bid with west bank rallies

    Tens of thousands of Palestinians rallied in Ramallah’s Yasser Arafat Square and other cities across the West Bank to support their campaign for statehood at the United Nations.

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    Kenya’s Finance Minister Uhuru Kenyatta Starts ICC Pre-Trial c.2011 Bloomberg News

    Sept. 21 (Bloomberg) -- Kenyan Finance Minister Uhuru Kenyatta and two officials appeared at the International Criminal Court in a hearing to confirm charges of crimes against humanity committed during violence after the 2007 election.

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    3 killed in shelling of Yemeni protesters
    Associated PressSANAA, Yemen — Medical officials say Yemeni government forces have fired mortars at a central district of the capital Sanaa where tens of thousands of opposition supporters had gathered, killing three and wounding at least 16 people.

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    African Union condemns massacre in Burundi

    The African Union condemned an attack in Burundi that killed at least 40 people and offered to support efforts to consolidate peace in the East African country as the authorities began investigating the incident.

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    Cameroon Court Ruling Boosts Presidential Candidates to 23 c.2011 Bloomberg News

    Sept. 21 (Bloomberg) -- Cameroon’s Supreme Court ruled that two presidential candidates rejected by the electoral commission may run in the Oct. 9 election, bringing the total number of aspirants to 23.The ruling late yesterday allows Anicet Ekane Georges of Manidem political party and Soh Fone Daniel of Parti Socialiste Unifie to run in the election.

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    Canada august inflation quickens to 3.1% On gasoline, food

    Canada’s inflation rate accelerated more than economists forecast in August, with gains led by gasoline, insurance premiums and food.

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    Turkey considering sanctions against Syria

    Turkey is considering imposing sanctions against Syria for its brutal crackdown on the country's uprising and is coordinating its efforts with the United States, Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan was quoted as saying Wednesday.

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    India’s Market Regulator Bars Seven Firms for Price Manipulation c.2011 Bloomberg News

    Sept. 21 (Bloomberg) -- India’s capital markets regulator barred seven companies from issuing shares or other convertible instruments after its initial investigation showed the firms manipulated prices through sale of global depository receipts.

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    Typhoon roke weakens, causes flooding, as it crosses Japan

    Typhoon Roke is moving across central Japan, flooding streets and disrupting travel on a path toward the nuclear power plant in Fukushima stricken in last March’s tsunami. The storm has killed at least three people.

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    China meat quality improves amid illegal additive probe

    China’s Ministry of Agriculture said more of country’s meat products are free of illegal additives such as clenbuterol after a four-month crackdown, Xinhua News Agency reported.

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    Clinton urges militants over Samali aid

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton urged al-Shabaab, the Islamist militant group that controls parts of drought-stricken Somalia, to allow food aid into the south, where 300,000 children may starve to death.

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    Practice how to handle embarrassing social situations

    A man's leery stare ruins a woman's dinner with her mom. Carolyn Hax offers an explanation of why we freeze when others act antisocially, as well as tips on how to deal with such behavior.

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    Fair offers details on housing, care services for seniors

    Arlington Heights Senior Center, Inc. is hosting its 11th annual “Senior Housing & Home Care Services Fair”from 8:30 a.m.-noon Thursday, Sept. 22, at the Arlington Heights Senior Center, 1801 W. Central Road.

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    Barrington fire district to host an open house

    The board of trustees of the Barrington Countryside Fire Protection District invite residents to experience a behind the-scenes glimpse of fire department operations, explore equipment and facilities and learn how firefighters and paramedics serve the community during the Barrington Fire Department’s annual open house from 9 a.m.–noon, Saturday, Sept. 24.

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    5 Illinois communities get $2 million in grants

    Five Illinois communities will share nearly $2 million in federal grants designed to create jobs and boost economic development.

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    East St. Louis cops fired at during shooting probe

    East St. Louis cops fired at during shooting probe Authorities say the initial shooting happened early Tuesday and wounded a man in the lower back. He was taken to a hospital.

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    Fall trout fishing season starts next month

    It's almost trout time. Officials with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources say the fall trout season starts Oct. 15 at 37 ponds and lakes statewide.

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    Partnership to focus on proton beam therapy

    A university, a hospital and a medical school are teaming up for a new research and academic partnership in the field of nuclear medicine and proton beam therapy.

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    Man admits sending threatening KKK letters in Ill.

    Sentencing will be held in January for a black man who admits posing as a member of the Ku Klux Klan in sending racist letters in 2006 to a police department and city hall in the southwestern Illinois community of O'Fallon.

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    This year’s Elgin Area Historical Society Cemetery Walk will be held Sunday, Sept. 25. Costumed guides will escort visitors on an hour walking tour that stops to meet six former Elgin residents.

    Elgin Cemetery Walk is Sunday
    The Elgin Area Historical Society’s 24th annual Cemetery Walk will be held from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25, at Bluff City Cemetery, 945 Bluff City Blvd., Elgin.

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    Open House at Schaumburg High School featured performances by the school’s orchestra in the cafeteria throughout the evening.

    Parents turn out for Dist. 211 open houses

    Township High School District 211 schools hosted the annual parent open houses on Sept. 15, and besides visiting their children's classes for short summaries of this year's expectations, parents also were treated to performances by many of the schools' art ensembles and were invited to buy spirit wear.

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    Beverly Chana

    CareerPlace free seminar to help job seekers improve image

    Job seekers can learn to gain a slight edge in interviews and the job search, as well as get insight into how and why people get hired during a seminar from 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Sept 22, at CareerPlace, 600 Hart Road, Suite 275, Barrington. The seminar is free.

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    Flooding an ancient problem in Arlington Heights

    Arlington Heights residents think that they have water problems now. Imagine was it was like in the 19th century when a network of waterways was part of the landscape.

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    Visitors to the Green Fair on Saturday at Cantigny can learn how to get started composting in their backyard. The fair, sponsored in conjunction with SCARCE, offers advice on being more environmentally friendly at home.

    Green Fair celebrates saving energy, recycling

    At Cantigny Park’s Green Fair, organized with a Glen Ellyn-based environmental group, visitors on Saturday can jump on a stationary bike hooked to a generator and feel the energy saved by the more efficient light bulbs.

Sports

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    Hawks, Emery fall to Penguins, 4-1

    Goalie Ray Emery allowed all 4 goals as the Blackhawks dropped to 0-2 in the preseason with a 4-1 loss to the Penguins in Pittsburgh.

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    Wednesday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s girls swimming scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls swimming meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Wednesday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    White Sox starter Mark Buehrle improved to 12-9 with his win over the Indians on Wednesday night.

    Slow starts, weak finishes doom Sox

    The White Sox won their second straight game over Cleveland Wednesday, but they are having another tough time in September following another slow start in April.

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    Carmel tops Vernon Hills

    At White Deer Run, the visiting Corsairs (150) received 1-over 37s from Tommy Schofield, Brian Miller and Mike Wilkinson as Carmel topped Vernon Hills 150-161 in boys golf on Wednesday. Nathan Lee added a 39 for Carmel Catholic.

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    Vernon Hills keeps share of Prairie lead

    Tightly contested North Suburban Conference Prairie Division girls volleyball matches seem to be happening regularly. Vernon Hills maintained its share of first place Wednesday by outlasting visiting Wauconda 15-25, 25-21, 25-17.

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    Marmion hands Burlington Central second loss

    Wednesday’s outcome was much different than last year’s tie between the Burlington Central Rockets and the Marmion Cadets in the St. Charles East boys soccer tournament. The Cadets defeated the Rockets by a score of 3-1 on the second day of tournament play.

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    K’s, Falconer carry Mundelein to victory

    Mundelein’s “Special Ks” and Erin Falconer helped lead the girls swimming and diving team to a North Suburban Conference victory Wednesday. Karrie Kozokar, Amy Klink and Jennifer Kordik — as well as Falconer — won the 400-yard freestyle relay (3:40.75), capping Mundelein’s 100-86 win over host Vernon Hills.

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    Stevenson’s Hannah Kay makes a diving attempt against Libertyville Wednesday night in Lincolnshire.

    Stevenson battles without Baader

    Stevenson standout junior Rachel Baader is nursing an injured thumb, but the Patriots still managed to knock off Libertyville in three games on Wednesday.

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    Mundelein tips Libertyville

    At Countryside, Courteney Fabbri’s 42 led host Mundelein (179) past Libertyville (183) in a tightly contested North Suburban Conference girls golf match on Wednesday.

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    Scouts step up as Stevenson struggles

    A former team state golf champion had one of those days when potential was reached. A former individual state golf champ had one of those rare days when potential never got off the first tee. While defending Class 2A state champ Stephanie Miller of Stevenson had an uncharacteristic day on the links, Lake Forest showed flashes of the Lake Forest of old Wednesday. Led by medalist Caroline Dolan’s even-par 36 and Paige Skinner’s 37, the Scouts shot a 158 to upset visiting Stevenson (172) at Lake Bluff Golf Club.

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    Northern Illinois tailback Jasmin Hopkins rushes for a touchdown against Wisconsin during the first quarter Saturday.

    NIU not about to panic after humbling loss to Wisconsin

    Northern Illinois has some problems to solve on both sides of the ball after losing 49-7 to No. 6 Wisconsin on Saturday at Soldier Field.

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    Still sore from the beating he took against the New Orleans Saints, Bears quarterback Jay Cutler said he expects to recover in time for Sunday’s game against the Green Bay Packers at Soldier Field. In this photo, B.J. Raji of the Packers wraps up Cutler in the NFC Championship game last January.

    Martz takes blame for pain, but Cutler says he’ll be ready

    Offensive coordinator Mike Martz took the blame for the pass-heavy play-calling that left quarterback Jay Cutler still hoarse on Wednesday from getting kicked in the throat against the New Orleans Saints last Sunday, and still sore from getting sacked six times and knocked down several other times. Cutler, however, said he’ll be ready for the Packers this week.

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    Erik Peterson, left, of Barrington, and Anthony Gregorio of Palatine are among the top competitors scheduled to compete in the Palatine Invitational on Saturday. Here, they’re trying to recover after finishing 1-2 in the Mid-Suburban League meet last fall at Busse Woods.

    Cross country/Palatine Invitational preview
    A preview of Saturday's Palatine cross country invitational, which is one of the premier regular-season events in the state.

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    Marian Central downs St. Edward

    St. Edward’s girls volleyball team has had some trouble with its serve receive this season. Marian Central dominates the serve.

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    Harper volleyball in winning mode

    Harper's women's volleyball team has won eight of its last nine matches and has amassed a record of 16-5 heading into the tournament hosted by the Hawks this weekend.

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    Jacobs’ Caz Zyks breaks through a hole in McHenry’s defense last week. The 4-0 Golden Eagles host 3-1 and state-ranked Cary-Grove Friday night.

    Jacobs aiming to take next step

    The Jacobs football team aims to take its 2011 team motto from theory to reality Friday night. “Taking the next step” is the motivational slogan driving the undefeated Golden Eagles, who made progress last year by reaching the state playoffs for the first time since 2006 and finishing with a record of 6-4.

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    St. Viator strikes in 2nd half

    A 4-goal second-half explosion from St. Viator all but swept away host Notre Dame on Wednesday night as the Lions roared to a 5-1 victory in an East Suburban Catholic Conference boys soccer match.

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    Alexei Ramirez celebrates after his solo home run off Cleveland Indians relief pitcher Chad Durbin in the eighth inning Wednesday.

    Buehrle pitches White Sox past Indians 8-4

    Mark Buehrle bounced back from a poor outing and pitched six effective innings, leading the White Sox past the Cleveland Indians 8-4 Wednesday night. Buehrle (12-9) gave up two runs and four hits. He had gone 0-3 with an 11.74 ERA in three previous September starts, allowing 33 hits in only 15 1-3 innings.

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    Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly says receiver TJ Jones is much more mature this year.

    Notre Dame’s Jones strong on and off field

    SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Through three games, TJ Jones has proved himself as a legitimate No. 2 receiver for Notre Dame, opposite Michael Floyd. He’s not just the player coach Brian Kelly got in his face for a mistake in the season opener.Jones, who has two touchdowns and 126 yards receiving, has worked his way up the depth chart with the Fighting Irish, but his biggest challenge came off the field while he was getting ready for his sophomore season.In June, Jones’ father Andre, who played football at Notre Dame, died at age 42 as a result of a brain aneurysm. Jones no longer needed to just step up on the field, he needed solidify his family life.“His mom needed his help, and he needed to be really a rock for the family, so he moved on,” Kelly said Wednesday.With five siblings, four younger than him, Jones was forced to fill the hole left in his family after his father’s death.“I’ve become the man of the house, so my problems don’t really matter to me anymore,” Jones said. “It’s more helping my family out.”On campus for summer workouts, Jones flew home to Atlanta after hearing his father was sick. One week later, Jones returned to South Bend at the urging of his mother.“It was very hard to leave, because I definitely wanted to stay there and help my mom and family through the time,” he said, “but after about a week of being there my mom told me she wanted me to get back and finish summer school classes strong and get ready for the season because I needed to set an example for my younger siblings.”That example started with a pregame ceremony honoring his father before the South Florida game. Andre Jones played outside linebacker at Notre Dame from 1987-1990 under coach Lou Holtz. He was a starter on the 1988 national championship team.“It was real hard. Seeing my mom out there for the first time in six weeks and she was crying so that made me more emotional,” Jones said of the ceremony. “It definitely just hit home that he wasn’t going to be standing there in the tunnel when I came out this year.”Jones said he struggled moving on, but his play on the field hasn’t reflected it. In fact, Kelly said Jones has become more accountable on the field.“He’s not a freshman anymore. Last year there would be times where he would just act like a freshman,” Kelly said. “He’s a lot more mature in the way he handles himself. I think the biggest thing is he plays really fast now. He’s a pretty tough matchup guy.”Averaging 10.5 yards per catch on 12 receptions, Jones has helped open up a passing game relying heavily on sophomore quarterback Tommy Rees and Floyd.“I think he got a lot better,” Floyd said. “ I think the defenses that we play take a big emphasis on me going down field. Just to have TJ on the other side to be able to make big plays for us is great.”Jones no longer lets the little mistakes get to him.In the South Florida game, a pass from Rees hit Jones in the helmet. Jones wasn’t looking for the ball. Kelly was caught by television cameras yelling at the young receiver, but Jones said he understood that he needed to learn from the play and move on.“With everything that’s happened, it’s put a lot of things in perspective for me,” Jones said. “A lot of the little things I used to let get to me, I realized this year don’t matter. I’ve seen the bigger picture and that’s what I focus on now and push myself working towards.”Jones was used to the criticism.“He was my toughest critic, but he was also my biggest fan and he used to tell me that after every time we would talk,” Jones said of his father.Andre Jones went through many of the situations his son deals with at Notre Dame, and TJ Jones said he misses the conversations the two would have about being a college football player in South Bend.

  •  
    Clay Matthews sacks Cam Newton last week during the Packers’ 30-23 victory over the Panthers. Matthews, who will be coming after Jay Cutler on Sunday at Soldier Field, had 23½ sacks in his first two years in the league.

    Bears’ Tice believes in his men despite 11 sacks in first two games

    The Bears' beleaguered offensive line and quarterback Jay Cutler can expect just as much pass-rush pressure from the Packers this week as they saw last week from the Saints.

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    Marian Hossa rejoined the Blackhawks on Wednesday after mourning the loss of his best friend and welcoming a daughter.

    Hawks’ Hossa gets back to work

    Marian Hossa rejoined the Blackhawks on Wednesday after experiencing two of the most emotional weeks of his life. On Sept. 7, Hossa lost best friend Pavol Demitra in the plane crash in Russia that killed the entire Lokomotiv Yaroslavl team from Kontinental Hockey League.

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    Geneva’s Colin Lillibridge hits out of a sand bunker on the 11th hole on Wednesday, September 21.

    Geneva completes perfect River record

    Behind its superlative depth and balance, Geneva concluded a flawless regular-season run in a battle of unbeaten boys golf programs with a 156-164 triumph over St. Charles East.

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    Gaspari + ‘retirement’ = one very happy football coach

    Mike Gaspari is having the time of his life in his retirement. It is, of course, a full-time job.

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    Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford is expected to make his first preseason start Friday night at the United Center.

    Hawks’ Crawford knows what he needs to be ready

    Blackhawks No. 1 goalie Corey Crawford estimates he'll need "three or four" exhibition games to be ready for the Oct. 7 regular season opener at Dallas.

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    Manager Mike Quade watches from the dugout Wednesday as the Cubs played their final home game of the season.

    Change in Quade a Cubs mystery

    The Mike Quade who managed the Cubs late last season like he had nothing to lose never showed up this year. The Mike Quade who did manage this year was a different guy -- and a disaster.

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    Should the White Sox offer manager Ozzie Guillen a contract extension before he leaves for vacation at the end of the season? Click on the comment link to share your view.

    Your turn: What would you tell Ozzie Guillen?

    Should the White Sox offer manager Ozzie Guillen a contract extension before he leaves for vacation at the end of the season? Click on the comment link to share your view.

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    Cubs power-hitting third baseman Aramis Ramirez will file for free agency at the end of the season.

    Cubs' Ramirez will file for free agency

    Aramis Ramirez may have played his last game as a Cub at Wrigley Field. For whatever reason, there are some fans and media members who gladly would show Ramirez the door. But they should be careful for what they wish, as Ramirez has been the most productive third baseman since the days of Ron Santo.

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    Cubs manager Mike Quade expects to return next season, despite the team’s dismal record and numerous changes ahead, including the hiring of a new general manager.

    Quade expecting to return as Cubs manager

    Cubs manager Mike Quade was hardly in a nostalgic or reflective mood Wednesday, before or after his team beat the Milwaukee Brewers 7-1 at Wrigley Field.

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    New York Giants defensive back Deon Grant is helped up by trainers during the first quarter Monday night. Grant said he really did hurt his knee on the play.

    Miffed Grant denies faking injury to slow Rams

    EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — A somewhat miffed Deon Grant denied faking an injury to slow down the St. Louis Rams’ no-huddle offense and give the Giants’ defense time to rest in Monday night’s nationally televised game.The veteran safety insisted Wednesday he hurt his right knee making a tackle on Cadillac Williams after an 8-yard run to the Giants 7 late in the first quarter.The Rams told the NFL on Tuesday they suspected Tom Coughlin’s team was faking injuries, and quarterback Sam Bradford added it was obvious the Giants were wasting time.On Wednesday, the NFL sent a memo to all 32 teams warning of fines, suspensions and loss of draft picks if it determines players faked injuries during a game.“You go and check my medical report,” Grant said Wednesday after readily agreeing to answer questions about whether he was faking. “I have the injuries to speak for it ... two torn MCLs that I never had surgery, wrist surgery, shoulder surgery, a broken hip with a metal plate and screws in. How can another person that’s not in your body tell you you are faking an injury?”The 32-year-old Grant, who barely took a breath in giving long-winded answers, showed reporters his swollen right knee and reminded them he has never missed a game in his 12 pro seasons.He said, however, he was hurt after tackling Williams.“I could see if I was walking and fell,” Grant said. “When you see after I made that tackle and bang my knee on that play, you see my bending my knee as I am walking.”Grant said he believed defensive end Justin Tuck noticed it and told him to “just go down” because he was not going to make it off the field, and he was out of position as the Rams approached the line for the next play.Bradford complained that he heard some Giants defenders telling someone to “go down” because they could not substitute and were out of position with the Rams in their no-huddle offense.What made Grant’s injury suspect was rookie linebacker Jacquian Williams also cramped after the play.Grant called that a coincidence and went off again when asked about a potential fine.“I don’t care,” he said. “If you want me to be fined for that, how about you give me money for playing on these torn MCLs and for me finishing the season with a torn rotator cuff, with a labrum that I am going to get fixed at the end of the season so I won’t miss no games and sell my team out. I’m not sitting out and letting my team down.”Grant scoffed at the Rams’ suggestion his alleged delaying tactics took them out of their offensive flow. He noted that the first three times the Rams got into the red zone they settled for field goals.“What happened all the other times they got into the red zone and couldn’t punch it in?” Grant said. “What happened then? If it all stopped what they were doing, then let’s have a conversation. But it didn’t stop what they were doing. They caught us off-guard the whole game, except when it was time to stand up, we stood up. When it was time to punch it in the end zone, you all (the Rams) couldn’t punch it in the end zone. It’s that simple.”Giants linebacker Mathias Kiwanuka questioned anyone who would accuse a player of faking an injury.“I really think that is a dangerous path to go down,” he said. “If you start letting referees decide whether a player is hurt or not it might come back to bite them big time.”Kiwanuka made that statement before hearing about the league’s memo, and he seemed concerned when told about it.“It’s going to put players in a position where if they are uncertain about an injury they might stay on the field a little longer and make the injury worse, and that might lead to lawsuits,” Kiwanuka said. “I think it’s inappropriate.”

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    West Chicago honors Dierking, Hansen

    It’s a good thing for Scott Dierking both North Central College and Purdue University football teams are on their bye week.

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    The Green Bay Packers’ Nick Collins is carted off the field after being injured during the fourth quarter of the Packers’ 30-23 win over the Carolina Panthers Sunday.

    Packers again turn to backup Peprah

    GREEN BAY, Wis. — Once again, the Green Bay Packers are turning to Charlie Peprah to step in and start at safety.With Pro Bowl player Nick Collins out for the season with a neck injury, Peprah is expected to take over as a starter going into Sunday’s game at Chicago. The Packers leaned heavily on Peprah during their run to the Super Bowl last season after highly regarded rookie Morgan Burnett tore his left ACL. Collins’ injury isn’t the only concern for the Packers. Charles Woodson sat out Wednesday’s practice with a recurring foot injury, and Clay Matthews sat out with a quadriceps injury. Packers coach Mike McCarthy says he expects both Woodson and Matthews to play Sunday.Cornerback Tramon Williams returned to practice after missing Sunday’s game with a shoulder injury.

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    Waubonsie Valley junior Dylan Warden has been involved in 8 touchdowns during his last four quarters of action on the football field.

    Conference call reaches Glenbard South

    Friday in Glen Ellyn, Glenbard South’s football team officially exits life as an independent. The Raiders (1-3) finally open play in the Metro Suburban Conference with a home game against Elmwood Park (2-2). Glenbard South then plays MSC games against Riverside-Brookfield, Fenton and Ridgewood before closing the regular season with a fifth nonconference game against Fort Zumwalt South in Missouri.

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    Prospect standout golfer Allison Walsh will continue her golf career and education at Bradley University.

    Prospect’s Walsh will tee it up at Bradley

    Since she began playing golf, Allison Walsh always wanted to be the best that she could be in the sport. “So Division I golf has always been a goal of mine,” said the Prospect senior, who helped lead the Knights to the Class AA state final a year ago (fourth place) and is trying to do the same this fall. Walsh recently accomplished her Division I goal when she committed to Bradley University in Peoria and coach Mary Moan.

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    Cubs starting pitcher Matt Garza delivers during the second inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Garza pitches 6-hitter, Cubs stall Brewers

    Matt Garza pitched a six-hitter, Marlon Byrd hit a three-run homer and the Cubs prolonged Milwaukee's drive to clinch the NL Central, beating the Brewers 7-1 in the final game at Wrigley Field this season. The Brewers' magic number for winning the division title and closing out second-place St. Louis remained at three. The Cardinals played the New York Mets on Wednesday night.

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    Daily Herald outdoors columnist Mike Jackson, who was inducted into Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame at the America's Outdoor Show in Rosemont last January, will be sitting out the fall hunting and fishing season as he recovers from lung cancer surgery.

    Exiled to the den: This fall is a time to heal

    Mike Jackson, the Daily Herald's outdoor columnist, reveals that he'll be missing the caribou hunt this fall, but it looks like he's cleared an important - and frightening and painful - health hurdle after undergoing lung cancer surgery.

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    Mike Jackson’s outdoors notes: Fishing update

    I would be doing a disservice to those dedicated anglers on Chicago’s lakefront if I didn’t tout the outstanding catches of trout and salmon going on right now. In fact, the Chinook and brown trout catches continue to amaze those doing the cranking on the reels.

  •  
    The Cubs can wait until five days after the end of the season to pick up a $16 million option for third baseman Aramis Ramirez for next. Should they lock him up or let him test the market?

    Your turn: Should Cubs bring back Aramis Ramirez?

    As Cubs beat writer Bruce Miles points out, third baseman Aramis Ramirez has been the most productive hitter on the club for most of the past decade. While the Cubs and Ramirez have a mutual option for $16 million for next season, he could be the best available in a down free agent market for quality third basemen. What should the Cubs do?

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    East Carolina applies to join Big East

    GREENVILLE, N.C. — East Carolina has sent a letter of application to join the Big East.In a joint statement, chancellor Steve Ballard and athletic director Terry Holland say the school will “maintain a proactive approach” in dealing with uncertainty about conference realignment. They also say that while the school has “formalized” its interest in the Big East, it will “remain focused on competing at the highest level through the efforts of Conference USA.”East Carolina won consecutive Conference USA football championships under Skip Holtz in 2008 and 2009. The Pirates also traditionally play a nonconference schedule featuring BCS opponents, including South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia Tech this season under Ruffin McNeill. Last season, East Carolina was the only league school to rank in the top 50 nationally in average home attendance.

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    Texas prez says Big 12 money deals can be redone

    AUSTIN, Texas — Texas officials said Wednesday they are open to a new revenue-sharing model in the Big 12 and have already suggested that top-level television and cable money be shared equally.But Texas athletic director DeLoss Dodds says Texas doesn’t want to share the money from its Longhorn Network, a 20-year, $300 million deal with ESPN.“That’s never been in play, that’s not in play,” Dodds said.He said Big 12 athletic directors more than a month ago approved Texas’ suggestion to equally share to network revenue around the league, which is the practice in other leagues. The plan has not been voted on by league presidents, Dodds said.“Those were Texas proposals,” Dodds said.Texas President William Powers said creating stability is the top priority for the Big 12. And a day after the Pac-12 said it had no plans to add any Big 12 members, Powers said one way to build stability is to restructure media contracts.“There are methods of doing that, including the way media deals are structured and we’ll be working with our partners in the Big 12 and our media partners to structure something that has stability,” Powers told reporters at the state Capitol.When pressed on the prospect of revenue sharing, Powers said: “We are open to every idea ... We’ve never said that’s off the table.”About an hour later, Dodds said revenue-sharing offers don’t include sharing the Longhorn Network.The Big 12 agreed to a 13-year television deal with Fox Sports in April worth more than $1 billion.Texas gets a larger share of league media revenue from television contracts than some of the other Big 12 members. The Longhorns also signed a deal with ESPN in January to create the Longhorn Network that launched several weeks ago.The network created uncertainty in the Big 12 and Texas A&M said it was a big reason why the Aggies will leave the Big 12 by July for the Southeastern Conference if legal issues can be cleared up.Nebraska athletic director Tom Osborne earlier this month said the Big 12’s revenue-sharing plan lends itself to instability as the Huskers opened their first season in the Big Ten. Each Big Ten school received $22.6 million this year — about twice as much as Nebraska could have expected if it had stayed in the Big 12.Powers said all issues are subject to discussion when talking with other Big 12 schools in the next few days.“A lot of these issues that you hear (about) whether its revenue sharing or whatever, we’ve been working on long before,” he said. “We will continue to work on those. I’m not going to prejudge on how those will come out. There are not any preconditions for the conference coming back together.“We want a stable, workable conference going forward,” Powers said.

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    Kansas regents push up Big 12 talks

    TOPEKA, Kan. — The Kansas Board of Regents on Wednesday moved up the time of a scheduled executive session to discuss the future of the Big 12 Conference, and how any changes would affect Kansas and Kansas State.Regent Chairman Ed McKechnie said the board would meet Wednesday afternoon instead of Thursday because of the pace of discussions taking place throughout the conference at various levels“Our priority is to have Kansas and Kansas State be together in the Big 12,” McKechnie said. “It appears that we are making great progress toward that.“I think the Big 12 is the best place for KU and K-State to be, and I hope that we are on the cusp of that happening.”Officials at Kansas and Kansas State declined to comment and deferred all questions to the nine-member Board of Regents. The executive session will be part of the board’s scheduled monthly meeting in Topeka.Regents have been watching closely as rumors about the conference dissolving have swirled, hinging on the possible departure of Oklahoma and Texas.The Pac-12 presidents and chancellors decided Tuesday night not to expand, quashing speculation that Oklahoma and Texas would be joining former Big 12 member Colorado, which joined the Pac-12 this season.Texas officials said Wednesday that they were open to restructuring revenue contracts shared with the remaining Big 12 members. Texas President William Powers said the top priority was to bring stability to the conference.McKechnie said a stable Big 12 would be in the best interest for Kansas and Kansas State, but declined to say how that could be accomplished.“I think we have a lot of smart people to figure that out,” he said. “This is all about TV sets. We’re a small state, that’s the problem.”McKechnie said a reconstituted Big 12 was the best arrangement for the Jayhawks and Wildcats, whether it adds more members or not.“What is the right number? We have an awful lot of people who make an awful lot of money and the need to tell us that,”McKechnie said he hoped Texas A&M could remain part of the conference and not move to the Southeastern Conference next July as has been announced.“If everything gets fixed, I would love for A&M to stay,” he said. “But we need to be the Big 12 in more than name only. Our name ought to reflect who we are.”

  •  

    Manning back at practice for 2nd time this week

    INDIANAPOLIS — Peyton Manning was back at Colts practice Wednesday, the second time this week he was seen taking laps around the practice field.The only four-time MVP in league history is expected to miss at least two months and possibly the entire season after having neck surgery to repair a herniated disk Sept. 8.This past Monday was the first time he had been seen by reporters at practice since having his third neck surgery in 19 months.He did nothing more than walk briskly around the indoor practice field while other Colts players worked out. It was the same scene Wednesday, except that Manning started his routine outdoors on a warm day in Indy. He has not talked with reporters.Manning had started 227 consecutive games, including the playoffs, before missing the last two -- both of them losses by the Colts.

  •  
    Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Cribbs, center, is tackled by Indianapolis Colts’ Jerry Hughes, right, and Jacob Tamme on a kickoff-return in the third quarter Sunday.

    Colts’ defense determined to turn things around

    INDIANAPOLIS — The Indianapolis Colts defense is used to the criticism. They hear it every year.What they’re not accustomed to is bailing out a team that has opened the season 0-2 for the first time in 13 years.With the Colts in desperate need of a victory and the rest of the football world already writing off the 2011 season, players and coaches are ignoring the talk and focusing on their jobs.Almost to a man, Indy’s defensive players insist that if they do their job a little better, things will work out and the wins will start to come. And they can’t think of a better time to turn things around than Sunday night when they play defending AFC champion Pittsburgh on national television.

  •  
    Cowboys coach Jason Garrett is hopeful that quarterback Tony Romo will play on Monday night against Washington.

    Cowboys’ Garrett hopeful Romo will play Monday

    ASHBURN, Va. — Dallas Cowboys coach Jason Garrett says he’s hopeful Tony Romo will play in Monday night’s game against the Washington Redskins.Garrett said Wednesday that Romo has been getting treatment for a fractured rib and punctured lung and “hopefully he’ll be ready” for the game against the Cowboys’ NFC East rival.Dallas’ players had an extra day off Wednesday. They resume practice Thursday ahead of the Monday night game. Garrett says receivers Miles Austin and Dez Bryant are day-to-day. Austin aggravated a hamstring injury in Sunday’s win over San Francisco. Bryant has been out with a bruised thigh.

  •  
    Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick might play Sunday against the Giants. Vick suffered a concussion in the second half of the Eagles’ loss to the Falcons.

    Vick partakes in walkthrough, may play Sunday

    PHILADELPHIA — Eagles quarterback Michael Vick took part in a morning walk-through on Wednesday, and there is a chance he will play against the Giants (1-1) on Sunday.Vick suffered a concussion in Philadelphia’s 35-31 loss to the Falcons in Atlanta on Sunday night, and was forced to leave the game in the second half.Head athletic trainer Rick Burkholder said Vick doesn’t have “a whole lot of concussion symptoms,” and would undergo further testing, including seeing an independent neurologist in the next day or two.“Just because he doesn’t have symptoms today doesn’t mean he won’t have symptoms tomorrow,” Burkholder said. “You can’t predict.”Coach Andy Reid wasn’t sure whether Vick would practice in the afternoon.“It’s hard to give you the future because you have to do things the right way and go through the process,” Reid said.Vick threw for a pair of touchdowns for the Eagles (1-1), but couldn’t continue after getting spun by a Falcons rusher into one of his teammates, right tackle Todd Herremans. He was replaced by Mike Kafka. Vince Young, who was signed to be the backup, has missed the first two games with a hamstring injury. He’s close to returning.“We’re pretty fortunate to have three quarterbacks who can play the game,” Reid said. “My message to all three of them was: ‘Get ready accordingly.’Giants coach Tom Coughlin, in his Tuesday conference call with the media, said he expected Vick to play, and that New York was not putting together a different game plan without Vick in it.Since the NFL instituted new guidelines, only one Eagles player — wide receiver Jason Avant — has played the next game after suffering a concussion.However, Avant had two extra days off because a snowstorm postponed Philadelphia’s game against Minnesota last December.“Every situation is different,” Avant said. “I got up right away, immediately knew where I was, who hit me, what the score was.”

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    Kansas City Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles is out for the season after tearing the ACL in his left knee Sunday against the Lions.

    Chiefs put RB Charles on IR, promote WR Horne

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The Kansas City Chiefs have officially placed running back Jamaal Charles on season-ending injured reserve and promoted wide receiver Jeremy Horne from the practice squad.Charles tore the ACL in his left knee in the first quarter of Sunday’s 48-3 loss to the Detroit Lions. He is the third Chiefs player to sustain the injury in recent weeks. Tight end Tony Moeaki went down in their preseason finale and Eric Berry in a season-opening loss to Buffalo.Coach Todd Haley said Monday that he expected Charles to go on IR and the team made the move official Wednesday. The Chiefs also announced they signed offensive lineman Lucas Patterson to fill Horne’s place on the practice squad.Horne played in three games for Kansas City last season.

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    Lions roaring as road favorite

    Now that’s more like it.Pro Picks rallied as if Josh Freeman was leading the charge, going 11-4-1 against the spread and 13-3 straight up. That was as impressive a turnaround as what the Steelers and Titans displayed in Week 2 after ugly openers.Or as noteworthy as what is going on for Detroit. The Lions not only are 2-0, but this week are road favorites. In a division game, no less.The Lions’ roar has been heard in Tampa and at Ford Field, with Detroit outscoring the Bucs and then the Chiefs by a combined 75-23. This isn’t the team we’ve grown to ignore except when they host the early Thanksgiving Day game — or when they are going 0-16.Nope, these Lions are a 3½-point choice at Minnesota, and rightfully so after the power they have shown. The Vikings are 0-2 and, while they haven’t been nearly as hapless as some of the other winless squads, they twice have blown late leads.In this game, they won’t likely have a late lead. Or any sort of lead, unless the Lions get cocky.“We have some experienced players and they know that two games don’t make a season,” Lions coach Jim Schwartz said. “We have a hard-working group of players that understand that it’s not about what you’ve done in the past, it’s what you do in the future ... nobody’s trying to rain on any parades or anything else, but it’s two games.”Soon to be three games won.LIONS, 24-16New England (minus 9) at BuffaloWe usually like home underdogs. In this case, though, see last week: “Until otherwise notified, the Patriots will be the choice to cover, whatever the spread.”BEST BET: PATRIOTS, 41-28Miami (plus 2½) at ClevelandLet the weirdness continue for Dolphins: lose at home, win on the road.UPSET SPECIAL: DOLPHINS, 16-13N.Y. Jets (minus 3½) at OaklandThis would be the upset special if the Raiders were healthier. They should at least cover.JETS, 20-19Green Bay (minus 3½) at ChicagoPack is in Super Bowl form, losing players (Nick Collins) and winning games.PACKERS, 28-16Houston (plus 4) at New OrleansInside the Superdome could be a true proving ground for the Texans. Or not.SAINTS, 34-27Atlanta (plus 1½) at Tampa BayIf this game is close in final period, count on Freeman and the Bucs.BUCCANEERS, 24-23Denver (plus 7) at TennesseeTitans come off big win without getting much from Chris Johnson. They’ll get plenty this week.TITANS, 24-20San Francisco (plus 2½) at CincinnatiNiners’ first road game — and they will remain in the East before their second next week at Philadelphia.49ERS, 16-13Jacksonville (plus 3½) at CarolinaTime for Cam Newton to either come down to Earth, or get his first pro win.PANTHERS, 27-16Kansas City (plus 14½) at San DiegoChiefs have been league’s worst team by far. Can’t believe they are really that bad.CHARGERS, 30-20Baltimore (minus 3½) at St. LouisWinless and battered is no way to face the angry (at themselves) Ravens.RAVENS, 17-10Pittsburgh (minus 10½) at IndianapolisHow juicy: Big Ben vs. four-time MVP Peyton ... oh, wait. Wrong year.STEELERS, 22-7Arizona (minus 3) at SeattleOK, forget about that attraction to home underdogs, considering these last three picks.CARDINALS, 23-10Washington (OFF) at Dallas, Monday nightRedskins can stamp themselves as a real contender in NFC East with a win. Tony Romo’s injured ribs force this one off the board.COWBOYS, 26-21N.Y. Giants (OFF) at PhiladelphiaMichael Vick’s status clouds this game and eliminates any betting line. But Eagles still are the healthier (and superior) team.EAGLES, 24-17———RECORD:Against spread: 11-4-1 (overall 17-13-2); straight up 13-3 (overall 19-13).Best Bet: 1-1 against spread, 1-1 straight up.Upset Special: 1-1 against spread, 1-1 straight up.

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    ‘Untame this beast’: Redskins’ Landry on the mend

    ASHBURN, Va. — LaRon Landry is ready to be a beast again.The Washington Redskins safety said Wednesday he anticipates returning from his hamstring injury for Monday night’s game against the Dallas Cowboys.“Don’t calm me down. Let me go,” Landry said. “Untame this beast, man. It’s been a while.”Landry hasn’t played since last Nov. 15 when his season ended early because of an Achilles’ tendon injury. At the time, he was having his best season and appeared on the verge of becoming one of the top safeties in the NFL. The Achilles’ tendon healed during training camp, but the fifth-year veteran pulled his hamstring warming up before the exhibition game against Indianapolis on Aug. 19. He had another setback the week before the regular season opener, but he said the leg now feels comfortable and ready to go. He plans to test it fully on Friday or Saturday to make sure, then will leave the decision up to coach Mike Shanahan.“The only thing I’m anticipating is me playing on Monday night,” Landry said. “Everything else is out of my control. I can’t speak for him. I can’t rush God. If it ain’t ready, it ain’t ready. ... I haven’t had any hiccups or any setbacks, so I’m looking forward to playing this Monday night.”Landry’s return would solidify a defense that’s already off to a good start. The Redskins (2-0) lead the NFC East headed into the showdown against the division rival.

Business

  •  
    Mark Buoniconti, president of the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis and the Buoniconti Fund, rolls into the first vehicle made by the Vehicle Production Group during their launch event of the MV-1 at AM General’s Commercial Assembly Plant in Mishawaka, Ind., on Wednesday.

    AM General is producing wheelchair-accessible cars

    The Mishawaka, Ind., plant that formerly made H2 Hummers has begun making wheelchair-accessible cars. AM General, which made the H2 under contract for General Motors Corp., is making the MV-1 for The Vehicle Production Group based in Miami.

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    Google Inc. has opened up its Google Plus social network to everyone after testing it with a limited audience for 12 weeks.

    Google opens Plus social network to everyone

    Google Inc. has opened up its Google Plus social network to everyone after testing it with a limited audience for 12 weeks.

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    One million young adults get health coverage under law

    Two new surveys find a big drop in the number of young adults without health insurance since last year — and President Barack Obama's overhaul is getting credit instead of criticism.

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    IMF: Financial risks rising in US and Europe

    The International Monetary Fund says the global financial system is more vulnerable than at any point since the 2008 financial crisis.

  •  
    Masaharu Hamada

    Japan whistleblower at highest court

    Masaharu Hamada is among a handful of whistleblowers in Japan, a nation that has long advocated corporate loyalty and subjected outspoken employees to bizarre punishments such as assigning them closet-sized offices.

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    AAR, Boeing collaborate on Royal Netherlands Air Force support

    AAR and Boeing Company have signed a letter of intent to cooperate on component maintenance, repair and overhaul capabilities to support Royal Netherlands Air Force rotorcraft operations

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    StudioNorth commits team to social media
    StudioNorth has boosted its commitment in social media by establishing a dedicated social media team to augment its interactive, branding and creative centers of excellence.

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    Midwest Real Estate Data debuts “The Thing”
    Midwest Real Estate Data LLC announced that last week’s successful debut of The Thing, which exceeded projections for customer adoption.

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    Survey: Banks are starting to recover

    Shifting priorities, modest salary increases and even rising turnover are all indicators that banks are beginning to recover from the recent economic downturn, according to Crowe Horwath’s 2011 Comprehensive Financial Institution Compensation Survey.

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    Abbott named top dealmaker for 4th consecutive year

    The Deal magazine has named Abbott Laboratories as one of its Most Admired Corporate Dealmakers for the fourth consecutive year.

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    ITW revenue grows 16 percent
    Illinois Tool Works Inc. said operating revenue grew by 16 percent for the three month period that ended in August 31, over the same period last year.

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    “Sold” signs, like these at the School Street development in downtown Libertyville, are increasing in Lake County, which had 726 homes sold during August compared to 513 the year before, according to a report Wednesday by the Illinois Association of Realtors.

    Number of homes sold here increases in August

    More homes in the Chicago and suburban market were sold in August, compared to a year ago, giving the industry and consumers a spark of hope after a brutal recession.

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    Oil down to near $86 ahead of U.S. Fed meeting

    Oil prices fell to near $86 a barrel Wednesday as the dollar gained on the euro and traders looked to a U.S. Federal Reserve meeting for possible stimulus measures to spur economic growth.

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    GOP leaders: Fed should resist new stimulus

    Republican leaders of the House and Senate are urging Federal Reserve policymakers against taking further steps to lower interest rates.

  •  
    Visitors check a model of Boeing 747-8 airplane at an aviation expo in Beijing, China, Wednesday;

    Boeing: New planes designed with China in mind

    China's fast growing demand for aircraft has become a strong influence on how Boeing Co. designs and markets its newest planes, one of the company's executives said Wednesday.

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    Greece to enact more austerity measures

    Greece will have to take fresh austerity measures, the debt-ridden country's finance minister said Wednesday, a day after Athens moved a step closer to getting the vital bailout funds it needs to avoid a disastrous default next month.

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    General Mills Inc.'s fiscal first-quarter net income fell 14 percent, but its adjusted results beat Wall Street's expectations as revenue climbed on higher prices, solid demand and new products.

    General Mills 1Q profit falls as revenue rises

    General Mills Inc.'s fiscal first-quarter net income fell 14 percent, but its adjusted results beat Wall Street's expectations as revenue climbed on higher prices, solid demand and new products.

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    A Swedish appeals court has approved cash-strapped car maker Saab's application for bankruptcy protection.

    Saab gets bankruptcy protection

    A Swedish appeals court has approved cash-strapped car maker Saab's application for bankruptcy protection.

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    A few hundred demonstrators protesting corporate greed march from nearby Zucotti park to Wall Street amid heavy police presence, Tuesday.

    20-somethings protest Wall Street

    In a small granite plaza a block from the New York Stock Exchange, a group of 20-somethings in flannel pajama pants and tie-dyed T-shirts are plotting the demise of Wall Street as we know it.

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    It looks like retailers will have to work extra hard to keep this holiday season from turning into a bah humbug.

    Holiday season may be a bah-humbug for retailers

    It looks like retailers will have to work extra hard to keep this holiday season from turning into a bah humbug. A new forecast shows sales will likely not be as high as last year and that shoppers won't be hitting the stores as much.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Mike Mills, left, Michael Stipe and Peter Buck of the rock band R.E.M have announced on their website that they are breaking up.

    R.E.M. calling it quits

    The Grammy-winning rock group announced on its website Wednesday that it has “decided to call it a day as a band.” The group composed of singer Michael Stipe, guitarist Peter Buck and bassist Mike Mills released its debut album “Murmur” in 1983. Drummer Bill Berry was also in the band but left the group in 1997.

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    Michael Lalagos of Schaumburg

    Cook of the Week Challenge: Week 2 winners announced

    Cook of the Week Challenge Week 2 contestants got high marks for creativity, but some fell short of putting together balanced, eye-popping dishes. With that in mind the judges ruled that Michael Lalagos of Schaumburg and Cate Brusenbach of Antioch will advance to the next recipe challenge round.

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    Issues of race take center stage in "Clybourne Park," a Pulitzer Prize-winning play now at Steppenwolf Theatre.

    Steppenwolf's ‘Clybourne Park' an explosive meditation on race

    Steppenwolf Theatre's production of “Clybourne Park” is a tour de force for actors, with the seven members of the cast playing different and parallel roles in the first and second acts, set in the same Chicago house 50 years apart. But playwright Bruce Norris' Pulitzer Prize-winning script becomes a director's showcase as well. The staging and pacing give this play its charge and enable it to use ditsy comedy as the stuff of explosive drama.

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    Actor Brad Pitt heavily promoted his film “Moneyball” during the recent 36th Toronto International Film Festival in Toronto.

    Pitt goes to bat for ‘Moneyball'

    Brad Pitt's about as free a free agent as they come in Hollywood, a superstar so big he could play ball with just about any team, on any film project he likes. Yet he wanted to make “Moneyball” so much that he stuck with it for years, even after pal Steven Soderbergh, his director on the “Ocean's Eleven” flicks, departed the film in a script squabble with Sony Pictures.

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    Colbie Caillat is set to perform a solo acoustic show at North Central College's Wentz Concert Hall in Naperville on Thursday, Nov. 10.

    Caillat replaces Benatar for NCC Sesquincentennial Homecoming

    Singer Colbie Caillat is set to perform Thursday, Nov. 10, at North Central College in Naperville as part of a Homecoming Week Sesquicentennial Celebration. She replaces originally scheduled performers Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo.

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    New uses for plastic ice cream tubs

    Plastic ice cream containers seem too good to throw away. They’re bulky, so you don’t want to save them without having a purpose for them. Some are now available as a square container. This makes them great space-saving storage or gift containers.

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    Simon Cowell, left, and Paula Abdul, judges on “The X Factor” pose together at a world premiere screening event for the new television series.

    Cowell hoping'X' will mark the spot

    Simon Cowell, a man who thinks big, is picturing his new singing contest “The X Factor” as America's No. 1 series. The British music industry executive, TV star and producer wants to prove that the U.K. and international TV hit can play on what he considers the world's top stage, America. The test starts this week with the debut of “X Factor” from 7 to 9 p.m. today and Thursday.

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    Arlington Heights Chamber of Commerce member Jay Beaton, from left, chamber business development director Mary Beisemann, Smashburger founder Tom Ryan, Arlington Heights Mayor Arlene Mulder, and city planner John Melaniphy were all smiles on opening night of the new Smashburger in town.

    Dining events: Smash-tastic burgers in Arlington

    BlackFinn in Naperville expands menu; Smashburger opens in Arlington Heights; Gordon Biersch introduces light menu items

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    Honey-Thyme Glazed Chicken with Cider Gravy and Baby Spinach features sweet autumnal flavors that can be tailored to your region by using a local wildflower honey and a cider pressed at nearby orchard.

    Rosh Hashana perfect for local, seasonal eating

    You may not think of Jewish cooking as trendsetting, but truth is it has been focused on seasonal recipes sporting local ingredients since long before farmers markets became the darling of the foodie scene. And the Jewish New Year meal, served at Rosh Hashana, is a perfect example of this unintended hipness.

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    Ray Romano, left, guest stars with Patricia Heaton in a scene from the comedy series “The Middle.”

    Role reveral for Heaton and Romano

    Patricia Heaton and her former “Everybody Loves Raymond” co-star are experiencing a role reversal on her new sitcom. Ray Romano guest stars in the season premiere of ABC’s “The Middle,” airing Wednesday at 7 p.m. Heaton plays a wife and mom on the show, just as she did for nine seasons on “Everybody Loves Raymond.”

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    JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.com Cook of the Week Challenge contestant Mary Beth Riley of Elk Grove Village.

    Cook of the Week Challenge: Week 3

    Glenn Sasveld had never eaten polenta before, and here he was faced with it as an ingredient for the Cook of the Week Challenge. Jay Deihs of Arlington Heights was in the same boat when it came to one of his challenge ingredients: chorizo. Read on to see how they and their competitors came up with the recipes for this week's challenges.

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    Chris Caviello of Elgin watches football at Hoopers Sports Bar & Grill.

    Hoopers Sports Bar in Elgin keeps things casual

    Open for 20 years, the family-owned Hoopers Sports Bar and Grill in Elgin has built up a following of local regulars but is still welcoming to newcomers looking for a casual spot to watch the game. Flat screen TVs are positioned everywhere you look. You can also entertain yourself with two electronic dart boards, a bowling game and a video game machine at the bar.

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    Drury Lane Theatre adds ‘Xanadu' to its 2012 lineup

    Drury Lane Theatre announced Tuesday that “Xanadu,” the 2007 Broadway musical inspired by the much-maligned 1980 film starring Olivia Newton-John as a Greek muse sent to inspire the invention of roller disco, will replace the previously announced “Promises, Promises.”

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    Johnny Weir, pictured in “Ice Dreams” at the Edge Ice Arena in Bensenville, will appear in “Fashion on Ice Starring Aretha Franklin” at the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates.

    Best bets: Aretha Franklin joins ‘Fashion on Ice' at Sears Centre

    America's legendary “Queen of Soul” Aretha Franklin performs classic material and songs from her new album, “A Woman Falling Out of Love,” alongside skaters like Sasha Cohen, Johnny Weir, Sarah Hughes and more in "Fashion on Ice Starring Aretha Franklin" at the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates.

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    “Happy Accidents” by Jane Lynch

    Lynch's memoir ‘Happy Accidents' heartfelt, funny

    Unlike the conniving, feisty — and hilarious — character on megahit “Glee” that has catapulted her to fame, Jane Lynch does have a heart. The deliciously evil Sue Sylvester's voice is drowned out by Lynch's heartfelt and hilarious forthrightness in her new memoir, “Happy Accidents.” Lynch recalls her long, varied path to stardom on “Glee” — her biggest role to date — as well as her struggles and triumphs.

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    Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones in an interview Monday said he is not sure if the Rolling Stones will tour for their 50th anniversary.

    Jagger unsure of Stones' anniversary tour

    Rumors of a Rolling Stones 50th anniversary tour have been floating around for months. But if they're true, Mick Jagger isn't saying. “I have no idea if there is going to be a tour,” the Stones frontman said during an interview on Monday. “We haven't really discussed it. We are talking about if next year is the 50th anniversary, sort of. It depends where you are counting from.”

Discuss

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    Palatine school chief’s creativity could grow on you

    A Daily Herald editorial says that a proposed educational farm in Palatine Township Elementary District 15 is an innovative idea for efficiently and effecting teaching kids about food and nutrition.

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    The 49 percent will remember, Mr. Walsh
    With Joe Walsh’s view (Sept. 16), we are given keen insight to this man’s behavior. Apparently Mr. Walsh misses the point about his “constituents.” This man was elected by the slimiest of margins. So by receiving 50.1 percent of the vote he claims to have a mandate? What about the 49.99 percent of your district that didn’t vote for you? What are they? Chopped liver?

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    Flawed argument in same-sex marriage
    I find “tradition” to be a flawed argument in the marriage and family values debates. By choosing to accept the traditional stance then it seems we should to restore other traditional values, such as slavery and indentured servitude, child labor and public flogging.

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    Seattle crosswalks good, not Naperville
    The laws do work if they are enforced and people know the laws. I try crossing Modaff at Tamarack in Naperville. It is a marked crosswalk and even if I step off the curb and point to the crosswalk, no one seems to get it, or they don’t care.

  •  

    Obama has not earned respect
    A Round Lake Beach letter to the editor: If Joe Walsh has shown disrespect for the president, Mr. Obama earned it.

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    Pedestrians must show care, too
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: I am both gladdened and sad concerning the article on the front page of the Sept. 15 Daily Herald about pedestrians in crosswalks.

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    President’s jobs plan stirs enthusiasm
    A Mundeleine letter to the editor: As a voter living in Mundelein for the past two years, I am proud to support President Obama’s jobs plan.

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    President can’t have it both ways
    It is, however, the only mistake that political necessity compels President Obama to admit. In the final analysis, though, the basis of his two apparently conflicting positions on raising the debt ceiling is consistent -- cynical, partisan opportunism.

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    Definition crucial in religion debate
    Despite Mr. Sherman’s hiding behind his idea of his civil rights, I think he has a problem with the fact that the offending publicity promotes a function sponsored by a religious organization. Despite the wording of the Constitution’s First Amendment, Sherman apparently believes in strict separation of church and state.

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    Embarrassed Walsh represents Illinois
    Letter to the Editor: I would hope that an official elected by people of Illinois would be able to have differences of opinion, but hold a meaningful conversation; make a statement, but listen with an open mind; take part in the solution, but not add to the problem. Unfortunately, Joe Walsh does not measure up to any of these simple expectations of an elected official.

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    ComEd plan makes no business sense
    Letter to the Editor: ComEd is to spend $2.6 billion to achieve these savings. The savings are — dividing $2.8 billion by 20 years — $140 million per year. According to this calculation, it would take 19 years to recover the investment, which is too long to qualify it as a good investment. The customers themselves save very little from smart meters. Perhaps ComEd should re-evaluate whether smart meters are a good investment?

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    Kane County needs to pay its lawyers
    Letter to the Editor: I have been reading for years how the Kane County Board has consistently skirted the issue of pay raises for assistant public defenders and assistant state’s attorneys. The Sept. 15 article just about tells you all that you need to know about Kane County: board member Deb Allen is quoted as saying that “the proposal was inappropriately timed.”

  •  

    U.S. stock futures flat ahead of Fed announcement

    Stock futures are roughly flat as traders wait to see whether the Federal Reserve will take steps to stimulate the economy.

  •  

    Citigroup unit announces tender offer results

    The brokerage and securities arm of Citigroup Inc. on Wednesday announced results of a cash tender offer to purchase 33,000 preferred shares on terms set forth in an Aug. 17 offer.

  •  

    Fifties fantasy finally fading in America

    Aside from his multiple infidelities, prodigious drinking and having the personality of a mud wall, what finally caused Betty Draper to separate from Don Draper, her husband and the protagonist of the wildly popular series “Mad Men,” was a clutch of Heineken beer. As Don Draper knew she would, Betty purchased the beer for their home because he had her infuriatingly pigeonholed as the typical upwardly mobile housewife of the early 1960s. The American Dream, it turns out, is about 5 percent alcohol.The Heineken affront was the last straw, a bizarre crisis even for the “Mad Men” series. In a trenchant essay in The New York Review of Books, Daniel Mendelsohn explains the show’s appeal by saying it “represents fantasies, or memories, of significant potency.” For me, the memory — now, alas, a fantasy — is the assumption that Americans would get richer and richer and that, if you were an ad man or a client, it made sense to market products to the affluent. Heineken, imported and thus hardly prole in origin, oddly represents an America that used to be and we may never see again.I direct you to a recent Wall Street Journal article about Procter & Gamble. This iconic American company — Ivory, Tide, Bounty, Gillette — has introduced a dish soap at a bargain price. It’s called Gain and it represents P&G’s attempt to attract less-affluent customers, not out of the goodness of its corporate heart but because the middle class is shrinking. It’s said that God must love the poor because he made so many of them, but in this secular age, he is getting some help. The sorry American economy is doing its share.For P&G, Gain represents a departure. The company became a behemoth because it washed, deodorized, sanitized and shampooed the burgeoning American middle class. The Betty Drapers of the new suburbs — a labyrinth of ersatz drives, lanes, paths and mews — were becoming richer and richer and they would pay more for a premium product. These products were the supermarket version of the space program, which began around the same time. We could go beyond the moon and, with the new detergents, beyond white itself. There were simply no limits.Now there are. The dream of Americans, as opposed to the mythical American Dream, was not to succeed by working hard but to get lucky or be born rich. As a nation, we were both. We were rich in timber and oil, fertile land and rivers that ran the right way. We took in immigrants by the millions, each one a human piggy bank filled in the Old World, emptied in the new. We got smug about it. We were the exception. We could spend. We didn’t have to conserve. We had a chaotic education system, 14,000 or so school boards run by people who had to pander to the voters.Now, it seems, it has all come a cropper. The mayor of New York, Michael Bloomberg, broods on his radio program of the unemployed rioting in the streets. The governor of Ohio, John Kasich, told a group of journalists, “I’m worried about this country. For the first time in my life, I’m worried about this country.” A kind of depression has set in, not — or not yet — an economic one but one of the spirit. You hear it everywhere. We’ve lost our mojo, our groove.Ah, you want me to say it will soon be morning again in America. Maybe not. We are crippled by a political system and culture that resists excellence and falls back on bromides. Our problems are national and yet a front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination says he wants Washington to shrink in importance. Ditto say his fellow candidates. One of them is a congenital liar, one is an uncomplicated isolationist and the others propose nothing more than lowering taxes and unshackling the vaunted small-business owner who has become, somehow, the functional equivalent of the yeoman farmer of yore. And at the top of this heap is a president who hasn’t a clue as to how to be president.

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    Israel under seige from U.N.

    The world — or at least the large part of it that hates Israel and wishes it would go away — moves a step nearer that goal this week when the United Nations votes on whether to recognize a Palestinian state. The vote violates the Declaration of Principles signed by the PLO in 1993, which committed the terrorist group and precursor to the Palestinian Authority to direct negotiations with Israel over a future state. This violation is further evidence the Palestinian side cannot be trusted to live up to signed agreements and promises. Jerusalem Post columnist Caroline Glick rightly calls the prospective U.N. vote “diplomatic aggression.”Israel — like the Jewish people for centuries — has become the fall guy for people who prefer their anti-Semitism cloaked in diplomatic niceties. The Palestinians could have peace any time they wish and probably a state, too, if they acknowledged Israel’s right to exist and practiced verbal, religious and military disarmament. One has a right to question the veracity of a people who claim they want peace, while remaining active in ideological, theological and military warfare aimed at its publicly stated objective: the eradication of the Jewish state.The United States has pledged to veto the Palestinian Authority’s membership application if it comes before the U.N. Security Council, but the General Assembly is another matter. There only a majority vote would be needed to grant the Palestinian government permanent observer status. From that point forward, it would be death by a thousand diplomatic cuts until Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad finally decides to fulfill his own prophecy and drop a nuclear bomb on Jerusalem or Tel Aviv. Following that horror, European and American diplomats will wring their hands and say it would not have happened had Israel been more “flexible” and ceded additional territory.Before Israel is allowed to disappear again (as Palestinian maps and school textbooks already depict) and the Jews who survive are sent into exile (who would take them?), it is worth noting a few of the numerous contributions Israel has made to the world.This tiny land with less than 1/1,000th of the world’s population, has produced innovative scientists that have contributed to cellphone, computer and medical technology, including the development of “a disposable colonoscopic camera that makes most of the discomfort surrounding colonoscopies obsolete,” discovery of “the molecular trigger that causes psoriasis,” as well as “the first large-scale solar power plant — now working in California’s Mojave Desert.” Read about many more Israeli contributions to the world at http://www.israel21c.org/didyouknow/didyouknow.These innovations, and many others, took place while Israel was engaged in wars, suffering terrorist attacks from enemies who seek its destruction and spending more per capita on its defense than any other country.If Israel were to be made even more vulnerable and possibly eradicated by unilateral recognition of a Palestinian state, the moral stain on the West would be a “mark of Cain” for generations to come. What other nation, what other people, would the so-called “civilized” world allow to be targeted for annihilation like Israel has been?Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, will come to the U.N. to deliver a speech on the same day Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas is scheduled to give his speech calling for the body to support Palestinian statehood. “The General Assembly is not a place where Israel usually receives a fair hearing,” Netanyahu said last week, “but I still decided to tell the truth before anyone who would like to hear it.”The U.N. can’t handle the truth and few member states will like hearing it. The blood of the Jewish people will be on their hands if they continue to empower individuals and nations whose goal is to create Holocaust II and a “Palestine” without Jews.

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