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Daily Archive : Saturday September 10, 2011

News

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    Remembering 9/11 in Tri-Cities

    Columnist Dave Heun looks back on where he was and what he was doing when told about the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

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    In this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, the remains of the World Trade Center stands amid the debris following the terrorist attack on the building in New York.

    Images: September 11, 2001 Attacks
    Images of Sept. 11, 2001. Hijacked airliners struck each tower of the World Trade Center in Manhattan as well as the Pentagon. Hijackers on a fourth jet, perhaps headed for a target in Washington DC, were overcome by determined passengers as the plane crashed in an open field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

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    Bill Fennelly, a volunteer firefighter from Baldwin, N.Y., pauses for a moment at the World Trade Center collapse in New York, Thursday morning, Sept. 13, 2001.

    Images: September 11, 2001 Aftermath
    Images from the days after Sept. 11, 2001. Americans, angry and mourning those lost, supported rescue and recovery efforts in the days after hijacked airliners struck the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

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    HUD: Wisconsin landlord refused to rent to single mom

    MILWAUKEE — A federal housing agency is accusing a western Wisconsin landlord of refusing to rent a rural house to a single mother because there was no man to live with her “to shovel the snow,” but the property owner said Saturday that she was simply watching out for the woman’s welfare.

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    Woman donates $535K to child abuse support group

    FORT WAYNE, Ind. — A former Indiana woman who overcame childhood abuse and neglect has donated nearly $535,000 to a Fort Wayne advocacy group to fund a program that will teach children to adapt and recover from the trauma of abuse.

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    Feds restore approval for Wisconsin Guard tree project

    MADISON, Wis. — A Wisconsin National Guard mission to clean up thousands of downed trees in northwestern Wisconsin has had its federal funding restored.

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    Rare shorebirds spotted at S. Ind. preserve

    LINTON, Ind. — Bird watchers at a southwestern Indiana nature preserve were thrilled to recently spot not one but several members of a rare shorebird species that’s an even rarer visitor to the state’s inland areas.

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    UN to help Pakistani flood victims

    ISLAMABAD — The United Nations says it will help victims of flooding in southern Pakistan that has left around 200,000 people homeless.Many of the affected communities are still recovering from last year’s devastating nationwide floods.A U.N. statement Sunday said the humanitarian crisis was “still growing” after exceptionally heavy monsoon rains.

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    Taliban truck bomb kills 2 at base in Afghanistan

    KABUL, Afghanistan — A large Taliban truck bomb struck the gate of a NATO combat outpost in eastern Afghanistan Saturday, killing two civilians and injuring others, the coalition said.No coalition forces were killed in the attack on Combat Outpost Sayed Abad in Wardak province, a statement said. An Afghan official earlier said there was at least one civilian killed.

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    Texas wildfire evacuees anxious to return home

    BASTROP, Texas — After spending nearly a week wondering whether his home had been destroyed in massive wildfires sweeping across Central Texas, George Gaydos got the news Saturday: His house had burned down in the blaze.

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    Israel, Egypt try to stem damage from embassy riot

    CAIRO — Israel and Egypt’s leadership tried Saturday to limit the damage in ties after protesters stormed Israel’s embassy in Cairo, trashing offices and prompting the evacuation of nearly the entire staff from Egypt in the worst crisis between the countries since their 1979 peace treaty.

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    Firefighters make progress on Washington wildfire

    GOLDENDALE, Wash. — Nearly 650 firefighters gained the upper hand Saturday on a roughly 4,200-acre blaze in the tinder-dry forests near Washington state’s Satus Pass, allowing authorities to lift evacuation orders for many of the roughly 200 threatened homes.

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    Mundelein family displaced by fire

    A Mundelein family has been displaced after a second story bedroom in their home caught fire Saturday, fire officials said. And firefighters responded to a second fire after a recycling bin outside of a detached garage caught fire.

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    Riot police stand guard as leftist Turks protest Saturday against Turkey's Sept. 12, 1980 coup and chant anti-U.S. slogans outside the U. S. embassy in Ankara, Turkey.

    U.S. considering request to base predators in Turkey

    The Obama administration is considering a request from Turkey to base a fleet of Predator drones on Turkish soil for counterterrorism operations in northern Iraq,

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    Gurnee motorcycle accident disrupts traffic Saturday

    In Gurnee, motorists should avoid the intersection of Delany Road and Rte. 41, where traffic was a mess early Saturday afternoon following a motorcycle accident. Two people appeared to be injured in the accident, which occurred shortly after 1 p.m. A large number of emergency vehicles were on the scene.

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    Actor Cliff Robertson smiles after test-piloting a replica of an airplane challenging the Wright brother’s status as the first to fly, at Sikorsky Memorial Airport in Stratford, Conn. in 1986.

    Oscar winner Cliff Robertson dies

    Cliff Robertson, the handsome movie actor who played John F. Kennedy in “PT-109,” won an Oscar for “Charly” and was famously victimized in a 1977 Hollywood forgery scandal, died Saturday.

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    Former Vice President Dick Cheney gives a lecture at the Richard Nixon Library in Yorba Linda on Wednesday night.

    Five myths about Dick Cheney

    What about the former vice president is real, exaggerated or outright myth?

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    One of many themed wines available at the Festival of the Vine in Geneva on Saturday.

    It’s about the food, wine at Geneva festival

    Festival of the Vine continues in downtown Geneva, with wine and food tastings and entertainment. Together, 22 local eateries participated, including three from the Geneva Commons shopping center on Randall Road.

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    Sam McKinney holds a photo of his friend, Max Dobner, who died after smoking fake cannabis. McKinney was protesting at Aurora smoke shop Saturday.

    Aurora protest targets ‘synthetic marijuana’

    Holding signs stating “Fake Pot Kills” and “Boycott This Store,” a group of about 15 people protested in front of an Aurora store Saturday, exhorting passers-by to be aware of the dangers of smoking so-called synthetic marijuana.

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    Amanda Carlson talks about the renovations that took place at 132 N. Channing St., which was one of the homes on the Gifford Park Association’s 30th annual Historic House Tour on Saturday in Elgin.

    Elgin tours put visitors ‘into the spirit of the house’

    Volunteers showed off the architectural flair of Bungalow, Queen Anne and Italianate home styles Saturday during the Gifford Park Association's 30th annual Historic House Tour. And while the home tours were about showcasing the old, some homes also displayed modern elements.

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    Chuck Hahn of Winfield participates in the fifth annual cornhole tournament Saturday at Winfield’s Good Old Days festival.

    Minnows leg it out at Winfield’s Good Old Days

    The annual minnow races drew crowds of kids Saturday at the Good Old Days festival in downtown Winfield. The event was held to raise money for the village’s proposed $3.7 million riverwalk project.

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    Waubonsie Valley High School performs Saturday during the 33rd annual Lancer Joust Marching Band Competition at the Lake Park High School West campus.

    Marching bands mix it up at Lake Park’s annual Joust

    Lake Park High School hosted its 33rd annual Lancer Joust marching band competition Saturday at the school's west campus. About 25 bands representing high schools from Wisconsin and Illinois performed in the daylong event.

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    An American flag still flies in the Shipoke area in Harrisburg, Pa., Saturday after flooding caused by the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee

    Residents return to muddy mess

    Tens of thousands of people forced from their homes in Pennsylvania were allowed to return Saturday as the Susquehanna River receded from some of the highest floodwaters ever seen.

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    Southwest Airlines flight diverted

    An airline official says a Southwest Airlines flight headed for Baltimore was diverted to Nashville after what he described as “suspicious behavior” by a passenger.

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    Wisconsin circus performer injured in fall

    Baraboo authorities say a circus performer has been injured after she fell about 10 to 15 feet from a swing.

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    Ohio River bridge remains closed

    NEW ALBANY, Ind. — Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels says an Ohio River bridge closed after cracks were found in two support beams will remain closed for more than three weeks as engineers scour the nearly 50-year-old span for more faults.

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    Frank McClatchey

    McHenry Democrat to run for 14th House District

    Former McHenry Alderman Frank McClatchey becomes the first Democrat to announce his intentions to run for Congress in the 14th District, which could feature a GOP primary battle between two sitting congressmen, Randy Hultgren and Joe Walsh.

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    Burglar found cooking inside Mt. Prospect restaurant

    Police responding to a Mt. Prospect restaurant’s burglar alarm about 3:30 a.m. Saturday found the suspect inside the restaurant beginning to prepare a meal. Hachem Gomez, 19, of Mount Prospect, was observed on surveillance video damaging the drive through window of Mr. Beef and Pizza, 1796 Elmhurst Road, then entering the restaurant, according to Mount Prospect police.

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    Mt. Prospect man charged with felony DUI

    A 20-year-old Mount Prospect man was charged with felony aggravated DUI after violating several traffic codes early Saturday morning, authorities said at a bond hearing in Rolling Meadows. Joaquin Espinoza-Lopez was pulled over at 1:43 a.m. Saturday at Dempster Avenue and Busse Road by Mount Prospect Police.

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    Woman charged with forgery, ID theft at Arlington Heights bank

    A Chicago woman faces felony charges of forgery and identity theft after she admitted in writing to using another person’s name and false identification cards to try to withdraw $2,500 from an Arlington Heights bank, authorities said Saturday at a bond hearing at the Cook County courthouse in Rolling Meadows.

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    Heinz and Nora Linderman met after the Sept. 11, 2001, attack on the Pentagon. They were married in the Pentagon chapel.

    9/11 aftermath leads one Pentagon survivor to a better life

    Heinz Linderman steps aside as a tour group peers into the Pentagon Memorial Chapel. Linderman knows this place so well that he could have given the tour himself. This is the wall that was rebuilt at the spot where the jetliner hit. Here, just outside the chapel doors, is a flag that was draped over a casket at Arlington National Cemetery during a ceremony honoring the 184 victims. And here, in...

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    Mark Kirk

    Kirk rallies Wheeling Township GOP faithful

    Republican U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk appeared at a Wheeling Township GOP rally Saturday morning in an effort to bolster the profile of area incumbents and a few GOP challengers for the coming March primary. He said he hoped Illinois voters would turn on President Barack Obama at the ballot box in November 2012 the way Tennessee voters did to native son Al Gore in 2000.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A Bartlett man was arrested in Hoffman Estates and charged with two counts of burglary. Reports said he served as a lookout for a juvenile who stole GPS units, CDs, and cash out of several cars.

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    Mount Prospect firefighters Dave Miller, left, and Jim East and Lt. Mike Werner wear special 9/11 commemorative T-shirts while unfurling a 9/11 flag on the back of their tower truck. The firefighters union came up with the shirt idea, which won approval from the chief. They’ll wear them through Sunday.

    District 211, Mount Prospect honor 9/11 victims

    Palatine and Conant high schools held ceremonies at their varsity football games Friday to commemorate 9/11 and Mount Prospect firefighters donned commemorative T-shirts at the suggestion of the firefighters union. Palatine students and staff erected a 14-foot by 290-foot Patriot Day Tribute Wall featuring more than 600 banners they’d made.

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    Tanzanian police carry bodies of children from the sea in Zanzibar, Tanzania, Sept 10. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office.

    Tanzania ship sinks; 45 dead, hundreds missing

    An overcrowded ship carrying at least 600 people sank in deep sea near one of Tanzania's top tourist destinations on Saturday, leaving at least 45 people dead and some 370 more believed missing or dead. Many of the missing are children.

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    Japan's Trade Minister Yoshio Hachiro gestures during a press conference at his ministry in Tokyo, Japan, Sept. 10. Hachiro resigned after making a comment deemed insensitive to residents forced out of their homes by the nuclear crisis. His departure is a major embarrassment for Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda. He took office and installed a new Cabinet on Sept. 2 amid hopes a new government could better tackle recovery efforts from the March 11 tsunami and nuclear crisis.

    Japanese minister leaves over nuclear crisis gaffe

    Japan's new trade minister resigned Saturday over a remark seen as insensitive to nuclear evacuees, dealing a blow to a government that took office just eight days ago in the hopes it could better tackle the daunting tsunami recovery.

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    Larger Cook County Jail garden teaches job skills

    Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart says a huge jailhouse garden is allowing detainees to learn skills that could lead to jobs once they're released.

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    Chicago issues traffic advisory for Midway

    Motorists headed to Chicago's Midway Airport should be ready for road construction delays. Work starts Saturday on the busy interchange at Central Avenue and Interstate 55 so the ramps can be rebuilt.

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    A New York police officer examines the rear section of a truck at a vehicle check point on Sept. 9 in New York. The city is deploying additional resources and taking other security steps in response to a potential terror threat before the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. U.S. counterterrorism officials are chasing a credible but unconfirmed al-Qaida threat to use a car bomb on bridges or tunnels in New York or Washington.

    AP sources: 2 terror suspects may be US citizens

    Al-Qaida may have sent American terrorists or men carrying U.S. travel documents to launch an attack on Washington or New York to coincide with memorials marking the 10th anniversary of 9/11, government officials say.

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    President Barack Obama gestures during a speech on his jobs bill at the University of Richmond in Richmond, Va., on Sept. 9. Obama is urging voters to get behind his new jobs bill and pressure lawmakers to pass it, delivering the message on the home turf of one of his chief GOP antagonists.

    Obama urges national unity on 9/11 anniversary

    President Barack Obama is calling for national unity ahead of Sunday's anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks and reflecting on a decade that tested America's character. "The terrorists who attacked us that September morning are no match for the character of our people, the resilience of our nation or the endurance of our values," the president said Saturday in his weekly radio and Internet address...

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    Public input sought for forest district’s master plan
    The Forest Preserve District of Kane County invites the public to several meetings to help revise the district’s master plan. The master plan details and prioritizes all capital and natural resources improvements in the forest preserves for the next five years.

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    Batavia’s Gustafson School’s resale fundraiser starts Friday
    The Alice Gustafson School PTO will host its annual Children’s Clothing and Toy Resale from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16 and 8 to 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 at 905 Carlisle Road in Batavia. Admission is free.

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    Dist. 211 open house Sept. 15 at high schools

    Township High School District 211 schools will host annual Open Houses. William Fremd, James B. Conant, Hoffman Estates, Palatine and Schaumburg high schools will hold Open Houses on Thursday, Sept. 15.

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    Aurora University professor Alicia Cosky, left, presents the proceeds of the “Tee Off for Hesed House” student-run golf benefit to Ryan Dowd, executive director of the homeless shelter in Aurora.

    Aurora University students raise $3,850 for Hesed
    Aurora University students hit a hole in one with a benefit golf outing for the Hesed House homeless shelter in Aurora.

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    The folkloric dancers of Mission San Juan Diego enjoy making crafts after their performance at the sixth annual Mexican Independence Day Celebration in Hanover Park. Bring the family to celebrate the eighth annual Mexican Independence Day Celebration from 6-10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16, at the Community Center Gym, in Hanover Park.

    Mexican consul general to attend Hanover Park Fiesta

    September marks the start of Hispanic Heritage month. If you are looking for a perfect way to celebrate, enrich your cultural knowledge and have a great time with family and fiends, then join the Fiesta.

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    Linda Wingstrom of Lisle is a member of the Perrin-Wheaton Daughters of the American Revolution chapter. The chapter had dedicated the boulder (in honor of early members) at Wheaton Community High School in 1932. The chapter worked with the school district to move it in April 2010 to Wheaton Warrenville South High School, where it was rededicated, along with an elm tree, on Arbor Day, April 30, 2010.

    Daughters of American Revolution preserve history, foster patriotism

    Women were not allowed to engage in politics or enlist in the military during the American Revolution, but that didn’t stop them — then or now — from being an integral part of history. Today, os a cornerstone of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Our Joan Broz looks at a local chapter's efforts.

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    Natalie Simpson of Huntley, left, and Elizabeth Steffen of Crystal Lake walked up the white carpet Friday during the movie premiere for “Contagion” at Elgin Marcus Fox Theatre. Both were extras during filming at Sherman Hospital in Elgin.

    Infectious excitement for ‘Contagion’ in Elgin

    Steven Soderbergh’s killer virus thriller “Contagion” got its local grand opening Friday evening at the Elgin Marcus Theatre. “Contagion” shot scenes at Elgin’s Sherman Hospital for six days last year and employed a large number of local residents as extras. Many of those extras were on hand for the premiere Friday and received the “white carpet” treatment.

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    Erica Cody of Fox River Grove was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre syndrome, an autoimmune disorder that attacks the nervous system, nine months ago. It left her nearly paralyzed. But she set her mind on running her first race — a 5K — today.

    Fox River Grove woman, once nearly paralyzed, running 5K

    Erica Cody of Fox River Grove, 40, was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre syndrome, an autoimmune disorder that attacks the nervous system, nine months ago. “I have given natural childbirth," she said, describing the pain of her recovery."This buried that.” She will be running her first race at the Fox Chase 5K run on Saturday, a goal she set while in the intensive care unit.

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    Des Plaines raises ambulance rates

    Des Plaines raised ambulance fees for residents and non-residents. However, residents no longer will have to pay for any costs not covered by their health insurance.

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    “Chicago’s Best” to feature Palatine’s Gators Wing Shack

    Gators Wing Shack in Palatine will be featured on “Chicago’s Best” on WGN-TV. The segment is set to air at 10 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11. The restaurant, known for its award-winning wings, opened its Palatine location in 2001 at 1719 Rand Road.

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    Shoe Factory Road closing until end of month

    Shoe Factory Road in Hoffman Estates will be closed from Monday until the end of the month for work on the railroad tracks.

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    Millions of passengers in the United States take off their shoes at airport security lines every week because of one act: Three months after the 2001 attacks, Richard Reid tried to set off a bomb in his shoe on an American Airlines flight from Paris to Miami.

    Shoe-removal requirement at airports to be phased out

    The No. 1 complaint passengers have with airport security is about removing their shoes. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said earlier this week that eventually that requirement will be dropped. “You’re going to see better technology over time” that will detect shoe bombs without running the shoes through the X-ray machine, she said.

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    A white tail deer faces the camera at Cervids Farm in rural St. Joseph, Ill. The farm is owned Dr. Clifford Shipley, a veterinarian at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital. He is one of about 400 deer farmers in Illinois.

    Vet loves to show off deer, elk farm

    University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital veterinarian Dr. Clifford Shipley is one of about 400 deer farmers in Illinois. Shipley also raises elk to be sold for meat, breeding stock for hunting ranches, and urine for hunters who use it to attract deer in the wild. If you're nice -- and quiet -- he just might give you a tour.

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    Al Jazeera English reporter Gabriel Elizondo is shown in Nashville, Tenn., on Sept. 8, 2011. Al Jazeera English will station reporters in New York and Washington Sunday to mark the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. It will also have reporters on hand in Baghdad, Bali, Nairobi and in the Pakistani town where Osama bin Laden was killed by U.S. Special Forces. The network, which started five years after the attacks, said it hopes to bring a global perspective to the anniversary that domestic networks likely won’t.

    Al Jazeera English maps out 9/11 coverage

    This weekend’s events may provide a test of whether Al Jazeera English, still seen mostly online in the United States despite its availability in a total of 250 million homes worldwide, can get past a lingering sense of hostility that many Americans feel toward it.

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    United Airlines Flight 175 approaches the south tower of the World Trade Center in New York shortly before collision as smoke billows from the north tower on Sept. 11, 2001.

    Audio files reveal 9/11 air traffic horror

    Newly posted audio files depict the horror of 9/11 unfolding in the sky, as air traffic controllers struggled to follow the faint tracks of hijacked planes, fighter jets tried in vain to chase them down and a flight attendant made a desperate appeal for help.

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    A detainee peers out from his cell inside the Camp Delta detention facility at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba in 2006 The U.S. has come under criticism for failing to define terrorism clearly and not handling terrorist suspects fairly, especially at the military detention center in Guantanamo Bay.

    35,000 worldwide convicted as terrorists in last decade

    In the first tally ever done of global anti-terror arrests and convictions, The Associated Press documented a surge in prosecutions under new or toughened anti-terror laws, often passed at the urging and with the funding of the West. Before 9/11, just a few hundred people were convicted of terrorism each year.

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    The World Trade Center site’s signature skyscraper — formerly called the Freedom Tower and now called 1 World Trade Center — is visible for miles around. It will rise to 1,776 feet, making it the tallest building in the U.S.

    Rebuilding WTC in homage to a fallen brother

    Rebuilding the World Trade Center is more than a job for Brian Lyons. It's a way to pay homage to his younger brother Michael, a firefighter killed in the Sept. 11 attacks and a way for Lyons to heal from his loss. Lyons has spent 10 years at the site. He rushed there with his brother's firefighting gear to look for him after the attacks; he stayed to help in the rescue and recovery; and then to...

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    The twin towers of the World Trade Center burn behind the Empire State Building in New York on Sept. 11, 2001.

    Internet archive shows Sept. 11 coverage

    For many in New York and Washington, Sept. 11, 2001, was a personal experience, an attack on their cities. Most everywhere else in the world, it was a television event.TV’s commemoration as the 10th anniversary approaches on Sunday puts that day in many different contexts. There is one place, however, for people to see the Sept. 11 attacks and the week after as they unfolded, without any filters.

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    New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s time in city hall will be book-ended by World Trade Center milestones — the attacks weeks before his election, and the planned opening of the building once called the Freedom Tower shortly before he leaves office in 2013.

    Elected in 9/11 shadow, Bloomberg deepens the link

    For many, Rudolph Giuliani is the mayor they will forever associate with the Sept. 11 attacks. But Michael Bloomberg’s tenure has been entwined with the economic and physical rebuilding that followed, and it will form a part of his legacy.

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    U.S. Marines in Iraq capture a bridge on the Tigris River, securing a key crossing point for their advance on Baghdad in 2003.

    Since 9/11, U.S. war footing set in concrete

    In previous decades, the military and the American public viewed war as an aberration and peace as the norm. Today, radical religious ideologies, new technologies and cheap, powerful weapons have catapulted the world into “a period of persistent conflict,” according to the Pentagon’s last major assessment of global security. “No one should harbor the illusion that the developed world can win this...

Sports

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    Week 3- Brendan Dunlap of Wheaton North and Tim LaScala of Naperville North dive for a ball.

    Images: Naperville North vs. Wheaton North football
    Wheaton North High School hosted Naperville North High School for Friday night football. Wheaton North won the game 24-13.

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    Northwestern quarterback Kain Colter scores on a touchdown run in the first quarter of Saturday's victory over Eastern Illinois.

    Colter, Northwestern well-grounded against EIU

    Northwestern ran wild in Saturday's 42-21 win over Eastern Illinois at Ryan Field, but Wildcats quarterback Kain Colter needs to rein in his wild side if NU wants bigger victories down the road. Then, as part of its earnest treatment of Eastern Illinois, Northwestern trampled that logo and every other blade of grass between the hashes while pounding to a 42-21 nonconference victory Saturday at Ryan Field.

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    Saturday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Saturday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s boys cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's boys cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s girls swimming scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's girls swimming meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Saturday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Saturday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    St. Edward’s Holveas champ at Rockford

    St. Edward’s Michael Holevas won the Rockford East boys golf invitational Saturday at Aldeen Golf Club with a 1-under par 71. A total of 185 individuals competed in the tournamentSt. Edward finished fifth as a team in the small school division with a 362. Daniel Winters (91), Jerry Barone (99) and Michael Butzow (101) also scored for the Green Wave.

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    Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo was 14 of 25 passing for 209 yard in Saturday’s loss at Northwestern.

    EIU’s Garoppolo falls short vs. NU

    It took just four plays against Northwestern for Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo (Rolling Meadows HS) to learn that Big Ten defenses prepare a little more thoroughly than Football Championship Subdivision-level defenses.

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    Penn State quarterback Rob Bolden loses his helmet Saturday after getting hit on a scramble in the fourth quarter. Alabama won 27-11.

    McCarron leads No. 3 ‘Bama by No. 23 Penn St. 27-11

    STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — To call Alabama tight end Michael Williams open would have been a stretch.It didn’t stop A.J. McCarron from delivering a fastball that must have made lots of Alabama fans think the Crimson Tide’s quarterback competition is over.McCarron was poised and efficient in a rare trip to Big Ten country for No. 3 Alabama, throwing for 163 yards and a 5-yard touchdown that he zipped through traffic to Williams as the Tide beat No. 23 Penn State 27-11 on Saturday.Alabama completed a sweep of the home-and-home series between the two storied programs with a methodical and smothering performance reminiscent of last year’s 24-3 win in Tuscaloosa.Both teams came into the second week of the season with unsettled quarterback issues. At Alabama (2-0), those now appear to be settled.“That’s not my concern. That’s why coach make the calls,” McCarron said. “Coach tells me to go out and I’m going to play.”Playing in front of the largest crowd ever to see an Alabama football game, McCarron was 19 for 31 with no turnovers.“Not just myself, the whole offense did a great job of not allowing turnovers and the defense got us turnovers,” the sophomore said. “That’s the way we have to play. If we keep playing like that, it’s going to be a special team.”McCarron started the Tide’s first game against Kent State but had to share the job with Phillip Sims. This week he was on his own. He gave coach Nick Saban no reason to make a change until the game was out of reach.Saban, of course, was not about to declare McCarron the unchallenged No. 1.“We still have a competition at the position,” Saban said. “We really do feel like we have two very good players and we want both guys to continue to develop. But I thought A.J. did a nice job today.”Nittany Lions fans might be wondering if either Robert Bolden or Matt McGloin are the answer at quarterback for Penn State (1-1). They combined to go 12 for 39 for 144 yards. McGloin completed 1 of 10 for no yards. Bolden led a late scoring drive and threw an interception.“We certainly deserved a whooping today,” Penn State coach Joe Paterno said. “I think we’ve just got a lot of work ahead of us.”With Paterno coaching from a box way above the field at Beaver Stadium — nursing pelvic and leg injuries from a collision with a player — there was only one two-time national champion coach on the floor of the stadium.Saban paced the Crimson Tide’s sideline with his headset on, stopping to watch the action with his hands on his hips or knees, before going back to stalking.At 59 years old, Saban has a 131 victories, 271 behind Paterno’s major college record. Saban will never catch the 84-year-old JoePa on that list, but he’s got a team capable of getting him a third national title this season.Trent Richardson was workmanlike with 26 carries for 111 yards and two touchdowns, including a 13-yarder with 6:14 left in the fourth that made it 27-3 and cleared much of the 107,846 at Beaver Stadium — save the ones in Crimson shirts.Led by defensive backs Dre Kirkpatrick and Robert Lester, the Tide defense held Penn State to 251 yards.At one point in the third quarter, Alabama nearly intercepted five straight Penn State passes. The first two thrown by Bolden were called picks on the field, but did not stand up to video review. Lester couldn’t quite keep either from touching the ground. On the next series, McGloin relieved and Alabama defenders got a piece of all three of his throws.“We’ve just got to catch the ball, we can’t worry about who’s back there, who’s not back there,” Penn State receiver Derek Moye said.Alabama finally did get an interception that stood on Penn State’s next possession when free safety Mark Barron ranged to the sideline and leaped high to get Bolden’s underthrown pass.Alabama improved to 10-5 against Penn State and snapped the Nittany Lions’ 23-game winning streak in nonconference home games.

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    Notre Dame wide receiver Michael Floyd avoids a tackle from Michigan cornerback Courtney Avery in the second quarter Saturday night.

    Michigan beats Notre Dame 35-31 on late TD

    Denard Robinson stunned Notre Dame in the final minute again. He threw a 16-yard pass to Roy Roundtree with 2 seconds left, lifting Michigan to a 35-31 heart-pounding win over Notre Dame on Saturday night. The Wolverines took their first lead on Robinson's 21-yard pass to Vincent Smith with 1:12 left, then lost it. Briefly. Tommy Rees threw a 29-yard touchdown pass to Theo Riddick with 30 seconds left.

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    Serena Williams reacts Saturday during her semifinal match against Caroline Wozniacki at the U.S. Open.

    Williams runs away from Wozniacki at US Open

    NEW YORK — This one didn’t come down to a foot fault, a referee’s call or anything else that could’ve made Serena Williams mad.In fact, if Williams was upset about anything Saturday night, it might have been that she didn’t get much of a match.In what was supposed to be her toughest test yet at the U.S. Open, Williams dominated top-seeded Caroline Wozniacki 6-2, 6-4 in the semifinals to move a win away from her 14th Grand Slam title.Williams was back in the semifinals at Flushing for the first time since 2009 when, also on a Saturday night in Arthur Ashe Stadium, she got called for a foot fault against Kim Clijsters, then went on a tirade against the referee that cost her match point.An ugly moment she’d love to forget — sort of the same way Wozniacki would like to forget almost everything that happened on a worst-case-scenario night for her in the world’s biggest tennis stadium.Her loss left No. 9 Sam Stosur as the last player with a chance to stop Williams at a tournament in which she has lost a grand total of 29 games over six matches and hasn’t dropped a set. Stosur beat Angelique Kerber 6-3, 2-6, 6-2 to reach her second Grand Slam final. They’ll play Sunday, with Williams going for her fourth U.S. Open championship on the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks.“It meant a lot to me to come out here as an American and still be in the tournament,” Williams said. “I really wanted to play tomorrow. Such a special day for the United States, so I’m really excited.”Williams finished with 34 winners, compared to five for Wozniacki, though the real picture was painted early in the second set when Williams led 20-0 in that category.That’s typical of each players’ game — Williams is about power and Wozniacki is about persistence — but the difference was glaring and the contest turned into a mismatch.Well, Wozniacki did make it competitive for a brief moment, taking advantage of two loose Williams shots and a double fault to pull within 5-4 in the second set.But Williams answered with a forehand winner, then drove Wozniacki into the corner on two shots she couldn’t get back. Five points later, it was over, and Williams was jumping up and down to celebrate — a marked difference from the last time she was at this point.Accentuating the aggressive-vs.-passive theme, Williams even came to the net a bunch in this one. She won 17 of 21 points up there. Wozniacki went 1 for 3.“Usually, I only come to the net to shake hands, but today, I was like, `Let me try something different,”’ Williams said. “I think the crowd really helped me. I could feel the energy.”

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    Win over ACC leaves Immaculate Conception singing

    Aurora Central Catholic borrowed an old Driscoll pregame ritual on Saturday, marching onto Bob Stewart Field in formation, led by a bagpipe player.

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    Girls volleyball/Fox Valley roundup

    Alyssa Ehrhardt had 49 kills, 7 aces and 18 digs and Maris Smith added 25 kills and 32 digs as the Jacobs girls volleyball team finished in third place Saturday at the Vernon Hills Invitational.The Golden Eagles (9-4) defeated Lake Park, St. Viator and Vernon Hills, but lost to Glenbrook North and to Vernon Hills in pool play.Nikki Madoch had 32 kills for Jacobs and Taylor Lauder added 101 assists.At DeKalb: Burlington Central went 4-1 and finished in third place at the DeKalb tournament. The Rockets lost to Belvidere, but defeated Elgin, McHenry, the DeKalb JV and Hampshire. Stephanie Sipinski (34 digs, 60-for-63 on serves), Sydney Sand (23 kills, 40 digs) and Allie O’Reilly (80 assists, 25 digs) were named all-tournament for the Rockets (8-7). Brenda Thasavong had 19 blocks and 9 kills and Hayley Brake added 15 kills and 14 blocks for BC.Hampshire went 3-2 at DeKalb, beating Harvard, Zion-Benton and West Carroll and losing to DeKalb and Burlington Central. Jenny Dumoulin had 42 kills and made the all-tournament team for the Whip-Purs (3-10), while Kelly Meache had 96 digs. Her 36 digs against Zion-Benton broke the Hampshire school record. Dakota Walther added 40 assists on the day for Hampshire.Elgin went 1-4 at DeKalb, losing to McHenry, Burlington Central, the DeKalb JV and Belvidere North and beating Harvard. Elyssa Helker (20 kills, 6 digs), Hope Demel (58 assists, 8 blocks), Monica Stockman (13 kills, 6 aces, 4 blocks) and Rachel Roth (5 kills, 3 aces, 45 digs) led the Maroons.At Bartlett: Bartlett was 2-3 but finished in third place at its own tournament, which was won by West Chicago. The Hawks (7-9) defeated Dundee-Crown and Woodstock North but lost to Larkin, Kaneland and West Chicago. Lexie Mason had 30 kills and 22 digs on the day for Bartlett, while Tori Burke added 22 digs and 70 assists. Jenn Krick had 17 kills, Katie Hrbacek had 14 kills and 24 digs as well as 12 aces.Dundee-Crown was also 2-3 for the day, losing to Bartlett, Kaneland and West Chicago and beating Larkin and Woodstock North. Rebeka Hischke had 16 kills and 4 aces for the Chargers (3-6), while Tess Barnes had 48 assists and 6 aces and Cassie Sommers 34 digs.John Radtke contributed to this report

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    Minnesota wide receiver Da’Jon McKnight hauls in a pass against New Mexico State defensive back Jonte Green during the first half Saturday.

    New Mexico State beats Minn. 28-21; Kill suffers seizure

    MINNEAPOLIS — New Mexico State hasn't enjoyed very many victories like this one at Minnesota.The celebration for the Aggies was tempered by a scary situation on the other team's sideline.New Mexico State's 28-21 win took a sobering turn on Saturday when Gophers coach Jerry Kill had a seizure with 20 seconds left in the game and was taken away by ambulance.Kill was stabilized, and Minnesota's team physician said the coach's condition was not life-threatening. Kill has had similar episodes three times before in his career, but never missed a game, and his assistants said they weren't worried.Still, the Aggies — like everybody else in the stadium — were concerned. It was hard not to be when a coach was writhing around on the turf with his arms and legs flapping back and forth, out of control."I know our players and our coaches will think about him and hope that he'll have a nice recovery," said New Mexico State coach DeWayne Walker.Walker gathered his team to pray for Kill during the break, which lasted about 15 minutes. Then his defense, clinging to a seven-point lead with the Gophers on the 25-yard line, forced quarterback MarQueis Gray into his third straight incompletion to end the game."This is a signature win for our program that hopefully we can build on," said Walker, who raised his record to 6-21 at NMSU.The Aggies have long been buried at the bottom of the NCAA's top tier. They haven't finished with a winning record since 2002, and their last postseason appearance was the Sun Bowl in 1960.This was their first victory over a Big Ten team, and their first win against a foe from a BCS conference since beating Arizona State in 1999.Walker was actually a starting cornerback for the Gophers in 1980-81, so this was extra special for him. Walker said he told Kill before the game that, as a former Gophers player, he's happy that Kill has the job."This program is in good hands," Walker said.Andrew Manley passed for 288 yards and three touchdowns for the Aggies (1-1), overcoming two interceptions with some clutch throws. They made up for a 20-point loss at home in their opener to Ohio.The Aggies set the tone from the start with a six-play, 60-yard drive. Manley hit Rogers for a 26-yard score, with cornerback Brock Vereen and safety Shady Salamon failing to reach Rogers in time.Manley wasn't highly recruited, and Walker said he didn't have the job locked down when the season started. But he looked crisp early, completing his first 12 passes, the last a 4-yard strike to backup tight end David Quiroga that stretched the NMSU lead to 21-7 with 6:53 left in the first half."He's going to be a good player for us, and he's going to help us win some more games," Walker said.Manley had help from Robert Clay, who rushed 20 times for 97 yards and a touchdown. Taveon Rogers had 88 yards receiving and two scores."That was a glimpse of what type of football team we can have, and it was good to see our guys come out today and just pick up where we left off," said Walker, who declined to make his players available for interviews out of respect to Kill.MarQueis Gray had another uneven performance at quarterback for the Gophers (0-2), who haven't lost their first two games to start a season since 1992, which was Jim Wacker's first year on the job.Da'Jon McKnight made a handful of acrobatic catches, finishing with 146 yards and one touchdown, and tight end Colin McGarry dived to haul in a 10-yard score in the corner of the end zone and pull the Gophers within 21-14 right before the half.Gray, who was relieved in the third quarter by freshman Max Shortell because he had cramps on a hot day, finished with 110 yards rushing on 17 attempts. He went 16 for 32 through the air for 211 yards, two touchdowns and two interceptions.

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    Crystal Lake Central dominates Wauconda field by huge margin

    There were a lot of strong girls cross country teams and individuals Saturday morning at the 25-team Wauconda Invitational.

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    WW South takes Wauconda Invite

    There was no rest for weary boys cross country runners Saturday morning at the Wauconda Invitational. Setting a torrid pace from the outset of the 3.05-mile race at Lakewood Forest Preserve, Wheaton Warrenville South displayed an impressive pack in rolling to the championship of the 27-team meet by a comfortable 62-100 margin over Lane Tech.

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    Regan Smith spins out Saturday during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Richmond International Raceway in Richmond, Va.

    Harvick wins Richmond, now tops Chase standings

    RICHMOND, Va. — Kevin Harvick snapped out of his slump in time to storm into the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship.Harvick picked up his fourth win of the season Saturday night by winning at Richmond International Raceway. The victory ties Kyle Busch for most in the Sprint Cup Series, and puts the two rivals at the top of the Chase standings.The 10-race Chase begins next Sunday at Chicago. The field will include Dale Earnhardt Jr., who will race for the championship for the first time since 2008.But Earnhardt making the 12-driver field was no gimmee: He struggled most of Saturday night and limped into the Chase with a 16th-place finish.

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    At left: Wauconda’s Jake Ziolkowski catches a touchdown pass in the end zone just past the outstretched hand of Round Lake’s Anthony Burton.

    Round Lake’s losing streak over

    Round Lake's football team hadn't won a North Suburban Prairie Division game since 2006. Anthony Burton's field goal with 31 seconds left changed that, as the Panthers prevailed over Wauconda 17-14.

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    Boys soccer/Fox Valley roundup

    Burlington Central’s boys soccer team remained unbeaten on the season Saturday with a 5-0 win over Winn ebago in a Big Northern Conference crossover game.Alan Camarena scored twice for the Rockets, with Chris Rodriguez, Josh Lung and Motor Deng also adding goals. Nolan St. John (2 saves) and Brett Rau (0 saves) shared time in the net for Burlington Central (5-0-3).Jacobs 1, Grant 0: Mario Rako’s first-half goal off an assist from Matt Tafflinger lifted Jacobs (5-3) to a nonconference win. Nick Matysek made 6 saves in goal for the Golden Eagles.Bartlett 4, St. Joseph’s 2: Anthony DiNuzzo had 2 goals and Christian Castro and Ramiro Arroyo added single knocks to lift the Hawks (3-2-1) to a win in the Pepsi Showdown. Salvador Arrellano had 5 saves in goal for Bartlett.North Shore Country Day 5, St. Edward 2: Joe French and Drew Doherty scored St. Edward’s goals in this nonconference loss. Matt Hesch had 11 saves in goal for the Green Wave (2-5-1).Elgin 1, Huntley 1: Josue Chavez scored for Elgin and Niko Miholopoulos found the back of the net for Huntley in this nonconference tie. Tony Benitez had 7 saves in goal for the Maroons (5-2-1) and Austen Emery 7 saves for Huntley (5-1-3).Westminster Christian 2, Keith School 1: Josh Beachler scored both goals for the Warriors in this nonconference win. Sam Carani had 13 saves in the net for Westminster (4-1-1).Neuqua Valley 3, CL South 1: Roberto Albuquerque scored Crystal Lake South’s only goal on a penalty kick in this nonconference game. Steven Folmer had 2 saves in goal for the Gators (5-3).Lyons 2, Larkin 0: Santagi Guerrero made 3 saves in goal for Larkin (5-3-1) but the Lyons defense shut the Royals down in the quarterfinals of the Pepsi Showdown.South Elgin 2, Glenbard North 2: Spencer Scott and Danny Fry scored goals for the Storm (3-3-2) in this nonconference tie. Tyler Shipon (3 saves) and Jarod Schieler (2 saves) shared time in the net for South Elgin.John Radtke contributed to this report

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    Northern Illinois quarterback Chandler Harnish gets past Kansas safety Bradley McDougald, right, for a touchdown during the first half Saturday night.

    Northern Illinois falls to Kansas in final seconds

    LAWRENCE, KAN. — Jordan Webb hit B.J. Beshears with a 6-yard touchdown pass on fourth down with 9 seconds to go and Kansas escaped with a wild, back-and-forth 45-42 victory over Northern Illinois on Saturday night.After Jasmin Hopkins’ 1-yard run put the Huskies on top 42-38 with 5:03 left in the seesaw slugfest, Beshears broke a 51-yard kickoff return to the 47. Then, facing a fourth-and-two from the 7 at the 1:19 mark, James Sims plowed to the 5 for a first-and-goal.Two running plays lost yardage, setting up the last-second drama that resulted in Kansas’ first two-game winning streak under second-year head coach Turner Gill. The touchdown on the goal line was so close, it was reviewed as the crestfallen Huskies, who won 11 games last season and are bidding to become the next mid-major upstart, looked on hopefully.

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    Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher, 33, says the defense is still playing at a high level despite relying heavily on six 30-somethings.

    Bears say defense getting better with age

    More than half of the Bears' starters on defense, including all three of their Pro Bowl players from last season, are 30 or older. That's an age when the ravages of the game often begin to have a cumulative and negative effect on the body. But no one inside Halas Hall seems too concerned about age.

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    Illinois running back Donovonn Young (5) celebrates with offensive linesman Graham Pocic (76) and wide receiver Darius Millines (15) after Young scored a touchdown against South Dakota State in Champaignon Saturday. Illinois defeated South Dakota State 56-3.

    Illinois routs South Dakota State

    There is Nathan Scheelhaase the passer and there is Nathan Scheelhaase the runner. South Dakota State coach John Stiegelmeier would much prefer to see the Illinois quarterback throwing the ball. "He has the ability to not just get five yards but to go a long ways," Stiegelmeier said. "He runs like a running back -- it's not like he's a frail guy that dances."

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    Indiana running back D’Angelo Roberts is shirt-tackled by Virgina cornerback Chase Minnifield during the first quarter Saturday night.

    Last-play FG gives Virginia 34-31 win over Indiana

    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Virginia scored 11 points in the final 96 seconds Saturday night, getting a 23-yard field goal from Robert Randolph as time expired to beat Indiana 34-31.It was Mike London’s first road win in two seasons as coach of the Cavaliers (2-0).Indiana (0-2) rallied from a 20-point second-half deficit, only to give away an 8-point lead in the final two minutes.Perry Jones had 3-yard TD run for Virginia with 1:36 remaining, and Michael Rocco threw to Paul Freedman for the 2-point conversion to tie the score at 31.Indiana got the ball back, but on third-and-3 from its own 23, Cam Johnson stole the ball out of quarterback Edward Wright-Baker’s hands. That gave Virginia the ball at the Hoosiers’ 14, setting up Randolph’s winning field goal.

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    Nebraska’s Tyler Moore, center, protects quarterback Taylor Martinez (3) from Fresno State’s Tristan Okpalaugo (88) in the first half Saturday night.

    Nebraska turns back Fresno St. upset bid 42-29

    LINCOLN, Neb. — Ameer Abdullah returned a kickoff 100 yards after Fresno State made it a two-point game in the fourth quarter, and Taylor Martinez’s 46-yard touchdown run secured the 10th-ranked Cornhuskers’ 42-29 victory on Saturday night.Martinez ran 15 times for 166 yards and two TDs and passed for another as the Huskers turned back an upset bid by the Bulldogs, who were four-touchdown underdogs.Derek Carr threw incomplete to a well-covered A.J. Johnson on a 2-point try after his 26-yard TD pass to Josh Harper pulled the Bulldogs to 28-26.Abdullah, who set a school record with 211 kick return yards, then made the biggest play of the night to break open the game.Fresno’s Robbie Rouse ran 36 times for 169 yards and Carr was 20 of 41 for 254 yards.

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    Benet runs away with Royal-Cadet

    Benet's girls cross country team won the Royal-Cadet invite with 30 points. Batavia (55), Geneva (116), Oak Park-River Forest (121) and Plainfield East (158) rounded out the top five.

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    Elgin junior Fabiola Ortiz runs the last lap at the Lake Park Invitational Saturday.

    Cross country/Fox Valley roundup

    Burlington Central senior Clint Kliem finished fifth Saturday at the Peoria Woodruff boys cross country invitational.

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    Senior duo leads Batavia

    A pair of runners from Jones broke away from the other front-runners early in the race at the Royal-Cadet Invitational. Jamison Dale and Luke O’Connor’s 1-2 finish — Dale won in 15:50 — led Jones to a narrow team championship, 41-42 over Plainfield East with Batavia fourth.

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    Batavia just misses winning own invite

    Lyons Township is arguably the toughest boys golf team in the extended area after denying host Batavia on a fifth-card tiebreaker to capture the Bulldogs’ 30-team invitational in North Aurora.

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    Streamwood’s Alex Crocker determines his next move with Elgin’s Dennis Moore on defense Saturday at Memorial Field in Elgin.

    Undefeated Streamwood rallies past Elgin

    A 14-0 first-quarter deficit would have caused previous Streamwood football teams to crumble. But these Sabres have sharper edges.

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    Libertyville does what it takes to beat Lake Zurich

    Playing on grass at a neutral site definitely was an equalizer for the Lake Zurich and Libertyville boys soccer teams Saturday afternoon — because they both are more accustomed to playing on artificial turf.

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    Alex Rios, far right, is greeted at home plate after hitting a walk-off gland slam in the 10th inning Saturday.

    White Sox were in New York on fateful day

    The White Sox were in New York City on Sept. 11, 2001, preparing to play the Yankees that night. The terrorist attacks put baseball on hold, and Sox starting pitcher Mark Buehrle still remembers his fear during the tragedy.

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    Cary-Grove wins Prairie Ridge title

    When St. Charles East and Cary-Grove tangle on the volleyball court, whether it be in the regular season or postseason, the match is usually hard-fought and closely contested. That was not the case at Saturday’s Prairie Ridge Invitational.

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    Conant takes 2nd at Dundee-Crown

    Democracy reigned for Conant at the Dundee-Crown girls tennis invitational Saturday. Cougars’ coach Jennifer Mogge let the players make their own lineups for the dual-team format tournament. The democratic process worked fairly well, carrying the Cougars to a second-place finish in the 8-team field.

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    Samantha Bowden/sbowden@dailyherald.com Claire Flood, a senior from Elk Grove, finishes her last lap of the varsity girls competition at the Lake Park High School cross country invite Saturday morning.

    Lake Park, Flanagan keep rolling

    Junior Kaylee Flanagan and Lake Park won an invitational tile for the second straight week in the Lancers' Harvey Braus Invite.

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    Samantha Bowden/sbowden@dailyherald.com Evan Prizy, a junior from Schaumburg runs to the finish line during the Lake Park High School cross country invite Saturday morning.

    Belvidere North keeps making statements

    Belvidere North and Tyler Yunk continued to make big statements as they won the Lake Park Invitational on Saturday.

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    Elgin’s Dennis Moore can’t be pulled down by Streamwood’s Blake Holder in the first quarter on Saturday, September 10.

    Images: Streamwood vs. Elgin football
    The Sabres of Streamwood visit Memorial Field to take on the Elgin Maroons in a Saturday afternoon prep football clash.

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    Robert Morris falls to 0-3

    Robert Morris University fell to 0-3 with a 30-7 loss to Siena Heights (Mich.) on Saturday in Arlington Heights.

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    Keller’s halftime chat lights fire under Fremd

    The speech. Fremd players heard loud and clear what coach Steve Keller thought of their efforts during the first 40 minutes of soccer Saturday.

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    Time again to see into NFL future

    bears/nfl

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    Northwestern running back Adonis Smith, right, leaps over tight end Drake Dunsmore (9) as Eastern Illinois defensive end Judes Amilcar (44), left, tries to tackle him during the second quarter Saturday.

    Colter leads Northwestern past E. Illinois 42-21

    Kain Colter keeps hearing he needs to take a few more slides, and it's not just coming from teammates and coaches. Joe Girardi made it clear he feels that way, too. Colter wasn't doing much sliding on Saturday. He was, however, running wild. Colter delivered again while filling in for star Dan Persa, rushing for a career-high 109 yards with three touchdowns and throwing for 104 more to lead Northwestern to a 42-21 victory over Eastern Illinois on Saturday.

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    Michigan State players, including Matt Giampapa (58), B.J. Cunningham (3), Jonathan Strayhorn (57) and Adam Setterbo, right, celebrate their 44-0 win over Florida Atlantic Saturday.

    Michigan State blows out Florida Atlantic

    Jerel Worthy and the Michigan State Spartans had a long week to stew after a sluggish performance in their season opener. Then they took the field against Florida Atlantic, ready to prove a point.

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    Iowa State players celebrate with fans after their 44-41 triple-overtime win over Iowa Saturday in Ames, Iowa.

    Iowa State beats Iowa 44-41 in 3 OT thriller

    Nebraska, Texas and now Iowa. Iowa State coach Paul Rhoads is knocking off the big boys one by one. Now it looks like he has a quarterback who can pull off more than one stunner a season.

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    Alex Rios swings on a grand slam off Cleveland Indians relief pitcher Chris Perez during the 10th inning Saturday.

    Rios’ slam lifts White Sox over Indians

    Alex Rios hit a game-ending grand slam in the 10th inning to lift the Chicago White Sox to a 7-3 win over the Cleveland Indians on Saturday.Rios’ one out, first-pitch shot off Chris Perez (3-7) was Chicago’s first game-ending home run this season and his first career grand slam.Alejandro De Aza doubled twice, walked and scored two runs for Chicago. Gordon Beckham had a double, two walks and two RBIs.Sergio Santos (4-4) threw a scoreless inning to get the win in relief. Santos combined with Chris Sale to strike out six straight batters during the late innings.Shelley Duncan doubled, homered and scored two runs for Cleveland. Matt LaPorta added a two-run double and Jim Thome singled twice.Indians starter Fausto Carmona allowed six hits and three runs in 5 1-3 innings but fell behind a number of hitters, running up his pitch count. He lowered his ERA to 9.14 ERA in four starts against the White Sox this season.Chicago’s Phil Humber was sharp in his six innings, holding Cleveland to two runs and striking out seven. Humber threw seven scoreless innings in his previous start at Minnesota, winning for the first time in over two months, but settled for a no-decision on Saturday.The White Sox grabbed the early lead on doubles from De Aza and Beckham, the latter driving in the game’s first run.The Indians went ahead on LaPorta’s two-run double in the fifth, which came on the heels of Duncan’s double and Lonnie Chisenhall’s single. LaPorta was making his first start for the Indians since Aug. 29, the day before he was sent down to Triple-A Columbus.The rally snapped Humber’s streak of 13 1-3 scoreless innings.Adam Dunn singled in the sixth, snapping a string of 18 hitless at-bats, and started Chicago’s rally. De Aza doubled off the center-field wall, sending Dunn to third and Carmona to the showers after 103 pitches.Chad Durbin replaced Carmona and walked Brent Morel and Beckham, forcing in Dunn with the tying run. Juan Pierre singled in De Aza, giving Chicago a 3-2 lead.The White Sox pulled Humber after just 73 pitches, bringing in Jesse Crain to start the seventh. Duncan greeted Crain with a homer to left-center, tying the score 3-all.Duncan has with five homers and 10 RBIs in seven games over the last week.The White Sox came up empty on bases-loaded, one-out situations in the first, sixth, eighth and ninth, and stranded 15 runners during the first nine innings before Rios snapped the streak in the 10th.NOTES: First base umpire Ed Rapuano had to leave the game because of sore neck. Indians RHP Josh Tomlin (elbow) is doing “very well” with his throwing program and the team is leaning toward not shutting him down, manager Manny Acta said. Acta doubts Tomlin will have the arm strength to return as a starter, but would still like to see him pitch before the season ends. DH Travis Hafner (foot) ran the bases on Saturday but Acta said there is still no timetable on his return. 3B Jack Hannahan (calf strain) will rejoin the Indians in Texas, though Acta is not sure when he’ll return to game action. The Indians will send Ubaldo Jimenez to the mound for Sunday’s series finale against Chicago rookie Zach Stewart. Jimenez is 2-1 with a 5.56 ERA since he was acquired from Colorado on July 31. Stewart is coming off a one-hit shutout of Minnesota on Sept. 5 in which he carried a perfect game into the eighth inning.

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    Purdue running back Ralph Bolden (23) is hit by Rice defensive end Jared Williams, right, during the fourth quarter Saturday. Rice won 24-22.

    Rice breaks BCS skid with 24-22 win over Purdue

    HOUSTON — Justin Allen blocked Carson Wiggs’ 31-yard field-goal attempt as time expired and Rice snapped its 10-year losing streak against Bowl Championship Series teams with a 24-22 victory over Purdue on Saturday.The Owls (1-1) had lost 22 consecutive games to BCS opponents since a 15-13 win over Duke on Sept. 8, 2001. Rice had not beaten a Big Ten team since a 40-34 win at Northwestern in 1997.The Boilermakers got the ball near midfield with 1:52 remaining, and three long runs by Ralph Bolden moved them inside the 20.Purdue (1-1) was content to let the clock run down so that Wiggs’ kick would be the final play. But Allen surged through the middle of the line and blocked it, and the Owls’ sideline emptied onto the field in celebration.Caleb TerBush completed 18 of 33 passes for 183 yards for Purdue, which needed a last-minute touchdown pass from TerBush to Antavian Edison to beat Middle Tennessee in its opener last week.The Boilermakers fell short this time, failing to cash in on several scoring opportunities in the second half.Taylor McHargue completed 19 of 29 passes for 230 yards and two touchdowns for Rice. The sophomore went 11 for 18 for 138 yards in the first half, then completed his first four throws of the third quarter, including a 19-yard touchdown to Sam McGuffie to put Rice up 24-17.The Boilermakers drove into Rice territory twice in the third quarter and came away with nothing.Owls defensive end Scott Solomon sacked TerBush to push Purdue out of field-goal range on the first series. Purdue then drove to the Rice 2, but Akeem Shavers was stopped at the line on fourth down.Purdue’s defense made a play of its own, tackling Rice running back Charles Ross in the end zone for a safety to make it 24-19.McHargue converted a third-and-19 with a 35-yard strike to wide receiver Randy Kitchens early in the fourth quarter. Purdue’s Robert Maci then sacked McHargue and knocked the ball loose, and Kawann Short recovered with 10:58 left.TerBush completed three consecutive passes for big gains and Purdue quickly drove to the Rice 13. The Owls’ defense stiffened again, and Wiggs’ 27-yard field goal cut the deficit to 24-22.The teams were tied 17-all at the break.The Owls led 3-0 when Shavers broke a 43-yard run to kick-start Purdue’s ensuing series. TerBush threw a 24-yard pass to Edison to the Rice 5, and TerBush dashed into the end zone on third down, his first career touchdown run.In the second quarter, Purdue cornerback Josh Johnson broke up an Owls’ reverse for a 16-yard loss, Rice punted from its own end zone and the Boilermakers started from the Rice 46.The Boilermakers moved ahead 17-10 after TerBush found tight end Crosby Wright over the middle for a 19-yard touchdown with 5:56 left in the half.McHargue had Rice on the move in the final minutes of the half, and got lucky when center Eric Ball recovered his fumble at the Purdue 19. Tight end Luke Willson made a diving catch in the end zone on the last play of the first half. After an official review, the catch was confirmed for the tying score.Purdue outgained Rice 366-352, but converted only 6 of 18 third downs. The Owls also recorded four sacks.

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    Wauconda’s Eric Dragon, middle, carries the ball after making an interception as Round Lake’s Luis Aceves, left, and Eddie Acevedo close in during Saturday’s game.

    Images: Round Lake vs. Wauconda football
    The Wauconda Bulldogs continued their homecoming celebration on Saturday, Sept. 10 and hosted the Round Lake Panthers in football action.

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    Batavia’s Miranda Grizaffi, returns a Naperville Central shot during the St. Charles East Mary Carlson Varsity Invitational in St. Charles Saturday, September 10, 2011.

    Benet wins tiebreaker over Naperville Central

    As the tournament director, Sena Drawer knew it wasn’t practical to split the St. Charles East Mary Carlson Invitational girls’ tennis championship plaque in half Saturday afternoon, so the St. Charles coach employed traditional tennis tiebreakers to determine whether Benet or Naperville Central would take home the title hardware.

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    Aramis Ramirez hits a two-run single during the ninth inning Saturday against the New York Mets. The Cubs defeated the Mets 5-4.

    Cubs rally for win after blowing late lead

    With first base open and the Cubs' best run producer at the plate in the ninth inning, Chicago manager Mike Quade was relieved to see the Mets pitch to Aramis Ramirez. Ramirez came through, too, hitting a two-run single with two outs, lifting the Cubs to a 5-4 victory over New York after they blew a three-run lead in the eighth Saturday.

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    Matt Forte said he would not worry about the possibility of a major injury despite the fact that his contract is over after this season. “If you play like that, you probably will get injured,” Forte said.

    Forte won't worry about potential injury

    Bears running back Matt Forte says he won't allow himself to consider the possibility of an injury in this, his contract year.

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    BRIAN HILL/bhill@dailyherald.com Bears linebackers Lance Briggs and Brian Urlacher.

    Plenty of questions as Bears open season

    Many of the most pressing questions facing the Bears this season will be answered in the first three games.

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    Novak Djokovic of Serbia reacts after winning his semifinal match against Roger Federer Saturday at the U.S. Open.

    Djokovic comes back to beat Federer at US Open

    NEW YORK — Facing two match points against a beloved player whose name is already in the history books, Novak Djokovic clenched his jaw and flashed an ever-so-slight glimpse of a smile.Might as well go down swinging, right?He turned violently on a 108 mph serve from Roger Federer for a cross-court winner that barely nicked the line. The fans in Arthur Ashe Stadium, ready to explode for a Federer victory, instead found themselves taking a cue from Djokovic — who raised his hands, asking for more volume, and a little bit of love.About 10 minutes later, those same fans were dancing with Djoko as he boogied at center court to celebrate an epic U.S. Open semifinal win — one in which he dug out of a two-set hole, then saved two match points against Federer for the second straight year.Top-seeded Djokovic won 6-7 (7), 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 7-5 Saturday to improve to 63-2 on the year. This was only his second career comeback from two sets down. Next, he’ll face Andy Murray or defending champion Rafael Nadal, who played in the second semifinal, as Djokovic tries to become only the fifth man to win three Grand Slam titles in a year since the start of the Open era.“It was definitely the biggest win of this year, one of the biggest wins of the career under the circumstances,” Djokovic said. “Roger was in control, playing better. I switched gears and played much better over three sets.”After the fourth set, the prospect of third-seeded Federer even having a match point seemed bleak.Djokovic, who spent the first two sets shaking his head, commiserating with the folks in his players box, even folding his hands in mock prayer, turned things around suddenly and unexpectedly.He got 16 of 20 of his first serves in during the fourth set and ripped off the first 15 service points. But Federer won the next three of those service points, all with the set on the line, to show an inkling of resistance — and give a preview of a fifth set that had as many momentum shifts as the match.The real action began with Djokovic serving at 3-4 and stringing together an uncharacteristically bad game, getting broken at love on two mishit forehands, a framer of Federer’s that set up a winner and a double fault on a second serve that missed the line by about a foot.After missing a backhand to open his service game at 5-3, Federer hit three straight serves Djokovic couldn’t get back. He had two match points, same way he did last year in the semifinals, and the fans were squarely on his side, as he stood oh-so-close to making his 24th Grand Slam final and moving a win away to adding to his record 16 Grand Slam titles.But Djokovic isn’t putting together one of the greatest seasons in tennis history for nothing.He knows all about risk-reward shots and figured being down two match points was as good a time as any to go for it. Federer spun a serve wide to Djokovic’s forehand side and the Serb took the all-or-nothing route.“If it comes in, it comes in,” he said. “It’s a risk. Last year, I was in a very similar situation. He was two match points up. I was hitting a forehand as hard as I can. You’re gambling. If it’s out, you lose. If it’s in, maybe you have a chance. I got lucky today.”Federer’s next serve hit the back of the service line and jammed Djokovic, but somehow he got it back. Federer moved in and cranked a forehand, but it ticked the net and ricocheted out. Federer sprayed a forehand wide at deuce and suddenly, a crowd gearing for a Federer win was shouting “No-vak, No-vak, No-vak!”They know a winner when they see one.Djokovic won the last four games and, counting the two match points he saved, he took 17 of the final 21 points.Federer was among the 23,000-plus on an 80-degree day in the stadium who couldn’t believe how the last comeback began. He said Djokovic is the best version of the kind of players he faced as a kid — who start taking huge chances when they feel they have nothing else to lose.

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    Panthers, Godfrey agree to 5-year extension

    CHARLOTTE — The Carolina Panthers and strong safety Charles Godfrey agreed Saturday to a five-year contact extension.Doug Hendrickson, Godfrey’s agent, said the deal is worth $27.5 million overall, $12.4 million guaranteed.“He’s on top of the world, and he’s thrilled because this is what he wanted,” Hendrickson said. “He really loves the new defense and the staff and everything about the organization. They stepped up big time.”His contract was set to expire after this season.Godfrey, one of the team’s six captains, is the latest Panther defender to earn a contract extension of at least five years, joining defensive end Charles Johnson and linebackers James Anderson, Jon Beason and Thomas Davis as the team makes a concerted effort to keep its core players.A third-round draft pick in 2008, Godfrey has started 43 games over the past three seasons with the Panthers and has 157 tackles, seven interceptions and six forced fumbles during that span. He led the team last season with five interceptions.His role has expanded this season as the Panthers plan to use him some at cornerback when the team goes to its nickel package.

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    Polamalu, Steelers agree on contract extension

    PITTSBURGH — Troy Polamalu never planned on leaving the Pittsburgh Steelers.Still, the defending AFC champions didn’t want to take any chances, signing the star safety to a contract extension through the 2014 season.Polamalu, the 2010 NFL Defensive Player of the Year, actually signed the contract at Pittsburgh International Airport on Saturday just before the team boarded a plane to Baltimore.The 30-year-old took to his Twitter account to announce the deal, tweeting “I am happy to say that I will retire a Pittsburgh Steeler!”Terms were not immediately disclosed. Polamalu was scheduled to make $6.4 million this season.The perennial Pro Bowler enjoyed perhaps the finest season of his career in 2010, finishing with seven interceptions, 64 combined tackles and a sack. He was slowed by a strained Achilles in the playoffs and has admitted he was not 100 percent in the loss to Green Bay in the Super Bowl.Polamalu was ready to start the final year of a five-year deal he signed in 2007. The Steelers typically do not negotiate contracts once the season begins. They got it in just under the wire, saving both sides from a potential distraction over the next five months.The contract is the third extension the Steelers have handed out to defensive starters since training camp opened. Linebackers Lawrence Timmons and LaMarr Woodley both agreed to long-term deals last month and Polamalu’s signing gives the Steelers stability well into the future. Pittsburgh returns all 11 defensive starters from a unit that led the league in points against a year ago.Polamalu paced himself during camp, though he showed flashes of brilliance in a preseason win over Philadelphia three weeks ago, intercepting Michael Vick and going on a freewheeling return that included a fake pitch and an abrupt ending after Vick drilled Polamalu in the knees.Cornerback Ike Taylor has been so impressed during camp he felt the need to declare “Troy’s back.” Actually, Taylor said, he never went anywhere in the first place.“Sure, he missed a couple games,” Taylor said, “but the games he was in there, he had like seven picks in six games.“So, Troy is Troy.”If the negotiations were weighing on Polamalu, it didn’t show. He declined to comment on the need to get a deal done earlier in the week, saying he’d prefer to keep all discussions between his agent Marvin Demoff and the team quiet so that things don’t get “misconstrued.”Still, his intention was to remain in Pittsburgh, where he has become one of the best players in the league quarterbacking defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau’s 3-4 attack.Polamalu’s frenetic play, along with his soft-spoken personality and flowing black locks have made him a fan favorite. His No. 43 jersey is among the top sellers in the NFL, ahead of teammates like quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and linebacker James Harrison.The signing means the Steelers have only one impact player — wide receiver Mike Wallace — not locked up beyond the 2011 season, though Wallace would only be a restricted free agent at the end of the season and Wallace, like Polamalu, has professed his desire to remain with the team.

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    Adrian Peterson agreed Saturday to a contract extension with the Vikings that includes $36 million in guaranteed money and as much as $100 million over the next seven years if he plays that long with Minnesota.

    Vikings lock Adrian Peterson into long-term deal

    MINNEAPOLIS — Adrian Peterson thinks he’s the best running back in the game.Now he’s getting paid like it, too.Peterson agreed Saturday to a contract extension with the Vikings that includes $36 million in guaranteed money and as much as $100 million over the next seven years if he plays that long with Minnesota.The deal came five days after the Vikings locked up linebacker Chad Greenway to a lucrative long-term contract, the latest in a line of millions of dollars doled out to top players by owner Zygi Wilf since he and his family purchased the franchise in 2005.Peterson has begun the final year of his rookie deal on a $10.72 million salary and was in prime position for a big pay day.After setting the NFL’s single-game rushing record with 296 yards against San Diego in 2007, Peterson has been picked for the Pro Bowl in each of his four seasons. He’s already second in Vikings history behind Robert Smith with 5,782 yards rushing for his career, and his 54 touchdowns over the last four years are the most in the league over that span.“Adrian loves playing for the Minnesota Vikings,” his agent, Ben Dogra, told The Associated Press in a phone interview. “Deep inside he wanted to finish his career with the Minnesota Vikings.”Already making major money this season, Peterson was in line for an even bigger salary in 2012 if the Vikings used their franchise tag to keep him from unrestricted free agency. He was content, then, to let the negotiations between Dogra and the Vikings work themselves out — and not protest any lack of progress.“He said, ‘Look, I’m under contract. I’m just going to play,”’ Dogra said. “He never contemplated holding out. He understands the business side of things. He’s very smart like that. He only knows one speed in life, and that’s all out. That’s why they call him, ‘All Day.”’Chris Johnson chose that path, sitting out for more than a month until the Tennessee Titans worked out a deal with their star running back that will pay him up to $56 million over the next six years, including $30 million guaranteed.DeAngelo Williams of the Carolina Panthers recently got a contract worth as much as $43 million over the next five years with $21 million guaranteed.But Peterson’s new deal, which is essentially a six-year extension through the 2017 season, when he will be 32, easily surpasses those.Even if Peterson lasts only five more years, not necessarily a given with the wear that running the ball in the NFL puts on a player’s body, he’ll get $65 million.“Adrian’s performances on the field have given fans so much excitement since he first joined us as a rookie,” Wilf said in a statement released by the team. “His talent and determination are remarkable and we are proud to have him be a part of the family for years to come.”The Vikings open the season against the Chargers on Sunday in their first meeting since Peterson’s 296-yard game.On Twitter, he thanked God, his family, the Vikings and their fans for their support.“Can’t wait to get a ring and finish my career in Minn.,” Peterson tweeted.NOTES: The Vikings signed rookie tight end Allen Reisner to their active roster, elevating him from the practice squad, in time for Sunday’s game. That gives them four tight ends. Backup guard Seth Olsen was waived to make room. Both Reisner and Olsen played at Iowa. ... Peterson has four of the top five single-game rushing performances in Vikings history, with 180, 192, 224 and 296 yards. Chuck Foreman rushed for 200 yards in a game in 1978.

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    Bengals want to show they’re not the dregs

    CINCINNATI — They know what fans think of them, and it’s not very much. There’s talk of an 0-16 season in Cincinnati, another year of setting new franchise lows with the same owner and coach presiding over a new cast of players.How could the Bengals’ ignore it?Better yet, how do they stop it?Win one in Cleveland.The Bengals could prove — for one week, anyway — that they’re not the worst team in Ohio, let alone the worst in the league. The intrastate rivalry on Sunday provides a chance to end all the talk about being No. 32 in the NFL.“We haven’t really talked about that,” left tackle Andrew Whitworth said. “It hasn’t really been our focus. But I would hope every competitor in here knows that and realizes that’s how people think about them, and that’s the way we have to fight.“It’s no different than any other year. The teams that go out fighting the hardest and want it the most are going to win, and we’ve got to be one of those teams.”The Bengals put up a good fight last season, but kept self-destructing with turnovers and penalties and botched plays during a 4-12 season that wasn’t the league’s worst. Carolina got that honor, going 2-14 while the Bengals finished with the same mark as Denver and Buffalo.Much of the pessimism comes from the offseason.Coach Marvin Lewis played out his contract, looking for signs that the front office was committed to doing what is needed to win. Then, he agreed to stay even though owner Mike Brown said there would be no significant change in how the team operates.A week later, franchise quarterback Carson Palmer threw in the towel, saying he’d rather retire than finish his contract with the Bengals. Disgruntled receiver Terrell Owens left as a free agent, and receiver Chad Ochocinco was traded to New England.The Bengals are left with one of their greenest offenses ever for a season opener. Second-round pick Andy Dalton will become the first Bengals rookie quarterback to start an opener since 1969, the team’s second year. First-round pick A.J. Green is the top receiver. Fourth-round pick Clint Boling starts at right guard in place of suspended Bobbie Williams. Tight end Jermaine Gresham and slot receiver Jordan Shipley are starting their second seasons.That’s a lot of inexperience.“We have a lot of young players,” running back Cedric Benson said. “But we’re strong in the offensive line. We’ve got one adjustment there (Boling). We’re strong in the backfield. But we’re still growing. It’s a great opportunity for us to come together.”The Browns weren’t much better last year, going 5-11 to finish one spot ahead in the AFC North. The teams split their series, each winning at home. The Browns took the first game 23-20 in October, while the Bengals broke a 10-game losing streak with their 19-17 win at Paul Brown Stadium in December.The newcomers will get their first experience with the Dawg Pound and the rivalry on Sunday afternoon.“I know a little bit about it,” Dalton said. “We are definitely going to know when we are on the Dawg Pound side of the field. We’ll have to know when we can use silent counts and different things like that. It will be fun to get to know a lot more about it and be a part of it.”Ochocinco loved to taunt the Browns and the Dawg Pound. He sent Pepto-Bismol to some Browns players one year, and did a leap into the Dawg Pound after a touchdown, only to get doused with beer and jeers. None of the current receivers is inclined to take on the Pound.“I don’t think so, but we’re hoping our guys are spending plenty of time in their end zone,” Whitworth said. “That’s what we hope.”

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    Ohio State’s Joe Bauserman throws a pass against Toledo during the third quarter Saturday. Ohio State beat Toledo 27-22.

    No. 15 Buckeyes hang on to beat Toledo 27-22

    For 90 years, Ohio State has stayed unbeaten against every in-state opponent it's played. On Saturday at Ohio Stadium, the streak nearly snapped.

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    Wisconsin’s Montee Ball (28) leaps over teammates Ryan Groy (79), Ricky Wagner (58) and Oregon State’s Lance Mitchell (10) for a touchdown run during the second half Saturday. Wisconsin beat Oregon State 35-0.

    No. 8 Wisconsin beats Oregon State 35-0

    MADISON, Wis. — Russell Wilson threw three touchdowns and No. 8 Wisconsin overcame a slow start from its running game to beat Oregon State 35-0 at Camp Randall Stadium on Saturday.With Oregon State’s defense stuffing running backs Montee Ball and James White early on, Wisconsin pounced on special teams mistakes and leaned on Wilson and the defense to do the rest.In his second career start for the Badgers (2-0), Wilson was 17 of 21 for 189 yards and the three touchdowns, including a pair to tight end Jacob Pedersen. Wisconsin’s running game broke through after halftime, and Ball had a pair of touchdowns in the second half.Sean Mannion most of the snaps at quarterback while the game still was in doubt but struggled to move the ball for Oregon State (0-2).

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    Northwestern head coach Pat Fitzgerald has led his team to a 144-24 scoring advantage against FCS competition. Eastern Illinois visits Evanston today and is 0-5 against Big Ten schools in the last five years.

    College football preview: EIU at Northwestern

    Northwestern opens up its home schedule Saturday with a visit from Eastern Illinois. The Wildcats are gunning for their fifth consecutive 2-0 start while the Panthers are looking for the program's first win over a Big Ten team.

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    Notre Dame travels to Ann Arbor for first game under lights at Michigan Stadium
    Notre Dame travels to Ann Arbor, Mich. for the first game under the lights at Michigan Stadium. The Irish have switched to QB Tommy Rees in an effort to avoid the program's first 0-2 start since 2007.

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    College football preview: SDS at Illinois

    Illinois guns for its first 2-0 start since 2005 (the start of the Ron Zook era) as Football Championship Subdivision foe South Dakota State checks in Saturday to Memorial Stadium.

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    Minnesota Vikings quarterback Donovan McNabb will try to help new coach Leslie Frazier turn the Vikings into contenders.

    Viking relish fresh start under Frazier

    The Minnesota Vikings are looking forward to a fresh start on Sunday after all of the distractions, disappointments and dysfunction that followed them last fall and winter.

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    College football preview: NIU at Kansas
    Northern Illinois will try to build on last week's romp over Army when it visits Kansas on Saturday. The Huskie are favored in this game, which is unusual for a MAC team going on the road in the Big 12.

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    2 big stakes races today at Arlington Park

    Two-year-olds of both sexes take the spotlight Saturday at Arlington Park with the 77th editions of the Grade III $100,000 Arlington-Washington Futurity and the Grade III $100,000 Arlington-Washington Lassie on tap.

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    Spurred by Briggs, NFL lets players wear Sept. 11 cleats, gloves

    NFL spokesman Michael Signora tweeted that the league told its 32 clubs that players may wear special shoes and gloves from official NFL equipment licensees for Week 1 games.

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    Only four of our NFL experts are expecting Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers will lead his team to a second straight Super Bowl win this season.

    Our NFL experts put their picks on the line
    Our stable of NFL experts — Daily Herald columnists and writers — offer their predictions for the NFL season, starting with divisional finishes followed by wild-card winners, conference championships and their Super Bowl XLVI matchup.

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    The Chicago Sky’s Sylvia Fowles leads the WNBA in field-goal percentage (59.6) and is third in scoring (19.8), but it’s doubtful she will win the league’s MVP award.

    Who deserves WNBA’s most valuable player award?

    Patricia Babcock McGraw's vote for MVP of the WNBA: Fowles or Catchings

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    A stadium security officer pats down a football fan before a preseason NFL football game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Houston Texans on Aug. 27 in San Francisco.

    ’Top level’ security for sports stems from 9/11

    From bomb-sniffing dogs to pat-downs of fans, security will be tight at 13 NFL games and the U.S. Open tennis tournament on Sunday, the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

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    Week 3- Joe Borsellino of Montini is tackled.

    Images: Marmion vs. Montini football
    Marmion plays football at Montini High School in Lombard Friday. Montini won the game 13-6.

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    Week 3- Geneva quarterback Matt Williams prepares to pass.

    Images: Geneva vs. St. Charles East football
    The Vikings of Geneva visit the home of the St. Charles East Saints for Friday night Upstate Eight River conference football action. Geneva won the game 35-17.

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    Week 3- Larkin’s Justin Banks breaks to outside and is brought down by Batavia’s Mike Moffatt.

    Images: Batavia vs. Larkin football
    The Bulldogs of Batavia defeated the Larkin Royals 50-6 in varsity football action at Memorial Field in Elgin on Friday night.

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    Rafael Nadal of Spain hits a ball into the stands after winning a quarterfinal match against Andy Roddick at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, Friday, Sept. 9, 2011. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

    Nadal obliterates Roddick to reach U.S. Open semis

    Overwhelming Andy Roddick right from the start, Rafel Nadal compiled a stunning 22-0 edge in forehand winners, broke six times and never left the outcome of their match even remotely in doubt, winning 6-2, 6-1, 6-3 on Friday to reach the semifinals at Flushing Meadows for the fourth consecutive year.

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    Detroit Lions defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh (90) and linebacker Julian Peterson (98) can make things difficult for quarterbacks, as Bears QB Jay Cutler found out last December.

    Expectations mounting for improved Lions

    Detroit wide receiver knows how to keep the Lions' 4-0 preseason record in perspective: “The regular season, for us, is everything. Right now, we’re everybody’s Cinderella pick, but until we actually go out there and win some games, it’s all for naught.”

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    Morgan Burnett reacts after the Packers’ defense stopped New Orleans running back Mark Ingram on the last play of the fourth quarter to give the Packers a 42-34 win Thursday night in Green Bay.

    Big win, but Packers defense has work to do

    They made a goal-line stand to get the win, but the Packers defense surrendered a jaw-dropping 477 net yards of offense — including 419 yards passing by Drew Brees — in their 42-34 victory Thursday night.

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    Bears running back Kahlil Bell is tripped up by Tennessee Titans cornerback LeQuan Lewis in a preseason game. Bell averaged 4.5 yards per carry in the preseason.

    With Barber out, Bell ready to back up Forte

    Backup running back Kahlil Bell is looking forward to some playing time Sunday with Marion Barber sidelined with a calf injury.

Business

  •  
    An original, unpublished personal photo of Amelia Earhart dated 1937, along with goggles she was wearing during her first plane crash, are going on the auction block at Clars Auction Gallery in Oakland, Calif.

    Gallery to auction Amelia Earhart goggles, photos

    The goggles were estimated to fetch between $20,000 and $40,000. Goggles Earhart wore during her flight across the Atlantic Ocean went for more than $140,000 two years ago.

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    Protesting taxi drivers confront riot police Saturday during a demonstration in Thessaloniki, Greece.

    Greece pledges to meet fiscal targets amid protests

    Greece will meet ambitious savings targets despite a deepening recession this year, the prime minister said Saturday.

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    Eric Calandriello, left, lends tech support to senior Jean Harafin, 17, after she and other students received iPads at Burlington High School in Burlington, Mass. Burlington is giving iPads this year to every one of its 1,000-plus high school students. Some classes will still have textbooks, but the majority of work and lessons will be on the iPads.

    Many US schools adding iPads, trimming textbooks

    For incoming freshmen at western Connecticut’s suburban Brookfield High School, hefting a backpack weighed down with textbooks is about to give way to tapping out notes and flipping electronic pages on a glossy iPad tablet computer.

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    Belkin Keyboard Folio for Apple iPad takes up the most space of keyboards tested, but was the easiest to use.

    Review: Seeking a keyboard that enhances the iPad

    The great thing about using an iPad is that you can tote around a skinny device instead of lugging your laptop. The bad thing is that the iPad’s virtual keyboard isn’t great for extended typing sessions. Fortunately, a market has sprung up to solve this problem: physical keyboards that work with the iPad, either on their own or as part of iPad cases. I tested four of them, and I wrote this review using one.

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    Yahoo Inc. has gone through three different CEOs in five years. Whoever takes the helm now will face the same puzzle: Why is a company that owns some of the world’s most widely used online services unable to gain traction among Web surfers, advertisers and investors?

    Perplexing puzzle: Can Yahoo’s luster be restored?

    Yahoo Inc. has gone through three different CEOs in five years. Whoever takes the helm now will face the same puzzle: Why is a company that owns some of the world’s most widely used online services unable to gain traction among Web surfers, advertisers and investors?

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    Twitter exceeds 100 million active users

    Twitter Inc., the biggest U.S. microblogging service, said it surpassed 100 million active users worldwide.About 55 percent of active users link to the service through a mobile device, said Dick Costolo, chief executive officer of the San Francisco-based company, at a press conference. Twitter also plans to start using so-called Promoted Tweets for brands that users don’t already follow, he said.

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    Sony Corp.’s Tablet S sounds much more appealing than the reality turns out to be: Its good ideas are undermined by its execution.

    Sony’s plump tablet ditches skinny iPad look

    Sony Corp.’s Tablet S sounds much more appealing than the reality turns out to be: Its good ideas are undermined by its execution.

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    Post-it Notes go digital

    Post-it Notes, those sticky slips for quick reminders from 3M, have adorned desks, bathroom mirrors and planners for decades. Now the company has an application to put digital notes on your iPhone.With PopUps, a combination social network and reminder service, the company has aimed to bring the organization tool into the digital age. Users can type or draw notes and set them to pop up in certain locations. Got a friend landing at the airport? You can set a note to pop up a welcome message.It’s a great theory, but the execution is far from flawless. Paper notes are easy, quick and digestible. But setting up a note requires you to set location, expiration and privacy limits. Those are all vitally important for protecting consumers -- and the app requires account registration -- but doesn’t scream convenience. Setting the location for a note can be buggy, too, and some messages took a couple of tries to get the note to stick.

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    Nextag Radar app tracks items you ask it to keep “on my radar” and alert you about price drops and new product launches related to your product.

    Nextag Radar app scans for deals

    Whether you hate shopping or love it, most people probably like to score a good deal. Nextag Radar aims to help you do just that by using image recognition and barcode scanning technology to scour the Internet for the best deals. By design, users are supposed to be able to take a picture of a product -- or scan its barcode -- and the mobile devices application will look for the best price.

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    Google says movie rental service on youtube ‘going well’

    Google Inc.’s new movie-rental service on its Youtube site is “going well” in the U.S., and the company is seeking to expand the service worldwide, Adam Smith, head of Youtube for the Asia-Pacific region at Google, told reporters in Seoul via teleconference.

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    Michael Dieffenbach sits in his class room on a typical Monday morning. Dieffenbach just scored a perfect 36 on an ACT test and is currently involved in numerous advanced placement classes. Dieffenbach is a senior who attends Wisconsin Virtual Learning school.

    More students forgo classrooms for laptops

    There are dozens of virtual schools in Wisconsin where students learn without setting a foot inside a classroom. People often question how students could go to school in an entirely online environment, devoid of regular face-to-face contact with teachers, but it doesn't appear to be hurting test scores.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    On homes and real estate: Co-signer of loan surprised

    Q. I am the co-borrower on an owner-financed property. I recently found out the mortgage bill was not being paid when I received a summons to court. I never received anything in the mail — no phone calls, nothing. They sent contact only to the borrower. Now they want to take me to court and sue me, but they never notified me about anything.

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    Broadway performers sing "New York, New York" to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, on Sept. 9, in New York's Duffy Square. The mini-concert was a replay of what the Broadway community sang 10 years ago to promote theater in New York City following 9/11.

    Broadway marks 9/11 anniversary with iconic song

    Joel Grey, Kara DioGuardi, Bebe Neuwirth, Ben Vereen and Brian Stokes Mitchell — along with sailors, nuns, drag queens, ballerinas and a Spider-Man — helped mark the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks with a full-throated reprise of the song "New York, New York."

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    The Fashion Institute of Technology presented the Italian designer Valentino Garavani with the 2011 Couture Council Award for artistry.

    Retirement only a chapter in Valentino’s life

    Even though iconic designer Valentino officially retired in 2008, the 79-year-old has no interest in slowing down. “Retirement is for old people,” he said with a laugh this week at an awards luncheon in his honor.

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    Fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld appears with Vogue editor Anna Wintour at Macy’s Herald Square flagship store where he unveiled his exclusive new collection, Karl Lagerfeld For Impulse Only, this week in New York.

    Lagerfeld launches affordable women’s line

    Some might expect Karl Lagerfeld, creative director for Chanel and Fendi, to be intimidating. In reality, he laughs often during interviews, doesn’t take himself too seriously and jokes as he shows off his iPhone case, which features a sketch of Lagerfeld on the back.

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    DuPage County Master Gardener Pam Kowalczyk collects produce from a garden for local food pantries. Master Gardeners this year are tending a garden near the Kraft plant in Naperville.

    Kraft garden project delivers produce to food pantry

    On the west side of the Kraft plant in Naperville where a variety of Nabisco brand crackers are produced, another type of food production goes on, thanks to the tender care by Master Gardeners. Nearly a dozen members of the University of Illinois Extension Service in DuPage County have been working the garden, coming twice a week throughout the summer.

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    The Woodstock Inn displays a closed sign after suffering water damage from Hurricane Irene.

    Vermont's leaf season tourism threatened

    The flood damage from Hurricane Irene in New England is all but certain to hurt Vermont's vital leaf-peeping season, when thousands of tourists come to see the autumn colors, pick apples, visit craft fairs and, at the end of the day, go to sleep under a down comforter at a historic inn.

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    This Oct. 9, 2010 photo shows a bull elk as it bugles during rutting season in Estes Park, Colo. There are certain signs of fall in the town of Estes Park: the chill of morning frost, the reds and yellows of autumn leaves, and the thousands of elk that visit the town. The elk come looking for romance; the tourists come looking for elk. (AP Photo/Karen Schwartz)

    Elks gather in Estes Park for mating season

    There are certain signs of fall in the town of Estes Park: the chill of morning frost, the reds and yellows of autumn leaves, and the thousands of elk that visit. The elk come looking for romance; the tourists come looking for elk.

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    The spring 2012 collection of BCBG Max Azria shown during New York Fashion week.

    NY Fashion Week launches with a twist for buyers

    New York Fashion Week launched Thursday with spring previews, but consumers don't necessarily have to wait that long to place their orders — and that has potential to upend the traditional fashion calendar. Typically designers show their shorts and bikinis in September, preparing for spring delivery to stores. The turtlenecks and coats are unveiled in February for the fall.

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    “Tía Isa Wants a Car” by Meg Medina, illustrated by Claudio Muñoz (2011, Candlewick Press), $15.99, 32 pages.

    Heroine learns pennies pave road to dreams come true

    There’s not a lot you can do with a penny anymore. In the new book “Tía Isa Wants a Car” by Meg Medina, illustrated by Claudio Muñoz, a little girl learns that her pennies can take her anywhere, no matter what the weather.

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    See military, civilian and stunt planes from across the country at the “Wings Over Waukegan” air show on Saturday, Sept. 10, at the Waukegan Regional Airport.

    Weekend picks: ‘Wings Over Waukegan' goes soaring

    The Waukegan air show, “Wings Over Waukegan,” features high-flying aircraft from across the country, with dozens of military and civilian planes and stunt fliers showing off their skills at the Waukegan Regional Airport, near the intersection of Green Bay and Yorkhouse roads, starting at 12:30 p.m. Saturday. Also, don't miss the traveling exhibit honoring the Tuskegee Airmen of World War II and the classic car show.

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    Water falls in the north pool of The National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York. Pools are located on the sites of the two towers of the World Trade Center destroyed in the terrorist attacks.

    Sparkling pools mist names of dead with grace at 9/11 memorial

    Individual names pop out at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York City. They’re arranged in long, gracefully staggered lines that demonstrate just how many they were. The veils of water behind the are not the main point: They shower the names with grace.

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    The bathroom vanity has designer touches in a Knoxville home flipped by Cynthia Block.

    Illinois woman turns house flipping into career

    Cynthia Block, the daughter of former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture John “Jack” Block, began flipping houses — buying houses at a low price, having them remodeled and selling them for a profit. Block decided to add a twist, developing designer houses using her own concepts. It was the design work that she did previously as a hobby.

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    The rendering of the Not So Big Showhouse, a concept home being built in Libertyville.

    The Not So Big Showhouse to be unveiled Nov. 19
    SchoolStreet Homes said the Not So Big Showhouse, a concept home in Libertyville designed by acclaimed architect and author Sarah Susanka, will open to the public Saturday, Nov. 19. The showhouse, 138 School St., will then remain open to the public on weekends for the next six months.

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    Pause for an after-dinner drink in the home’s wine cellar.

    On the Market: English-style estate in South Barrington

    This large English country estate in “The Glen” of South Barrington, an exclusive gated community, takes your breath away as you drive up its driveway past lushly-landscaped grounds to the brick, cedar and stucco edifice.

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    Mortgage Professor: Do you know your true loan-to-value ratio?

    Last week’s article made the point that when borrowers cannot lock the price quote that was instrumental in their decision to select the lender, the price they finally lock is more likely to be higher than the original quote. The lock price can also be affected by corrections in property value and loan amount.

Discuss

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    The Soapbox

    From a reminder about local observances to a celebration of the local heroes who serve and protect us every day, today's Soapbox focuses on a wealth of thoughts inspired by the events of Sept. 11, 2001.

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    Hate speech and the hypocrisy of liberals
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: When Gabriel Giffords was tragically shot in January and liberals blamed it on tea party rhetoric (we now know she was shot by a mentally insane liberal college student), President Obama made a grand gesture of giving a speech asking for more respectful dialogue. But apparently it only works one way.

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    Exclude ‘junk food’ from aid program
    A Lake Villa letter to the editor: According to the current guidelines of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), efforts are made to ensure “low-income people and families buy the food they need for good health.” The guidelines are ambiguous, however, when it comes to what foods qualify “good health.”

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    A simple solution to our tax woes
    The payroll tax should be collected on all wages, with no cap exempting the highest wage earners from paying taxes on all their earnings. For those who argue that this would be too great a burden on small businesses (employers are required to match the payroll taxes their employees pay) we could require businesses to match only the first $106,800 earned by each worker.

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    No wonder Postal Service is struggling
    On occasion I visit the post office and am often met with clerks who seem more interested in their next break than my concerns. I now pay as many bills as possible in person or on the Internet and have virtually eliminated letters in favor of email.

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    Jobs czar not doing much for jobs
    I thought a jobs czar appointed by Obama would create jobs for Americans. We have foreign workers getting job visas, illegal aliens who have already been deported getting work visas, and a jobs czar creating jobs overseas. I do not believe Obama when he says that jobs are his highest priority.

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    A government divided cannot stand
    The war then between the North and the South is similar to the war between the Democrats and Republicans today, only without bloodshed. This current “war” is tearing this country apart and our government is perishing.

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    Find solution in cuts to military spending
    A knee-jerk response to 9/11 was to authorize military action against an ill-defined enemy (“terrorists”). It has led to an imbalance in our spending in which over half of our national budget is spent on the military. It has impoverished our nation as we allow our educational system, our infrastructure and our provision for the poor and otherwise disadvantaged to be ignored.

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    Debt percentages are fuzzy math
    Letter to the Editor: I am writing in regard to the letter by Raleigh Sutton in Fence Post Sept. 3, titled “Who has gotten us in deeper debt?” Sutton lists the percent increase or decrease in the national debt for various presidents. I would like to set the record straight regarding the percentages listed by Sutton.

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    Dropping English testing big mistake
    Letter to the Editor: I agree wholeheartedly with the Daily Herald editorial Aug. 29 expressing a dim view of the state’s declining emphasis on writing mastery for elementary and high school students. As a former high school English teacher, I can attest that most students entered my high school with minimal writing skills.

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    No wrist slap for insurance defrauders
    Letter to the Editor: I read with great interest the article about chiropractic clinics defrauding insurers. I really hope that the doctors involved don’t get off the hook by claiming they didn’t know that the practice or business manager was billing nonexistent services to the insurers.

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    Geneva, don’t allow open burning
    Letter to the Editor: It’s my suggestion that Geneva not follow Batavia’s example on open burning and instead keep it to a minimum inside its city limits.

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    Support of literacy programs is vital
    Approximately 125,000 DuPage County residents struggle with limited English skills. Nationwide, funding for adult literacy programs is under siege, affecting the more than 30 million adults nationwide who cannot read well enough to read a news article written at the third grade level, take a driver’s exam, or read the label on a medicine bottle.

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    Thanks for support of K-9 Frisbee events
    I’d like to thank all of you who came down to enjoy our two-day K-9 Frisbee events during Naperville’s Last Fling. I hope you had as much fun as we did. But with that we could not have done it without a support group, first and foremost, my family. Also, a big thanks to the Naperville Jaycees for letting us be a part of their weekend.

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    Actors laugh all the way to the bank
    I read Mr. Ronske’s Sept. 4 letter and can’t agree more. I have always thought it amazing that the people who are always against violence of any kind make their living bringing that same violence to the big screen.

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    Obama thinks he is the state
    We are now seeing President’s Obama’s administration adopting the same "L'etat, c'est moi" attitude as Louis XIV. Eric Holder, the Attorney General, declined to prosecute the thugs with batons filmed outside a Philadelphia voting place intimating voters coming to vote — a clear violation of voting rights law. L’etat, c’est moi.

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    Roskam parroting tea party points
    In just two full terms Congressman Peter Roskam has used his considerable intelligence, ambition and drive to rise to Chief Deputy Whip of the majority Republican House leadership. Alas, Roskam’s rise coincides with the rise of the cultlike tea party mentality that has captured the GOP, causing it to oppose every sensible measure to extract America from its economic malaise.

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    9/11, Ryans’ tragedies help us keep perspective

    Columnist Jim Davis: Perspective.The word has been on my mind a lot this week as I’ve been a part of our coverage of the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and other poignant stories that might provide some real perspective on life’s challenges.

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