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Daily Archive : Saturday August 20, 2011

News

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    Historic vacant home burns to ground in Mundelein

    A historic century-old house in Mundelein burned to the ground early Saturday. The two-story wood frame home at 20951 Rt. 83 had been vacant for several years and was slated to be torn down, said Mundelein Fire Department Lt. Mark Gaunky.

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    Man hospitalized after found running naked around W. Chicago High School football field

    A man was reportedly running around naked on the West Chicago High School football field.

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    Barrington Hills man charged with escape from hospital

    A Barrington Hills man arrested on a traffic violation and taken to a hospital for treatment of some existing wounds on his arms faces felony charges after police say he concocted an elaborate ruse and fled the hospital.

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    Wine was poured throughout the day Saturday at the Naperville Wine Festival at CityGate Centre.

    Tasters walk a wine line at Naperville fest

    More than 300 wines from around the world merged Saturday in Naperville, giving suburban winos the chance to taste to their heart’s desire. “It’s such a relaxing setting that people come and they stay,” said Matt Minella, director of sales for inPLAY Events of Barrington, which organized the festival. “It’s like having a big backyard barbecue and access to 300 wines.”

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    Paul Ruby, center, talks to guests at last year’s Concert for a Cure benefit for Parkinson’s disease. This year’s fundraiser for the Paul Ruby Foundation starts at 3 p.m. Aug. 27 at Tanna Farms, 39W808 Hughes Road, Geneva.

    5th annual Concert for a Cure coming up

    The Paul Ruby Foundation's fifth annual Concert for a Cure is Saturday, Aug. 27, at Tanna Farms in Geneva. Proceeds benefit Parkinson's disease research.

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    Contractor electrocuted at Naperville’s Monarch Landing

    A man working on a power line was electrocuted and send to the hospital with significant injuries Saturday evening in Naperville, fire officials said.

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    Vincent Gatto of Batavia, left, along with Stephanie Knappe, middle, and her husband, Ed Knappe, right, fill their glasses at the refreshment fountain, during the Batavia Fine Arts Centre’s Red Carpet Gala opening on Saturday. The arts center is the school’s first real auditorium, and will also serve as a community center for the city of Batavia.

    Batavia Fine Arts Centre kicks off in style

    Hundreds of people attended the Red Carpet Gala opening of the Batavia Fine Arts Centre on Saturday evening in Batavia. The event featured hors d’oeuvres and refreshments, tours of the visual and performing arts center, and dance, theater, music and improv performances well into the night.

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    Though an ambulance was present, police said no one was injured in the incident. The unnamed man was transported to a hospital.

    Palatine standoff ends without injuries

    Palatine police barricaded a residential street for two hours Saturday morning when a man renting a townhome threatened to kill himself.

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    Kane County Sheriff Pat Perez throws his arms up in victory during the Fox Valley United Way’s ninth annual What Floats Your Cardboard Boat Race Saturday on Mastodon Lake in Aurora’s Phillips Park.

    Rain doesn’t dampen charity cardboard boat race in Aurora

    Participants in the Fox Valley United Way’s What Floats Your Cardboard Boat Race knew they’d get wet Saturday when their handmade crafts began to sink. So the day’s rainy weather didn’t cancel the event, which kicks off the yearly fundraising campaign for the United Way.

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    Fire forces family from Palatine home

    Having just returned from the airport after a vacation in China, a Palatine family was home for less than half-an-hour Saturday morning when a fire erupted in their townhouse, said Palatine Fire Department Battalion Chief William Gabrenya.

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    Heavy rain fell in Mount Prospect as Walmart shoppers rushed to their cars on Saturday.

    A soggy start to a busy suburban weekend

    Fun in the sun had to wait a bit Saturday morning as a band of thunderstorms moved through the suburbs, dumping heavy rain and hail and temporarily halting several local events.

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    iPad purchase in Schaumburg leads to felony charge

    Bond was set at $80,000 Saturday for a man charged in Schaumburg with the unlawful use of a credit card to buy an iPad.

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    Schaumburg Township Assessor John Lawson announces that he will run as a Republican for the 56th District House seat.

    Schaumburg Township assessor to run for state rep

    Schaumburg Township Assessor John Lawson announced his candidacy for state representative in the 56th District to a crowd of GOP supporters Saturday.

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    Rosemont police help, then arrest, stranded motorist

    A man whose car ran out of gas faces felony drug charges after police stopped to help him.

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    Amusement park ride breaks; 5 hurt

    Authorities say five people were injured when a ride partially collapsed at a New Jersey amusement park where a girl fell to her death from a Ferris wheel in June.

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    Hikers Shane Bauer, left, and Josh Fattal, attend their trial last February at the Tehran Revolutionary Court, Iran.

    Iran sentences U.S. hikers to 8 years in jail

    Two American men arrested more than two years ago while hiking along the Iraq-Iran border have been sentenced to eight years in prison on charges that include espionage, state TV reported Saturday.

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    Women take part in Friday prayers in the rebel-held town of Benghazi, Libya, Aug. 19.

    Libya rebels capture coastal city of Zawiya

    Libyan rebels expelled government forces from the strategic western city of Zawiya on Saturday, a major victory for the opposition in their march on Moammar Gadhafi's stronghold of Tripoli.

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    Official: 1 dead in storm in northeast Wis.

    Officials say one man has been killed after severe weather moved through northeastern Wisconsin.

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    No injuries in explosion at Hormel plant in Beloit

    Beloit fire officials say an air compressor exploded at a Hormel Foods production facility, leading to a fire that caused an estimated $50,000 in damage. No injuries were reported.

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    Search on for man in alleged gang shooting

    Authorities are searching for a 31-year-old who is wanted in a shooting of two small girls in Chicago earlier this year.

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    Millions expected for Chicago Air & Water Show

    An estimated 2.2 million people are expected on the shores of Lake Michigan for this year's Chicago Air and Water Show.

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    Crackdown on drunken driving now through Labor Day

    Law enforcement authorities have kicked off a two-week crackdown on drunken driving called "Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over."

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    President Barack Obama, left, waves as he departs a book store with his daughters Malia Obama, right, and Sasha Obama, partially obscured behind center, in Vineyard Haven, Mass., on the island of Martha's Vineyard Aug. 19. Obama is vacationing on the island with his family during the last half of August 2011.

    Obama to Congress: Work together to aid jobless

    President Barack Obama says members of Congress should put country before politics, set aside their differences and find ways to get people back to work. The president is vacationing on Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts, but he recorded his weekly Saturday radio and Internet address earlier in the week while in Alpha, Ill., during an economy-focused Midwestern bus tour.

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    A law enforcement officers arresting suspect Fatina Hicks at her home in Fallbrook, Calif. State, federal and county officers served warrants in San Diego county on people suspected of smuggling drugs illegally into Mexico from the U.S. Authorities speculate that it was easier for smugglers to unload large batches of pills at those loosely regulated pharmacies than to distribute them in small amounts through American street dealers.

    15 arrested in prescription drug case

    U.S. border inspectors are not only seizing drugs coming into the country from Mexico — they're making arrests for drug smuggling that's going the other way.

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    U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords is seen at TIRR Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston. The Arizona Republic reports that C.J. Karamargin confirmed Aug. 19 that the Democratic politician was told in late July the names of the dead, including aide Gabe Zimmerman, U.S. District Judge John Roll, and 9-year-old Christina-Taylor Green.

    Aide: Giffords now knows who died in shooting

    Rep. Gabrielle Giffords is now aware of who was killed during the January shooting rampage in Tucson that left her seriously wounded, her spokesman said.

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    Pittsburgh emergency responders throw a life vest to Robert Bailey, 80, who climbed onto the roof of his car after being caught in a flash flood Aug. 19, in Pittsburgh. Three people died in a flash flood on Friday after heavy rains submerged cars in the area around Washington Boulevard, which runs parallel to the Allegheny River in the city's Highland Park neighborhood, after thunderstorms dropped up to 3 inches of rain in an hour.

    3 dead, 1 missing in Pittsburgh flash flooding

    Flash floods submerged more than a dozen vehicles in Pittsburgh, killing three people, leaving another missing and presumed dead, and forcing others to swim to safety or scramble onto the roofs of their cars.

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    Atia Lutarewych, 3, meets King Kandy as she arrives at her Celebration of Life event held recently at Chateau Ritz in Niles. The event raised $8,500 for Atia’s Project Ladybug Fund, a nonprofit organization that helps children with cancer and their families.

    Villa Park Recreation makes sweet donation

    Villa Park Recreation Department staff and volunteers helped make its award-winning Life Size Candy Land game part of a recent fundraiser for Atia’s Project Ladybug Fund, a nonprofit organization that helps children with cancer.

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    Ed Frederick of Elgin has several large beds where he grows his gladioluses, in addition to some vegetables and herbs.

    Gladiolus grower raises champion flowers

    The world around him is changing but Ed Frederick has maintained his love for the tall spiked flower called Gladiolus. And even at 78 - with two new knees, a new shoulder and a new back - he has maintained his success in growing it. Frederick finished as the grand champion in two different Gladiolus categories at the Illinois State Fair and he also received the governor’s trophy – a...

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    Resident Paula Steffan accepts a Des Plaines flag from Mayor Martin J. Moylan in the mayor’s office. Steffan will be sending the flag to her son, Jacob, serving in the Army in Afghanistan. Jacob joined the Army in 2010.

    Soldier’s mother receives Des Plaines flag

    Mayor Martin J. Moylan presented a city of Des Plaines flag to resident Paula Steffan for her son, Jacob, who is serving in Afghanistan. Pvt. 1st Class Jacob Steffan currently serves with the 10th Mountain Division, 3 Brigade Combat Team in Operation Enduring Freedom.

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    David Pivorunas from Washington, D.C., left, John Vytautas Prunskis and Owen Vytautas Prunskis plant the new oak tree in the Prunskis’ back yard in Barrington. Their fallen tree is in the background. Pivorunas brought them the acorn of the famous Tvereciaus Oak Tree in Lithuania, from which the new tree was grown.

    Family replaces fallen tree with one of Lithuanian stock
    A Barrington family has gone to great lengths to replace a beautiful old tree killed in the recent storms -- all the way to Lithuania.

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    Condell offers series on women’s health

    Advocate Condell Medical Centerbegins a series of free education programs in August designed to make sure women are informed about a variety of leading health issues.

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    Vicki Ann Brodeur, coordinator of Naperville Public Library’s special services, shows the digital talking books device that allows the visually impaired and physically disabled to download books and magazines

    Naperville Public Library now has digital talking books available

    Naperville Public Library now has talking books and magazines for the visually impaired available in digital form. Library staff will help patrons download the materials.

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    Bruce Dir checks a fermentation tank at Tighthead Brewing Co. As a production brewery, only beer made on premises can be sold there.

    Downsized Mundelein man brews a new career

    After being downsized twice, Mundelein resident Bruce Dir is pursuing his passion and opening the Tighthead Brewing Company in an industrial area near the Metra commuter station in Mundelein. “It’s a dream. Every home brewer out there wants to own their own brewery,” said Dir.

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    Anders Johnson, a U.S. ski jumper, flies over the hill at Norge Ski Club in 2006.

    Norge to host national ski jumping, Nordic combined championships

    Norge Ski Club in Fox River Grove will host the U.S. Ski Jumping and Nordic Combined Championships Oct. 1. Olympic medalists Billy Demong and Johnny Spillane are expected to compete. “This is the biggest national event we’ve had for more than 40 years," said Norge Ski Club board member Gene Brown.

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    Kane County officials said Friday their juvenile justice center can easily add DuPage County’s juvenile offenders, but Kane County Board members said they want all their questions answered before agreeing to any deal.

    Kane officials have questions about taking DuPage’s juveniles

    Kane County Board members asked Friday about when they'll be allowed to start posing questions and getting information about the possible deal to take DuPage County's juvenile inmates. Board members expressed some concerns but received several reassurances from county staff.

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    Carol Glemza, 87, will retire Sept. 1 after working for the St. Charles Park District for 69 years. Glemza was honored Friday with a retirement party at the Baker Community Center. Here she is overwhelmed by a standing ovation at the end of her retirement lunch.

    St. Charles parks stalwart Carol Glemza to retire after 69 years

    After 69 years at the St. Charles Park District, Carol Glemza is retiring. Friday, co-workers and friends held a party to thank her for her years of service. “When I think of Carol, I think of her commitment and loyalty to the park district and board, and it is unparalleled,” park board member Jim Cook said.

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    What life in WWI era McHenry County looked like

    Step back in time to the 1850s and World War I at McHenry County Conservation District’s Living History Open House from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 21 at Glacial Park’s Powers-Walker House, 6201 Harts Road, Ringwood.

Sports

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    Brent Lillibridge, right, scores on a hit by Alex Rios as Texas Rangers catcher Taylor Teagarden waits for the ball during the eighth inning Saturday.

    Rios hits go-ahead double for White Sox

    Alex Rios entered the game when Carlos Quentin was injured in the first inning then hit a go-ahead double in the eighth, giving the Chicago White Sox a 3-2 victory over the Texas Rangers on Saturday night to snap a three-game skid.

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    Kinney thrilled to be back in the bigs

    Josh Kinney finally made it back to the major leagues after having two surgeries on his elbow. The veteran right-hander was sharp in his White Sox debut Friday, pitching 3 scoreless innings while striking out six.

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    The last time the Bears played the Giants, the the Giants' ferocious pass rush sacked quarterback Jay Cutler 9 times.

    Bears O-line has lots to prove against Giants

    The Bears' young offensive tackles have a tough assignment in Monday night's second preseason game keeping the Giants' ferocious pass rush off Jay Cutler.

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    Starter Matt Garza scattered five hits, struck out 8 and won at Wrigley Field for the first time since June 27 as the Cubs topped the Cards 3-0.

    Garza repays Cubs run support

    Matt Garza pitched seven sharp innings, Aramis Ramirez homered and the Cubs beat the St. Louis Cardinals 3-0 Saturday.

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    Cubs owner Tom Ricketts is attempting to steer the Cubs in the right direction by hiring a new general manager and improving Wrigley Field by using public funds. It will be interesting to see how he fares on both fronts.

    Cubs owner may be in over his head

    Tom Ricketts has no more time to learn how to be a major-league owner. The Cubs' chairman finds himself competing in two of the most cutthroat games -- basball and politics -- as he tries to simultaneously hire a general manager and wrangle public funds to renovate Wrigley Field.

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    Bears wide receiver Roy Williams, left, talks to wide receiver Jimmy Young during NFL football training camp Monday, Aug. 1, 2011, at Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais, Ill.

    Bears need Williams, Cutler to sizzle

    New WR Roy Williams is ready to begin playing a major role in the Bears' offense, starting with Monday night's preseason game against the Giants.

Business

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    Security consultants Don Bailey, left, and Mathew Solnik, right, with iSEC Partners, demonstrate with a computer how they force cars with certain alarm systems to unlock their doors and start their engines by sending them text messages in San Francisco.

    Thieves use hacking into auto anti-theft systems

    Computer hackers can force some cars to unlock their doors and start their engines without a key by sending specially crafted messages to a car’s anti-theft system. They can also snoop at where you’ve been by tapping the car’s GPS system. That is possible because car alarms, GPS systems and other devices are increasingly connected to cellular telephone networks.

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    A new web-based game, “Rift,” is drawing gamers online and could possibly cut in to sales of PlayStation and Xbox.

    ‘Rift’ pulls 1 million gamers online

    A million Internet users have flocked to the fantasy world of “Rift” since its March release, in a trend that threatens games consoles such as Sony Corp.’s PlayStation and Microsoft Corp.’s Xbox. By 2013, revenue from games that can be played online or on a mobile device will jump 50 percent to $32.6 billion.

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    In response, Research In Motion Ltd. is trying to spice up its product line by releasing several BlackBerrys with touch screens and new software for better performance.

    New BlackBerrys improved, but lackluster

    Well before the iPhone, BlackBerry gained its “CrackBerry” nickname for its seemingly vital place in users’ lives. Lately, however, the surging popularity of Apple’s gadget and smartphones running Google’s Android software has made the BlackBerry seem less habit-forming. In response, Research In Motion Ltd. is trying to spice up its product line by releasing several BlackBerrys with touch screens and new software for better performance.

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    The four titans of tech are Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon. And they are impossible to escape, tapping nearly every consumer’s wallet and holding vast power over huge swathes of the economy.

    Four titans in race to dominate tech industry

    Eric Schmidt, the executive chairman of Google, has called them the “gang of four.” They are the four titans of tech: Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon. And they are impossible to escape, tapping nearly every consumer’s wallet and holding vast power over huge swathes of the economy.

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    Google’s purchase of Motorola Mobility for $12.5 billion will net it mobile patents and expand its hardware business.

    Google’s Motorola move undermines Samsung-led handset makers

    When Google purchases Motorola Mobility, it also will buy more than 17,000 patents it can use to defend against allegations of infringement as competition accelerates in the $206.6 billion mobile-phone market.

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    Most Americans, 83 percent, own some type of mobile device. And 13 percent of us have used it to dodge human interaction.

    Survey: Cellphones a lifeline, boredom staller

    If you’ve ever used a fake cellphone conversation to avoid real-life interactions, you’re not alone. The Pew Internet & American Life Project says that 13 percent of adult mobile phone owners in the U.S. have used the old “I’m on the phone” tactic. Thirty percent among those aged 18 to 29 did that at least once in the previous 30 days.

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    “Wizard 101” is a multiplayer online game that immerses players in a world of magic and student wizards.

    `Wizard 101’ heads to China

    Online game company KingsIsle Entertainment is bringing its popular “Wizard 101” game to China in a deal with Taomee Holdings Ltd. KingsIsle says the game has 20 million registered players.

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    A Texas gaming startup claims Zynga Inc., the maker of popular online games such as “FarmVille,” violated patents related to redeeming prizes in games.

    Zynga accused of patent infringement

    Agincourt claims Zynga is violating two of its patents related to systems for redeeming prizes in games. The patents were awarded in 2001 and 2004.

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    HTC Corp., led by CEO Peter Chou, has accused Apple Inc. of violating three patents covering smartphones and other technologies.

    HTC sues Apple in latest round of patent dispute

    In the latest case, HTC sought unspecified damages and a ban that would prevent Apple from using the three technologies in question.

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    The Samsung Galaxy Tab has a higher-resolution display than the iPad 2 and better a camera, according to reviewer Rich Jaroslovsky.

    Review: Galaxy Tab in same class as iPad 2

    Samsung's latest weapon is the newly upgraded Galaxy Tab 10.1, which lays legitimate claim to the title of Best Tablet That Isn’t an iPad.

Life & Entertainment

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    Desmond Butler fishes the upper Madison River in Yellowstone National Park, Mont.

    Montana a fly fishing paradise

    For some of us, fly fishing is an obsessive sport that drives the afflicted to bouts of monomania. I was lucky enough to be going fishing during the warmest month of the year in a place so full of beautiful water and big trout that I daydreamed about it for weeks.

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    The U.S. Army parachute team Golden Knights brave the heights in order to amaze viewers at the Chicago Air and Water Show this weekend.

    Weekend picks: Chicago Air & Water Show takes off

    Be amazed by the aerial acrobatics of the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds and the U.S. Army Parachute Team Golden Knights as they take to the skies at the annual Chicago Air & Water Show along the lakefront this weekend.

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    Kim Kardashian, right, and her fiance, NBA basketball player Kris Humphries, arrive at the Kardashian Kollection launch party in Los Angeles, Aug. 17. The Kardashian Kollection designed by the Kardashian sisters is available at Sears.

    Kardashian, Humphries to wed in evening ceremony

    Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries are ready to walk down the aisle. The 30-year-old reality TV star and 26-year-old professional basketball player will be married Saturday evening near Santa Barbara, California, in a ceremony that will be televised as a two-part special on the E! cable television channel in October.

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    Sweeney Todd (Gregg Edelman) and his partner-in-crime Mrs. Lovett (Liz McCartney) dance (almost literally) on the graves of their victims in Drury Lane Theatre's stellar production of Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler's masterwork, "Sweeney Todd."

    Drury Lane delivers a stunning ‘Sweeney'

    Drury Lane Theatre delivers a grand, glorious revival of Stephen Sondheim's masterful musical "Sweeney Todd," about a unjustly imprisoned London barber, who with help from an avaricious neighbor, returns to exact a horrible revenge on those who wronged him.

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    When she visited England, Pinky Edens fell in love with stone. She used the material to build a chapel in a former bedroom of her home.

    Seeking peace in home decor? Give stone a chance

    It was in the ancient city of Bath, England, and particularly while relaxing in a stone-walled soaking pool in 2006, that Elizabeth Pinky Edens became enchanted with the strength and serenity that can be drawn from stone.

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    Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, during a welcome ceremony in Yellowknife, Canada as the Royal couple continue their Royal Tour of Canada. Since the heyday of the 1980s, there’s been a casual revolution, a revolt against covered-but-sheer legs. Now hosiery is making its comeback.

    Return of hosiery: Sheer torture or pure polish?

    So you thought they were gone — gone forever — until Kate Middleton hit the scene. Then Marc Jacobs put them on the runway, Banana Republic partnered with “Mad Men” and, suddenly, everywhere you look, sheer hosiery seems to be in fashion again.

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    Rachel Zoe attends the grand re-opening of the Chanel SOHO boutique on in New York. Rachel Zoe is a fixture at Fashion Week shows. It’s where she does a lot of “shopping” for her celebrity clients — not to mention her own wardrobe. But this September, she’ll be on the other side, hosting a preview of her own collection for retailers, editors and other stylists.

    Rachel Zoe’s life as a celeb stylist helps shape her line

    Rachel Zoe is going center stage in September as part of the official Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week lineup at Lincoln Center to show off her spring looks.

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    Designers Mark Badgley, left, and James Mischka hold their dogs Rommel and Whiskey during a doggie fashion show at Bergdorf Goodman during Fashion’s Night Out during Fashion Week in New York. the shopping initiative driven by Vogue Editor-In-Chief Anna Wintour, returns as a bigger event next month, extending to 250 U.S. cities, but there seems to be a sharper focus on industry stars — including designers, red carpet experts and makeup artists — instead of the Hollywood celebrities who grabbed headlines the past two years.

    Fashion’s Night Out zeroes in on style celebrities

    Fashion’s Night Out, the shopping initiative driven by Vogue Editor-In-Chief Anna Wintour, returns as a bigger event next month, extending to 250 U.S. cities. But there seems to be a sharper focus on industry stars — including designers, red carpet experts, and makeup artists — instead of the Hollywood celebrities who grabbed headlines the past two years.

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    Plans for a proposed religious theme park called Ark Encounter, at the Ark Encounter headquarters in Hebron, Ky. Noah’s ark will be the centerpiece of a proposed $170 million religious theme park that has been approved for $40 million in taxpayer-funded incentives, upsetting activists who think public tax dollars should not be used to fund a religious theme park.

    New Noah’s Ark in Kentucky aims to prove truth of Bible

    Tucked away in a nondescript office park in northern Kentucky, Noah’s followers are rebuilding his ark. The biblical wooden ship built to weather a worldwide flood was 500 feet long and about 80 feet high, according to Answers in Genesis, a Christian ministry devoted to a literal telling of the Old Testament.

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    Religion in the news: Indiana vouchers cleared

    A judge declined to halt Indiana’s broad new school voucher program, allowing the law to remain in effect while a group of teachers and religious leaders challenge it.

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    An Indian model displays a creation by designer Sidharta Aryan during Lakme Fashion Week in Mumbai, India.

    Images: New fashions in India
    Models were strutting up and down the catwalks in Mumbai during the Lakme Fashion Week Winter 2011 in India. The event, held at the Grand Hyatt this week, is the biggest fashion event of the year in India.

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    Artwork is shown from the Barneys New York and Lady Gaga Holiday Campaign. The singer and her team are going to reinterpret Santa’s workshop and put it on display at Barneys. She’ll get an entire floor and take over the coveted windows starting in mid-November at the retailer’s flagship Madison Avenue store.

    Lady Gaga to design Christmas at Barneys

    Christmas is getting a makeover — Lady Gaga style: The singer and her team are going to reinterpret Santa’s workshop and put it on display at Barneys.

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    A new book alleges that iconic French fashion designer Coco Chanel was an anti-Semite and a Nazi spy.

    Book alleges Coco Chanel was Nazi spy

    PARIS — A new book alleges that iconic French fashion designer Coco Chanel was an anti-Semite and a Nazi spy.“Sleeping with the Enemy: Coco Chanel’s Secret Wars,” by American historian Hal Vaughan, contends Chanel was an agent of Germany’s Abwehr military intelligence organization that undertook wartime missions to Berlin and Madrid.The book is based in part on documents from archives in Germany, France, Britain and Switzerland.The House of Chanel said the book’s claims about Chanel’s alleged anti-Semitism “cannot go unchallenged.” It said: “More than 57 books have been written about Gabrielle Chanel. ... We would encourage you to consult some of the more serious ones.”The book was released Tuesday.

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    Fashion gets mobile with new Snapette app

    Co-founders and Harvard alumni, Jinhee Kim and Sarah Paiji, announced the beta launch of Snapette, an application that enables fashion-savvy women to discover and share photos of in-store products by location and social recommendations.Snapette is the first mobile fashion application that lets users browse products near their current location, allowing them to easily see what shoes and bags are in nearby stores. Women can also see what’s trending globally by viewing what users around the world are sharing from their favorite stores in real time.Users launch Snapette from their mobile device, and the app connects them with products through social features and crowd-sourced photos and descriptions that other “Snapettes” have shared. Users can search by brand, store or description, or by what’s rated “New”, “Near” and “Hot”, and share photos and comments with other users.“While you’re out shopping, you can snap and share photos of your great shoe and bag finds, check Snapette to discover what styles are in stores near you, and also see what’s trending right now in New York, Paris, Tokyo or anywhere around the world - it’s like window shopping right from your phone,” says co-founder Kim. “Plus, if you find another Snapette with great style you can ‘follow’ her and get updated on all her latest fashion finds.”Each user has a “virtual closet” profile page that collects and showcases photos of items they’ve Snapped, Like and Want, and integration with Facebook and Tumblr allows for easy sharing on these social platforms as well.

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    Romanian Tourism Minister Elena Udrea has sparked outrage with her star-printed Dolce & Gabbana number, a frock she admits cost as much as many Romanians make in more than a month. Journalists accused Udrea — known for her love of expensive purses and shoes — of being insensitive during the economic downturn in Romania, where the average national monthly salary is 320 ($455) after tax.

    Romanian tourism minister defends pricey dress

    Controversial Tourism Minister Elena Udrea has sparked outrage with her star-printed Dolce & Gabbana number, a frock she admits cost as much as many Romanians make in more than a month. She defended the dress this week, insisting it cost less than the thousands of euros that media has reported.

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    Now is a good time to look over your perennial bed to decide what you’d like to add.

    Art in the garden: Late summer is a good time to plant perennials

    Plants planted at the end of summer enter a hospitable environment due to more reliable rainfalls and lower, less hostile temperatures.

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    On homes and real estate: What to do if a house won’t sell

    Q. My husband and I are trying to sell so we can move and I can start college. Our home was built in 2006, and we have set a very reasonable price. After paying off the mortgage and the commission, it will only leave us with maybe $3,000. I am okay with that, but it has been on the market for three months already, and we must move now. I am getting desperate and don’t know what to do.

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    Mortgage Professor: Independent contractors denied mortgages

    Q. I started a business last year, and while a number of people are helping me in various capacities, I have no employees. The two people who work closely with me on a continuing basis are partners, and all the others are independent contractors retained to do specific tasks for a specific amount of money.

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    Groth’s paintings are done in a way that stands up to sun and rain.

    ‘Fence painter’ hangs cheerful paintings on gardens

    Carolyn Groth found her niche as a "fence painter," but don't expect her to haul out the whitewash.

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    The neutral-toned carpets of recent years are giving way to ones that are boldly colored or textured.

    Carpet, the bolder the better, makes a comeback

    After years of being ripped out and kicked to the curb, carpet is making a comeback. And not just the neutral-toned carpets of recent years, but ones that are boldly colored or patterned.

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    Green cleaners tackle dirt but vary in strength

    Most of the environmentally friendly cleaners on the market today do a really good job cleaning up most messes. But not all are up to the biggest challenges - bathroom and kitchen surfaces.

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    A winding staircase is the centerpiece of this five-bedroom home in Arlington Heights.

    On the Market: Five-bedroom Arlington Heights home

    Like a treasure box, this very attractive home in Arlington Heights reveals most of its highlights within.

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    Scott Sanders/ssanders@dailyherald.com Realtor Ed Prodehl of Coldwell Banker is shown outside a listing in Plainfield.

    Industry Insider: Ed Prodehl, owner, Coldwell Banker Honig-Bell

    There has never been a better time for people with good credit ratings to buy a home, Ed Prodehl believes. “Prices are at historic lows. They really can’t fall much more and you can get a 4 percent interest rate on a 30-year mortgage. When those rates start to go up and they will you will have missed an amazing opportunity,” said Prodehl, president and owner of Coldwell Banker Honig-Bell.

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    Home repair: Water-based sealants will protect garage floors

    Q. I recently purchased a condo with a one-car garage. The floor is cracked in three places coming from the drain in the lower center of the floor. I want to put some type of coating over the entire garage floor after the cracks are fixed. I live in western Pennsylvania and need something that would hold up to the salt that is used in the winter months. What would you recommend?

Discuss

  •  

    The Soapbox

    The Daily Herald editorial board offers a range of thoughts on ethics rules at the DuPage Housing Authority, the high cost of highways, governments cooperating to save and much more.

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    Why don’t police tranquilize dogs?
    Letter to the Editor: I was sad that the Elgin police could not find other ways than shooting and killing dogs for what they call aggressive behavior. Why can’t they tranquilize the dogs and find out why they act the way they do? Be advised that not all pit bulls or other breeds are bad. Please give them a break.

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    Why remind us about Facio’s attack?
    Letter to the Editor: I found the Aug. 15 article regarding Angel Facio to be quite distressing and distasteful. School starts for Elgin’s teachers, including Mrs. Gilbert, next week and this kind of reminder of such a horrific event does little to boost morale or encourage teachers, students, or parents to feel good about our schools.

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    Ellen’s sale indeed was excellent
    Letter to the Editor: Although the opportunity to be involved with Ellen's Excellent Sale may be over, why not get involved at Lazarus House? The St. Charles shelter is open 24/7. You could help your neighbors in need by volunteering your time and/or resources. So reach out and get involved. It could change your life — I know it changed mine.

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    (No heading)
    Regarding the Aug. 9 Fence Post letter, “The tragic death of Uncle Sam,” as a political satirist, Walt Zlotow should keep his day job.

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    Tea party didn’t prompt downgrade
    The stock market crash is the inevitable consequence of government’s irresponsible fiscal policies. The tea party stepped in to finally hold government accountable for its actions and to a better extent than both Republicans and Democrats alone could have accomplished, they succeeded.

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    How many more Afghanistan deaths?
    The Russians constructed a long tunnel in Afghanistan before leaving. They also left more than 20,000 men dead in there before leaving. We have just recently lost 30 of our men there from rocket fire.

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    Clueless, and in over his head
    Our great nation is in the midst of an unprecedented fiscal crisis, and we are burdened with a president who doesn’t recognize it or doesn’t care. The debt crises was recognized by the American public at the polls last November

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    Why worry about S&P, Dow Jones?
    Far too much emphasis is being placed on two numbers that are not reliable sources of information regarding the current economic condition. Why should anyone, anywhere, place any credence in the judgment of Standard & Poor’s regarding the credit rating of the U.S. government?

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    Walsh aside, Obama owes explaination
    President Obama has reportedly spent $2 million hiding his past from the American public, sealing records of his birth, adoption, passport and travel, education, student loans, his university thesis on the Soviet Union, Selective Service and more. As you say, as a keeper of the public trust, Mr. Obama “owes an explanation, and citizens are reasonable to expect one.”

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    The ‘fair share’ tax lie
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: The big lie from Democrats is that wealthy Americans “don’t pay their fair share of taxes.” Let’s review the facts.

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    Panel needs to start work on spending goals
    A Lake County letter to the editor: I am calling on Gov. Quinn to immediately convene this necessary panel to begin its duty to help restore fiscal responsibility to Illinois.

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    Thanks for making health fair a success
    A Waukegan letter to the editor: The 19th Annual Kids 1st Health Fair, sponsored by the Lake County Health Department, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science and United Way of Lake County was a huge success.

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    Time is now to demand peace
    Faith, hope and love. The least of these, it may seem to many, is hope. But hope is the beautiful night bridge of light between the dark shores of faith and love. Cross it, and while crossing it, demand peace.

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    Join in solidarity as Muslims reach out
    While misconceptions about Islam and its true followers continue to grow with extremists spreading such debris, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community USA is making progress in uniting mankind.

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    Politicians’ greed grows more evident
    We (the taxpayers) are providing security to the family and home of the vice president in Maryland at no cost to the vice president. Then the vice president turns around and charges me and you (the taxpayers) for a “cottage” on his property to provide him and his with “free” security.

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    Musings on peace, problem solving
    What are all those in Washington, D.C., who are there supposedly serving the people doing? It seems to me they are interested only in being self-serving, just worried about keeping their cushy jobs at our expense. Do any of them really care about what’s best for this country and its people, or is it all just about politics?

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    Simple rules of budgeting ignored
    Any business or individual creates a budget by first estimating income and then budgeting expenses to be equal to or less than anticipated revenues. Our politicians spend first, then try to figure out how to pay for it later.

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    As the Dow dropped, the party went on
    While the president was in Chicago raising funds for his 2012 re-election and celebrating his birthday, the Dow lost 512 points. Sure glad our country is in good hands.

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