SCGT

Daily Archive : Saturday August 13, 2011

News

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    Julie Fitzpatrick and Aimee Higgs are opening a fitness studio this fall in the old St. Charles National Bank (and Fifth Third Bank) building on West Main Street. They will be teaching The Dailey Method of fitness, shown here, which is a combination of yoga, Pilates, ballet and other core-strength and balance practices.

    Fitness studio coming to W. Main St.

    The Dailey Method, a new fitness studio, is coming to West Main Street in St. Charles. Columnist Dave Heun says it was a vibe that led the owners to conclude there was no other place but St. Charles for their fall opening.

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    Bikes and barbecues highlight Winfield Criterium

    Bicyclists dressed in a colorful array of spandex and helmets went head-to-head Saturday during the first race of this weekend's Winfield Criterium. “It’s turning out to be a nice day,” said Brian Arfmann, 19, of Arlington Heights, while waiting for his race to begin. “I’m not too worried about crashes."

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    Fans waiting to see Sugarland attempt to hold up the stage after high winds blew the stage over at the Indiana State Fair Grandstands, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011, in Indianapolis.

    5 killed, more than 40 injured in Indiana stage collapse

    The wind gust that toppled a stage at the Indiana State Fair Saturday night, killing five and injuring dozens, was a "fluke" that no one could have anticipated, the governor and others said Sunday.

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    Giovanny Rodriguez of Waukegan grilled chicken Saturday at the Pincho's Racing booth during BoriquaFest, which celebrates Puerto Rican heritage in Elgin.

    Elgin celebrates its Puerto Rican spirit

    People were dancing in the rain at the annual BoriquaFest on Saturday in Elgin, which celebrated Puerto Rican culture. Nelson Velazquez, of Carpentersville espeically enjoyed it. “It's a small island, but it's a great heritage," he said.

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    Even in the rain, Veggie Fest strives to focus on the diet and lifestyle choice that is vegetarianism. The annual celebration in Naperville continues from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. today near Warrenville and Naperville roads.

    ‘Veg-curious' crowd checks out Naperville's Veggie Fest

    Naperville's Veggie Fest appeals not just to the curious, but the health-concious as well. 100 vendors offer everything from organic food delivery to raw food ideas.

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    Congresswoman Michele Bachmann of Minnesota

    Bachmann wins GOP 2012 test vote

    The 2012 Republican presidential race lurched into a new phase Saturday as Iowans weighed in for the first time on their expanding field of presidential hopefuls and Michelle Bachmann came out ahead.

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    State Sen. Chris Lauzen greets supporters Renee Mollenhauer, from left, her daughter Mallory Mollenhauer, and her daughter’s friend Cathryn Augustine, all of St. Charles, at his annual picnic on Saturday in Aurora. Lauzen announced his bid to become the chairman of the Kane County Board.

    Lauzen aims to helm Kane board

    Pledging to push for a property tax levy freeze in Kane County, state Sen. Chris Lauzen announced his candidacy on Saturday to become Kane County Board chairman.The Aurora Republican, who has held the 25th District State Senate seat since 1992, told about 600 supporters gathered at his annual picnic in Aurora that “this is no time to quit politics.”

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    Cara McKeighan of Naperville wore a bright red hat while watching the Arlington Million at Arlington Park on Saturday.

    Arlington Million festivities feature lots of hats

    A downpour that caused an early 20-minute racing delay, and a lighter rain during the big race, couldn’t dampen the excitement of Saturday’s Arlington Million, where fancy hats, a happy crowd and umbrellas marked the day.

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    Somalis camp in a deserted building Saturday in Mogadishu. The World Food Program says it is expanding food distribution efforts after the U.N. has estimated that only 20 percent of people needing aid are able to receive, mainly because an al-Qaida-linked group controls large portions of the country.

    U.N. expands famine relief work in Somalia

    The World Food Program said Saturday that it is expanding its food distribution efforts in famine-struck Somalia.

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    Sarah Palin visits Ronald Reagan’s boyhood home

    DIXON — Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin has greeted a small crowd at the boyhood home of President Ronald Reagan in northern Illinois.The 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee made a stop Saturday in Dixon as part of her “One Nation” bus tour. She signed autographs and posed for cellphone pictures.

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    Attorney tapped to replace southern Illinois state rep.

    AVISTON, Ill. — Southern Illinois Republican leaders have chosen an attorney from O’Fallon to replace a longtime state representative.Former state Rep. Ron Stephens served in the Illinois House for 27 years before resigning earlier this month, citing personal reasons.

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    Ex-Ill. firefighter gets 30 years for child porn

    A former central Illinois firefighter has been sentenced to 30 years in prison after pleading guilty to child pornography charges.Justin Weaver, a former firefighter in Rochester, admitted during his January plea hearing that he molested a 7-year-old relative and produced child pornography of the molestation.

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    Judge refuses to shorten sentence in choking death

    BLOOMINGTON — A central Illinois judge has refused to reconsider the 8 1/2-year prison sentence given to a man convicted of choking his roommate to death during a party.Xavier Cordova, 25, is originally from Chicago and was living in Champaign with Mitchell Robinson, 26, in September 2009 when the two went to a party in Normal.

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    Nick Sabatasso checks his cell phone Saturday while waiting for a BART train at San Francisco’s Civic Center station.

    Cell phone shutdown sparks outrage

    Details emerge of Bay Area Rapid Transit officials’ decision to cut off underground cellphone service for a few hours at several stations Thursday.

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    The Punjabi Cultural Society float in Chicago-based Federation of Indian Associations 65th India’s Independence Day parade Saturday in Schaumburg.

    First suburban celebration of India independence held in suburbs

    The first suburban celebration of India's independence was modest but provided a base to build on the future, organizers said. The locale in Schaumburg was chosen because of increasing numbers of south Asians in the area. “This is good. This is where we start our journey,” Federation of Indian Associations spokesman Neil Khot said.

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    Police: Rolling Meadows man hides in trash bin, attacks wrong guy

    A Rolling Meadows man was charged with assault after police say he hid in a large trash bin and stabbed another man he falsely believed attacked him earlier in a parking lot.

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    Men take part in Friday prayers behind a banner honoring U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice, British Prime Minister David Cameron, France’s President Nicolas Sarkozy and President Barack Obama, at the main square of the rebel-held town of Benghazi, Libya.

    Heavy clashes as Libyan rebels enter Zawiya

    Libyan rebels fought their way into the strategic city of Zawiya west of Tripoli on Saturday in their most significant advance in months.

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    Texas Gov. Rick Perry arrives to speak at the RedState Gathering, a meeting of conservative activists, where he announced his run for president Saturday in 2012 in Charleston, S.C.

    Texas Gov. Perry jumps into 2012 Republican race

    Texas Gov. Rick Perry joined the 2012 GOP race for president Saturday.

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    This large yellow diamond, known as the “Golden Eye,” was seized in a federal drug and money laundering investigation in northeast Ohio and is going on the auction block.

    Special yellow diamond going on auction block

    A large yellow diamond — known as the "Golden Eye" seized in a federal drug and money-laundering investigation in northeast Ohio is going on the auction block.

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    Bus crash injures 24

    A Greyhound bus bound for St. Louis from New York City flipped on its side on the Pennsylvania Turnpike early Saturday.

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    Police: American abducted in eastern Pakistan

    Gunmen abducted an American man from his home in the eastern Pakistani city of Lahore on Saturday.

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    District 50 families invited to Sneak Preview

    Woodland Elementary District 50 schools will host two Sneak Previews this month. Parents and their children are invited to visit the district, tour the schools and greet principals and other administrators before the start of the 2011-12 school year. Teachers will not be present.Elementary East and Elementary West will host a different Sneak Preview event this year.

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    Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty greets residents as he makes a campaign stop at Coffee Cup Cafe in Sully, Iowa, on Tuesday.

    As Iowa poll nears, doubts about Pawlenty grow

    As a critical week began in the Republican presidential contest, the broadening perception in Iowa was that enthusiasm for Tim Pawlenty has sagged recently, imperiling his candidacy, while Michele Bachmann has soared to front-runner status.

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    Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty

    Pawlenty says his goal in Iowa is to ‘do well’

    DES MOINES, Iowa -- Tim Pawlenty began the most important week of his presidential campaign with a cinnamon roll the size of a loaf of bread and a side order of expectations.

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    Don Lomax, 66, uses a fountain pen as he draws his comic “Vietnam Journal” at his home in Galesburg, Ill. Lomax bases the stories in his comics on his experience in the Vietnam War.

    Veteran’s comic book focuses on Vietnam

    Don Lomax was drafted in 1965 and spent 11 months in Vietnam with the 98th Light Equipment Company. The stories he heard, the notes he made and the sketches he drew resulted in the creation of “Vietnam Journal.”

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    Students and others as watch live television coverage of the flaming New York City skyline at Ackerman Student Union at UCLA in Los Angeles following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Most people got word of the attacks shortly after they occurred that morning, but in the era before smartphones and staying connected 24/7, there were some Americans who did not find out until some time later.

    Hiking, in mourning, at sea, many missed Sept. 11

    In a technology-saturated world, would it be possible today to remain oblivious to such a shattering event as the 9/11 attacks for hours, or even days? In 2001, mobile tech was just coming into its own. Facebook and Twitter weren’t even glimmers in the eyes of consumers, let alone iPhones, tablets or widely available Wi-Fi.

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    Michael Arad, an architect of the 9/11 memorial at ground zero, poses for a picture in front of the ongoing construction at ground zero in New York in April

    Architect’s memorial moment arrives

    Michael Arad’s Sept. 11 memorial design, “Reflecting Absence,” features waterfalls cascading into reflecting pools where the towers stood. The names of all those killed on Sept. 11, 2001 and in the earlier World Trade Center attack on Feb. 26, 1993, are inscribed on bronze parapets.

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    Firefighters walk through the rubble of the collapsed World Trade Center buildings on Sept. 11, 2001.

    From JFK to Sept. 11, conspiracy theories thrive

    Thousands of people don’t believe the official version of how the World Trade Center collapsed, who was responsible or what the government knew and when.

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    New York police officer Frank Gotay listens to a message on his radio as his partner Yolanda Cortes waits for a subway car’s doors to open while performing random checks along the platform at the 42nd Street station in New York.

    10 years after 9/11, N.Y. responders communicate better

    In the years since Sept. 11, 2001, New York City emergency agencies have upgraded equipment, built in redundancies and increased training. But first responders say it’s not good enough and hope legislation will be passed authorizing creation of a national network where police and fire departments around the country can talk to each other and share photos, video and other critical data.

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    Jose Graziano da Silva is one of the creators of Brazil’s “Zero Hunger” social programs, which include giving money directly to poor households. That idea may now get a global tryout as world food prices spike, economies everywhere sputter and a horrific famine desolates East Africa.

    Does global battle against hunger have a new hero?

    When Altaiza Silva lost her job two years ago, she thought she would have to pull her daughters out of school and put them to work, likely perpetuating her family's cycle of poverty. Instead, their fall has been halted by Brazil’s widely admired social safety net.

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    Wilma Ellis Kazemzadeh, left, and Adrienne Ellis Reeves accept a plaque in honor of their father, Charles Everett Ellis, on July 31 in Altamont, Ill. Behind the sisters, Michael Wunsch is shooting footage for an upcoming documentary centered around a diary that Charles Ellis kept for more than 40 years.

    Small-town barber recalled as pioneer

    Charles Everett Ellis started keeping a diary on Jan. 22, 1927, and kept writing for the last 44 years of his life. The entries are a fascinating look into the life of an black man in a predominately white community at the turn of the century.

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    Zach Lewis, 11, of Knoxville has three years’ experience as a drag racer.

    Young driver has impressive track record

    Most kids grow up playing sports their father taught them, but very few participate in the sport Knoxville’s Zach Lewis does, especially at his age. At just 11 years old, Lewis has three years’ experience as a drag racer.

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    On Sept. 11, 2001, photographer Marty Lederhandler knew the real story was downtown. But he also knew that the trains weren’t going that way, and his 84-year-old legs wouldn’t carry him that far. “If there’s obstacles in your path, you try some other way,” he had said in an interview. “You go behind. You go in back. You go up high.” Lederhandler took the elevator to the 65th floor and the famed Rainbow Room at 30 Rockefeller Plaza, which he knew would offer a stunning view of the Empire State Building and the Twin Towers beyond, and began shooting. “The only other story that compares to this is D-Day,” said Lederhandler, who died in March 2010 at the age of 92.

    Lenses shield 9/11 photographers as they capture history

    Five photographers whose images of Sept. 11 became iconic discuss how the photos came about, how endless hours of shooting sporting events, news conferences and everything in between helped prepare them for moments no one could ever have anticipated, and how their lenses helped shield them from the fears and tears that would come later.

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    President Barack Obama has said repeatedly that he is focused on putting Americans back to work. He will launch his own bus tour next week — a three-day haul through the Midwest that will focus on jobs.

    Poverty tour hits Obama’s policies

    A bus tour that is drawing large crowds and media attention ups the stakes on the continued criticism of White House policy toward blacks. A recent poll showed 86 percent of blacks expressed approval of the job Obama is doing, but the view is nuanced.

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    A large crowd watches as attendants adjust a black hood over Rainey Bethea’s head just before his public hanging in Owensboro, Ky. Bethea, a 22-year-old black man convicted of murdering and robbing a 70-year-old white woman, was the last person killed in a public execution in the United States.

    After 75 years, last public hanging haunts city

    Rainey Bethea's grave is anonymous and unmarked, like other places associated with his hanging on Aug. 14, 1936. As the 75th anniversary of the execution approaches, it is something some in Owensboro, Ky., would like history to remember differently.

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    Haley Ferguson, 7, of Mount Prospect goes round and round on a pony at the Mane Event on Friday in downtown Arlington Heights.

    Mane Event means Arlington Heights is in the party zone

    Once the white picket fences go up around intersections in downtown Arlington Heights, it’s time to party with the Mane Event -- the lead-up to today’s Arlington Million. “It’s one day a year, when you can drink in the streets,” quipped Rose Sherry of Arlington Heights. “It’s better than New Orleans, because you know everybody.”

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    Steve Lundy A foam pit makes great therapy for Colin Brown, 8 of Arlington Heights as he works with occupational therapist Melissa Deets of Greendale, Wis., in a program called A Big Blast Project at the Gym Spot in Mundelein. The program uses gymnastics as therapy for kids with developmental issues.

    Special needs kids learn through gymnastics therapy

    Special needs children are having fun and learning important skills through a special gymnastics therapy program called A Big Blast in Downers Grove and Mundelein.

Sports

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    Bills safety Jairus Byrd trips up Bears running back Marion Barber in the first half of their preseason game at Soldier Field on Saturday.

    Bears O-line a work in progress

    The Bears O-line must get better if the team is to compete. On their first four pass plays, Bears quarterbacks were sacked three times, Jay Cutler once and backup Caleb Hanie twice.

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    Cape Blanco, with Jamie P. Spencer aboard, pulls away near the finish line to win the Arlington Million horse race.

    Cape Blanco wins Arlington Million

    All the hype about a showdown between Irish import Cape Blanco and his American counterpart Gio Ponti fizzled like a match in a thunderstorm during the 29th running of the Arlington Million.

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    Carlos Zambrano would probably respect the rules of Ozzie Guillen's clubhouse, so trading for the disgruntled Cubs pitcher makes a lot of sense.

    Sox should trade Dunn or Rios for Zambrano
    If he hasn't done so already, White Sox general manager Kenny Williams should pick up the phone and call Cubs counterpart Jim Hendry. Williams should propose a trade for ... Carlos Zambrano. Don't hang up, it makes sense. Really. In order for the Sox to acquire a lunatic like Zambrano, the Cubs would have to make a sacrifice of their own.

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    Juan Pierre waits out the rain delay in the dugout while two White Sox fans take shelter Saturday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Guillen happy with way Sox battled to victory

    The White Sox withstood two rain delays and rallied back from a 4-2 deficit to beat the Royals 5-4 Saturday night at U.S. Cellular Field.

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    Juan Pierre left, Alejandro De Aza middle, and Carlos Quentin celebrate after defeating the Kansas City Royals 5-4 Saturday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Konerko, Flowers power Sox over Royals

    Paul Konerko hit a two-run homer and Tyler Flowers added his first home run in the majors to lead the White Sox to a 5-4 win over the Kansas City Royals on Saturday night.

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    Bears’ Smith still counting on Knox

    Johnny Knox, who led the Bears in receiving last season but is playing behind Roy Williams, still has a big role in the offense and on special teams.

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    Red Bulls, Fire battle to draw
    The Chicago Fire overcame a 1-goal deficit to reclaim the lead before settling for a 2-2 draw against the host New York Red Bulls.

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    The Cubs placed pitcher Carlos Zambrano on MLB's disqualified list, which shuts him down for 30 days without pay while his comments and actions from Friday's game in Atlanta are reviewed. Zambrano left the game — and the Cubs — after giving up 5 home runs.

    Disqualified Zambrano not retiring

    A day after he walked out on his teammates and spoke of retiring from baseball, the Chicago Cubs took matters into their own hands and placed volatile right-handed pitcher Carlos Zambrano on the disqualified list, effective immediately, possibly ending his season.

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    Wild finish to Cougars’ 10th-inning win

    CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa — The Kane County Cougars rallied for 2 runs in the top of the eighth and later scored 2 runs in the top of the 10th to pull out a 4-3 victory over the Cedar Rapids Kernels on Saturday night at Veterans Memorial Stadium. The game-winning runs scored on a wild pitch in the 10th, and the Cougars held on to take the opener of a three-game set and keep a 3-game lead over Clinton in the Western Division.Down 2-0 in the top of the eighth, Brian Fletcher drilled a two-out double to left to score Angel Franco and Geulin Beltre to make it 2-2. Then in the 10th, the Cougars loaded the bases against Beau Brooks (0-1) with no outs, and Manny Correa came in for the Kernels. With Brett Eibner at the plate, Correa uncorked a wild pitch that catcher Francis Larson could not find. Jovan Pickett and Franco both scampered home to give the Cougars their first lead of the night. Chase Boruff yielded 1 run in the bottom of the 10th before striking out Larson to end the 3-hour, 26-minute affair. The Cougars’ Jason Mitchell (2-0) ended up with the win after he turned in 4⅔ innings of shutout relief. The Cougars began the season 0-6 against the Kernels but have won five of the last seven meetings.

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    Jockeys bunched up durnig the seventh race at Arlington Park on Saturday.

    Images: The Arlington Million
    The 29th running of the Arlington Million took palce on Saturday at Arlington Park. In addition to the featured Million race, fans also watched the Beverly D and the Secretariat stakes.

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    Quarterback Jay Cutler was hit early and often, but powered by a strong defense, the Bears held on for a 10-3 victory over the Buffalo Bills Saturday at Soldier Field.

    Cutler on the run, but Bears beat Bills

    Cutler played just one series and watched as the Bears beat the Buffalo Bills 10-3 on Saturday night even though the offensive line did little to ease any lingering concerns.

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    Chicago Bears wide receiver Johnny Knox (13) runs for a 70-yard kickoff return against Buffalo Bills place-kicker Rian Lindell (9) and Aaron Williams (23) in the first half.

    Images: Chicago Bears vs Buffalo Bills
    The Chicago Bears kicked off their preseason schedule with a game against the Buffalo Bills Saturday night at Soldier Field. The Bears won the game 10-3.

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    The Cubs won after general manager Jim Hendry announced the team placed right-hander Carlos Zambrano on the disqualified list. Zambrano will not be paid and have no part in team activities for 30 days.

    Led by Castro, Barney, Cubs top Braves

    Starlin Castro drove in two runs and starting pitcher Randy Wells gave up two runs on eight hits in five-plus innings for the Cubs, who have won 10 of 13 and who beat the Atlanta Braves 8-4 Saturday.

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    Ramon Dominguez celebrates after winning the Beverly D aboard Stacelita at Arlington Park on Saturday.

    3D: Stacelita wins Beverly D for Schwartz

    Thoroughbred owner Martin Schwartz, a Wall Street trader from southern Florida, won an unprecedented third Beverly D. on Saturday with 9-5 favorite Stacelita and jockey Ramon Dominguez.Stacelita, a 5-year-old French-bred mare, came home a 1¼-length winner over Dubawi Heights in the Grade I $750,000 1¼-miles turf event run on yielding sod before a crowd of 31,069 at Arlington Park.

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    Colm O’Donoghue, aboard Treasure Beach, celebrates victory in the Secretariat Stakes at Arlington Park on Saturday.

    Treasure Beach strikes it rich in Secretariat Stakes

    Treasure Beach proved why he was the 3-2 favorite in the 1¼-miles turf test for 3-year-olds. The European English-bred ship-in, trained by world-renowned Aidan O’Brien, caught Ziyarid at the wire for a neck victory before 31,069 fans at Arlington Park on Saturday.

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    Rain ends scrimmage after just 15 plays

    Though Illinois' first big scrimmage was washed out after 15 plays Saturday night at Rantoul High School, that was enough snaps for the first-stringers to dominate the second team.

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    Brendan Steele watches his putt on the ninth hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament Saturday.

    No-names doing just fine at PGA Championship

    Brendan Steele is playing in his first major championship. Jason Dufner has never won a tour event. Hard to tell at the PGA Championship. "It's a great week for me just to be in the field," Steele said. "To have a chance to actually win in my first major is really something special."

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    Cubs fans should all hope they’re rid of Zambrano

    Carlos Zambrano didn't do a thing to hurt the Cubs Friday after he left the field. This is merely a chance for the Cubs to get rid of very expensive and selfish fool.

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    Carlos Zambrano gave up 5 home runs on Friday, then nearly hit Chipper Jones twice. He was then kicked out of the game and threatened to retire.

    At least Zambrano has a pulse

    If the Cubs and Carlos Zambrano divorce, which will be better off? Which will have a better chance to win a World Series in the next few year? My money is on Big Z.

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    Chicago Fire game day
    Game day: Chicago Fire at New York Red Bulls, 6:30 p.m. Saturday at Red Bull Arena

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    Victory eludes Sky

    A long pass that could have tied the game went out of bounds, and the Chicago Sky ended up falling to the Minnesota Lynx 79-76 at the Allstate Arena on Friday.

Business

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    Italian Finance Minister Giulio Tremonti listens to questions during a press conference Saturday in Rome’s Chigi palace, Premier’s office.

    Italy to slash political jobs, merge towns in new austerity

    Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi predicted Saturday his government's emergency austerity package — which raises taxes, cuts political jobs and consolidates small towns would quickly be passed by parliament.

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    South Korea, China considering free trade agreement

    South Korea and China are considering starting negotiations for a free trade agreement to increase the export of goods and services between the two countries.

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    Honda wants to build fuel-efficient car factory in Mexico

    Honda Motor Co., Japan’s third- largest automaker, plans to build an $800 million factory in Mexico to supply fuel-efficient cars to Mexico, the U.S. and Canada.

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    Recalls this week: exit signs, flood lamps

    Emergency exit signs and flood lamps that can fail or malfunction were recalled this week. No serious injuries were traced to the products, although falling glass from the flood lamps caused some minor damage and injuries.

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    AT&T sees doubts rise about T-Mobile takeover

    AT&T Inc. is working to strengthen its case with U.S. regulators scrutinizing its proposed $39 billion purchase of T-Mobile USA Inc., as a survey of analysts found falling expectations for approval.

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    Hulu to launch subscription video service in Japan

    Online streaming site Hulu.com plans to launch a subscription video service to Japan this year.

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    Games are a big draw on Facebook, so it makes sense for Google to incorporate them into Google Plus. Google says initial games include the popular “Angry Birds,” “Bejeweled Blitz” and “Zynga Poker.”

    Google adding games to its Plus social network

    Google Inc. has started to gradually roll out games on Google Plus. The online search leader says it is looking to make games available for everyone on the network soon.

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    Starting at just under $20,000 for the base LX model, the Kia Optima mid-size sedan is mechanically related to its Hyundai cousin, the Sonata. But the exteriors differ completely.

    Review: Hot red mystery car Is Kia Optima

    Reviewer Jason H. Harper says the Kia Optima’s redesign is so thorough and absolute that it would put a contestant in a makeover reality TV show to shame.

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    The recently introduced DS4 challenges Audi’s A3.

    Citroen revival of DS seen winning German drivers

    PSA Peugeot Citroen is expanding the DS line of upscale cars to challenge Bayerische Motoren Werke AG and Volkswagen AG’s Audi with lower-priced French alternatives.

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    The best hackers can beat the tools meant to stop them and many potential victims don’t know it.

    Experts: Small targets no match for savvy hackers

    An online attack against dozens of rural American law enforcement agencies in which emails, credit card numbers and crime tips were stolen and posted on the Internet has left some officials wondering how they can ward off future hacking attempts, if at all.

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    Apple recently forced Amazon to remove an app button that launches Amazon’s Kindle website, where users buy books. Apple wants companies to sell their content through its iTunes system, where it gets a 30 percent cut.

    Amazon, Walmart bypass Apple fees

    Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. revealed new video and book-reading services that are designed for the iPad but bypass Apple Inc.’s fees on content sales.

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    Although you can easily find a cheap digital camera that can take higher-resolution photos than the HTC myTouch 4G Slide smartphone, the phone has a lens that gathers more light, which makes for better shots in dim lighting.

    Review: Can a smartphone camera do it all?

    A new entrant to the market should inspire some more competition in the phone camera sphere: the myTouch 4G Slide smartphone made by HTC and available through T-Mobile.

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    Young people browse Internet using free Wi-Fi access at a park in Indonesia.

    Indonesian tech frenzy tantalizes venture capitalists

    Venture capitalists from Silicon Valley to New York all have the same question about Indonesia’s come-from-nowhere tech frenzy: Are the young entrepreneurs that have piqued their interest smart bets or just surfing a hype that will soon burn out.

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    An electronic board displays trading activity on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Aug. 4 — a week before the Dow Jones and the overall stock market went on a wild ride.

    5 myths about the Dow

    The Dow still has an antique feel to it, but as a metaphor for the stock market, it remains unsurpassed: endlessly cited, parsed, followed, predicted — and misunderstood. It's not an index of the largest companies in the U.S., and it's not calculated like any other index, such as the S&P 500. But it still tells us a lot.

Life & Entertainment

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    Johnny Depp

    ‘Lone Ranger’ filming shut down over budget

    LOS ANGELES — A source close to Walt Disney Studios’ much-anticipated big-screen adaptation of “The Lone Ranger” starring Johnny Depp and Armie Hammer says the production has been shut down.The source says those involved are figuring out their next steps, and it’s possible filming could resume. The source asked to remain anonymous because they’re not authorized to speak publicly about the discussions.The development was first reported in Deadline Hollywood, an entertainment industry news website. It cited difficulties with reducing the movie’s estimated $250 million cost to $200 million.Jerry Bruckheimer was set to produce the film with a script by Justin Haythe. Hammer was expected to play the title character, and Depp was set to play the Lone Ranger’s partner, Tonto.The Western was scheduled to be released Dec. 21, 2012.

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    FILE - In this April 16, 2009 file photo, actor Daniel Baldwin, a cast member in "Grey Gardens," poses with his wife Joanne at the premiere of the HBO film in Los Angeles. Joanne Baldwin told The Oregonian on Friday Aug. 12, 2011 that "we have a lot of work to do in our marriage and a lot of healing to do." Daniel Baldwin filed for divorce last month and was granted a restraining order against his 41-year-old wife. The couple married in July 2007. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, file)

    Baldwin, wife call off divorce

    LAKE OSWEGO, Ore. — Daniel Baldwin’s wife says the couple is attempting to reconcile and is dropping divorce filings.Joanne Baldwin told The Oregonian on Friday that “we have a lot of work to do in our marriage.” The actor filed for divorce last month and was granted a restraining order against his 41-year-old wife.The newspaper reports a Clackamas County court has dismissed the restraining order. Baldwin’s manager did not respond to a request for comment.Joanne Baldwin says she is living separately from her husband but they have joint custody of their two daughters, ages 1 and 3.She was jailed July 13 after her husband reported she became violent when she drank and threatened to kill him. A judge gave her a 10-day sentence for violating probation on a drunken driving conviction.

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    This quintessential suburban family home in Hoffman Estates has been updated through the years.

    On the Market: Hoffman Estates home

    If you are searching for the quintessential family home in a comfortable, friendly suburban community, this brick and vinyl-sided home in Hoffman Estates will fit the bill.

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    Drapes and blinds can reduce the amount of sunlight and outdoor air making its way into a room.

    Window treatments can lower energy costs

    Homeowners searching for ways to lower energy bills may overlook something as simple as window shades. Window treatments can actually lower a home's energy consumption by insulating windows and restricting outdoor heat and cold from invading a home's interior.

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    In the United States, most rabies cases before 1960 were in domestic animals, but today more than 90 percent of all animal cases reported annually to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control occur in wildlife, most frequently in raccoons, bats, skunks and foxes.

    Most U.S. rabies cases come from wildlife

    Rabies prevention in the United States is by and large a success story, with just one to four people dying of rabies each year in the U.S. thanks to widespread pet vaccinations and aggressive treatment for people bitten by potentially rabid animals.

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    Recycled denim is turned into handmade greeting cards by workers with special needs at Paperworks Studio.

    Blue jeans, green cards grow a Goodwill business

    The green movement has gone blue at Paperworks Studio, where recycled denim is turned into handmade greeting cards by workers with special needs and disadvantages. They can do the same thing with scrap wool and old coffee grounds.

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    At just 14, Lourdes Leon, better known as Lola, is already a fashion star with Material Girl, which is geared toward teens and sold at Macy’s. The clothing line, which she launched with her mother, Madonna, last year, is now branching out into cosmetics, undergarments and nail polish.

    Madonna’s daughter Lola discusses her fashion line

    Even though she’s got her own fashion line, Lourdes Leon — better known to the masses as Lola, the daughter of Madonna — admits that she had a lot to learn when she first launched the Material Girl brand.

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    The Bud Billiken Parade returns to Chicago's South Side for its 82nd anniversary.

    Weekend picks: Let the drums roll out ...

    Spend some time outside today as the Bud Billiken Parade heads through Chicago's South Side and leads the crowds to Gospel Festival. Closer to home, Batavia rolls out the local art along the Riverwalk, and the Mayslake Peabody Estate presents Family Day.

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    Guitars from the group Alabama are on display in the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, Tenn.

    Folk music fans ready to flock to Nashville

    Nashville has no theme park, no beach and no casinos. But it has music. Lots of it. The National Folk Festival, which is coming to Nashville Labor Day weekend, caps off several months of major events held here that validate Nashville's self-proclaimed moniker “Music City USA.”

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    Sealing the Deal To get buyers to the closing table, sellers are making more concessions, from cash to the big screen, but they don’t have to lose leverage in process. Here’s how to keep the listing attractive and negotiating power intact

    A lower price is always nice, but homebuyers today are increasingly enticed by extras that sellers are more willing to throw in the deal. Based on the latest Spending and Saving Tracker survey from American Express, to unload their residences in the current market, 44 percent of homeowners said they would be interested in including appliances, and 28 percent would contemplate offering to make requested repairs or permitting an allocation for repairs.

Discuss

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    The Soapbox

    The Daily Herald editorial board offers thoughtful nuggets on the super Congress, high school football, street improvements in Schaumburg and Hoffman Estates, openness in the Glen Ellyn parks, a historic home in Fox River Grove and more.

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    I’m worried for our country

    No matter where you look, fewer people are doing the work because fewer are out there buying, ordering, building. More people are spending their days worrying — not about who will get blamed or who will get elected, but how they are going to make ends meet.

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    Nation has been corrupted by poor leadership
    A Gurnee letter to the editor: I hope someday to be proud to be an American again.

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    Thanks to all from rescue team
    A Lake Zurich letter to the editor: I had a small stroke on Sunday, July 24, and took myself to the Northwest Hospital Clinic via my SUV.

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    Afghanistan is not ‘right’ war
    Lake Zurich letter to the editor: The “right” war? Just because President Obama uttered those words during his campaign does not make it the “right” war. In fact, in my humble opinion President Bush should have withdrawn us from there before anyone thought of a President Obama.

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    Millburn plan is dangerous
    A Lindenhurst letter to the editor: The Millburn Strangler is fast becoming the Millburn Monster. LCDOT announced their final decision at the July CAG meeting. Their choice which I suspected but feared, is to cut through Forest Trail subdivision.

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    What could Obama’s next step be?
    Leter to the Editor: Obama has been elected three times — Illinois Senator, U.S. Senator and U.S. President. In each position he has stayed the minimum time period and in each he has immediately started working toward his next step up. It appears Mr. Obama is working on becoming friends with and being one of the billions-a-year CEOs/Wall Streeters/banksters.

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    Preserve melting pot with ethnic quotas
    Letter to the Editor: Too many immigrants of any nationality inhibit full integration into the American culture. As a result, Latinos tend to reside in Latino communities and maintain their previous cultural patterns of behavior and also their home language. Quotas need to be enforced just so our melting pot of Americans can be preserved.

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    Protect natural area in Moose annexation
    Letter to the Editor: It is our hope that the elected representatives of the City of Batavia will incorporate into the annexation agreement with Moose International the protection of the Mill Creek natural area, which is only 10 percent of the property under consideration. We do not oppose development. The issue is what is the best long term interest of the Batavia community.

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    Let’s hope Baucus doesn’t cave to GOP
    Leter to the Editor: While we sit and await the Super Committee to get settled in Congress, hopes for anything positive arising from it are very low. The key to the committee is who on which side of the aisle will be the first to blink to let the other side predominate. Based on what we have seen from President Barack Obama and his party during the debt ceiling and other negotiations with the Republicans and their tea party subset, the odds are with the righties.

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    Require budgetary promise for your vote
    Letter to the Editor: Don't vote for a congressman or senator unless he or she promises to exercise strict budget control each year of the term.

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    Veterans lacking what teachers have
    Veterans also do not have a well-entrenched labor union that protects their jobs, salaries and a wide variety of benefits that the rest of American workers can only dream about. Think about that next time you hear a whining teacher.

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    Thanks for kindness to a stranger
    I come to the Northwest suburbs one to two weeks a month on business. I have to use two canes to walk. I have been surprised and pleased at the way total strangers treat me. I drop one of my canes and someone picks it up.

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    Teachers serve in trenches of their own
    Oh yes, the veterans may have put their lives on the line so our teachers may teach, but it’s our teachers who continue working long after the soldier, Marine or sailor has finished his or her service.

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    Only compromise can clean the mess
    I think the tea party’s stance is not brave, principled, or correct -- I think it’s cowardly. Actually, the tea party’s intransigence is the easy way out; compromise is always difficult, but it is the only course a person should ever think of pursuing.

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    Corrupt state culture lives without Blago
    Although most of us are pleased to be rid of Mr. Blagojevich, I don’t think that there is much reason for rejoicing. His enablers and apologists are still around, and they are still the ones calling the shots in government.

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    COD not a good example to students
    As a citizen of the village of Glen Ellyn, COD is expected to follow and obey the local laws and ordinances, just like the rest of us, whether or not one agrees with the local codes.

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    Why would you want more government?
    Most reasonable people on the left and right of center would agree the government is broken. So the only question worth asking is why some people want more of it?

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