Daily Archive : Wednesday July 13, 2011

News

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    Sara Malloy, who plays Suzanne, is part of the show’s hilarious ensemble. Dave Amato, right, plays the famous artist Pablo Picasso in “Picasso at the Lapin Agile.”

    Picasso and Einstein meet in Wheaton Drama production

    Wheaton Drama will perform Steve Martin's "side-splitting satire" "Picasso at the Lapin Agile" beginning July 15.

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    Pictured at the Schaumburg A.M. Rotary Club grant awards breakfast are, from left: Seated: Susan Reedquist, Children’s Advocacy Center; Maureen Stabile, WINGS; Schaumburg A.M. Rotary President Karen Maczka-Bishop; Karen Brierly, Cub Scout Pack 394; and Colleen Breheny, Canine Companions for Independence. Standing: Rick Sarver, Boy Scout Troop 193; Rich Lalley, Operation Warm; Jack Bishop, ShelterBox; Bob Podgorski, St Hubert Job & Networking Ministry; Nick Breheny, Canine Companions for Independence; and Paul Jochim, Clearbrook.

    Schaumburg A.M. Rotary donates $18,000 to groups

    The Rotary Club of Schaumburg A.M. donated more than $18,000 to various organizations, who provide a broad range of services to residents in the local and international community.

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    Palatine church offers women’s July retreat

    The Spirited Women of Christ Lutheran Church, Palatine, invite you to “Sisters Soul Journey,” a rejuvenating women’s retreat, at the Hyatt Regency Woodfield from 6-10 p.m. Friday, July 22, and 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, July 23.

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    Schaumburg to combat emerald ash borer

    Schaumburg will participate in the Legacy Tree Project to combat the emerald ash borer. This is a cooperative program with Valent Professional Products to perform treatments for this destructive insect on parkway trees.

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    Schaumburg approves two new restaurants

    The Schaumburg Village Board approved separate measures Tuesday to help add to the community's restaurant offerings while also preserving the town's historical sites.

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    There’s always plenty of traditional music and dancing at Irish Fest.

    Arlington Hts. Irish Fest opens July 15
    The annual two-day Irish Fest is back in its usual location: Friday and Saturday, July 15-16 in Arlington Heights.

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    Head Coach Steve Martinson stands next to the team logo as the Chicago Express name is unveiled at a news conference in October 2010 at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates.

    Hoffman Estates hockey team finds NHL partner

    The Chicago Express hockey team, which will open play in October at the Sears Centre, announced today it will be affiliated with the NHL's Columbus Blue Jackets.

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    Margaret Pennington

    Judge: D304 eavesdropping lawsuit can proceed

    Geneva District 304's lawsuit against a former principal over allegations she illegally recorded meetings with administrators can proceed, a Kane County judge ruled Wednesday.

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    Mary Homuth holds Chuck Linder's hand Wednesday at the Blue Goose in St. Charles as she thanks him for fixing her scooter. Homuth is a longtime customer of the supermarket, and when she stopped coming in employees investigated to make sure she was all right, and found she was having trouble making the trip over since her scooter broke. Linder, whose wife works at Blue Goose, diagnosed the problem and fixed it.

    St. Charles resident gets new wheels with friends' help

    At the corner of Route 64 and First Street in St. Charles, a woman in a red motorized scooter waits to cross the street on Wednesday after grocery shopping at the Blue Goose. The scooter is significant. Without it Mary Homuth, 77, would instead be on crutches carrying her groceries

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    Emma Mebane

    Geneva woman, 19, dies in her sleep

    A funeral service is Thursday for 19-year-old Emma Mebane of Geneva, who died unexpectedly at home July 8.

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    Nikhi Kanneganti passes out Gillyweed to the Triwizard champions before they take to the pool to complete their second task.

    Palatine area teens celebrate last Harry Potter movie with three-day event

    A group of 22 June graduates of Fremd High School has a great love for all things Harry Potter, and they admit that this meticulously planned event is also the end of an era in their friendship.

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    State of emergency in Lake County

    Lake County has been declared a state of emergency because of the damage left behind by a powerful thunderstorm this week, officials said Wednesday.

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    Cambridge Lakes school sues architect

    The group that operates the Cambridge Lakes Charter School in Pingree Grove is suing its architect for $775,000. The Northern Kane Educational Corp. says delays and design flaws from Newman Architecture drove up costs of the facility and delayed openings. The school will serve some 700 Community Unit School District 300 students next year.

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    President Barack Obama sits with House Speaker John Boehner, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin in Wednesday’s debt reduction talks at the White House.

    GOP clashes over debt-ceiling offer

    Two top Republican leaders clashed Wednesday over a plan that could allow the government to avoid a potentially catastrophic default but would not ensure the deep cuts in federal spending that party members seek.

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    Elgin squad cars to get tech upgrade

    The Elgin Police Department will soon be able to order the last of its squad car camera equipment – purchases that will total $460,000 in grant funding.

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    Left, John Tessier, now believed to be Jack Daniel McCullough, from the 1971 Sycamore High School yearbook. Right. McCullough, now 71, a former police officer accused in the 1957 of a 7-ye2r-old girl.

    Prosecutors face daunting task in 1957 murder case

    Over the years, evidence decays or passes through so many hands it's rendered useless. Murder weapons disappear, and witnesses' memories dim or are carried to the grave.

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    Libertyville Township funding applications available

    Applications are available for Libertyville Township funding for any not-for-profit social service agencies. To be eligible for 2011-12 funding, a not-for-profit agency has to serve the Libertyville area and have an application completed and sent in by Tuesday, Aug. 23, at 4 p.m. No applications will be accepted after the due date. Applications can be picked up in person or mailed by written...

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    Wauconda having Hawaiian-themed farmers market

    A special Hawaiian-themed farmers market makes its appearance in Wauconda on Thursday, July 14. Some of the village’s Main Street restaurants, including Bull Dogs, Honey Hill, Bliss Wine and Gifts, and Lindy’s Landing, will serve Hawaiian wines, coffee, hamburgers, and much more. The event will also feature a Hula Show by Aloha Chicago Entertainment company at 6 p.m. and several contests and...

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    New Great Lakes commander

    Great Lakes Naval Station will have a change in commanding officers Friday. Navy Capt. John Malfitano will hand the reins to Capt. Randall Lynch in a ceremony on the base’s Recruit Training Command section. Malfitano took over at Great Lakes in July 2009. Lynch, a native of Huntington Beach, Calif., served as a joint staff officer at U.S. Africa Command in Stuttgart, Germany, from 2007 to 2010.

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    State Rep. Elaine Nekritz

    Nekritz: No across-the-board elimination of regional education offices

    Rep. Elaine Nekritz, who a year ago sponsored legislation to close down one Regional Office of Education, says shutting others down may not be nearly as simple, as they all function differently. Nekritz talks in response to Quinn's recent move to eliminate the salaries of each county's Regional Office Superintendents.

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    District 207 dissolves special education co-op

    The Maine Township High School District 207 school board this week voted to dissolve a special education cooperative, which includes East Maine Elementary District 63, Park Ridge-Niles District 64 and Des Plaines Elementary District 62.

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    Ruling on Buffalo Grove landfill delayed again

    The IEPA decision on whether monitoring must be continued at the former Land and Lakes Landfill site in Buffalo Grove has again been postponed, this time to Oct. 12.

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    Abortion protests Thursday in NW suburbs

    Anti-abortion demonstrators will be in Lake Zurich, Arlington Heights and Palatine on Thursday, July 14, according to the Pro-Life Action League. Called the “Face the Truth” tour, demonstrators will display pictures of preborn babies juxtaposed with huge graphic photographs of aborted babies.

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    Hanover Park library branch gets more space

    Hanover Park officials agreed to give up their dedicated meeting room at the Poplar Creek Public Library District's Sonya Crawshaw branch to give it more space to serve patrons.

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    Quentin Tucker, 12 of Richton Park, and Jimmy Klank, 11, of Winfield, look over their tiger mascot, made of recycled materials, during a camp Wednesday at Winfield Central School.

    Winfield camp stresses math, science

    For four Winfield boys, a Wednesday trip to a swamp took them to familiar territory: their school. As part of a camp that drew 5- to 12-year-olds from throughout DuPage County, a classroom at Winfield Central School was converted into a “swamp” by tossing several items onto the floor.The children’s charge? Find a way across the swamp by using recyclable materials and working together.

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    Capt. D. Court Harris

    State representative’s son to serve in Afghanistan

    U.S. Army Capt. D. Court Harris, an Arlington Heights resident and son of state Rep. David Harris, is deploying to Afghanistan Friday for a one-year tour of duty.

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    ECC approves new deal with support staff

    Almost two months after approving a three-year agreement with its faculty, the Elgin Community College board this week signed off on a three-year deal with its support staff. Under the agreement, which has already been ratified by employees, support staff salaries will rise by 2 percent in each year of the contract, which expires June 30, 2014, according to ECC. But employees will begin to pay a...

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    Police reports

    John E. Hegel, 64, of the 500 block of Lavoie Avenue in Elgin, appeared in bond court Wednesday on a felony charge of reckless discharge of a firearm and a misdemeanor charge of damage to property, according to court documents. Police responded shortly before 3 p.m. Tuesday to the 600 block of Bent Avenue and found a bullet hole in the back patio sliding door of the home and aligned holes in the...

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    Eastern Illinois county OKs first wind farm
    DANVILLE — The Vermilion County board has given its OK for a developer to begin building the first wind-energy farm in the eastern Illinois county.The Commercial-News in Danville reports that board members voted 21-1 Tuesday night to give Chicago-based Invenergy a building permit for its California Ridge wind project.

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    Gaming board chief wants Quinn to veto expansion
    The Illinois Gaming Board chief says Gov. Pat Quinn should veto a bill that would allow a major expansion of gambling in the state.Gaming board chairman Aaron Jaffe said Wednesday that he would be “flabbergasted” if Quinn signs the bill.Jaffe calls the bill “garbage” and says it’s full of regulatory loopholes.

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    Judge sets bond for 3 in Galesburg shooting death
    GALESBURG— A Knox County judge has ordered bond amounts to stand for three suspects arrested in connection with the shooting death of a man in a crowded park in the western Illinois community of Galesburg.The three face charges in the June 30 death of 21-year-old Jemell Ware, who died not long after the shooting near a playground in Kiwanis Park.

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    Schaumburg public works union signs contract

    The village of Schaumburg and its public works union have signed a contract giving workers 2 percent raises each of the next two years.

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    Report says climate change harms Great Lakes parks

    Some of the Great Lakes' treasured national parks are showing ill effects of climate change that are likely to worsen in coming decades, from shoreline erosion to decline of certain wildlife and plant species, a former park system administrator said Wednesday.

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    St. Charles looks to chase riffraff out of rental units

    St. Charles will explore the creation of a landlord licensing program designed to keep rental units looking good and convicted criminals from becoming renters in the city.

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    Truffles Grove restaurant in Itasca will become Rosanna’s Restaurant after nearly three decades in business.

    Longtime Itasca restaurant changing hands

    Truffles Grove restaurant, an Itasca landmark for more than 30 years, is changing owners and is set to become an Italian eatery.

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    Wife, son plead not guilty in attack on Winthrop Harbor man

    The wife and the son of a 74-year-old Winthrop Harbor man pleaded not guilty Wednesday to charges they duct-taped the man to a bed and pepper-sprayed him.

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    Carnival rides are a popular draw of Vernon Hills Summer Celebration.

    Vernon Hills Summer Celebreation ready to rock

    The days of heavy spending on entertainment have passed but the lineup for the annual Summer Celebration in Vernon Hills will still pack a punch.

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    Former Wauconda Village Administrator Dan Quick announced he’s seeking a Lake County Board seat in the spring Republican primary.

    Wauconda ex-administrator seeks Lake County Board seat

    Former Wauconda Village Administrator Dan Quick says he wants to represent the area on the Lake County Booard.

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    Des Plaines, Wheeling grocers close

    A grocery store that opened months ago in Des Plaines has closed and an Aldi store in Wheeling is closing at the end of the month. The Aldi located at 901 W. Dundee Road, Wheeling, will close for good July 31 after the store and its landlord couldn’t agree on a new lease, village officials said.

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    A demonstration display inside a prototype Ford intelligent vehicle Wednesday in Lombard shows how the system lights up in green to warn the driver of another car to the left.

    Ford demonstrates prototype ‘talking’ cars in Lombard

    Ford Motor Company representatives stopped Wednesday at Yorktown Center in Lombard to demonstrate prototype technology that allows cars to communicate with each other to help drivers avoid crashes and traffic congestion.

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    Rhonda Anderson, left, executive director of Faith in Action of McHenry County, presents a certificate of appreciation to Dave Parmer and Don Walz, right, of St. Mary of Huntley Knights of Columbus Council 11666 at the May meeting.

    Knights of Columbus of Huntley recognized
    At the May meeting of the St. Mary of Huntley Knights of Columbus Council 11666, Rhonda Anderson, executive director of Faith in Action of McHenry County, presented a certificate of appreciation to the council recognizing the volunteers supporting the mission of Faith in Action of McHenry County.

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    Free clinics to get your game in shape will be offered July 19, 26, 28 and Aug. 4 at the 1½-acre short game practice area at Golf Center Des Plaines.

    Free Golf Tips from a Pro series

    Golf Center Des Plaines will host four free golf clinics with the purchase of a short game pass July 19, 26, 28, and Aug. 4, at 353 N. River Road.

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    Bartlett Community Character Expo July 20

    The Bartlett Character Counts Coalition holds its fourth annual Bartlett Community Character Expo from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 20. The expo is open to the public and takes place at the Hanover Township Senior Center, 240 S. Route 59, in Bartlett.

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    Piano Man tribute to Elton John and Billy Joel will perform a free concert on Thursday, July 14, in Hoffman Estates.

    Elton John, Billy Joel tribute to perform free concert

    The Hoffman Estates Arts Commission and the Hoffman Estates Park District welcome Piano Man to the Village Green 7 p.m. Thursday, July 14, as part of the “Summer Sounds on the Green” concert series.

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    Commercial Retrofit Grant application available

    Applications for the 2011 Commercial Retrofit Grant Program are now available at the City of Elgin’s Planning and Neighborhood Services Department.

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    Cinderella, played by Abbey Bjork, sings as an ensemble of characters dance onstage during the D300 Foundation rehearsal of “Into the Woods, Junior” at Jacobs High School in Algonquin. She is a Dundee-Crown High School student.

    D300 going ‘Into the Woods’

    The District 300 Foundation is putting on a production of "Into the Woods, Junior" this weekend and next at Jacobs High School.

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    Police reports

    An Elburn man was charged July 6 with disorderly conduct for causing a disturbance at the St. Charles Public Library, according to police.

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    This is a sketch of what the revamped Heritage Park in Wheeling will look like.

    Neighbors talk about Heritage Park renovation in Wheeling

    Citizens from the neighborhoods surrounding Heritage Park in Wheeling came to see the final plan for its redevelopment as part of a $31 million flood control project and to see how close the new parking lot would be to their homes.

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    Grayslake teen gets probation in burglary case

    The second of two teens charged with burglarizing a Grayslake house was placed on probation for two years Wednesday after he admitted his role in the crime.

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    Quinn signs legislation for new school in Aurora

    Gov. Pat Quinn Wednesday signed into law a plan that could lead to a new elementary school in Aurora focused on a math and science curriculum.

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    Study: Minorities get more traffic tickets in Illinois

    A new study shows a driver's race continues to play a role in the outcome of traffic stops in Illinois. Minority drivers are more likely to get tickets after being pulled over than white drivers are. They're also more likely to have their vehicles searched, although police more often find illegal material in cars driven by white people.

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    2012 Republican campaign gets not so polite

    It was all going so pleasantly. A month ago, the Republicans who would be president gathered for a debate in New Hampshire and had nothing but nice things to say about one another.

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    Harvard man dies when tractor hit by car

    Authorities say a 66-year-old Harvard man was killed when the tractor he was driving was hit by a car trying to pass him.

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    Actor Gary Sinise has made it his passion to advocate for members of the military and their families. He will once again perform at Operation Support Our Troops-America's Rockin' for the Troops event with the Lt. Dan Band Saturday, July 16.

    Sinise talks about his dedication to military

    Gary Sinise, known for his acting roles, also is a committed advocate for military members and their families. Sinise, who is returning to Wheaton Saturday, answers a few questions about how he got involved with helping.

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    Motorola Solutions CEO Greg Brown said the company is weighing the best way to invest its $3.55 billion in net cash.

    Motorola Solutions makes returning cash a priority

    Motorola Solutions Inc., the maker of bar-code scanners, plans to make returning cash to investors a priority after selling its networks unit and shoring up its balance sheet, Chief Executive Officer Greg Brown said.

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    8-year-old Brooklyn boy is killed and dismembered

    An 8-year-old Brooklyn boy who got lost while walking home alone from day camp in his Orthodox Jewish neighborhood was killed and dismembered by a stranger he had asked for directions, and his remains were found stuffed in a trash bin and the man's refrigerator, police said Wednesday.

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    Clinton says Gadhafi's days are 'numbered'

    Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is warning Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi that his days in power are "numbered" and that the international community in the coming days will be stepping up pressure on him to leave.

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    US, Russia agree on rules for safer adoptions

    The United States and Russia ended an ugly dispute over the abuse of adopted Russian children on Wednesday, with Washington agreeing to investigate reports of maltreatment and increase oversight of adopting families.

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    AP coverage of Japanese disaster wins APME awards

    Coverage of the massive earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis along Japan's northeastern coast won awards for deadline and enterprise reporting from the Associated Press Managing Editors association Wednesday for journalism excellence by AP staffers.

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    Gov. Quinn to sign bill boosting coal-to-gas plant

    Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation Wednesday that could lead to the construction of a new plant in Chicago that converts coal to natural gas.

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    Astronauts saluted by Elton 'Rocket Man' John

    The astronauts making NASA's last shuttle flight turned into moving men and garbage haulers Wednesday with no time to dwell on their place in space history, after enjoying a special salute from the original "Rocket Man," Elton John.

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    Drug stops HIV among hetero couples, not just gays

    An AIDS drug already shown to help prevent spread of the virus in gay men also works for heterosexual men and women, two studies in Africa found. Experts called it a breakthrough for the continent that has suffered most from AIDS.

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    From left, actors Johnny Schueneman, Doug Burrichter, Dan McQuaid, Robb Cleave, Nicolette Pollack, Kristen Duerdoth, Jessica McCluskey, Allison Grischow, Frank Warpeha rehearse for “Love’s Labour’s Lost,” which will be performed outdoors at 6 p.m. Saturday, July 16 in Geneva’s Island Park.

    Making Shakespeare easy to understand

    Director Toni Hix gets to show off her interpretation of Shakespeare on Saturday, July 16 at Island Park as the Midsummer Theater Troupe performs “Love’s Labour’s Lost” at 6 p.m. Admission is free and those attending can bring their own food and should bring blankets and lawn chairs.

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    Policemen inspect the site of a bomb explosion in Mumbai, India, Wednesday. Three explosions rocked India’s busy financial capital at rush-hour Wednesday.

    Coordinated bombings kill 21 in Mumbai

    Three coordinated bombings tore through the heart of India’s busy financial capital during rush hour Wednesday, killing 21 people in the worst terror attack in the country since the 2008 Mumbai siege.

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    Can stinky socks fight malaria?

    What do mosquitoes like more than clean, human skin? Stinky socks. Scientists think the musky odor of human feet can be used to attract and kill mosquitoes that carry deadly malaria.

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    DC report says Sheen escort 'routine'

    A new District of Columbia inspector general's report says there was nothing unusual about the police escort given to actor Charlie Sheen, even though the police chief said it appeared to violate department protocol.

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    Needles have Clemens DNA, steroids; fakery claimed

    Prosecutors said Wednesday that needles and cotton balls Roger Clemens' former trainer says he used to inject the star pitcher tested positive for Clemens' DNA and anabolic steroids — evidence the defense said was faked.

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    Mumbai attacks won't stop Clinton trip to India

    Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton says it is more important now than ever to show solidarity with India in its fight against terrorism and she will not cancel her planned trip to the country next week following bomb attacks in Mumbai.

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    Coburn may return to Senate's 'Gang of 6'

    Sen. Tom Coburn said Wednesday that he may rejoin the so-called Gang of Six, the bipartisan band of senators seeking to reach agreement on a big deficit-cutting deal that would blend spending cuts with a tax code overhaul.

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    Waukegan among storm's hardest hit suburbs

    Thousands of residents in the Chicago suburb of Waukegan are still waiting for power two days after a storm pummeled the region.

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    ComEd says 169,000 people are still without power.

    Power slowly but surely returning, ComEd officials said

    ComEd officials said they are slowly and deliberately working to restore power to the hundreds of thousands that were plunged into the dark when storms hit Monday morning. ComEd spokesman Paul Elsberg said 169,000 customers still remained without power as of noon Wednesday, with 113,000 of those customers in the hardest hit northern region of the state.

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    Ex-NSA official Drake seeks probation in leak case

    A former senior official with the National Security Agency who admitted leaking information on a failed billion-dollar NSA computer project is asking the judge to sentence him to a year's probation and community service.

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    Seemingly a modest figurine of a woman in a gown, the 19th-century statue's skirt opens to reveal her bloomer-clad legs. It's one of the unusual pieces included in Naper Settlement's Curator's Curiosities programs.

    Naper Settlement shows off its collection of curiosities

    That pretty little China doll with the red shoes seems innocent enough. Not many would guess that the 6-inch-tall lady — a decorative figurine from the 19th century — has a naughty secret. The artifact in Naper Settlement Museum's collection knows something you don't — she has a peek-a-boo skirt that reveals her undergarments!

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    FACT CHECK: Vaccination not a CIA front. Usually.

    In his 2009 speech to the Muslim world, President Barack Obama announced a new effort to eradicate polio, which persists in three Muslim countries. One of the biggest hurdles had been persuading some local leaders that vaccination campaigns were independent health efforts, not nefarious programs being run by the CIA.

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    Obama offers condolences to Afghan president

    President Barack Obama has expressed condolences to Afghan President Hamid Karzai about his brother's murder.

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    Obama condemns 'terrorist acts' in India

    President Barack Obama is condemning deadly attacks in India's busy financial capital of Mumbai, calling them "deplorable terrorist acts."

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    US-Pakistanis meet amid tension, military aid cut

    High-level U.S.-Pakistan visits were unfolding Wednesday for the first time since Washington announced it was cutting more than one-third of its military aid to its terrorism-fighting partner.

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    Obama to address American Legion on Aug. 30

    President Barack Obama will address thousands of veterans and their families at the American Legion's national convention in Minneapolis on Aug. 30.

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    Conservative training group hosts July 16 seminar

    American Majority, a political training group for conservative candidates and activists, will host a seminar from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, July 16 at Millrose restaurant, 45 S. Barrington Road, South Barrington. State Sen. Matt Murphy of Palatine and state Rep. Randy Ramey of Carol Stream, both Republicans, are the featured guests.

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    Cops: NY man in custody; boy's remains in fridge

    A young Brooklyn boy who vanished while walking home from a day camp in one of the safest parts of the city was killed and dismembered by a stranger he had turned to for help after getting lost, police said Wednesday.

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    Fish kill near Ill. lake turns up invasive carp

    Several thousand fish have died just below the dam between Lake Decatur and the Sangamon River and most appear to be a variety that local officials hope will never make it into the lake — Asian carp.

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    Some in GOP doubt default would be catastrophic

    Some congressional conservatives are discounting their own leaders' claim that defaulting on the nation's debt would be disastrous.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Mount Prospect police said a former employee at Bosch Tools is suspected of using a company credit card between December and June to purchase several thousand dollars worth of goods and services for personal use.

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    Chain restaurants will make kids menus healthier

    Parents seeking healthier restaurant meals for their kids can start to look beyond chicken nuggets and macaroni-and-cheese.

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    AP sources: Feds eye CIA officer in prisoner death

    A CIA officer who oversaw the agency's interrogation program at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq and pushed for approval to use increasingly harsh tactics has come under scrutiny in a federal war crimes investigation involving the death of a prisoner, witnesses told The Associated Press.

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    Powerless patrons on Monday packed the Village Bar and Grill in Buffalo Grove to seek an air-conditioned refuge after storms knocked out electricity.

    Ice, generators, hotel rooms hot items after storm

    If you're worried about getting enough ice to keep your food from spoiling after Monday's power outages knocked out your refrigeration, don't fret. “We will not run out of ice,” said Jeff Sypek, plant manager for Home City Ice in Chicago, adding, though, that delivering it fast enough is a challenge.

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    Lucas Zamudio, 20, of Barrington, fires up a generator Tuesday for his grandparents, Rosemary and Richard Libby of Barrington, who've been without power since Monday.

    Local families find ordinary tasks are challenging without electricity

    People who still have no power spent much of the day driving around, looking for a place to shower or charge their phones, helping out neighbors, and, worst of all, waiting for ComEd.

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    Bill offers break for properties in flood zone

    Overseers of levees in southwestern Illinois welcomed Wednesday the advance of a federal measure that could give thousands of property owners up to a five-year reprieve in having to buy costly flood insurance in areas with questioned defenses against rivers.

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    Obama raises more than $86M for campaign, DNC

    President Barack Obama collected $86 million combined for his re-election campaign and the Democratic party during the past three months, giving him a large fundraising advantage over the Republican field seeking to challenge him in 2012.

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    Cops: Naked man swimming in water near NY airport

    Authorities say a man was found swimming naked in a waterway next to the fuel farm of New York's Kennedy Airport.

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    23 Senators press Pentagon chief on terror suspect

    Twenty-three senators are pressing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta on why a suspected Somali terrorist will be tried in a New York court and not the U.S. facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

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    Aurora, park district reach new cop pact

    Fox Valley Park District has supplied a police officer to patrol the city of Aurora’s Phillips Park since 2002. Now, under an intergovernmental agreement approved this week, that officer also can be called to other city-owned parks if needed.

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    Naperville man charged after knife attack

    A Naperville man has been arrested and charged with aggravated assault after slashing someone with a kitchen knife.

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    Phone hacking on long list of journalism scandals

    Before the technology existed for Rupert Murdoch's journalists to hack into phone records, past generations of dubious reporters have given readers 4-foot-tall furry creatures living on the moon, a bogus 8-year-old heroin addict and a nonexistent interview with a sick president that won a Pulitzer Prize.

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    Lawyer: Deal reached to care for paralyzed gymnast

    A champion Chinese gymnast who was paralyzed in an accident at the 1998 Goodwill Games is grateful toward the United States after reaching a deal with insurance companies to provide her with medical care and rehabilitation in China, along with financial help, her lawyer said Tuesday.

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    East St. Louis girl probe girl's shooting

    Police in East St. Louis are trying to figure out how a 13-year-old girl apparently shot herself in the side accidentally outside her home.

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    Alton animal control workers nab large lizard

    The large lizard nabbed by animal control officers in Alton came up short of expectations but still caused quite a stir.

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    Alton police probe shooting death of man in car

    Police in the Mississippi River city of Alton are investigating the death of a 22-year-old man who was gunned down as he sat in his rental car.

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    SPOTLIGHT: Rockford women open home for their moms

    Despite an industry of senior living options that run the gamut from assisted-living apartments to nursing homes, Holly Hanson and Ruth Little wanted something more.

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    Safety net hospital receives palliative care award

    A palliative care program at Chicago's Stroger Hospital has received a national award from the American Hospital Association.

Sports

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    Report: Auburn still under NCAA investigation

    The New York Times is reporting that an NCAA official told Auburn coach Gene Chizik that it is not done investigating the Tigers’ football program and the recruitment of Cam Newton.The newspaper reported Wednesday that Chizik asked NCAA vice president for enforcement Julie Roe Lach several questions, including why the NCAA had not announced that the Newton investigation was finished, during a presentation at the Southeastern Conference meetings in Destin, Fla., last month.“You’ll know when we’re finished,” Roe Lach told Chizik, according to several coaches who were at the meeting, the Times reported. “And we’re not finished.”Vanderbilt coach Kevin Stallings, LSU coach Trent Johnson, Mississippi coach Andy Kennedy and Arkansas coach Mike Anderson all confirmed the exchange to the newspaper.

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    Strong wind may cause havoc at British Open

    SANDWICH, England (AP) — With strong wind set to cause havoc at the British Open, organizers said Wednesday that some tees may have to be brought forward at Royal St. George’s to make the course playable.Gusts of up to 30 mph are forecast for the first two rounds on Thursday and Friday. Depending on wind direction, it will make some fairways unreachable off the tee for many players.Royal and Ancient chief executive Peter Dawson picked out the par-5 No. 7 and the short No. 11, which is 243 yards from tee to green, as two of several holes that could be modified.“We do have some wind issues out there,” Dawson said. “We made the players aware at the start of the week that some tees may be moved up and they were invited to practice off forward tees if they wished. I think players should be able to reach the fairway and reach the par 3s, frankly.”Otherwise, the course was described by R&A championship committee chairman Jim McArthur as “in terrific condition” and by Dawson as “right up there with the best.”“We believe that Royal St. George’s is a true Open Championship test,” McArthur said. “It’s very much based on strategic play rather than muscle power.”Conditions should be easier than in the 2003 tournament at Sandwich, when players were critical that the rough, which gobbled up errant drives, was too thick.As a result of the dry spring in southeast England, Dawson said organizers had been concerned there would be nearly no rough at all. Recent rainfall has calmed their fears.“We’ve always said we take what nature gives us, but fortunately we’ve had some rain ... which has been sufficient to rejuvenate the golf course and the amount of rough we have out there is pretty close to what we would like,” Dawson said. “It’s not as thick as it might have been but it’s good playing conditions. We’re happy with it.”American Ben Curtis was the only player to finish under par in 2003, and Dawson said he doesn’t expect particularly great scoring this time.“This course, I think, needs more knowing than most because there are more slightly blind shots here, the kicks off the fairway ... you need to know them,” he said. “Like all the links courses, it’s very wind-dependent how it plays.“I don’t think we’re going to get particularly low scoring here this week, especially with the wind up. The course is tough.”Dawson said, based on advanced ticket sales and indications on practice days, he anticipates bigger crowds than in 2003, when about 185,000 spectators came through the gates.

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    Traveling lightly can pay hefty dividends

    There's no shame in re-gifting quality fishing tackle if you've got a good recipient in mind.

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    Woods works in at St. Charles East; Bilyeu commits to Air Force

    Patrick Woods has been hired as new St. Charles East boys basketball coach, and Bartlett's AJ Bilyeu has committed to play quarterback at the Air Force Academy.

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    The Chicago Sky’s Michelle Snow controls the ball past Tulsa Shock’s Tiffany Jackson during the second half of their game Wednesday at the Allstate Arena.

    Sky get win in front of record crowd

    The Chicago Sky cruised to 72-54 win over the Tulsa Shock in front of a record setting crowd Wednesday at the Allstate Arena.

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    Mets GM says K-Rod deal not ‘a significant change’

    NEW YORK — Francisco Rodriguez is gone, and Jose Reyes and Carlos Beltran could be next.It all depends on the next couple of weeks for the New York Mets.Sitting on the fringe of the playoff race, the Mets got rid of a potentially costly problem at closer when they sent Rodriguez and cash to the Milwaukee Brewers on Tuesday night for two players to be named.New York (46-45) is third in the NL East and 7½ games behind the wild card-leading Braves heading into the opener of its first post-All-Star break series on Friday against Philadelphia. And general manager Sandy Alderson said Wednesday the K-Rod trade doesn’t change the Mets’ status.The Mets still have a strong bullpen, but now they’ve shifted payroll — to a team that is tied for the lead in its division. “This certainly does not signify a change in direction from our continuing attempt to win games this season,” Alderson said. “I certainly would not draw any conclusions from this transaction.”Alderson also said in a conference call he knows there is interest from other teams in acquiring players such as All-Stars Beltran and Reyes, but he plans to see how the next two weeks play out.“Carlos’ situation is well known to all teams,” Alderson said. “Not surprisingly, given his situation as well as his performance this year, there has been a lot of interest.”There was plenty of interest in K-Rod, too. The Mets figured they could get more for him now than closer to the July 31 deadline for trading without waivers.The 29-year-old Rodriguez is 2-2 with a 3.16 ERA and 23 saves, a year after a fracas with a family member at Citi Field led to his arrest, an injury and the early end of his season. He is a four-time All-Star and set the single-season saves record with 62 in 2008 with the Angels.Rodriguez has a contract clause that guarantees him $17.5 million in 2012 if he finishes 55 games this year. The right-hander currently has finished 34 and is on pace to vest, though he may not get ample chances to do that with the Brewers.“As far as where Frankie was in achieving his vesting option, I don’t think that was a factor either,” Alderson said. “I’m not suggesting that that whole option consideration was not a factor. It was one of many. But he certainly wasn’t going to vest by the end of July.”Alderson said the Mets are helping Milwaukee cover “a substantial portion, but not all” of the roughly $8.4 million Rodriguez is due from them this year. Rodriguez is in his 10th major league season. He is 32-27 with 291 saves and a 2.54 ERA with the Angels and Mets, who signed him as a free agent after his record-setting year when they figured their strongest need was a proven closer.Now the Mets have a closer ready to replace K-Rod, likely Jason Isringhausen or Bobby Parnell. What they need is the bats of David Wright (stress fracture in lower back) and Ike Davis (bone bruise in his ankle) back in the lineup.That still may not be enough.“Ike is some time away,” Alderson said. “We expect to have David back by the deadline.” Stats website baseballprospectus.com gave the Mets a less than two percent chance to make the postseason before play resumed on Thursday. New York came out of the All-Star break within three games of eight other NL teams — though Milwaukee and St. Louis are tied atop the NL Central — and has 16 games left this month.“We’re obviously at a delicate point as far as wins and losses,” Alderson said. “In some sense, it’s not just our 10 percent of the season, but it’s reflected in the seasons of seven or eight different teams.”

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    NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith enters a Manhattan law office Wednesday. NFL owners and player representatives arrived for another round of labor talks as the negotiations hit a critical phase.

    Brady, P. Manning, Brees: It's time for NFL deal

    NEW YORK — Calling the players' offer "fair for both sides," star quarterbacks Tom Brady, Peyton Manning and Drew Brees — plaintiffs in an antitrust suit against the NFL — said Wednesday "it is time" to wrap up negotiations on a deal to end the league's lockout.At the bargaining table, though, it wasn't that easy.On the day Brady, Manning and Brees spoke as a group publicly for the first time, players and owners spent nearly 11 hours meeting at a Manhattan law office before pausing for dinner."We're just taking a break — long day," players' association chief DeMaurice Smith said.Asked if they were returning Wednesday night, Smith replied, "Probably. Probably coming back."Regardless, negotiations were expected to continue Thursday. With each passing day, the need to strike a bargain and end the first NFL work stoppage since 1987 becomes greater.Deadlines are coming up next week to get training camps and the preseason started on time. Although it seems the sides have agreed on the basic elements of how to split more than $9 billion in annual revenues, among the key sticking points recently have been how to structure a new rookie salary system and what free agency will look like.In a statement released to The Associated Press via the NFL Players Association, New England's Brady, Indianapolis' Manning and New Orleans' Brees said: "We believe the overall proposal made by the players is fair for both sides and it is time to get this deal done."They continued: "This is the time of year we as players turn our attention to the game on the field. We hope the owners feel the same way."In response, the NFL issued a statement saying: "We share the view that now is the time to reach an agreement so we can all get back to football and a full 2011 season. We are working hard with the players' negotiating team every day to complete an agreement as soon as possible."Brady, Manning and Brees are among 10 players who are named plaintiffs in an antitrust suit that is pending in federal court in Minnesota. That class-action lawsuit was filed March 11, hours after federally mediated negotiations to arrive at a new collective bargaining agreement broke down, and the old labor contract expired. The NFLPA immediately dissolved itself, meaning players no longer were protected under labor law but instead were allowed to take their chances under antitrust law.On March 12, the owners imposed a lockout on the players, a right management has to shut down a business when a CBA expires. During the lockout, there can be no communication between the teams and current NFL players; no players — including those drafted in April — can be signed; teams won't pay for players' health insurance.A series of court rulings followed, including one last week from an appeals court that said the lockout could continue.Talks gained steam in May, overseen by a court-appointed mediator, U.S. Magistrate Judge Arthur Boylan, who is on vacation this week. Boylan ordered both sides to speak with him in Minneapolis next Tuesday, and the owners have a special meeting set for July 21 in Atlanta, where they could vote to ratify a new deal if one is reached.That means there's intense pressure on Smith and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to keep things moving in a positive direction. Disruptions to the planned preseason schedule would decrease the overall revenue pie.In an added complication, a federal judge has set an Aug. 8 hearing for NFL retirees, who claimed Wednesday that the league and NFLPA "have conspired" to set low retiree benefit and pension payments in the negotiations. The retirees also say they have been illegally and intentionally excluded from the talks.

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    Carli Lloyd, at left challenging for a ball with France’s Marie-Laure Delie, has been a dependable player for the United States, but it makes sense to give younger players such as Lori Lindsey a shot in Sunday’s Women’s World Cup championship.

    Time for Americans to let the fresh legs finish Cup

    The Americans should be proud just to get to the Women's World Cup final, but they can’t and they won’t rest on their laurels. That’s why coach Pia Sundhage should consider making a couple of changes for Sunday’s championship match against Japan.

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    Abby Wambach celebrates with Megan Rapinoe after scoring her second goal Wednesday during the semifinal match between France and the United States at the Women's Soccer World Cup in Moenchengladbach, Germany.

    Wambach comes up big in World Cup semifinals

    Abby Wambach sure knows how to deliver. A goal, a promise and soon, she hopes, a World Cup title. The U.S. women had fans on edge once again until Wambach broke a tense tie with her header off a corner kick in the 79th minute Wednesday.

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    Argentine midfielder Sebastian Grazzini will join the Fire on Friday.

    Pressure is on Fire’s new addition

    The Fire announced the signing of 30-year-old Argentine midfielder Sebastian Grazzini on Wednesday.

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    Pitcher Ryan Dempster, left, general manager Jim Hendry, center, and Cubs team president Crane Kenney each face an interesting second half to a so-far disappointing season.

    Changes on the way for historically bad Cubs?

    There's no getting around it. As the Cubs open the unofficial second half of the season Thursday night against the Marlins, talk will turn of trading key players and to possible changes in the front office.

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    Years after Guillen incident, gay slurs reach epidemic

    Five years after Ozzie Guillen's infamous use of a gay slur toward a writer, little has changed and the discussion continues to be superficial at best and useless at worst, as daily is the news that an athlete has hurled gay invectives at someone.

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    Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens, right, and his attorney Rusty Hardin, arrive at federal court in Washington Wednesday for his perjury trial. The newly seated jury of 10 women and two men is scheduled to get to work Wednesday with opening arguments.

    Clemens' prosecutors: Needles have DNA on them

    WASHINGTON — Prosecutors said Wednesday that needles and cotton balls Roger Clemens' former trainer says he used to inject the star pitcher tested positive for Clemens' DNA and anabolic steroids — evidence the defense said was faked.Assistant U.S. attorney Steven Durham revealed the results during opening arguments in Clemens' trial on charges of lying to Congress about using performance-enhancing drugs. Clemens' attorney Rusty Hardin responded that he won't dispute the needles contain Clemens' DNA and steroids, but accused the trainer Brian McNamee of "mixing" it up."He manufactured this stuff," Hardin told jurors. "Roger Clemens' only crime was having the poor judgment to stay connected with Brian McNamee."Hardin said steroids would have been so "incredibly inconsistent with his career and beliefs that there's no way he would have done it."Clemens has said that the only things McNamee ever injected him with were the common local anesthetic lidocaine for his joints and vitamin B-12 to ward off flu viruses and stay healthy. But Durham said neither substance was found on the needles or cotton swabbed with his blood stains.Hardin told the jury that the government is "horribly wrong" in charging his client with perjury, false statements and obstruction of Congress. Clad in a dark suit, Clemens watched silently from the defense table with a clenched jaw."There was a rush to judgment on Roger that has made it impossible for him to be fairly heard until he got here," Hardin said in the federal courthouse just a couple blocks from the congressional hearing room where he testified three years ago."It's a fact of life that sometimes when people reach the mountain, there is an unwillingness to give them equal consideration when people come down on them," Hardin said. "And that's what happened with Roger."Hardin showed the jury an enlarged photo of the country with all the sites where federal agents investigated the case. He said it involved 103 law enforcement officers, five attorneys, 229 investigation reports and 72 investigation locations across the continental United States, Germany and Puerto Rico."They still didn't find anything to connect him with steroids except Brian McNamee," Hardin said.Durham, however, said that about 45 witnesses, including several of Clemens' former teammates, will help make the case that Clemens used anabolic steroids and human growth hormone. When Clemens denied the use under oath before a House panel in 2008, Durham said, "It was false and he knew it was false."Hardin argued that the government's case essentially rises and falls with McNamee, who the lawyer said has lied repeatedly. "He's still lying," Hardin said.Hardin also said that McNamee lied in a police investigation in Florida in 2001. The trainer was investigated for sexual assault, but Walton had previously instructed Hardin not to discuss specifics of that probe in front of the jury.Hardin tried to fight the perception that Clemens arrogantly insisted on testifying before Congress to protect his legacy and thus put himself in this criminal position. He was not subpoenaed to testify and Hardin says it was "technically true that he voluntarily appeared" though under tremendous pressure."Roger Clemens, unless he was comatose, always knew the danger of him testifying," Hardin said, pointing out that fellow Major League Baseball player Miguel Tejada was charged with misleading Congress for earlier testimony."Did he (Clemens) do it out of arrogance and wanting to go to the Hall of Fame?" Hardin said. "Really? To get into the Hall of Fame? Really? Is that what we've come to?"

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    The way Mike Martz sees it, the Chicago Bears could play in the Hall of Fame game on a day's notice if necessary.

    Martz: Bears could be ready quickly for Hall game

    The way Mike Martz sees it, the Chicago Bears could play in the Hall of Fame game on a day's notice if necessary. Of course, that's not realistic and he wouldn't want to try. But if they absolutely, positively had to?

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    The new roof of the Metrodome, home of the Minnesota Vikings NFL football team, is in place after it was inflated for the first time Wednesday in Minneapolis. The original roof collapsed last December after a snowstorm dumped 17 inches of snow. The hanging grey panels help provide better acoustics.

    Metrodome roof up again, nearly ready for Vikings

    Seven months after the Metrodome's Teflon-coated fiberglass ceiling collapsed in a snowstorm, forcing the Minnesota Vikings to play their final two home games last season elsewhere, the new roof has been raised in plenty of time for the first preseason game.

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    Heavily fined Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison calls NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell a "crook" and a "devil," among other insults, in a magazine article.

    Steelers' Harrison to magazine: Goodell a 'devil'

    Heavily fined Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison calls NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell a "crook" and a "devil," among other insults, in a magazine article.

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    The Chicago Sky’s Sylvia Fowles, left, and Tulsa Shock’s Elizabeth Cambage battle for a rebound during the second half Wednesday at Allstate Arena.

    Fowles leads Chicago Sky past Tulsa

    WNBA scoring leader Sylvia Fowles had 21 points, and the Chicago Sky beat Tulsa 72-54 on Wednesday.Fowles, now averaging 20.4 points per game, added 13 rebounds in front of a franchise record crowd announced at 13,838 at Allstate Arena.The loss was the seventh straight for the Shock (1-12) and second for interim coach Teresa Edwards, who took over July 9 after Nolan Richardson’s resignation.Chicago (7-7) opened with eight straight points and never trailed on the way to a 21-9 first-quarter lead. Jennifer Lacy had 13 points off the bench while Andrea Riley added 12 for the Shock. Epiphanny Prince had 11 while reserve Tamera Young added 10 for the Sky.

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    Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter rounds third base after he hit a solo home run, his 3,000th career hit, off Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher David Price in the third inning Saturday at Yankee Stadium.

    Baseball’s first half marred by injured stars

    From Derek Jeter to Albert Pujols and Joe Mauer, you could put together an All-Star team just from the guys who have been stuck on the disabled list this season. If 2010 was the Year of the Pitcher, 2011 might just be the Year of the Injury. David Wright, Buster Posey and Zack Greinke have missed big chunks of time as well, and the rash of injured stars may be one of the biggest reasons that all six division races are so close heading into the unofficial second half of the season. With so many teams playing short-handed, no one has been able to break away from the pack yet and take command of the pennant race, setting up a 2½-month sprint to the finish. Jeter spent 21 days on the shelf with a calf injury that slowed his pursuit of 3,000 hits, Pujols stunned everyone by coming back from a broken forearm after just two weeks and Mauer’s seemingly unimpeachable image in his home state of Minnesota took a big hit when he spent most of the first two months of the season rehabbing a mysterious leg injury.The current disabled list is chock full of stars — Johan Santana, Jon Lester, Roy Oswalt, Carl Crawford, Josh Johnson, Justin Morneau. And many of the trips haven’t been quick ones. Wright has been on the list since May 16 with a stress fracture in his lower back, Morneau is not expected back until mid-August after having neck surgery and Johnson was placed on the 60-day disabled list with right shoulder inflammation on May 17. Others won’t be back at all this year. Posey, San Francisco’s bright young star catcher, is out after breaking his left leg and straining some ligaments in his left ankle on a home plate collision with Florida’s Scott Cousins on May 25. Cardinals ace Adam Wainwright, Yankees right-hander Joba Chamberlain and Boston’s Daisuke Matsuzaka have all had surgery on their pitching elbows and are rehabbing for 2012. It even sent the All-Star managers searching a little bit to fill a few holes created by injuries.“You are scrambling a bit when you have the number of injuries that we have to deal with before we chose the team,” NL manager Bruce Bochy said on Monday.The Red Sox, Cardinals and Giants have somehow been able to weather a series of significant injuries and sit atop their respective divisions as the second half of the season is about to commence. Others such as the Twins, who have watched eight regular players hit the DL for extended periods of time, and the Tampa Bay Rays, who saw Evan Longoria miss 26 games with an oblique injury, got off to slow starts in part because of health problems. With the airtight nature of the playoff chase — all six division leaders have a cushion of 3½ games or fewer — it is conceivable that the teams who are able to remain the healthiest and avoid any more key injuries will be the ones that advance to the postseason. How teams choose to address key injuries will also add some intrigue to the trade deadline, which is three weeks away. Here’s a quick look at the stars, slumps and surprises of the first half of the season:STARS:—Jose Reyes, SS, New York Mets: Electrifying presence has made the Mets worth watching. Leading NL with .354 average and 15 triples, six more than next closest hitter.—Matt Kemp, CF, Los Angeles Dodgers: All-around stud. Hitting .313 with 22 homers and 67 RBIs. Been intentionally walked 12 times and leads in many of the stat geeks’ favorite categories, including wins over replacement. —Jair Jurrjens, RHP, Atlanta Braves: Leads NL in wins (12), ERA (1.87) to keep Braves within striking distance of the juggernaut in Philadelphia.—Jose Bautista, OF/3B, Toronto Blue Jays: His assault continues. Belted a league-high 31 homers in first half and also hitting .334, second in the league while playing two positions.

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    Ohio State players left to live with sanctions

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio State’s players say they are resigned to make the best of the school’s self-imposed penalties, no matter how hurt or angry some may feel.“There’s nothing we can really do about that,” offensive lineman J.B. Shugarts said after a conditioning workout this week. “The university decided to make that call. We’ve got to accept it.”Athletic director Gene Smith announced Friday that the university would vacate the 2010 season, including the Sugar Bowl victory. It also self-imposed a two-year NCAA probation, in addition to suspending six players for the first five games and accepting the resignation of coach Jim Tressel. All the sanctions resulted from a cash-for-memorabilia scandal that has rocked the program for the past eight months.The next big date is Aug. 12, when Ohio State meets with the NCAA’s committee on infractions. That committee could accept the penalties Ohio State placed on itself or could pile on recruiting restrictions, bowl bans, return of bowl money and other stiffer sanctions.Left in the wake of the uncertainty are the players who didn’t do anything wrong but who are left to make the best of the situation.Tight end Jake Stoneburner has come to terms with the fact that, officially at least, the 12-1 season a year ago never happened in the eyes of the NCAA or Ohio State’s record book.“It hurts a little bit because I was a part of that. I was out there sweating, bleeding and trying to get those wins,” he said. “If that’s what they’ve got to do, we have to move on and try to repeat them (wins) this season. The films are there and everyone saw what happened. Everyone knows what happened in the 2010 season.”Among the games erased from the books is Ohio State’s seventh straight win over archrival Michigan.Vacating that game is asking a lot, said senior linebacker Tony Jackson.“If you say of the Michigan game, `You didn’t win’ — you and I can look eye-to-eye and know what happened that day,” he said of the 37-7 victory. It’s the uncertainty of possible additional penalties that makes it even harder to focus on the fast-approaching season.“As long as we know what we have to deal with right now until the NCAA (decision) comes, that gives us a little bit of relief,” Stoneburner said.Defensive back Tyler Moeller has missed most of the past two seasons. He suffered a severe brain injury when he was assaulted at a Florida bar while on vacation with his family. That cost him all of the 2009 season.A year ago, he stunned many of his doctors when he recovered enough — he’d been told he would never play again — to return to the Buckeyes. But just a few games into the season he tore a chest muscle, which again put a premature end to his senior season. Now he’s been granted a sixth season of eligibility. He hopes to be one of the elder statesmen on the team, showing the way to brighter days.He said that, just as in years past, the Buckeyes are still setting their sights on national and Big Ten championships.“What people forget is we’re Ohio State. We all came here to win,” he said. “One person or one coach doesn’t define our team. We’re still talking about the same things but maybe with a little more intensity about it.”Shugarts said the almost daily controversies surrounding the program have brought the players closer.If the NCAA comes down even harder on the Buckeyes, that unity will help them cope.“Whatever happens, happens,” he said. “We just have to be strong as a team.”

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    Andy Lally looks to the sky Friday as rain closes in on qualifying for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at the Kentucky Speedway.

    Lally finding his way on NASCAR’s fringe

    SPARTA, Ky. — Andy Lally wants a hamburger. Badly. The bloodier the better.Yet the former sports car champion turned NASCAR driver won’t have one. Not today. Not tomorrow. Not ever.He’ll deal with the craving, internalize it and put it aside just like he’s done every day for the last seven years, since he decided every living thing was entitled to the same rights he enjoys.Two years ago Lally took it a step further, moving from vegetarian to vegan, which means he’s cut out dairy products, too. Though the 36-year-old from New York’s Long Island considers it an ethical choice, he understands it’s not for everybody, particularly the largely meat-and-potatoes crowd that crams the grandstand every weekend at a Cup race.That doesn’t mean he’s not open to educating whenever possible.“If (people) were able to see the mistreatment and what goes on and see what shows up to them in a nice shiny package,” Lally begins then cuts himself off, saying “I don’t want to go there.”Then Lally laughs. Sorry, he can’t help but go his own way. When you’re a newcomer driving for an underdog Cup team that’s had a revolving door in the driver’s seat for three years, you don’t really have a choice.Halfway through his first full-time Cup season driving the No. 71 TRG Motorsports Ford, Lally is trying to find pleasure in the grind. He heads to this week’s race at New Hampshire 33rd in points, but with something almost resembling momentum.Lally qualified seventh in Daytona two weeks ago only to fade to 27th after having trouble finding a running partner in the later portion of the race. He finished 32nd at Kentucky last Saturday, not bad considering he started as the 43rd — and last — car in the field.Could the three-time winner of the Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona still be winning Grand-Am races somewhere? Sure. Yet he’d rather be sweating it out every weekend in Cup. Even if it means working from the back of the field.“Every aspect of the Cup series is humbling, man,” Lally said. “People will say, `He’s coming from something so different he’s going to get his butt kicked all year and if he makes any strides, great.’ But on my end, it’s not acceptable unless we’re going forward.”And he’s encouraged by the progress his somewhat thrown together team has made over the last five months. Though the 71 car has been around for the last three years, stability has been hard to come by. Lally is one of nine drivers to hop behind the wheel for owner Kevin Buckler since he founded the team in 2009.The team switched from Chevrolet to Ford this spring and is already on its third crew chief of the year, with Doug Richert now calling the shots. That’s a lot of moving pieces to deal with, and Lally remains optimistic the program is heading in the right direction.“Even in races where we don’t finish well, we try to break it down and find some stints in the race, like `we hit it, we hit it, we hit the setup right, I drove it right, we did it well,’ “’ Lally said. “We try to take the good parts out of it and analyze it and try not to do the bad things again.”Still, it can be a nerve-racking experience. He calls failing to qualify at Darlington and Charlotte earlier this year “one of the toughest things I’ve ever gone through as a professional.”Yet there’s no place he’d rather be. Though he grew up in the Northeast far from the sport’s southern roots, he’s been fixated on NASCAR for years.“These were my toys, these were my remote-control cars, these were my matchbox cars,” he said. “This was just nonstop. NASCAR, NASCAR, NASCAR.”Even if acceptance has been hard to come by. He figured it would be part of the territory coming in. He found an ally at Daytona in Bobby Labonte, with the two working to run in the top 10 for portions of the race.Yet when it came down to it, he found himself trying to forge his own way.

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    Stage winner Mark Cavendish of Britain kisses the best sprinter’s green jersey on the podium of the 11th stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 104.8 miles starting in Blaye les Mines and finishing in Lavaur, south central France, Wednesday.

    Cavendish wins 11th stage and seizes green jersey

    LAVAUR, France — Mark Cavendish nearly lost a shoe in the final stretch but kept his cool to win a rainy 11th stage of the Tour de France in a mass sprint Wednesday, easily beating Andre Greipel of Germany at the line to seize the leading sprinter’s green jersey.French rider Thomas Voeckler kept the race leader’s yellow jersey after the 104.1-mile trek from Blaye-les-Mines to Lavaur. Voeckler finished 75th in the stage but with the same time as the winner.Cavendish made the most of the last stage designed for sprinters before the race reaches the Pyrenees to claim his 18th stage win at the Tour, his third in this year’s race. He won in 3 hours, 46 minutes, 7 seconds.“It’s incredible to have the green jersey. It’s the most beautiful jersey in the world,” said Cavendish, who got an assist from HTC-Highroad teammate Mark Renshaw.Cavendish’s efforts were almost ruined toward the end when he hit the front wheel of Frenchman Romain Feillu’s bike.“There were 10 of us close together and my shoe banged into his front wheel,” he said. “My foot technically came out of the shoe — I had to reach down and slide the ratchet and redo it with 600 meters to go. I was lucky there were no swerves in the peloton. It could have been quite dangerous.”Cavendish, who took the green jersey from Philippe Gilbert of Belgium, now leads Jose Joaquin Rojas by 16 points. He will have two more opportunities to win stages before the race ends on the Champs Elysees on July 24.Despite his impressive tally of stage wins at the Grande Boucle, the coveted sprint champion’s jersey has so far eluded the 26-year-old Cavendish.He was second last year, 11 points behind Alessandro Petacchi of Italy, and second by 10 points to two-time sprint champion Thor Hushovd in 2009. Cavendish pulled out before the Alpine stages in 2008 to conserve energy for the Olympics.Voeckler said he was expecting to lose his yellow jersey during Thursday’s 12th stage, which takes the riders on the first of a three-day trek across the Pyrenees with a punishing 131-mile ride over the legendary col du Tourmalet and finishing on top of Luz-Ardiden.The stage is likely to be a key moment of the race. It also features a new climb, the Hourquette d’Ancizan, a 6.15-mile ascent with an average gradient of 7.5 percent.With their minds already on the big mountain battle to come, three-time champion Alberto Contador and his rivals stayed comfortably in the pack and didn’t take any risks.Contador, who has been hampered by crashes this year, trails Cadel Evans of Australia and Andy Schleck of Luxembourg by 1:41 and 1:30, respectively, before visiting his favorite playground.“The Schleck brothers have a strong team, which might be more united than Contador’s one,” Voeckler said. “Evans looks in great shape and his teammates are doing an amazing job for him. They all be there tomorrow.”The stage came alive after 8 miles when six breakaway riders — Ruben Perez Moreno, Tristan Valentin, Jimmy Engoulvent, Mickael Delage, Lars Boom and Andriy Grivko — pulled away under a light rain.Being pushed along by a strong tail wind, the bunch started the chase before the intermediate sprint halfway through the stage, where Cavendish took seventh place ahead of Rojas to earn nine more points.HTC-Highroad manager Bob Stapleton said intermediate sprints tired out Cavendish this year after race organizers changed the rules. There is only one intermediate sprint in each stage, with 20 points available to the rider who wins — as opposed to six points in previous years when there were more intermediate sprints.

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    Phil Mickelson was the last American to capture a major championship. He won the 2010 Masters.

    Americans look to snap winless streak in majors

    SANDWICH, England — Tiger Woods is back home, nursing a sore leg. The rest of American golf isn’t doing so well, either.The U.S. is mired in its longest drought of the modern Grand Slam era, having gone five straight majors without a victory.Phil Mickelson was the last American to capture a title, more than a year ago at the 2010 Masters. Since then, it’s been two golfers from Northern Ireland, two from South Africa and one from Germany.While most players describe the U.S. slump as nothing more than cyclical, Nick Watney concedes that it’s getting a bit bothersome. As he puts it, “You never want to hear you’re inferior.”Coming into the British Open, Europeans hold the top four spots in the world rankings. Steve Stricker is the highest American at No. 5.

Business

  •  
    Netflix has provoked the ire of some of its 23 million subscribers by raising its prices by as much as 60 percent for those who want to rent DVDs by mail and watch video on the Internet.

    Netflix price hike angers users, some drop plan

    Some Netflix customers called it a slap in the face. Others a betrayal. Many threatened to drop the movie service. On Wednesday, many of them vented on Twitter, Facebook and elsewhere, seething over Netflix Inc.'s decision to raise its prices by up to 60 percent.

  •  

    Singapore economy stalls as manufacturing slumps

    SINGAPORE — Singapore’s economy stalled in the second quarter as manufacturing slumped amid weaker global demand for the city-state’s exports, the government said Thursday.Gross domestic product grew 0.5 percent in the April to June period from a year earlier, the Trade and Industry Ministry said in a statement. Industrial production slid 5.5 percent while services expanded 3.3 percent, the ministry said.Singapore enjoyed record economic growth last year as the global economy recovered and two new casino-resorts boosted tourist arrivals. GDP surged 14.5 percent in 2010, and the government in May said it expected growth of up to 7 percent this year after a 9.3 percent expansion in the first quarter.But growth petered out last quarter as production of electronics and pharmaseuticals dropped, the ministry said.The economy contracted a seasonally adjusted, annualized 7.8 percent from the previous quarter while manufacturing plunged 23 percent from the January to March period.“This largely reflected a decline in the biomedical manufacturing cluster,” the ministry said. “Output in the electronics cluster also fell, partly due to an easing in global demand for semiconductor chips.”The second quarter economic data is preliminary and is compiled mostly from April and May statistics, said the ministry, which is scheduled to release more complete figures next month.

  •  

    AP Exclusive: Nike faces new worker abuse claims

    SUKABUMI, Indonesia — Workers making Converse sneakers in Indonesia say supervisors throw shoes at them, slap them in the face and call them dogs and pigs. Nike, the brand’s owner, acknowledges that such abuse has occurred among the contractors that make its hip high-tops but says there was little it could do to stop it.Dozens of workers interviewed by The Associated Press and a document released by Nike show that the footwear and athletic apparel giant has far to go to meet the standards it set for itself a decade ago to end its reliance on sweatshop labor.Nike says nearly two-thirds of the factories that make Converse products fail to meet its standards for contract manufacturers but insists it cannot address many of those problems because many factories operate under contracts that were set before Nike bought Converse in 2003.That does not appear to explain abuses that workers allege at the Pou Chen Group factory in Sukabumi, some 100 kilometers (60 miles) from Jakarta — it didn’t start making Converse products until four years after Nike bought Converse. One worker there said she was kicked by a supervisor last year after making a mistake while cutting rubber for soles.“We’re powerless,” said the woman, who like several others interviewed spoke on condition of anonymity out of fear of reprisals. “Our only choice is to stay and suffer, or speak out and be fired.”The 10,000 mostly female workers at the Taiwanese-operated Pou Chen plant make around 50 cents an hour. That’s enough, for food and bunkhouse-type lodging, but little else. Some workers interviewed by the AP in March and April described being hit or scratched in the arm — one man until he bled. Others said they were fired after filing complaints.“They throw shoes and other things at us” said a 23-year-old woman in the embroidery division. “They growl and slap us when they get angry.“It’s part of our daily bread.”Mira Agustina, 30, said she was fired in 2009 for taking sick leave, even though she produced a doctor’s note.“It was a horrible job,” she said. “Our bosses pointed their feet at us, calling us names like dog, pig or monkey.” All are major insults to Muslims. Indonesia is the world’s most populous Muslim nation.At the PT Amara Footwear factory located just outside Jakarta, where another Taiwanese contractor makes Converse shoes, a supervisor ordered six female workers to stand in the blazing sun after they failed to meet their target of completing 60 dozen pairs of shoes on time.“They were crying and allowed to continue their job only after two hours under the sun,” said Ujang Suhendi, 47, a worker at a warehouse in the factory. The women’s supervisor received a warning letter for the May incident after complaints from unionized workers.The company’s own inquiries also found workers at the two factories were subjected to “serious and egregious” physical and verbal abuse, including the punishment of forcing workers to stand in the sun, said Hannah Jones, a Nike executive who oversees the company’s efforts to improve working conditions.“We do see other issues of that similar nature coming up across the supply chain but not on a frequent level,” she said. “We see issues of working conditions on a less egregious nature across the board.”Nike, which came under heavy criticism a decade ago for its use of foreign sweatshops and child labor, has taken steps since then to improve conditions at its 1,000 overseas factories. But the progress it has made at factories producing gear with its premier “swoosh” logo is not fully reflected in those making Converse products.An internal report Nike released to the AP after it inquired about the abuse show that nearly two-thirds of 168 factories making Converse products worldwide fail to meet Nike’s own standards for contract manufacturers.

  •  

    Businesses look to cash in on ‘Carmageddon’

    LOS ANGELES — JetBlue’s ploy to pluck Los Angeles drivers from gridlock by offering flights over Interstate 405 during planned closures this weekend paid off.The airline sold out all four of the newly offered Saturday flights between Long Beach Airport and Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, calling the service a “planepool” between the San Fernando Valley and the beach.Regular seats were snapped up for $4 and seats with extra legroom went for $5.Authorities plan to shut a 10-mile segment of Interstate 405 for 53 hours so crews can demolish one side of the Mulholland Drive Bridge as part of a larger $1-billion freeway improvement project.

  •  

    Bernanke: Fed would supply more stimulus if needed

    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said Wednesday that the central bank is prepared to provide additional stimulus if the current economic lull persists.

  •  

    Stock rally fades as hopes dim for more stimulus

    Comments from Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke set off a stock market rally early Wednesday, but it wasn't long before another Fed official cut it short. In testimony before Congress, Bernanke said the central bank would be open to new economic stimulus measures, but only if the economy gets much worse.

  •  

    Budget deficit on track to top $1 trillion

    The federal budget deficit is on pace to break the $1 trillion mark for the third straight year, ratcheting up the pressure on the White House and Congress to reach a deal to rein in spending.

  •  

    Motorola Solutions CEO makes returning cash to owners a priority

    Motorola Solutions Inc., the maker of bar-code scanners, plans to make returning cash to investors a priority after selling its networks unit and shoring up its balance sheet, Chief Executive Officer Greg Brown said.

  •  

    Treasury prices edge down after auction

    Treasury bond prices are little changed, keeping interest rates near their lowest levels of the year.

  •  

    GOP scraps hearing on financial inquiry panel

    A Republican-led House committee has postponed a hearing into GOP allegations of mismanagement on a commission that investigated causes of the financial crisis.

  •  

    Minnesota's shutdown causing problems for Chicao-based MillerCoors

    Minnesota's state government shutdown is causing a big problem for Chicago-based brewing giant MillerCoors. The state told MillerCoors it must pull its beer from Minnesota bars, restaurants and stores because it failed to renew brand-label registrations that cost $30 apiece before the state government shut down July 1, the Public Safety Department said.

  •  

    Chrysler recalls 242,000 Ram pickup trucks

    Chrysler is recalling nearly 250,000 Ram pickups because a bad part in the steering system can cause drivers to lose control of the truck.

  •  

    Earnings Preview: Mattel 2nd-quarter results

    Mattel Inc., maker of Barbie and Hot Wheels toys, reports second-quarter results before the market opens on Friday.

  •  

    Stocks jump as Bernanke details possible stimulus

    With a few unexpected words, Ben Bernanke caused stocks to jump. Stock indexes rose sharply Wednesday as the Federal Reserve chairman spelled out ways the central bank might stimulate the economy if weakness persists and if the threat of deflation, or falling prices, reemerges. The rally came after three days of losses.

  •  

    WH discourages GOP balanced budget amendment idea

    The White House sees no need for a balanced budget amendment, an idea many Republicans are pushing as a way to force the government to balance its books.

  •  

    US Treasury: Savings bonds go digital in January

    U.S. savings bonds, available as paper documents since 1935, are joining the digital age. They will no longer be sold as paper beginning Jan. 1, Treasury officials said on Wednesday.

  •  
    A single stalk of corn stands upright in a flattened patch in a field on Keslinger Road near Dauberman Road in Maple Park. Several cornfields had patches of flattened stalks after Monday's brief storm.

    Windy storm beat, didn't kill, corn crop

    Monday's storm, with its 60-plus mph winds, didn't just fell trees and power lines. It also did a number on some cornfields, flattening stalks. But local sweet corn growers in Kane and McHenry counties say those looking forward to the annual summer treat, which starts showing up this month, don't have to worry.

  •  

    5 tips for staying under your own debt ceiling

    It seems like common sense: Don't take on more debt to pay off your bills. Yet debt-laden consumers routinely do just that, even as they criticize the federal government for efforts to raise the debt ceiling.

  •  

    Gov't agency vote to lower lead in toys

    The amount of lead allowed in toys and other children's products will soon be reduced to one of the lowest limits in the world.

  •  

    IMF urges Greece to move quickly on budget cuts

    Greece's government must move quickly and decisively to bring its huge public debt under control, the International Monetary Fund said Wednesday.

  •  

    Survey: Most pharmaceutical execs foresee more M&A

    A survey of top executives of U.S. drugmakers indicates mergers and acquisitions should pick up in the next couple of years, as companies aim to offset rising generic competition.

  •  

    Honda Civic still a strong contender

    The new, ninth-generation Honda Civic sedan isn't the sexiest small car. But it's surprisingly roomy for a compact, has a quieter interior and a more compliant ride than its predecessors and delivers good fuel economy.

  •  
    A demonstrator wears a mask depicting Rupert Murdoch, chief executive officer of News Corp., next to puppets of U.K. political figures during a protest outside Murdoch's apartment in London, U.K., on Wednesday

    Murdoch drops bid for Britain's largest TV group

    Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. dropped a bid to gain full control of British Sky Broadcasting Group Plc after U.K. lawmakers demanded the offer be scrapped because of a phone hacking scandal at its newspapers.

  •  

    FDA: pelvic mesh for women riskier than thought

    Federal health officials say a product used in surgery to treat incontinence and other women's health problems causes far more complications than previously thought and is likely exposing patients to unnecessary risks.

  •  

    Oil up as supplies drop, Bernanke talks stimulus

    Oil climbed above $98 per barrel Wednesday after the government said U.S. supplies fell more than expected last week.

  •  
    Deerfield-based Walgreen Co. announced its quarterly dividend increased 28.6 percent, the largest quarterly dividend increase in the company's 110-year history.

    Walgreen Co. announces record dividends

    Deerfield-based Walgreen Co. announced its quarterly dividend increased 28.6 percent, the largest quarterly dividend increase in the company's 110-year history.

  •  

    Lawmaker: US airports are not secure enough

    U.S. airports are still vulnerable to terror attacks, despite billions of dollars invested in security enhancements since 9/11, a Republican congressman said Wednesday.

  •  

    Regeneron rheumatoid arthritis drug meets goal

    Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Sanofi said a clinical trial showed their drug candidate sarilumab reduced symptoms of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis.

  •  

    Kraft Europe executive resigns

    Michael A. Clarke, Executive Vice President of Kraft Foods and President, Kraft Foods Europe, is leaving the company in mid-August to take a senior executive position with a U.K.-based public company. Kraft named Timothy P. Cofer, 42, to succeed Clarke. He will be based in Zurich, Switzerland.

  •  

    Capital One 2Q profit up, plans $2B stock offering

    Capital One Financial Corp. said Wednesday that its second-quarter profit climbed 50 percent as it made more money from deposits, loans and fees. The financial services company also announced a $2 billion stock offering.

  •  
    Google receptionist Lee Stimmel works at the front desk in the company's office in New York.

    Google's 2Q results to review action-packed period

    Internet search leader Google Inc. is scheduled to report its second-quarter earnings Thursday after the stock market closes.The April-June period marked an eventful changing of the guard at Google as co-founder Larry Page returned as its CEO for the first time in a decade.

  •  

    AAR announces cash dividend

    Wood Dale-based AAR Corp. announced Tueday that its Board of Directors at its regularly scheduled meeting declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.075 per share to its stockholders.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Relax when it comes to others' lack of safety

    What to do when mother won't listen to daughter's advice about how to stay safe.

  •  
    Harry (Daniel Radcliffe), right, leads his pals Hermione (Emma Watson) and Ron (Rupert Grint) through a perilous battleground during “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 2.”

    Harry embraces his destiny in stirring final chapter

    The fan-centric "Deathly Hallows: Part 2" sends Harry Potter off in grand fashion, climaxing the film series with a satisfying blend of character and action, although it suffers from an anticlimactic finale and a way-too-dark, even distracting 3D process.

  •  

    Full Pitchfork 2011 schedule

    Check out the full schedule for the 2011 Pitchfork Music Festival.

  •  
    Homemade cookies and doctored store-bought ice cream come together for delicious frozen treats.

    Kids scream for ice cream sandwiches

    When you spend most of your day outside — at camp, at the pool, riding your bike with friends — you want to cool down fast. Come inside for a cold ice cream sandwich.

  •  

    Spicing up your family’s plate with MyPlate

    MyPlate makes suggestions on healthful eating for all Americans. Suburban Parent nutrition columnist breaks down what it means for families.

  •  

    Bands you shouldn't miss at Pitchfork 2011

    Pitchfork will host more than 40 bands during its three days at Union Park in Chicago. Here's a look at some of the must-see acts.

  •  
    The California punk band OFF!, which includes members of Black Flag and Redd Kross, will play Pitchfork on Saturday.

    Punk band OFF! set to rock Pitchfork

    The Pitchfork Music Festival is here! As usual, this weekend's fest includes a mix of veteran rock acts and exciting newcomers. Both aspects are contained in OFF!, the new punk band whose members have roots in the West Coast scene of the late 1970s and early '80s.

  •  
    “Phase 7” director Nicolas Goldbart strives for a mixture of suspense, thrills and dark comic relief, but he fails to muster sufficient levels of any of them.

    Boring cast further sickens 'Phase 7' horror film

    When a virus outbreak forces authorities to quarantine a Buenos Aires apartment building, a man and his pregnant wife discover the real danger might be their neighbors.

  •  
    R&B singer R. Kelly faces foreclosure on his mansion in Olympia Fields.

    R. Kelly faces foreclosure on Chicago-area mansion

    Grammy-winning singer R. Kelly faces a $2.9 million foreclosure on his Olympia Fields mansion. Crain's Chicago Business reported Tuesday that JPMorgan Chase Bank filed the foreclosure lawsuit last month in Cook County Circuit Court.

  •  
    Busy parents are finding it harder to get in the kitchen to cook family meals.

    Cooking a thing of the past as families get busier

    Today's generation of parents either doesn't know how to cook, or chooses not to cook, creating nutritional problems for children.

  •  
    Biking at the Arboretum has gotten easier since official there decided to open up the 14 miles of trails to just bicyclists and pedestrians on Friday evenings and Saturday and Sunday mornings.

    Five ‘don't miss' attractions at Morton Arboretum

    The Morton Arboretum offers suburban families opportunities to enjoy nature's beauty all summer long, especially in the children's garden.

  •  
    Writer/producer Sherwood Schwartz received a kiss from actresses Florence Henderson, left, and Dawn Wells during a ceremony where Schwartz was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2008. Schwartz died Tuesday at the age of 94.

    Creator of ‘Brady Bunch,' ‘Gilligan's Island' dies

    Sherwood Schwartz, writer-creator of two of the best-remembered TV series of the 1960s and 1970s, “Gilligan's Island” and “The Brady Bunch,” has died at age 94.

  •  

    Sun exposure is risky — salon tanning too
    We get it, the sun is fun. But despite many campaigns against it, people of all ages are still getting too much harmful ultraviolet radiation — naturally and from salon tanning — and rates of skin cancer continue to rise, even in young people.

  •  

    Fight a fever? Not so fast, please
    When a child is feeling under the weather, the first thing a parent reaches for is the thermometer. The numbers on the digital readout will help the parent decide what to do next: call the doctor, give a fever-reducing medicine or send them outside to play.

  •  

    More weekend sleep helps control body weight
    When children are given the opportunity to sleep more, like on weekends and holidays, the extra sleep tends to counter the negative effects — including extra body weight — of irregular sleep on weekdays.

  •  

    Depression in dads affects parenting
    Depressed dads spank their children more often and read to them less often than their non-depressed counterparts. That comes from a study published in April by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  •  
    Ice cream sandwiches.

    Lemon Drop Ice Cream Sandwiches
    Move Over Mom: Lemon Drop Ice Cream Sandwiches

  •  
    Ice cream sandwiches

    Mint Chocolate Chip Ice Cream Sandwiches
    Move Over Mom: Mint chocolate chip ice cream sandwiches

  •  
    When it comes to ultraviolet radiation, it is just as important to protect your eyes as it is to protect your skin.

    Why ultraviolet protection is more important than you think

    Most Americans know the importance of UV blocking sunscreen to protect their skin from aging and diseases. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said when it comes to protecting their eyes.

  •  

    Books-turned-into-movies for family fun

    Here's the list of books in the KidsPost Summer Book Club: Books vs. Movies. Starting Wednesday and continuing each week through mid-August, we'll feature a different book. We'll also offer suggestions for other books-turned-into-movies that you might like.

  •  
    Rapper Tech N9ne's latest album, "All 6's And 7's," which was released in mid-June, debuted at No. 4 on Billboard's Top 200.

    Rapper Tech N9ne's success comes to fruition

    On a phone call from jail last year, Lil Wayne told a radio show about one of the first rappers he wanted to collaborate with once he got free. It wasn't a reigning chart-topper like Jay-Z or Kanye West. Instead, Lil Wayne blurted out the name Tech N9ne.

  •  
    Zach Braff is set to make his debut as a playwright in the off-Broadway production "All New People," opening July 25 in New York.

    Ex-'Scrubs' Zach Braff tries his hand at a play

    "It's by far the most intimidating, humbling experience," ex-'Scrubs' actor Zach Braff says of "All New People," his debut as a theater writer. "I think the biggest thing is not letting your ego get in the way of making the play better."

  •  

    Pick up your shoes and other fatherly advice: When giving up is OK
    As I sat in my office preparing to write this column, my 15-year-old son Dan entered with the remnants of tears in his eyes. "I just watched 'Toy Story 3'," Dan said. "Man, was that sad." I was going to remind him that "Toy Story 3" is a Disney movie, and that's what the best Disney movies do best is make us cry. Do I need to make a list? Old Yeller, Bambi's mom, Dumbo's mom, Simba's dad. I detect a theme.

  •  
    Dandrea Delgado, 7, runs up to three times weekly with the Elgin Sharks running club at Channing Park in Elgin.

    Parents should match their goals to running club coach's style

    It goes without saying that keeping active by running and engaging in other sports is beneficial to children and adults, alike. And since running is not a contact sport, it could be argued that it is safer than many other active pursuits and can be pursued long into adulthood.

  •  

    What to do in a dental emergency

    While prevention is the name of the game when it comes to keeping kids off the injured list, knowing what to do in a dental emergency is vital.

  •  
    Steve Lundy/slundy@dailyherald.com Dr. Sonia Guiterrez fits 13-year-old Rachel Effa of Grayslake for sports retainer at Kids Dentist in Grayslake.

    Take the bite out of sports injuries

    Accidents happen. But if you’re the parent of one of the 30 million kids under 14 who participate in organized youth sports, simple preventive steps can help save your child’s smile and keep them off the injured list.

  •  
    Tony Arkeilpane pours a beer at JJ's Prime Time.

    JJ's scores with more than just sports fans

    Since opening in February, JJ's Prime Time Sports Pub has been bringing in local sports fans for big games. Even when there's nothing on, the bar's food and cheap drinks make it worth a visit.

Discuss

  •  

    Parents must set the limits on video games

    A recent Supreme Court ruling stands as a reminder that parents need to know what video games their children are playing, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  

    Disaster coverage focuses on usefulness

    Comparing today's Daily Herald against the past, you find evidence of how much more vital the local news source is today in helping communities deal with disaster, Jim Slusher says.

  •  

    Victim of a digital mob

    Anthony Weiner and Bill Clinton have much in common. Both had their private lives invaded. Both men were clamped in the stocks of mortification. In both cases, the persecution was supposedly justified because both men had lied. But they had not lied to cover up a crime, but to cover up an embarrassment.

  •  

    Warming up for Alibi Ike

    In the contest to determine who will wield those words, there have been three important recent developments: Michele Bachmann’s swift ascent into the top tier of candidates, Tim Pawlenty’s perch there becoming wobbly, and Jon Huntsman’s mystifying approach to securing a place there.

  •  

    Electricity choice good for residents
    Top businesses across the state have enjoyed competition in the electricity market for more than 10 years. They find the low prices, reliable customer service and innovation to be valuable in running efficient businesses. Now Illinois residents can enjoy these same benefits.

  •  

    Tough enforcement needed for teens
    To teenagers two years without driving privileges is an eternity. Incredibly, fear of that loss would be more effective at stopping teen road carnage than the deaths of dozens of their classmates.

  •  

    Gym teachers’ pay is excessive
    I recently read the Daily Herald’s analysis of teachers’ salaries and was outraged about one thing: gym teachers raking in money. I fully understand that gym teachers are the most likely candidates to receive large stipends for coaching teams, so it makes sense that they occupy a large chunk of the highest paid teachers.

  •  

    Union leaders don’t heed worker needs
    Boeing Corporation has built a new very large building for the production of their new 787 Dreamliner. Guess who wants to prevent the opening of this new business that will hire 1,000 new employees?

  •  

    ESO board to blame for Hanson’s departure
    I ask all of the Fox Valley area Elgin Symphony supporters to remember the names of the current board members, President Jerry Cain and CEO Dale Lonis. These people individually and collectively are responsible for Bob Hanson’s resignation, through their new operating policies.

  •  

    We can’t really want four more years
    How can anyone believe the Democrats?

  •  

    Obama has kept the wrong promise
    Susan Estrich’s recent column touting the promises that Obama has kept screamed of selected recall.

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