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Daily Archive : Saturday July 9, 2011

News

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    Police reports
    Michael Cartwright, 20, of the 1200 block of Abbott Drive, was arrested and charged with one count of aggravated arson and one count of residential arson after a fire he allegedly started in his apartment Friday, police said.

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    The Master 35 plus race makes its’ way through the course during the Geneva Cycling Grand Prix Saturday, July 9, 2011 in Geneva.

    Images: The Geneva Cycling Grand Prix
    Geneva was the second stop of the International Cycling Classic. The Geneva Cycling Grand Prix consisted of seven races and a total of 700 racers on Saturday.

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    Gerald Manzella, 10, of St. Charles swings for a home run during the Wiffle ball tournament Saturday at Batavia’s Windmill City Festival.

    Batavia’s Windmill Festival a home run

    Both Chicago baseball teams have had a tough time hitting the ball out of the park this summer. But there were home runs aplenty Saturday afternoon at the Windmill City Festival in downtown Batavia.

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    Naperville man killed in single-vehicle crash

    A 2011 Naperville Central High School graduate who loved hockey and Notre Dame football died early Saturday after the sport utility vehicle he was driving struck a tree in Naperville, police said.

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    Working on a three-dimensional canvas, Anthony J. Path of Homestead, Iowa, creates sculptures of plants and animals using a mixture of acid patinas and airbrushed automotive finishes. Path was displaying his work in the Annual Oak Brook Fine Craft exhibition at the Oak Brook Shopping Center Saturday.

    Crafters display their artistic side at exhibit

    Sure, Oakbrook Center already has art in the form of frog sculptures on display, and sure, the mall already sells jewelry in several stores. But the sculptures, jewelry and other art forms the shopping mall was showcasing Saturday were the wares of 57 crafters participating in the 48th annual Invitational Fine Craft Exhibition.

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    General George Armstrong Custer played by Tom Peacock of Caledonia, Illinois was trying to stay away from any Indians on the first day at the 20th annual Civil War days.

    Images: Civil War Days
    Lake County Forest Preserves' 20th Annual Civil War Days draws 600 re-enactors from seven states and 5,000 visitors. Civil War Days features infantry, cavalry and artillery re-enactors as well as musicians, historical figures and civilians. The event continues Sunday, July 10 from 9:00am-3:00pm at the Lakewood Forest Preserve near Wauconda.

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    Distracted teen driver.

    Call to keep teens from being distracted behind wheel

    Andrea Hail is a lucky statistic. In 2004, the Libertyville 16-year-old made a quick exit from a fast-food restaurant into the path of a pickup truck. The occupants of the truck were unscathed but Hail, who was driving a tiny coupe, broke her arm and required surgery for a brain injury.

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    2 injured in North Aurora crash

    Two people were injured one of them seriously after a motorcycle struck a pickup truck at the Route 31 exit ramp along Interstate 88 in North Aurora late Friday, police said.

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    Streamwood man charged with intent to deliver cocaine

    A 19-year-old Streamwood man was charged with intent to deliver a controlled substance, a Class X felony punishable by six to 30 years in prison upon conviction.

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    Rolling Meadows man charged with possession of controlled substance

    Schaumburg police charged 25-year-old Bogdan Filip of Rolling Meadows with unlawful possession of a controlled substance after they received a call of a man driving a car while smoking cannabis. A Cook County judge set his bail at $7,500.

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    A Navy sailor, at the Madero war ship, looks through binoculars Thursday during the search and rescue efforts for the fishing vessel the Erik, which sank on Sunday, near Punta Bufeo, Mexico.

    Fishermen recount surviving Sea of Cortez sinking

    In all, 19 U.S. fishermen on an annual Fourth of July trip and 16 Mexican crew members made it safely to dry land. One man was found drowned on a remote island beach and seven other Americans remain missing.

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    Israel detains foreign activists

    Some 120 foreign activists were being held in Israeli jails Saturday, awaiting possible deportation, after arriving at Tel Aviv's airport over the weekend.

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    Sudanese boys wave the national flag Saturday during a celebration of Sudan’s separation from South Sudan in the Sudanese capital of Khartoum. South Sudan raised the flag of its new nation for the first time Saturday.

    South Sudan wins independence in shadow of conflict, poverty

    The Republic of South Sudan was declared an independent nation today.

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    Panetta says al-Qaeda defeat ‘within reach’

    U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta landed in Afghanistan today, vowing “maximum pressure” to defeat al-Qaeda, a goal he said was “within reach.”

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    Arlington Hts. man arrested on drug charges

    An Arlington Heights man who Cook County Sheriff's police were investigating in connection with a burglary, faces drug possession charges. A Cook County judge set bail at $10,000 for Nicholas Eich, 23 who police say had pills and heroin in his possession.

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    This 6-foot “Cheddar Gator” is to cheese sculptor Sarah Kaufmann what the “David” statue is to Michelangelo.

    ‘So much cheese, so little time' for cheddar sculptor

    It's not only fine art. It's tasty. Recognized as the nation's premier cheese sculptor, Sarah "The Cheese Lady" Kaufmann is carving large works of art from cheddar cheese during this weekend's grand opening of Mariano's Fresh Market in Vernon Hills.

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    Danealle Khaimskiy, Daily Herald entertainment intern

    Everything is a distraction when you’re young

    Why teens and distracted driving are a recipe for disaster.

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    Quiz yourself on teen driving rules
    Why teens and distracted driving are a recipe for disaster.

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    Larry Bell, vice president of construction at Central DuPage Hospital in Winfield, talks about the new patient pavilion that opens next month.

    CDH opening new wing with ‘upscale hotel feel’

    Central DuPage Hospital in Winfield is preparing to unveil its new $210 million patient wing. Designed to resemble an upscale hotel more than a hospital, the wing will provide more than 200 beds.

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    As a then-Miami Heat forward, Shawn Marion celebrates his game-winning basket against the Chicago Bulls during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Chicago in 2009.

    Lake County to honor NBA champ with local ties

    He doesn’t own six championship rings like basketball great Michael Jordan, but on Tuesday Dallas Mavericks forward Shawn Marion will receive something Jordan never did: a resolution from the Lake County Board.

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    Carolyn Soderholm is a seasonal inspector for Elgin’s code enforcement department. She spends much of the spring, summer and fall measuring grass and ticketing people whose weeds are taller than 8 inches.

    Overgrown lots keeping inspectors busy

    As the snow melts and buds sprout on trees, the suburbs change color, leaving the depressing browns of late winter for the brilliant green of spring. It’s more than allergy sufferers who aren’t thrilled by that. On some suburban properties, nature is left unchecked.

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    Yvonne Tarman, 2, of Libertyville plays on a computer in the children’s section at the Aspen Drive Library in Vernon Hills.

    Vernon Hills library proves popular in its first year

    Patrons at the Aspen Drive Public Library in Vernon Hills checked out nearly 600,000 items in the facility's first 11 months of operations, newly released statistics show. That accounts for about 40 percent of the Cook Memorial Public Library District's overall circulation for the period.

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    To mark the 10th anniversary of 9/11, the annual Quilt & Textile Show will display the “Ground Zero” quilt, which features more than 700 photos of individuals who perished in the World Trade Center collapse.

    Batavia museum hosts quilt show
    The Batavia Depot Museum will present the fifth annual Quilt and Textile Show Friday through Sunday, July 15-17 at the Eastside Community Center and Shannon Hall, 14 N. Van Buren St. This year’s show will feature several patriotic exhibits.

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    Forgiveness can help well-being talk in Geneva
    Leslie Karen Sann will lead an essential workshop about the power of forgiveness and how to use this gift to achieve the greatest well-being from 6 to 7:30 p. m. Thursday, July 14 at the LivingWell Cancer Resource Center in Geneva.

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    The 2010 Chase steps off; more than 300 runners and walkers competed in the event, which raises money for the Des Plaines Park District Scholarship fund.

    Registration open for this year’s Chase, in Des Plaines

    Registration is in progress for The Chase, the Des Plaines Park District’s sixth annual 5K Run-Walk, held July 23, beginning at Prairie Avenue and Pearson Street. Runners take off at 8 a.m. Proceeds fund scholarships for Des Plaines Park District programs

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    The late Rev. Michael Komechak, holding a 1504 etching titled “Betrothal of the Virgin” by Albrecht Durer, was curator of Benedictine University’s art collection and dreamed of a gallery. The university now is raising money to someday build a gallery.

    Art auction to help build gallery at Benedictine
    Benedictine University is asking people to donate art for an auction to be held in October. Proceeds will help fund construction of a gallery to showcase the more than 3,000 pieces of art collected by its late curator, the Rev. Michael Komechak.

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    Kristin Zanini as Marion Paroo, Tony Mirabelli as Harold Hill and Ben Senetra as Winthrop Paroo, rehearse a scene.

    ‘Music Man’ onstage in Arlington Hts.

    Rare is the musical that has such memorable songs that you find yourself humming them to yourself for days. That is the case with St. James Community Theatre’s production of Meredith Willson’s “The Music Man,” which will be performed July 15-30 in Arlington Heights.

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    St. Charles quilter in elite contest
    St. Charles-area quilter has been selected as a semifinalist for the 2011 AQS Quilt Show & Contest, July 13-16 at the Knoxville Convention Center in Knoxville, Tenn.

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    Geneva Pet Carnival honors boy’s mememory
    The fourth annual Pet Carnival will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 16 at Petco, 1885 S. Randall Road, Geneva.

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    Bird “hero” Ralph Ostrom with his new friend, Kasha, and its owner, Lida Dobina.

    Lost parrot and Lake Zurich owner reunited

    A lost pet parrot from Lake Zurich, Kasha, was reunited with her owner thanks to the help of residents and staff at the Prairieview at the Garlands Assisted Living Community.

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    Exodus World Service volunteer Sue Horgan of Roselle has worked with the Magar family since February to help them become acclimated to life in the United States.

    Exodus World Service provides welcome to refugees
    Itasca-based Exodus World Service trains volunteers to befriend refugees and help them adjust to life in America.

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    Kimberly Ziegenhorn, 13, of Grayslake recently donated handmade blankets to the Pediatric Unit at Vista Medical Center East in Waukegan.

    Grayslake teen donates blankets to Vista

    Young patients in the Pediatric Unit at Vista Medical Center East in Waukegan can thank Kimberly Ziegenhorn as they snuggle up in their new colorful blankets.

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    Encore Theatre presents “Hairspray” July 14-16 at Carmel High School.

    Encore Theatre presents ‘Hairspray’

    Encore Theater presents "Hairspray" July 14-16 at Carmel High School in Mundelein.

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    Elgin-area philanthropist Mark Seigle was recently honored as a lifetime director for the local United Way. Seigle has been involved with the organization since he moved back to town after college in the early 1980s and served on its board from 1993 to 2006.

    Elgin man reaps joy from giving

    Mark Seigle’s family has had a presence in Elgin since the late 1800s and that’s a trend he never wanted to change. Another family tradition he has never wavered on is philanthropy.

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    DuPage park districts organize teen texting contest

    Teens account for a good portion of the millions who text daily, so why not put those skills to the test? A texting competition is among the first events for teens organized jointly by the park districts serving Lisle, Westmont, Woodridge, Bolingbrook and Downers Grove.

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    From left, Grayslake Greenery Garden Club scholarship winner Claire Cameron, scholarship chair Kathy Carper and scholarship winner Jeremy Terlap.

    Grayslake club names scholarship winners
    The Grayslake Greenery Garden Club is proud to announce Jeremy Terlap of Gurnee and Claire Cameron of Mundelein as their 2011 scholarship winners.

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    The Lake County Forest Preserve District is trying to boost the numbers of the smooth green snake through scientific study, breeding, monitoring and reintroduction to the wild.

    Lake County project aims to save snake

    Six tiny, brightly-colored juvenile smooth green snakes were released into the wild June 30 at Old School Forest Preserve in Libertyville. This new project aims to save the endangered reptile.

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    Lake County health official takes on new tasks

    Irene Pierce’s leadership as executive director of the Lake County Health Department and Community Health Center is expanding.

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    Wearing a big hat to keep cool is Caroline Provost, 5, with her sister Elizabeth, 10, and brother Patrick, 8. The Palatine family was enjoying the Hometown festival.

    Power outage, heat don't dampen Palatine fest

    A minor power outage and heat did not stop a crowd of over 40,000 from attending last weekend's Palatine Hometown Fest.

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    Moiz Kanchwala makes a pizza in his business Chicago Pizza & Catering at 909 E. Wilson in Batavia. Kanchwala opened seven months ago and is the only business in the new strip mall.

    Batavia man hopes good product builds business

    Chicago Pizza & Catering on Wilson Street wouldn't mind a few tenants in the new strip mall to help drive business.

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    Wind turbine company coming to Elgin

    Proven Energy has officially chosen Elgin as the site for its North American headquarters. The Scottish small wind turbine company signed a lease in Elgin Corporate Center on Big Timber Road at the beginning of June. It plans to focus for now on sales and marketing, but eventually plans to take on assembling and then manufacturing its small wind turbines in Elgin.

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    In this photo released by the Dekalb County Sheriff's office in Georgia, Hines Ward is shown on Saturday, July 9. The DeKalb County sheriff's office says the former Super Bowl MVP and "Dancing With the Stars" champ was arrested early Saturday. Ward was booked into the DeKalb County jail in suburban Atlanta at 3:41 a.m. ET and charged with driving under the influence. He was released on $1,300 bond.

    Steelers' Hines Ward arrested on DUI charge in Ga.

    Pittsburgh Steelers star wide receiver Hines Ward was arrested early Saturday in Georgia on a drunken driving charge, sheriff's officials said.

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    Report: Ind. beaches saw spike in bacteria rates

    Environmental groups are calling on northwestern Indiana to improve aging storm and sewer infrastructure after a report showed a sharp increase in the amount of bacteria found in water taken from area beaches in 2010.

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    Chicago to reduce security provided to alderman

    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is reducing the size of a controversial security detail that a powerful city alderman has had for years and is eliminating city-funded security for the Cook County State's Attorney and the CEO of the Chicago Housing Authority.

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    This booking photo provided by the Wheatland Wyoming police department shows Everett Conant III. Conant allegedly opened fire inside a Wyoming mobile home, killing his three sons and a brother and injuring his wife, authorities said Friday. One neighbor said the wounded woman ran from the home screaming, "He killed my babies!" Conant surrendered July 8 without incident and was charged with first-degree murder, attempted first-degree murder, battery and a weapons violation.

    Wyo. man charged with killing 3 sons, brother

    A quiet, agricultural town in central Wyoming is reeling from a shooting spree after a man opened fire inside a mobile home, killing his three sons and a brother and wounding his wife, authorities say.

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    Downstate man suspected in kidnapping kills suicide

    Authorities in East Peoria say a man suspected of kidnapping his ex-girlfriend and driving her through a number of Illinois counties killed himself in Champaign hours later.

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    Texas state Sen. Chris Harris says he will introduce a new law to make it a felony for a parent or guardian to not report a missing child. The Arlington Republican will name the law after Caylee Anthony, pictured, the daughter of Casey Anthony. The Florida mother did not report her daughter missing for more than a month. She later said her daughter died accidently. Casey Anthony was found innocent this week of murder charges.

    States weigh 'Caylee's Law' in verdict aftermath

    Lawmakers outraged over Casey Anthony's acquittal have responded by proposing so-called Caylee's laws that would allow prosecutors to bring felony charges against parents who do not quickly report missing children.

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    Prince William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, look on during a private reception at the British Consul-General's residence in Los Angeles, July 8.

    Prince to duke it out on horseback

    The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are making a recreational detour on their busy weekend business trip to Los Angeles on Saturday, when they will attend a charity polo match near the swanky seaside city of Santa Barbara.

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    Sandra Magnus, mission specialist; Rex Walheim, mission specialist; Chris Ferguson, commander and Doug Hurley, pilot are seen in the Astrovan as they ride to launch pad 39A to board space shuttle Atlantis July 8 at the Kennedy Space Center Friday in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Atlantis is the 135th and final space shuttle launch for NASA.

    Special wake-up for Atlantis from shuttle workers

    Usually space shuttle astronauts are awakened in orbit by a song sent by a loved one. But not much is routine for the final space shuttle flight, not even a wake-up call.

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    Grandparents aren’t the parents

    As a lot of us are finding out, being grandparents is a whole lot different from being parents. Some of us even wind up in both categories at the same time — having grandchildren while we still have our own children at home.

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    Rick Sullivan of Clinton, Ill., and his dog, Murray, enjoy a ride in a vehicle he created in the shape of a giant Radio Flyer wagon.

    Clinton man's giant Radio Flyer turns heads

    Rick Sullivan's version of the iconic toy wagon is 17 feet long and 8 feet wide and can seat up to seven windswept passengers.

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    Professor Emeritus Richard Warner, left, and Nohra Mateus-Pinilla, a wildlife veterinary epidemiologist at the Illinois Natural History Survey at Illinois, display the collars they used to study movements of cats at the University of Illinois Research Park in Champaign. a.

    Feral cats travel far and wide

    A two-year University of Illinois study has found that one of 42 adult cats tracked with a radio collar traveled on a range of 1,351 acres south of Champaign and Urbana.

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    Rep. Peter J. Roskam of Wheaton.

    Roskam: Debt deal can be reached, eventually

    John Boehner's optimistic a deal on the debt ceiling can be reached. Eric Cantor's not. So, where does our guy, Chief Deputy Whip Peter Roskam stand?

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    Westin ownership reverts to lenders

    Lenders have taken ownership of the Westin Chicago North Shore Hotel in Wheeling that is engulfed in foreclosure proceedings, said John Weiss, a partner with Chicago law firm Duane Morris LLP representing the lenders’ agent. With no other bidders for the property, the lenders on Thursday made a $63 million credit bid for the upscale 412-room hotel at a court-ordered auction, Weiss said.

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    Schaumburg Mayor Al Larson and his daughter, Catherine Koerner, deputy manager of NASA’s International Space Station Vehicle Office, a minute after Atlantis launches.

    Schaumburg’s Larson at shuttle launch

    Schaumburg Mayor Al Larson said the final launch of the space shuttle Atlantis which he witnessed Friday morning was as dramatic as it was historic.

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    VNA Health Centers offer sports physicals
    VNA Health Centers are now accepting appointments for school and sports physicals for the fall school year. Cost for the physicals is $25 and includes all immunizations.

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    Youngsters in the Camp Paws and Claws program at Naperville-based Animals Deserving of Proper Treatment participate in a variety of activities, including story times.

    ADOPT summer camp brings kids, animals closer together

    Naperville-based Animals Deserving of Proper Treatment is sponsoring a summer camp designed to bring kids and animals closer together.

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    One man killed in crash in Mount Prospect

    A 51-year-old was killed after being hit by a car while trying to cross Busse Road in Mount Prospect late Thursday night.

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    Family members, Jessica, left, Margie and Efrain Perez on Friday welcome home 23-year-old U.S. Army PFC Andrew Perez. Perez received an escort home and other recognition as part of Vernon Hills’ “Operation Welcome Home” initiative.

    Vernon Hills solder honored

    A Vernon Hills soldier received a big welcome home Friday complete with fire trucks and a police escort.

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    Tom Stuker of Bloomingdale, center, on Saturday will become the first customer ever to fly 10 million miles with United Airlines. When he lands at O’Hare at 5 p.m. he will be welcomed by family, friends and airline officials to celebrate his accomplishment.

    Bloomingdale man nears 10 million miles on United

    Tom Stuker of Bloomingdale will reach the 10 million mile mark Saturday on his United flight from Los Angeles to Chicago.

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    Former Hononegah High School baseball player Anthony Billups temporarily lost his sight for two months in the spring of 2003. His blindness led to a path in music he used as a way to escape the stress and anxiety of losing his sight. He is now a country singer and songwriter and is coming back to Rockton to perform at Old Settlers Days.

    Temporary blindness leads to music career

    ROCKTON, Ill. — Anthony Billups sat blind and alone in a Nashville, Tenn., hospital room, a handful of CDs and a hardly-used guitar by his bedside.A former star pitcher for the Hononegah High School baseball team, Billups was 20 years old, between junior colleges, and had been playing in a summer league in hopes of getting drafted into the pros.

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    Robert Oswald

    Jail time, anger management for man accused of choking wife

    Robert Oswald, a Crystal Lake man accused of gagging his wife with a cloth and tightening a rope around her neck in June 2010, pleaded guilty to aggravated domestic battery and is sentenced to periodic jail time and anger management and fined nearly $3,500.

Sports

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    Alexei Ramirez hits a solo home run during the first inning of the White Sox’ victory over Minnesota on Saturday.

    Bad break: Castro likely out a month

    White Sox backup catcher Ramon Castro is out indefinitely after breaking his right hand during Saturday's 4-3 win over the Twins.

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    Kyle Busch celebrates in victory lane after winning the inaugural NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race at the Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., on Saturday.

    Kyle Busch rises above gridlock in Kentucky

    Kyle Busch figured the best way to beat the traffic on Saturday night at Kentucky Speedway. He simply stayed out of it. Busch rolled to victory in the inaugural Sprint Cup race at the 1.5-mile oval in Sparta, Ky., pulling away from Jimmie Johnson on a restart with three laps to go to collect his third victory of the season and jump into the points lead with two months to go before NASCAR's Chase for the championship begins.

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    Team Miyazato to pool U.S. Women’s Open winnings for Japan

    For months now, the battered country of Japan has been looking for a lift. By using her blossoming golf game as a tool for charity, 21-year-old Mika Miyazato could turn the U.S. Women’s Open into the feel-good story her country seeks and back it with some cold, hard cash.

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    Cougars stay in first place

    The first-place Kane County Cougars opened up a nine-game homestand Saturday night with a 6-4 victory over the Burlington Bees at Elfstrom Stadium. The Cougars maintained their 1-game lead atop the Western Division.

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    Cubs pitcher Ryan Dempster throws in the first inning Saturday night in Pittsburgh.

    Not a happy win for Cubs' Dempster

    In this trying season for the Cubs, even when they win a game, they're still making news for the wrong seasons. Ryan Dempster won for the first time in 5 starts despite arguing with manager Mike Quade after he was lifted after 5 innings, and the Cubs beat the Pittsburgh Pirates 6-3 on Saturday night.

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    Sky scouting report
    Sky scouting report

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    Sky charges past Dream

    Coaches are expected to teach their players a lot of things. But etiquette? Who knew that was on the list? Chicago Sky coach Pokey Chatman put it on hers Saturday night at the Allstate Arena. Kind of.

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    Mediator sets NFL meeting on July 19

    The federal magistrate judge who is mediating the labor dispute between NFL owners and players has scheduled another session for July 19 in Minneapolis. Judge Arthur J. Boylan set the meeting on Saturday, just before starting his vacation. But he also made clear that both sides should continue their own sessions in the interim as they work toward a new collective bargaining agreement.

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    Flashy record finish for Fantasia

    Augustan Stable's Fantasia sets a stake record while winning the Modesty Handicap, earning an automatic bid to the Grade I Beverly D. on Aug. 13.

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    First Dude and jockey Martin Garcia win the Grade I, $500,000 Hollywood Gold Cup Saturday at Hollywood Park.

    The Dudes finish 1-2 in Gold Cup

    The Dudes did it. First Dude held off Game On Dude by a nose to win the $500,000 Hollywood Gold Cup on Saturday, giving Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert a 1-2 finish. The victory earned First Dude an automatic berth in the Breeders’ Cup Classic in November at Churchill Downs.

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    Willcox Inn, with Robby Albarado onboard, wins Saturday’s American Derby by 4 lengths at Arlington Park.

    Willcox Inn only 1 win from taking Mid-America Triple

    Co-owner Marette Farrell says Saturday’s American Derby champion Willcox Inn is far from an adult. “He’s just a boy,” said Farrell, who picked out the 3-year-colt for the All In Stable at the 2009 Lexington, Ky., Fasig-Tipton sale. “He is still trying to figure things out.”

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    Bulls assistant Griffin resigns

    After one season on the Bulls’ bench, Adrian Griffin resigned his position as an assistant coach to spend more time with his family. Griffin, 38, has four children, two girls and two boys.

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    Japan’s players celebrate after winning 1-0 against tournament host Germany in a Women’s World Cup quarterfinal Saturday in Wolfsburg.

    U.S. women’s soccer team hoping history repeats

    The U.S. is the No. 1 team in the world, a two-time World Cup champion and three-time Olympic gold medalist.However, the only number that matters right now is zero. As in, the number of World Cups the current team has won.“I take it personally that I haven’t won one,” Abby Wambach said Saturday, “and I’ll be heartbroken if we walk away without one.”The Americans better get it in gear then. After losing a group stage match for the first time at the World Cup, they must play old foe Brazil in the quarterfinals on Sunday in Dresden, Germany. It’s a matchup most had penciled in for next weekend’s final. Lose, and not only will the Americans be going empty-handed again, it will be their earliest exit at the World Cup, a tournament they last won in 1999.The United States is the only team that’s made the semifinals at each of the previous five World Cups.“We have the confidence and the faith in each other as a team. We believe that if we do this together, we can beat anybody,” Wambach said. “We have our hands full. But I still believe, in the end, we have the best chance of winning.”History would seem to back that up. Go back more than a decade, to the Algarve Cup in the spring of 2001, to find the last time the United States lost back-to-back games. It’s been more than four years just since the Americans failed to win consecutive games.Yet the U.S. has been uncharacteristically inconsistent of late, losing four games since November alone. Granted, Hope Solo started only one of those losses, and not even Iker Casillas would have stood much of a chance against Lisa Dahlkvist’s penalty or Nilla Fischer’s deflected free kick in the 2-1 loss to Sweden on Wednesday night.But the Americans don’t do losses. They usually go years without a single one — like the two year-plus unbeaten streak they had before being stunned by Mexico in regional qualifying.“It doesn’t matter if the U.S. has had some bad results in the last six months,” said Marta, Brazil’s dazzling playmaker. “It’s Brazil-U.S., a big game. It’s special.”Just like its men’s team, Brazil’s roster is loaded with spectacular players. Marta, the FIFA player of the year five times running, is so gifted with the ball it looks as if she’s got it on a string, creating goals out of thin air. Cristiane has scored twice so far, once on a penalty kick. Brazil’s unique 3-5-2 formation presents all kinds of challenges.For all their star power, the Brazilians have never won the title at a major tournament. They lost to the Americans in the last two Olympic finals, and were runners-up to Germany at the 2007 World Cup.Their track record against the Americans is less than impressive. The U.S. is 23-2-2 all-time against Brazil, with only one loss since January 1998. All but four of those matches since 1998 were shutouts, and Brazil managed a grand total of eight goals.“Those defeats don’t matter,” Brazil coach Kleiton Lima said through a translator. “They rise up with this experience. They are much better in this moment.”Much has been made about the teams’ last meeting at the World Cup. Brazil’s 4-0 rout in the semifinals was the worst defeat in U.S. history and led to a meltdown worthy of a soap opera. Goalkeeper Hope Solo blasted then-coach Greg Ryan’s decision to bench her against Brazil despite three straight shutouts, and Ryan responded by kicking Solo off the team. Less than a month later, Ryan was essentially fired.Since then, the Americans have won the teams’ last four meetings, shutting the Brazilians out each time. Solo’s save on Marta’s point-blank shot in the 72nd minute of the 2008 Olympic final was stunning, and a must-see for every goalkeeper.“Brazil, they have so much to prove. They have best player in world but have yet to win a major championship,” Solo said. “Do I think Marta’s time will come? Certainly. She deserves that. With that said, I do think we overall have the team to win it.

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    The pack climbs La Croix Saint Robert Pass during Stage 8 of the Tour de France, which spanned 117.5 miles in central France on Saturday.

    Costa’s super in Stage 8

    Portuguese rider Rui Alberto Costa won the eighth stage of the Tour de France after withstanding a late attack from Philippe Gilbert on Saturday, while Thor Hushovd kept the leader’s yellow jersey.

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    Cubs starter Ryan Dempster wasn’t happy manager Mike Quade pulled him after 5 innings, but the Cubs held on and got the win over the Pittsburgh Pirates, 6-3.

    Dempster fumes, but gets win

    Ryan Dempster won for the first time in five starts despite arguing with manager Mike Quade after he was lifted after five innings, and the Cubs beat the Pittsburgh Pirates 6-3 on Saturday night.

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    Last summer, protesters hung a banner against the new Arizona immigration law during a game in Phoenix.

    All-Star game becomes part of immigration fight

    Tuesday's Midsummer Classic has turned into a well-lighted stage for activists to voice their displeasure with an immigration law they say promotes racial profiling.

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    Alexei Ramirez, middle, celebrates with Jake Peavy, left, and Omar Vizquel after getting the game-winning hit in the ninth inning Saturday.

    Losing streak to Twins is ovah

    Behind big two-out hits from Alexei Ramirez and Carlos Quentin and a strong effort from starter Mark Buehrle, the White Sox accomplished the near impossible -- they beat the Twins.

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    The Yankees' Derek Jeter waves to the cheers of the crowd after he collected his 3,000th hit, a solo home run in the third inning Saturday. Jeter went 5-for-5.

    Jeter truly one special ballplayer

    Even a Chicago baseball fan has to admire how the Yankees' Derek Jeter has risen to the moment during his career. His 3,000th his Saturday was just another example.

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    Alexei Ramirez had a homer and the game-winning single to help the Sox beat the Minnesota Twins for the first time in 10 games, 4-3.

    Ramirez helps Sox finally top Twins

    Alexei Ramirez drove in the winning run with a two-out single in the bottom of the ninth Saturday and the White Sox finally beat the Minnesota Twins, 4-3.

  •  
    New York Yankees' Derek Jeter homered for his 3,000th hit while going 5 for 5 with the tiebreaking single in the eighth inning.

    Jeter homers for 3,000th hit

    Derek Jeter homered for his 3,000th hit and raced right past the milestone in a scintillating performance Saturday, going 5 for 5 with a tiebreaking single in the eighth inning that gave the New York Yankees a 5-4 victory over the Tampa Bay Rays.

Business

  •  
    Former British government communication chief and editor of the News of the World Andy Coulson leaves his house in London Saturday.

    Murdoch backs UK news operation CEO amid scandal

    Rupert Murdoch has expressed his full support for the head of his U.K. newspaper division amid continuing fallout from an expanding phone-hacking scandal.

  •  
    SAP co-CEO Bill McDermott has been a Jets fan since the days of Broadway Joe, so he jumped at the chance when he was asked a few months ago by Mike Tannenbaum, the team’s general manager, to meet up and exchange thoughts on leadership and running a business.

    Jets GM, software exec share gameplans for winning

    A meeting in late-May spawned an instant friendship between one man who has led his company to five straight quarters of double-digit economic growth and another who hopes to deliver on his team’s goal of winning a long-awaited second Super Bowl title

  •  
    Paramount’s first fully owned animated movie, “Rango,” has grossed more than $240 million worldwide since its release in March.

    Paramount to launch big-budget animation unit

    The new division will make one animated film per year with a fairly large budget by Hollywood standards up to $100 million each. The first title is set for release in 2014.

  •  

    The apps that eat your wireless data

    If you have a smartphone with a monthly data limit, here are some tips on what types of phone use will gobble up your precious megabytes.

  •  
    Google Plus offers many of the benefits of Twitter, but without its 140-character limit. You can follow anyone without being accepted, whereas Facebook requires the consent of both sides.

    Review: Google Plus a thoughtful answer to Facebook

    Google Plus has smart solutions to some irksome limits entrenched in other social-media sites, according to one reviewer.

  •  
    A model looks at a LG Electronics’ Optimus 3D phone during a news conference Thursday in Seoul, South Korea. LG Electronics is touting 3D smartphones as an alternative to dedicated handheld game devices.

    LG touts Optimus 3D smartphone for gaming

    Park Jong-seok, CEO of LG’s mobile communications business, said that 3-D smartphones such as the Optimus can hold their own against dedicated handheld gaming platforms.

  •  
    Verizon currently charges $30 a month for an unlimited smartphone data plan. But new smartphone users will pay between $30 and $80 each month for plans that include 2 to 10 gigabytes of data usage. Customers who use more than their allotment will be charged $10 more for each additional gigabyte.

    Budgeting for wireless data on Verizon’s new plans

    The tricky thing about capped data plans is that few people have a clue how much a megabyte of data is, so they don’t know much to sign up for.

  •  
    Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, distributor of “Cars 2,” is among the companies participating in the online copyright alert system.

    Alert system to notify consumers of online piracy

    The new “copyright alerts” system is intended to educate consumers about online piracy by sending up to six electronic messages notifying subscribers when their accounts are used to download or share such content.

  •  
    Bloggers participate in the first meeting about Twitter social networking in Havana, Cuba. A few dozen members of Cuba’s small but growing Twitter community met for the first time last week, connecting strange faces to familiar usernames and commiserating about woeful Internet access on an island.

    Cuba reports 16 percent online in some capacity

    Cuba’s National Statistics Office said in a report posted online this week that nearly 1.8 million of the country’s 11.2 million residents used some kind of “Internet service” in 2010, a 12 percent increase from 1.6 million the previous year.

  •  
    Flaws in the software running the iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch devices came to light after a German security agency warned that criminals could use them to steal confidential data off the devices.

    Security holes discovered in iPhones, iPads

    Flaws in the software running those devices came to light after a German security agency warned that criminals could use them to steal confidential data off the devices.

  •  
    If you want the closest Windows equivalent to the Apple experience, look no further than the Series 9 from Samsung, reviewer Rich Jaroslovsky advises.

    Review: Lighter-than-air Samsung tackles Apple’s Air

    If you want the closest Windows equivalent to the Apple experience, look no further than the Series 9 from Samsung, one reviewer advises.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Rhode Island requires most cats to be sterilized, and Los Angeles requires most dogs and cats to be spayed or neutered by the time they are 4 months old.

    Fewer pets killed because of spay, neuter programs

    It took years of campaigning to change thinking about sterilizing pets, but it has paid off. This year fewer than 4 million unwanted dogs and cats will be euthanized, down from as many as 20 million before 1970.

  •  
    “Elric: The Balance Lost” was released simultaneously in comic book shops and via digital apps earlier this week.

    `Elric’ download, print copy available the same day

    Offering comics digitally and in stores on the same day is growing among publishers, with more and more of them embracing it as readers opt to read issues on tablets, smart phones and personal computers.

  •  
    Courtesy of The Planter's Palette Coneflowers

    Drought-resistant plants save on maintenance

    Choosing drought-resistant plants and following wise cultural practices conserves precious water, uses fewer chemicals and saves time in maintenance, too.

  •  
    The Bristol Renaissance Faire opens Saturday for its 24th annual season near Kenosha, Wis.

    Weekend picks: Bristol Renaissance Faire returns

    The Bristol Renaissance Faire returns in its 24th annual edition with a special “Pirates of the Renaissance” theme this summer. Get in on the Elizabethan fun starting this weekend near Kenosha, Wis.

  •  
    Whether you move across town or across the country, you have to organize your possessions, pack and then unpack them … and it’s complicated.

    How to lower the stress of moving

    The end of June through the beginning of September is considered the high season for moving. That’s likely driven by recent graduates striking out on their own and families with children looking to minimize school-related disruptions. If you are moving, are you stressed about it? If so, you’re in good company there, too.

  •  

    Ask the broker: Is cash better than a mortgage?

    Q. We have the ability to pay cash for a home. Is that a better choice than getting a mortgage?

  •  

    In real estate, cash buyers quickly close the deal

    Aren’t sellers rolling out the red carpet for homebuyers these days? Yes, buyers are valuable, say experts, but some are being afforded extra-special consideration from anxious sellers.

  •  

    On homes and real estate: What lies ahead for home after spouse passes away

    Q. My husband passed away six months ago. While we were married, he bought our house in his name only. I have been paying the mortgage; however, my name is not on the mortgage or deed. What happens now? Can the bank force me to sell, or will they just take the house altogether? What lies ahead?

  •  

    Mortgage Professor: Falling short on flood insurance Is borrower required to buy more coverage after lender’s mistake?

    JMortgages are complicated instruments subject to a myriad of rules and regulations from the many private parties and government entities that are involved. With so much complexity, mistakes are inevitable.

  •  
    This home in the Forest Estates subdivision of unincorporated Palatine has a large lower level with space for additional bedrooms.

    On the Market: Hillside ranch in Palatine

    Set back among big old trees is a custom, contemporary-style hillside ranch home with a walkout lower level in the Forest Estates subdivision of unincorporated Palatine.

  •  
    Developer Kent Shodeen lives at the Herrington Inn in Geneva.

    Industry Insider: ShoDeen Inc.

    Just about everywhere one looks in the Fox Valley, one sees the legacy of Kent Shodeen from residential developments like Woodland Hills in Batavia, Mill Creek in Geneva and Fox Chase in St. Charles, to hotels like The Harrington Inn in Geneva and Fairfield Inns in Naperville and St. Charles, to office buildings, apartment complexes and commercial developments.

  •  
    Chelsea Fernandez steers a wheelchair through the woods at the Crotched Mountain Rehabilitation Center in Greenfield, N.H. The center offers trails designed to be easily accessible for people in wheelchairs and those who have difficulty walking.

    N.H. trails bring nature to the disabled

    Chelsea Fernandes steered her wheelchair up and down the forest trail, passing a maple grove, zigzagging over water along a narrow boardwalk, and stopping to look at a beaver-built wetland — a view she never thought she’d experience from her wheelchair. Considered unique by the U.S. Forest Service for offering the disabled unparalleled access to mountain wilderness, the 2½ miles of trails at Crotched Mountain Rehabilitation Center in southern New Hampshire is open for business.

Discuss

  •  

    Preckwinkle’s attempt to make Cook County work

    A Daily Herald editorial lauds Toni Preckwinkle's efforts to professionalize Cook County government operations and questions Chief Judge Timothy Evans' refusal to cooperate.

  •  

    The people want higher taxes

    Perhaps the people remember that in 1993 President Clinton signed a tax increase that helped set off an economic boom and job bonanza. Why? America had shown a willingness to start paying its bills, and investors responded with enthusiasm. In this case, higher taxes created jobs.

  •  

    Stumbling along on the deficit

    Obama has run disastrous annual deficits of around $1.5 trillion while insisting for months on a “clean” debt-ceiling increase, i.e., with no budget cuts at all. Yet suddenly he now rises to champion major long-term debt reduction, scorning any suggestions of a short-term debt-limit deal as can-kicking.

  •  

    Teachers’ treatment far cry from veterans’
    I was one of those returning veterans and was actually spit at, had eggs thrown at me, was called a “baby killer,” and was refused service in restaurants and bars while in uniform.

  •  

    Stats show prudence of concealed carry
    Our obtuse Springfield “spokespersons” base their party line guesstimates on an endless supply of jaded facts, figures and statistics as well as the opinions from select “experts” who project that these freedoms will be the cause of our society’s downfall.

  •  

    Belief in civil rights makes America great
    The writer says those who oppose civil unions do so not out of bigotry but after “carefully thinking through the implications for our country and culture.” The only thing the most vocal opponents and self-appointed “role models” for traditional marriage have thought through is how attacking civil unions distracts public attention from their own philandering.

  •  

    Enjoying your Great Society?
    Check Karl Marx’s “Ten Tenets of Communism” to know where we are headed. Hopefully our politicians will wake up before we go over the abyss.For all who can’t see it, all these entitlement programs making us dependent on the government is a new form of slavery.

  •  

    Shame on Casey Anthony jury
    The 5-year waiting period requirement was waived and the Casey Anthony jury was unanimously elected to the Jury Hall of Shame.

  •  

    Don’t forget about GOP-backed war
    In response to Michael Hanley’s letter, he mentions all of the great things the Republicans did, but he also forgot what Richard Nixon did, and most of all he forgot to mention the upward to 5,000 killed in Iraq plus the untold thousands who lost an arm or leg or both.

  •  

    Voters are the losers in current map process
    Gerrymandering is not unique to DuPage County or Illinois. In DuPage, it has historically been Republicans arguing with Republicans about the map. In previous cycles in Illinois, we have seen the “winning map” drawn from a hat. The loser is always the voter.

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